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					                   Triceratops
                                                             OVERVIEW: Preview book and vocabulary,
DATE:     [Insert Day/Date Here]                             read, discuss, create a dinosaur diorama or
SESSION 1                                                    do an online activity

MATERIALS LIST:
Books, shoeboxes, colored clay, colored paper, crayons, child-safe scissors, glue, markers
Alternate Online Activity: Computer with internet access

          PREVIEW BOOK
          Pass out Triceratops to each student. Tell students they will be learning many interesting facts about
          this horned dinosaur. Can you imagine a 30-foot long, 12-ton reptile with three sharp, pointed horns
          jutting out from its face? Triceratops tells about this awesome creature, whose head alone was about
          the size of a tall man! Triceratops lived almost 70 million years ago and was one of the last dinosaurs
          to roam Earth.


         DISCUSSION
10 - 15   Let students flip through pages of the book. Start a group discussion by asking the following questions:
 min.          What kind of animal was Triceratops?

              When did Triceratops live? Where did they live?

              How large was Triceratops? What did it look like? What made it different from other dinosaurs?


         VOCABULARY
5 - 10       atmosphere (AT-muhss-fihr) the blanket of gases that surrounds the Earth. Changes in Earth’s
min.           atmosphere have caused climate changes.
              fossils (FOSS-uhls) evidence of plants and animals that lived long ago. Fossils can include
               bones, footprints, teeth, or leaf imprints on rocks. Paleontologists learn about dinosaurs from
               fossils.
              frill (FRIL) a large bony plate that stretches out from the back of a dinosaur’s skull. Triceratops
               may have used its frill as a weapon or a shield.
              paleontologist (PAY-lee-uhn-TOL-uh-jist) a scientist who studies prehistoric life.
               Paleontologists figure out what dinosaurs looked like by putting fossils bones together.
              predators (PRED-uh-turz) animals that hunt other animals for food. Triceratops traveled in
               herds for protection from predators.
              prehistoric (pree-hi-STOR-ik) from the time before history was recorded. Triceratops, like all
               dinosaurs, was a prehistoric reptile.
              reptiles (REP-tilez) cold-blooded animals that crawl on the ground or creep on short legs.
               Dinosaurs were large, leathery-skinned reptiles.
        PARTS OF THE BOOK
5 - 10      Show students the cover of the book and read the title aloud. Ask: What kind of animal is this?
min.          (It is a dinosaur. Students might also say that it is a Triceratops, a reptile, extinct, or prehistoric.)
              Explain to students that dinosaurs were reptiles, like lizards and crocodiles.
             Take a picture walk through the book to point out the amazing photographs and illustrations.
              Show students that there are captions on the photographs that point out important information.
             Point out the time line of prehistoric periods on Earth on pages 38-39. Talk about the
              Cretaceous period when Triceratops existed. Tell students that Triceratops was one of the last
              dinosaurs to roam the earth. Discuss the fact that humans did not exist at the same time as the
              dinosaurs in spite of what we see on TV or in the movies. Perhaps students have observed
              dinosaur skeletons at a museum. Ask: Has anyone seen a dinosaur skeleton? Allow time for
              students to share their experiences.
             Show students how to use the inserted pages, 7 and 33. Explain that these pages provide
              additional information for the reader. Show students that as they finish reading page 6, the
              regular text continues on page 8. Explain to students that they may wish to skip over the
              inserted pages and go back to them later.
             Next, turn to the Table of Contents and read the chapter titles aloud. Ask students to predict
              what the book will be about. Ask: On what page should we look to find out how Triceratops
              lived? What other things do you predict we will learn about the Triceratops in this book? (The
              book might tell about fossils or how the Triceratops became extinct.)
             Ask students to turn to the index on page 47. Explain that an index lists important topics in the
              book and shows the page numbers where readers can find out about these topics. Ask: Where
              should we look to find out about computer models of Triceratops? (page 34, 35) Turn to those
              pages and read the caption together.
             Turn to “Important Words” on page 46 and introduce key vocabulary. Explain to students that
              they will find vocabulary words in bold print in the text. For example, have them find the word
              “fossils” on page 26. Point out that the photograph on page 31 shows fossils of dinosaur tracks.
             Look at pages 44 and 45 with students. Tell them that this book suggests library and online
              resources to help them learn more about Triceratops.


       READING
20 – 25 Read pages 5-18
 min.       If you or students are reading aloud, use think-aloud strategies to help with comprehension.
              Share your thoughts before, during, and after reading. After reading a page or two of the book,
              pause to ask: What did we learn from these pages? What are the most important ideas? Have
              we found answers to any of our questions? If so, jot down the answers.

             Encourage students to use text features, photographs, illustrations, and charts to assist them
              with their reading. Remind students to use the list of Important Words to help them with key
              vocabulary.

             Encourage students to make personal connections between the text and their own experiences
                (text-to-self connections). Guide students to think about connections between the text and other
                books about dinosaurs they have read (text-to-text connections). How does what students have
                learned from the text connect to recent information or news about Triceratops (text-to-world
                connections)?
       ACTIVITY – Create a Dinosaur Diorama
60-90    Divide students into pairs and have them work together to create a dinosaur diorama showing
 min.       Triceratops in its natural environment. Provide each pair of students with a shoebox, colored clay,
            colored paper, crayons, scissors and glue. Have students label and sign their dioramas. If
            possible, display the dioramas in the room so students can admire each other’s work.

            Note: Use the Activity Assessment Grid to record how well students completed and presented
             their dioramas.


       ALTERNATE ONLINE ACTIVITY
30 – 40   If online resources are available, invite students to play fun games and learn more about
 min.      dinosaurs from the sites below. Make sure that the computer’s sound is turned on before you
           begin.

        Go to: http://goafterschool.grolier.com.
        Click on the Interactive Skill Builders next to the apple.
        Click on the Grade 3-5 tab.
        Click on the Dinosaurs! link under the Science column.
        Explore the games and activities.
                   Triceratops
                                                              OVERVIEW: Review, read, discuss, take a
DATE:    [Insert Day/Date Here]                               dinosaur survey, do a crossword puzzle or an
SESSION 2                                                     online activity

MATERIALS LIST:
Books, Favorite Dinosaur reproducible, pencils, crayons or colored pencils
Alternate Activity: Triceratops Crossword reproducible, pencils
Alternate Online Activity: computer with internet access


       DISCUSSION
10 – 15 Review what was already covered in the book. Ask the following, adding additional questions based on
 min.   students answers.
             How were Triceratops similar to modern day animals?

              How have paleontologists learned about Triceratops?


       READING
20 – 25 Read pages 19-26
 min.       If you or students are reading aloud, use think-aloud strategies to help with comprehension.
              Share your thoughts before, during, and after reading. After reading a page or two of the book,
              pause to ask: What did we learn from these pages? What are the most important ideas? Have
              we found answers to any of our questions? If so, jot down the answers.

              Encourage students to use text features, photographs, illustrations, and charts to assist them
               with their reading. Remind students to use the list of Important Words to help them with key
               vocabulary.

              Encourage students to make personal connections between the text and their own experiences
               (text-to-self connections). Guide students to think about connections between the text and other
               books about dinosaurs they have read (text-to-text connections). How does what students have
               learned from the text connect to recent information or news about Triceratops (text-to-world
               connections)?


       ACTIVITY – Take a Dinosaur Survey
30 – 40    Copy the Favorite Dinosaur reproducible so there is one for each student. Ask students to
 min.         walk around the room surveying their classmates about their favorite kinds of dinosaurs. Each
              time someone is surveyed, the surveyor should make a small line in the appropriate “tally” box
              on the reproducible. When students are done conducting the survey, help them to follow the
              directions on the reproducible to create a bar graph showing the results. Now help the group
              compare results—what was the group’s favorite dinosaur? Finally, let the students draw a
              picture of the group’s favorite dinosaur.

             Note: Use the Activity Assessment Grid to record students’ effort and participation.
       ALTERNATE ACTIVITY – A Tri-Puzzle
30 – 40    Copy the Triceratops Crossword reproducible so there is one for each student. Tell students
 min.       that Triceratops means “three-horned face.” The prefix tri- means “three.” Have students fill in the
            crossword puzzle with common words that also begin with the prefix tri-.

            Note: Use the Activity Assessment Grid to record how well students’ completed the puzzle.

       ALTERNATE ONLINE ACTIVITY
30 – 40  If online resources are available, invite students to play fun games about learn more about
 min.      dinosaurs from the sites below. Make sure that the computer’s sound is turned on before you
           begin.

            Go to: http://kids.yahoo.com/science.
             Click on What is a Dinosaur? Watch as Sally Gray teams up with the Dinosaur Detectives in the
             video Dinosaur Detectives.
                   Triceratops
                                                           OVERVIEW: Review, read, discuss,
DATE:    [Insert Day/Date Here]                            summarize, write a dinosaur tale, present
SESSION 3                                                  some dinosaur facts or do an online activity

MATERIALS LIST:
Books: paper, pencils, colored pencils and markers
Alternate Activity: paper and pencils
Alternate Online Activity: Computer with internet access


       DISCUSSION
10 – 15 Review what was already covered in the book. Ask the following, adding additional questions based on
 min.   students answers.
             What did triceratops eat? How did they get food?

              Did they live alone or in groups?


       READING
20 – 25 Read pages 27-43
 min.       If you or students are reading aloud, use think-aloud strategies to help with comprehension.
              Share your thoughts before, during, and after reading. After reading a page or two of the book,
              pause to ask: What did we learn from these pages? What are the most important ideas? Have
              we found answers to any of our questions? If so, jot down the answers.

              Encourage students to use text features, photographs, illustrations, and charts to assist them
               with their reading. Remind students to use the list of Important Words to help them with key
               vocabulary.

              Encourage students to make personal connections between the text and their own experiences
                 (text-to-self connections). Guide students to think about connections between the text and other
                 books about dinosaurs they have read (text-to-text connections). How does what students have
                 learned from the text connect to recent information or news about Triceratops (text-to-world
                 connections)?


       DISCUSS AND SUMMARIZE
20 – 30     Summarize what you have learned about Triceratops that you did not know before.
 min
              How did Triceratops defend itself against predators?

              Describe two similarities between Triceratops and animals today.

              Tell me about the good and bad things about working as a paleontologist.

              NOTE: Use the Activity Assessment Grid to record how well students participated in the
               discussion.
       ACTIVITY – Write a Dino Tale
30-45    Ask students to write a “Dinosaur Disaster” story from the point of view of a Triceratops. Instruct
 min.       students to write about what happened to bring about the end of the age of dinosaurs, and to give
            the story an interesting title and illustrations.

            NOTE: Use the Activity Assessment Grid to record how well students completed and presented
             their stories

       ALTERNATE ACTIVITY – Triceratops Facts
20-30    Ask students to print the letters of the word TRICERATOPS down the left-hand side of a sheet of
 min.       paper. Next to each letter of the word, have them write a sentence that begins with that letter,
            telling one fact they have learned about Triceratops. Tell students to be ready to share their facts.

            NOTE: Use the Activity Assessment Grid to record how well students completed the activity.

       ONLINE ALTERNATE ACTIVITY
20-30    If online resources are available, invite students to play fun games about learn more about
 min.       dinosaurs from the sites below. Make sure that the computer’s sound is turned on before you
            begin.

            Go to: www.zoomdinosaurs.com.
             Click on List of Dinosaurs on the left. Then click on Triceratops. Read the information, then click
             on the links on the bottom for A Triceratops Skeleton Printout.

				
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