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									SLLC UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMME HANDBOOK

BA (Single Honours)
Arabic Studies                      Linguistics
Chinese Studies                     Modern Middle Eastern History
English Language                    Middle Eastern Studies
French Studies                      Persian Studies
German Studies                      Russian Studies
Hebrew Studies                      Spanish, Portuguese and Latin-American
Italian Studies                          Studies
Japanese Studies                    Turkish Studies



BA (Joint Honours)
American and Latin-American Studies
A Middle Eastern Language and a Modern Language
A Modern Language and Business and Management
Arabic and Islamic Studies
English Language and a Modern Foreign Language
English Literature and a Modern Foreign Language
English Literature and Linguistics
European Studies and Modern Languages
Hebrew and Jewish Studies (Years 2 and 3)
History and a Modern Language
History of Art and a Modern Language
Islamic Studies and Arabic (Year 1
Islamic Studies and Muslim Societies (Year 1)
Jewish Studies and Hebrew (Year 1)
Linguistics and a Modern Language
Linguistics and Social Anthropology
Linguistics and Sociology
Middle Eastern Languages
Screen Studies and a Modern Language, English Language, or Linguistics
Modern Languages
Master of Modern Languages
Modern Middle Eastern History and Arabic
Persian and Islamic Studies
Turkish and Islamic Studies



             Year of Entry: 2008 - 2009
Welcome to the School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures in the Faculty of Humanities. We
hope you will find your time at the University of Manchester an interesting, enjoyable and
profitable experience. This Programme Handbook will help to guide you through your degree
programme and it tells you (in sections 2.1 and 8) who to go to for support and guidance. Those
who use the Handbook, staff and students alike, are urged to inform the School‟s Undergraduate
Manager of any errors or omissions, and to suggest ways in which the contents might be made
more comprehensive, or the presentation of information improved. Every attempt is made to
ensure the accuracy of the documentation below, however, the SLLC reserves the right to advise
you that this Handbook may be subject to change at short notice.




Professor Kersti Börjars, Head of School (from February 2009)




                                              1
                                         CONTENTS

          Foreword

1        Welcome to the Faculty of Humanities                            5
    1.1 What is the Faculty of Humanities?                               6
    1.2 What does the Faculty do?                                        7
    1.3 How is the Faculty Run?                                          7
    1.4 Student Representation                                           8
    1.5 What will the Faculty mean to you as a Student?                  8
    1.6 Faculty Role in Academic Appeals, Discipline of Students and
         Student Complaints                                              8
    1.7 Academic Appeals                                                 8
    1.8 Conduct and Disciplinary Matters                                 9
    1.9 Complaints                                                       9
    1.10 Dates of Semesters                                              9
    1.11 Provisional Dates of Examinations                               10
    1.12 IS services within the Faculty of Humanities                    10
    1.13 The University Language Centre                                  11


2         General Information                                            12
    2.1   Seeking advice                                                 12
    2.2   Keeping in touch                                               12
    2.3   The School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures              12
    2.4   Health and Safety                                              15

3         Learning resources                                             16
    3.1   The Language Centre                                            16
    3.2   Library Resources                                              17
    3.3   Computer facilities                                            18
    3.4   Cultural institutes                                            19
    3.5   Bookshops                                                      19

4        Programmes of Study                                             20
    4.1 Aims and learning outcomes                                       21
    4.2 Planning your choice of course units                             21
    4.3 Years, Semesters, Levels and Credits                             21
    4.4 Learning and teaching                                            23
    4.5 Skills acquisition                                               25
    4.6 Regulations                                                      26
    4.6.1 University Undergraduate Regulations                           26
    4.6.2 Regulations for Degree Programmes administered by the School   37
         ~ American and Latin-American Studies                           38
         ~ Arabic Studies                                                39
         ~ Arabic and Islamic Studies                                    41
         ~ Chinese Studies                                               42
         ~ English Language                                              44
         ~ English Language and a Modern Foreign Language                45

                                               2
             ~ English Literature and Linguistics                                       47
             ~ English Literature and a Modern Foreign Language                         48
             ~ European Studies and Modern Languages                                    49
             ~ French Studies                                                           51
             ~ German Studies                                                           52
             ~ Hebrew Studies                                                           53
             ~ Hebrew and Jewish Studies (Years 2 and 3)                                54
             ~ History and a Modern Language                                            55
             ~ History of Art and a Modern Language                                     56
             ~ Islamic Studies and Arabic (Year 1)                                      58
             ~ Islamic Studies and Muslim Societies (Year 1)                            59
             ~ Italian Studies                                                          60
             ~ Japanese Studies                                                         61
             ~ Jewish Studies and Hebrew (Year 1)                                       63
             ~ Linguistics                                                              64
             ~ Linguistics and a Modern Language                                        65
             ~ Linguistics and Social Anthropology                                      66
             ~ Linguistics and Sociology                                                67
             ~ [A] Middle Eastern Language and a Modern Language                        68
             ~ Middle Eastern Languages                                                 70
             ~ Middle Eastern Studies                                                   72
             ~ [A] Modern Language and Business and Management                          73
             ~ Modern Languages                                                         75
             ~ Master of Modern Languages                                               76
             ~ Modern Middle Eastern History                                            79
             ~ Modern Middle Eastern History and Arabic                                 81
             ~ Persian Studies                                                          82
             ~ Persian and Islamic Studies                                              83
             ~ Russian Studies                                                          84
             ~ Screen Studies and a Modern Language, English Language, or Linguistics   85
             ~ Spanish, Portuguese and Latin-American Studies                           87
             ~ Turkish Studies                                                          88
             ~ Turkish and Islamic Studies                                              89

    5 Residence Abroad                                                                  90
      5.1    Residence Abroad Regulations                                               90

    6 Student progression                                                               90
      6.1    Registration                                                               90
      6.2    Induction                                                                  90
      6.3    Accreditation of prior learning                                            91
      6.4    Attendance requirements                                                    91
      6.5    Unsatisfactory progress                                                    92
      6.6    Transfer between programmes of study within the School                     93

7     Assessment                                                                        95
      7.1   Methods of assessment                                                       95
      7.1.1 Assessed Coursework                                                         95
      7.1.2 Examinations                                                                96

                                                   3
  7.1.3   Take Away Exam Papers                                                96
  7.1.4   Study Project                                                        96
  7.1.5   Dissertation                                                         96
  7.1.6   Oral Examinations                                                    97
  7.2     Feedback on students‟ work                                           98
  7.3     Criteria of assessment                                               98
  7.4     Second marking                                                       114
  7.5     Guidance to students on plagiarism + other academic malpractice      114
  7.6     Plagiarism                                                           114
  7.7     Collusion                                                            116
  7.8     Fabrication or falsification of results                              116
  7.9     Emergencies affecting examinations or other assessments (including
          information about mitigation)                                        118
  7.10    Resit arrangements                                                   120
  7.11    Reassessment of coursework                                           120
  7.12    Contribution of the Second Year Examination to the degree result     120
  7.13    Classification of Degrees                                            121
  7.14    Mitigating Circumstances                                             121
  7.15    Examination results                                                  122
  7.16    Review procedure                                                     122
  7.17    Prizes and awards                                                    126

8 Student support and guidance                                                 124
  8.1    University support services                                           124
  8.2    Personal tutors                                                       126
  8.3    Withdrawal from study                                                 126
  8.4    Harassment                                                            126
  8.5    Ill health                                                            127
  8.6    Questions and problems: who should I go and see?                      130

9 Student feedback and representation                                          131
  9.1    Evaluation of course units and programmes                             131
  9.2    Student representation                                                131
  9.3    Channels for complaint                                                132




                                                4
                                FACULTY OF HUMANTIES

             SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES, LINGUSITICS AND CULTURES


                UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK, 2008/2009



WELCOME TO THE FACULTY OF HUMANITIES

As Dean of the Faculty of Humanities, I would like to extend a warm welcome to all students in
the University of Manchester. The Faculty of Humanities is one of four faculties in the University
and consists of seven Schools that offer an unprecedented range of innovative programmes at
undergraduate and graduate level, embracing disciplines as diverse as business and management,
informatics, social sciences, law, education, languages, arts and environment and development.

We are confident that this rich mix of opportunities will make undergraduate study in the
University of Manchester an exciting and stimulating experience, where you will benefit from the
experience of leading scholars in your field and also from being part of a large and diverse
undergraduate student community.

The Faculty of Humanities is committed to providing a student experience of the highest standard,
and during this year we will be seeking your opinion on how well we have succeeded in the
objective. I urge you to participate in this process, and use all the chances we make available to
you to let us know how we can improve the quality education we provide.

This Handbook contains material specific to the programme of study or the discipline area in
which your studies will be based.

Alistair Ulph
Dean and Vice-President, Faculty of Humanities                       September, 2008




                                                5
1.1    What is the Faculty of Humanities?

Universities all over the world have traditionally divided their academic activities into faculties.
Faculties consist of academic units based on a particular discipline or on a grouping of disciplines
employing similar methodologies. This is the approach that has been followed in the University of
Manchester, and these sub-faculty disciplinary units are known as Schools. The Faculty plays an
important role within the University, since it is the Faculty which is responsible, on behalf of the
Senate, for the regulation of the degree programmes offered, and it is through the Faculty that
academic qualifications are awarded by the Senate. The designation Humanities distinguishes this
Faculty from the other three science-based faculties – Engineering and Physical Sciences; Medical
and Human Sciences; and Life Sciences.

The Faculty of Humanities encompasses academic areas as diverse as Arts, Education, Social
Sciences, Business & Management and Informatics and is the largest Faculty in the University.
With a total income approaching £100m per year over 13,000 students and some 860 academic
staff, it is equivalent to a medium-sized university in the UK. The vast majority of the disciplines
in the Faculty already have international reputations and is proof of the University‟s commitment
to, and ambitions for, these areas.

The Faculty has seven Units of Assessment that were rated 5* or better in the 2001 Research
Assessment Exercise (RAE), fourteen rated 5, and seven rated 4. (The RAE measured research
excellence of UK higher education institutions.) Its taught programmes, both postgraduate and
undergraduate, are highly successful and have proved popular with students from both the UK and
overseas. Quality of provision is proven by strong showings in recent Quality Assurance Agency
assessments.

The Faculty has seven Schools: Arts, Histories and Cultures; Education; Environment and
Development; Languages, Linguistics and Cultures; Law; Social Sciences; and Manchester
Business School. The formation of these schools has provided opportunity for increased
collaboration throughout the Faculty and for regional, national and international engagement.

The Faculty of Humanities will enter its fifth year of operation, along with the University, on 1
October 2008 and is strongly committed to the ambitious vision of our first President and Vice-
Chancellor, Professor Alan Gilbert, which aims to see Manchester highly placed among the select
group of world class institutions by 2015, with respect to both teaching and research.




                                                 6
1.2 What does the Faculty Do?

The Faculty is the interface between the discipline-based Schools and the University. The Faculty
is headed by a Dean, who also holds the title of Vice-President of the University and as such is a
member of the University Senior Executive Team. The Dean is supported in the Faculty by a team
of Associate Deans, all of whom hold a particular portfolio, and these are listed below. The Dean
and Associate Deans constitute the academic management of the Faculty. They are supported in
their work by a Faculty administrative team, organised along functional lines (e.g. academic
administration, planning, and estates matters). The administrative team is answerable to the Head
of Faculty Administration, while working on a day-to-day basis with the Associate Deans and
other administrative colleagues in the Faculty and in the Schools. The emphasis is on team-
working across school and faculty boundaries.

The Faculty Officers are:

Dean & Vice-President                         Professor Alistair Ulph, MA, BPhil

Associate Deans
Research                                      Professor Luke Georghiou, PhD, BSc
Graduate Education                            Dr Maria Nedeva, PhD, MSc, MA
Teaching & Learning                           Dr Chris Davies, PhD, MSc, BSc, C.Eng,
                                              C.Geog, CITP, FRGS, MBCS
Head of Faculty Administration                Russell Ashworth, BA


The work of the Faculty, through its administrative team involves the following:

      preparing and implementing Faculty policies, strategies, procedures and regulations within
       a university framework;
      planning and resource allocation;
      co-ordinating and developing activities to respond effectively to institutional or external
       initiatives or activities, encouraging best practice across Schools and facilitating the
       seamless operation of processes across School, Faculty and University boundaries;
      monitoring and evaluating the performance of Schools;
      quality assurance and enhancement;
      facilitating inter- and multidisciplinary activities;
      the delivery of operational services that are best undertaken centrally.

1.3 How is the Faculty Run?

In common with other faculties, the Faculty of Humanities is governed through a combination of
bodies representing schools, staff and students. There are two bodies on which staff from all areas
of the Faculty, academic and support staff, are represented. These are the Faculty Assembly, held
at least once a year for all staff in the Faculty, and the Faculty Committee. The Faculty Assembly
is consultative and involves all staff, whereas the Faculty Committee is advisory and has members
by virtue of the office they hold (e.g. Associate Deans and Heads of Schools) as well as an elected
element. The Faculty Policy and Resources Committee, consisting of the Faculty Officers (Dean,
Associate Deans, Head of Faculty Administration and Heads of Schools) assists the Dean on
issues of policy and resourcing. The Dean also has an Advisory Group comprising the Associate

                                                7
Deans and the Head of Faculty Administration, which meets at the Dean‟s request.

There are a number of Faculty committees, whose purpose is to co-ordinate essential academic
functions and formulate policy and regulatory frameworks for approval within the Faculty. These
cover Undergraduate and Postgraduate matters (taught as well as research programmes), Teaching
& Learning, and Research. Membership of these Committees is normally on the basis of an office
held within the School, e.g. all School Research Directors are members of the Research
Committee. The Faculty also has a Library Committee to consider issues that affect relations
between the Schools and the University Library.

1.4 Student Representation

There is provision for student membership of all of the above except the Faculty Assembly, the
Policy and Resources Committee, the Dean‟s Advisory Group and the Research Committee.
Students normally participate in full in the business of committees unless an item of business is
reserved, e.g. when it involves discussion of a named individual. On such (rare) occasions student
members will be asked to withdraw. There is also student representation on key bodies within
schools and there are separate Student Representatives‟ Committees at Faculty level.

1.5 What will the Faculty mean to you as a Student?

Most students spend their time at university blissfully unaware of the Faculty and what it does.
This is because for students, the focus of their involvement is the disciplinary grouping, i.e. the
School within which their studies are based, or in the case of students on interdisciplinary
programmes, the office which is responsible for administering their programme. Students may
have contact with the Faculty if they have a problem that cannot be resolved at a local level within
the School or Programme Office, e.g. breach of regulations, appeals or disciplinary matters.
Otherwise it is entirely possible to complete a course of study without ever interacting directly
with the Faculty. As a student, you need to know that the Faculty has a monitoring and co-
ordinating role vis à vis the Schools and is the body with which the University interacts on a
formal level. In addition, as has been stated above, students are represented on the Faculty bodies
which make decisions about its activities.

1.6 Faculty role in Academic Appeals, Conduct and Discipline of Students and Student
Complaints

University regulations allow for students to appeal against a number of decisions that may affect
their academic progression. There are also regulations governing student misconduct and
procedures for complaints from students. These regulations and procedures can be found in full
on the University website http://www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/policies/. The regulations XVII, XVIII
and XIX approved in June 2004 will apply to all students, new and returning, with effect from
October 2005. The following paragraphs describe how these matters will be handled by the
Faculty.

1.7 Academic Appeals

University General Regulation XIX (http://www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/policies/) defines a number
of decisions affecting a student‟s academic progression against which students might wish to
appeal. These include expulsion from the University, exclusion from a programme of study, or the

                                                  8
result of assessment or award of a particular degree classification. There are specific grounds on
the basis of which an appeal may be made and these are listed in Regulation XIX. Before
proceeding to formal appeals, students are strongly advised to try to resolve the matter with an
appropriate person in their School. If this fails, then the formal appeals procedure may be invoked
by completing the relevant „Appeals Form‟ which is available on the website. Completed Appeals
Forms should be submitted to Mr Neil Ferguson, Head of Faculty Academic Services, Faculty of
Humanities, Room G10, Devonshire House, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester
M13 9PL.

1.8 Conduct and disciplinary matters

University General Regulation XVII (http://www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/policies/) defines types
of behaviour which may lead to disciplinary action being taken against students who are in
breach of the regulation. Misconduct can be defined as the improper interference, in the
broadest sense, with the proper functioning or activities of the University or of those who work
and study in the University, or action which otherwise damages the University or its
reputation. The Regulation on Conduct and Discipline of Students does not cover action
against students following failure in examinations or failure to meet other academic
requirements. Any student found guilty of misconduct has the right of appeal both against the
finding itself, and any penalty imposed, provided that there is: evidence of procedural
irregularity on the part of the University; availability of new evidence which could not
reasonably have been expected to be presented at the original hearing; or the disproportionate
nature of the penalty. Any enquiries about issues relating to student misconduct in the Faculty
of Humanities should be referred to the Head of Faculty Academic Services in the Faculty of
Humanities Office (telephone: 306 1105, email: neil.ferguson@manchester.ac.uk).

1.9 Complaints

University General Regulation XVIII (http://www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/policies/) sets out a
procedure for handling complaints by students. A complaint is defined as ‘an expression of
dissatisfaction which merits a response’ and covers complaints about the provision of
programmes or parts of programmes, services or facilities by the University, or the actions or lack
of actions by University staff. The Student Complaints Procedure does not cover matters relating
to assessment and progression, nor complaints involving allegations of misconduct or harassment,
as these are covered by separate procedures. The Procedure allows for the complaint to be handled
informally at School level, however, if that approach is unsuccessful, formal procedures can be
invoked by completing a Complaints Form. Any enquiries about issues relating to student
complaints in the Faculty of Humanities should be referred to the Head of Faculty Academic
Services in the Faculty of Humanities Office (telephone: 306 1105, email:
neil.ferguson@manchester.ac.uk) to whom completed Complaints Forms should also be submitted.



1.10 Dates of Semesters 2008-2009

First Semester                                         Second Semester

22 September 2008 – 19 December 2008                  2 February 2009 – 27 March 2009
19 January 2009 – 1 February 2009                     20 April 2009 – 12 June 2009


                                                9
1.11 Provisional Dates of Examinations 2008/9

First Semester

Examinations                             19 January 2009– 30 January 2009


Second Semester

Oral examinations                        11 May 2009 – 15 May 2009
Written Examinations                     21 May 2009 – 10 June 2009

August/September 2009

Re-sit period                            24 August 2009 – 4 September 2009


The information given in this Handbook is as known at the time of going to press (November
2008). It is subject to final confirmation at a later date.


1.12 IS Services within the Faculty of Humanities

Students at the University of Manchester enjoy access to a wide range of high quality IS
services provided across campus. Within Humanities itself there are in excess of 900
computers located within Faculty buildings available for student use complementing the 500+
seats provided by the University in public clusters – including a public cluster at Owens Park.

All cluster computers are configured in the same way and provide access to services offered by
schools, faculties and central service providers such as IT Services
(http://www.itservices.manchester.ac.uk), and the John Rylands University Library
(http://www.library.manchester.ac.uk/). Full details of software available on clusters can be
found at http://www.itservices.manchester.ac.uk/clustersoftware/. Full details of library services and
other electronic resources can be found at http://www.library.manchester.ac.uk/.

In addition to cluster computers wireless networking is being installed across campus enabling
students with wireless equipped laptops to access IS services on campus. Full details of the
services offered, including a list of available locations, can be found at
http://www.itservices.manchester.ac.uk/wireless/.

Help and advice is available from our Service Desk which can be contacted by phone, via the
web, email or in person. Physical Servicedesk support is available at John Rylands and the
Joule Library. Details of opening hours and other contact details can be found at
http://www.itservices.manchester.ac.uk/contacts/.

Training courses are provided centrally by IT Services, see
http://www.itservices.manchester.ac.uk/trainingcourses/. Undergraduate and Postgraduate
taught students have access to a variety of online resources and courses from the IT Services
http://www.itservices.manchester.ac.uk/trainingcourses/ and online resources through the Faculty, see


                                                  10
http://www.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/ictsupport/services/icttraining/.

1.13 The University Language Centre

The University Language Centre provides resources not only for students studying for a degree in
languages, linguistics and cultural studies, but also for students from a wide variety of disciplines
wishing to include modern languages within their studies and those for whom English is not their
native language.

The University Language Centre‟s open learning facilities, situated in the Samuel Alexander
Building, offer:

       A well stocked library of materials in text, audio, video, DVD and CD-ROM formats
       Materials in some 60 languages
       A suite of TV/VCR presenters fed by a range of satellite and terrestrial channels
       A suite of dedicated multimedia PCs for computer aided language learning.
       Support and advice for learners from expert staff and through on-line resources

Face to Face - This is a reciprocal language learning scheme, in which students can meet with
native speakers of the language they are learning. Overseas students find that this is a good way to
meet home students and to become more integrated into the University. Home students can
prepare themselves for study abroad by finding out about their partners‟ home universities and
cultures.

Tandem Programme - This programme is similar to Face to Face, but is more formal and
provides credits within the Language Enhancement for All Programme (LEAP), which counts
towards a University degree. It is fully monitored, assessed and supported via practical workshops.

Language Experience for All Programme (LEAP) – These courses provide credits towards a
degree and are attended by students of a wide range of subjects and disciplines from across the
University. Currently there are 18 languages offered at varying levels. Please note that not all
languages are available at every level.

English Language Programmes
If English is not your native language, you may wish to enquire about the wide range of courses
and support available through the University Language Centre.

A full guide to resources and to resource-based language learning is available on the University
Language Centre website at: http://www.langcent.manchester.ac.uk




                                                       11
2      General Information

2.1    Seeking advice

If you need clarification, assistance, or advice on any matter, academic, financial, medical,
or personal, do not delay – seek help immediately. All members of staff are willing to help
and, in cases where they are unqualified to offer assistance, will be able to put you in touch with
the appropriate agency (see section 8 below).

Academic issues In academic matters, make use of the formal channels that are open to you –
your personal tutor, programme director, student representative. The School and its constituent
discipline areas are in a state of constant evolution and are responsive to suggestions and new
ideas: positive input from you will contribute to better programmes of study and a better
environment in which to learn.

General enquiries Members of the administrative staff are very busy, and may stipulate times
when they will be available to deal with students‟ enquiries. You are urged to respect the
arrangements made in this matter.


2.2    Keeping in touch

Managing programmes of study is a considerable task and requires constant two-way
communication. You should cultivate the habit of regularly checking your pigeonhole for mail
and relevant notice boards for information that may concern you. Pigeonholes for student mail are
situated in the glass corridor that links the south and west wings on the third floor of the Samuel
Alexander Building. Make sure that you keep us informed immediately regarding any
change of term-time or home address by amending it yourself through the Student Portal.
Access the University portal at www.portal.manchester.ac.uk , select My Services and log on to
the Student System to change your address information. Once you have registered as an e-mail
user your University e-mail address (the one that ends @student.manchester.ac.uk) will be the one
used by tutors and administrative staff and you should then check your e-mail regularly for
communications from the University.

Academic staff can be contacted in their rooms during their office hours. The times at which
members of the academic staff are available to see students depend on their individual
commitments, but will in each case be advertised on their office door. If you have any trouble
contacting a tutor, you can send an e-mail message or leave a message with a member of the
undergraduate support staff team. Check your e-mail and pigeonhole regularly for a reply. Let the
tutor have your e-mail address and if possible a telephone number at which you can be contacted.

2.3    The School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures

       Head of School                         Professor Vera Tolz-Zilitinkevich (until December
                                              2008)
                                              Professor Kersti Börjars (from January 2009)
       Head of School Administration          Ms Krys Chandler (room S3.20)




                                                12
Director of Undergraduate Programmes
                                 Professor Ian Reader (Room N1.14) (until end of
                                 January 2009)
                                 Professor Matthew Jefferies (Room S3.18)
                                 (from start of February 2009)

Executive Director of the
Language Centre and Director
of Language Teaching and Learning Ms Jocelyn Wyburd (room LG8.1)

Manager of Institution Wide
Language Programmes                Dr John Morley (room LG7.2)

Chairs of Specialist Committees
External Relations
(Admissions and Recruitment)       Dr David Bell (room S3.17)
Undergraduate Programmes           Professor Matthew Jefferies (S3.18)
Examinations                       Mrs Penny Brown (room S4.8)
Residence Abroad and Exchanges     Dr Wiebke Brockhaus-Grand (S3.26)

School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures - Administration
Undergraduate Manager              Mrs Elizabeth Nolan (room S3.25)
Admissions Manager                 Mr Charles Pybus (room S3.25)
Research and Dev. Manager          Mr Jonathan Starbrook (room S3.10)
Postgraduate Manager               Ms Sara Latham (room S3.11)
Language Centre Manager            Ms Francesca Smith (based at Oddfellows Hall)
Administrator for Centre for
Chinese Studies                    Ms Karen Wang (room S3.14)

School Address                     School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures
                                   Samuel Alexander Building
                                   The University of Manchester
                                   Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL
Telephones
External Relations                 +44 (0)161 275 3265
Fax                                +44 (0)161 275 3031
E-mail                             uglanguages@manchester.ac.uk
Website                            http://www.llc.manchester.ac.uk

Undergraduate Support Officers (for more information please consult the website:
www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug)

Undergraduate Coordinator          Ms Fiona Harper (room S3.6)
(full-time)                        +44 (0)161 306 1625
                                   fiona.harper@manchester.ac.uk

Undergraduate Coordinator          Mrs Linda Fraser (room S3.10)
(part-time)                        +44 (0)161 306 1798
                                   linda.fraser@manchester.ac.uk

                                    13
School Residence Abroad Co-ordinator
                                        Dan Herman (Room S3.6)
                                        +44 (0)161 275 8123
                                        Dan.Herman@manchestr.ac.uk

School Residence Abroad Assistant       Mr Stuart Davis (Room S3.6)
                                        +44 (0)161 275 3242
                                        Stuart.Davis@manchester.ac.uk

LEAP Programmes Support Officer         Mr Andrés Lozoya (room SG.14)
Institution Wide Language Programmes    +44 (0)161 275 8306
                                        Andres.lozoya@manchester.ac.uk

Undergraduate Support Assistant and School Receptionist
                                         Ms Aagje Buzink (room S3.8)
      Telephone:                         +44 (0)161 275 8311
      E-mail                             Aagje.buzink@manchester.ac.uk

French                                  Ms Gill Worrall (room S3.5)
                                        Mrs Wendy Howat (room S3.5)
         Telephone                      +44 (0)161 275 3209/3183
         Fax                            +44 (0)161 275 3031
         E-mail                         french@manchester.ac.uk
                                        Gill.worrall@manchester.ac.uk/
                                        wendy.howat@manchester.ac.uk

German AND
European Studies and Modern Languages
                                        Ms Rachel Corrigan
                                        (room S3.6)
         Telephone                      +44 (0)161 306 1727
         Fax                            +44 (0)161 275 3031
         E-mail                         german@manchester.ac.uk /
                                        Rachel.corrigan@manchester.ac.uk

Italian AND
Linguistics and English Language
                                        Ms Gillian Woodward (room S3.6)
         Telephone                      +44 (0)161 275 3124
         Fax                            +44 (0)161 275 3031
         E-mail                         italian@manchester.ac.uk /
                                        linguistics@manchester.ac.uk
                                        Gillian.woodward@manchester.ac.uk

Middle Eastern Studies AND
A Modern Language and Business & Management
                                      Ms Miroslava Hukelova (room S3.6)
         Telephone                    +44 (0)161 275 3595

                                         14
          Fax                                 +44 (0)161 275 3031
          E-mail                              mes@manchester.ac.uk
                                              Miroslava.hukelova@manchester.ac.uk

Russian and East European Studies AND
Master of Modern Languages                    Mr Stuart Davis (Room S3.6)
                                              +44 (0)161 275 3242
                                              Stuart.Davis@manchester.ac.uk

Spanish, Portuguese and Latin-American Studies
                                          Ms Bernadette Cunnane (room S3.5)
                                          Mrs Wendy Howat (room S3.5)
          Telephone                       +44 (0)161 275 3040
          Fax                             +44 (0)161 275 3031
          E-mail                          spanish@manchester.ac.uk
                                          Bernadette.cunnane@manchester.ac.uk
                                          Wendy.howat@manchester.ac.uk

East Asian Studies                            Ms Emily Birch (Room S3.13)
                                              +44 (0)161 275 8667
                                              emily.birch@manchester.ac.uk


The Head of School is responsible for the general management of the School and for maintaining
the academic standard of its programmes of study. Professor Börjars will be pleased to meet any
student who wishes to discuss academic or personal matters during her office hours: an
appointment can be made through the School Assistant (Room S3.7) or School Reception (see
above).

The Director of Undergraduate Programmes is responsible for ensuring the smooth running of
the programmes of study provided by the School. This involves overseeing the programme
evaluation process, considering changes and improvements to the structure and content of
programmes, and ensuring adherence to the University's Academic Standards Code of Practice.
The Director will be happy to meet any student registered with the School to discuss relevant
issues during office hours, which are posted on the door of the Director‟s room.


2.4    Health and Safety

Individual responsibility All students are required to familiarise themselves with the Health and
Safety at Work regulations, extracts of which are posted in the South Wing foyer of the Samuel
Alexander Building and in the other buildings used by the Faculty. The School has a Health and
Safety Officer (the School Officer, Room S3.7), whom you should consult if you have any
questions or cause for concern. Do not leave unreported anything you perceive to be a fire
hazard or other potential source of harm.

First aid Anyone requiring first aid for themselves or for others should contact one of the first
aiders whose names and telephone numbers are posted in common user areas (for example, by lift
entrances). A first aid kit is kept in the Building Attendants' Office (Samuel Alexander Building,

                                               15
north foyer). If an ambulance is required, inform the Building Attendants or Porters of the
situation so that they can direct the ambulance personnel when they arrive. Outside normal
working hours dial 9999 (not 999).

Fire or similar emergency It is very important that you familiarise yourself with the procedures
for dealing with an emergency. You should know how to raise the alarm in the event of fire and
should note where emergency exits are situated in the buildings you commonly use. There are fire
alarms and fire extinguishers at both ends of every corridor and opposite lifts. Fire drills are held
twice a year in the Samuel Alexander Building.

Emergency exits, in the Samuel Alexander Building, are situated as follows:

       •   on the ground floor, in the glass corridor between the west wing and the south wing;
       •   on the ground floor, at the foot of the north wing staircase;
       •   on the third floor, at the east end of the south wing near room S3.1, there is emergency
           access to the external fire-escape;
       •   on the fourth floor, the west wing may be reached from the south wing, and vice versa,
           by means of the emergency exits that give access to the roof terrace that connects these
           two wings of the building.

Assembly points for the Samuel Alexander Building in the case of evacuation are the Refectory
concourse opposite the main entrance and the area outside the South Wing opposite the Ellen
Wilkinson building. Once you are outside the danger may not be over, so stand well clear of the
building.
On no account use lifts in an emergency. When you hear the alarm, make your way as quickly
as possible to the nearest regular or emergency exit. If for any reason you will need help to
leave the building in the event of an emergency, you should inform the relevant Head of
Discipline Area or the School Officer of this fact.


3      Learning resources

3.1    The Language Centre

       Executive Director                  Ms Jocelyn Wyburd (room LG8.1)
       Technician                          Mr Abdul Pathan (room LG1C)
       Secretary and Librarian             Mrs Angela Farrand (room LG1B)

       Telephone                           (0161) 275 7960
       E-mail                              langcent@manchester.ac.uk
       Website                             http://langcent.manchester.ac.uk


Facilities The University Language Centre is situated in the Samuel Alexander Building, on the
lower ground floor. Entry is from the foyer of the south wing, through the Jubilee coffee bar and
the Leamington PC cluster. Undergraduates of the School are the Centre‟s primary users, but it is
open to any member of the University who wishes to make use of it. It houses a resources library
with materials in book, audio, video, DVD and CD-ROM formats; two multimedia studios
comprising PCs, satellite TV, VCRs, DVD players and cassette player/recorders; one language

                                                 16
teaching laboratory (available at set times for self-access); and a room bookable for pair-work or
voice recording. The library provides a quiet study space, while speaking is encouraged in the
multimedia studios, which are designed to allow students to record their own voices. The PCs are
equipped with headsets, can be used for DVD playback, and are linked to the University network,
including internet and e-mail facilities. They provide access to extensive language-learning
software and multilingual word-processing facilities. The TV/VCRs provide playback and
recording facilities, and access to live satellite broadcasts. Full information about the University
Language Centre and supportive materials for language learners are to be found on its website.

Opening hours. The Centre's opening hours are the same as those of the Samuel Alexander
Building, i.e. Monday to Friday 08.30-20.00 in term time, 08.30-18.00 during student vacations.
Reception is staffed for registrations and the loan of materials Mon-Thur 09.30-19.00, Friday
09.30-17.00 in term time and Mon-Fri 09.30-17.00 (closed 13.00-14.00) during student vacations.

3.2    Library Resources

The John Rylands University Library of Manchester
Telephone
                 – General enquiries                           (0161) 275 3751
                 – Renewals                                    (0161) 275 3718
                 – Short Loan enquiries                        (0161) 275 3714
                 – Website                                     www.library.manchester.ac.uk

The John Rylands University Library of Manchester (JRULM) is one of the largest academic
libraries in the country. It has extensive reference and borrowing facilities, including a Short Loan
Collection, which contains core texts and other material much in demand in connection with
taught course units and associated essay work. Although you will need to familiarise yourself with
many of the areas in the building during your time at the university, the most relevant collections
are housed in the Blue Area, Floor 3 (general history; French, German, Italian, and Iberian
languages, literatures, and linguistics – books and periodicals) and Floor 4 (Classics; philosophy;
Slavonic languages, literatures, and linguistics and English language – books and periodicals). The
Near Eastern Collection can be found on Floor 4 of Area 1. The Library has published a useful
guide to its Middle Eastern collection – Middle Eastern and Judaic Studies: A Guide to Research
Resources, 1997. Current and recent (unbound) periodicals are available in the Blue Area, Floor 1.
 There is a general enquiry desk on the ground floor. The library‟s Special Collections are housed
in the Deansgate building in the centre of town. The Deansgate library has one of the finest
collections of manuscripts and early printed books in the UK. Its holdings include large Arabic,
Persian, Ottoman Turkish, Hebrew and Syriac collections. These are a rich resource for
researchers in particular, and are available for consultation in the Library only. The University
Museum and the Whitworth Art Gallery both contain extensive collections of material related to
the Middle East.


Student Learning Resource Centres

School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures Learning Resource Centre Room S2.5 (shared
facility with the School of Arts, Histories and Cultures)




                                                 17
These resource centres house photocopying facilities for the use of students who wish to make
copies for their personal use of course materials deposited there for this purpose. Photocopier
cards are made available for students to purchase as necessary. Typically, lecturers will leave in
the resource centres copies of articles or book extracts for which the demand on the part of
students following particular course units is expected to be heavy. The material is made available,
and may only be used, in accordance with prevailing copyright legislation and agreements binding
on the University. The Resource Centre is open from 10.00 to 4.00 Mondays to Fridays during the
two teaching semesters (but not during the vacation or during the exam periods).

Manchester Central Library
St Peter's Square, Manchester M2 5PD
Telephone
                    – Arts Library                      (0161) 234 1974
                    – Chinese Library                   (0161) 234 1970
                    – Commercial & Business Information (0161) 234 1991
                    – General Readers Library           (0161) 234 1971
                    – Language and Literature Library   (0161) 234 1972/3
                    – Science and Humanities Library    (0161) 234 1983/7

This is a valuable resource often overlooked by students but worth a visit if you cannot find the
books you need in the JRULM. It has well-stocked collections in all relevant areas and is open for
free membership to all Manchester residents and those studying full-time in the city. The library
is normally open 10.00–20.00 Monday to Thursday and 10.00–17.00 on Friday and Saturday.

3.3    Computer Facilities

The Faculty of Humanities offers a wide range of computing facilities within the Samuel
Alexander, Bridgeford Street, Mansfield Cooper, Dover Street and Manchester Business School
buildings. All the PCs within these buildings are configured in the same way.

The main software available in the Faculty includes:

               Windows XP
               Microsoft Office

There is also subject-specific software available to assist you in your learning.

See http://ict.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/facilities/index.html

The main IT helpdesk is located in the John Rylands Building, Blue 1, at the top of the escalator.
The helpline is (0161 306 4999).


The University Language Centre

In the University Language Centre there is a specially designed cluster equipped with 22 PCs.
Headphones with microphones are provided so that the special language software can be fully
utilised by students. Laser printing is available at a small cost per sheet.



                                                18
Microsoft Office is supported by the Microsoft multi-lingual Proofing Tools and fonts (with
variable keyboard layouts), to permit word-processing, the checking of spelling and grammar, and
thesaurus use in multiple languages.

Available computer-aided language-learning (CALL) software includes network-based
programmes and standalone multimedia CD-ROMs in the following languages: Arabic, Catalan,
Chinese (Mandarin), Dutch, English, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Persian, Portuguese,
Russian, Spanish and Turkish. Full details of IT facilities and available software are on the
Language Centre‟s website.

Multimedia CD-ROMs are issued to members of the University Language Centre from reception.
A library card is required as security against any borrowed items.


3.4    Cultural Institutes

Alliance Francaise French Cultural Delegation
Churchgate House, 4th Floor, 56 Oxford Street, Manchester M1 6EU
Telephone (0161) 236 7117

       The purpose of the Delegation is to foster closer links between France and the city of
       Manchester, and to promote French culture in the north-west of England.

Goethe-Institut
      Churchgate House, 56 Oxford Street, Manchester M1 6EU
      Telephone (0161) 237 1077

       The purpose of the institute is to foster closer links between Germany and the city of
       Manchester, and to promote German culture in the north-west of England.

       Please note that the Goethe-Institut Prüfungszentrum is now based at the University of
       Manchester within the School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures (contact the Goethe-
       Institut Support Officer, telephone (0161) 275 3141


Instituto Cervantes
       322/330 Deansgate, Manchester M3 4FN
       Telephone (0161) 661 4200

       The Instituto Cervantes offers a full range of courses in Spanish and houses an extensive
       library of Spanish language materials: newspapers, books, periodicals, videos, and
       audiotapes. It has a significant programme of cultural events, including an annual Spanish
       film festival.

3.5    Bookshops

       Blackwell‟s Academic Bookshop
       The Precinct Centre
       Oxford Road

                                               19
       Manchester M13 9RN
       Telephone (0161) 274 3331

       Waterstones                                       and
       2/4 St Ann‟s Square                               91 Deansgate
       Manchester M2 7HH                                 Manchester M3 2BW
       Telephone (0161) 832 0424                         Telephone (0161) 837 3000


4. Programmes of Study

This Handbook contains information for students on the following Honours degree
programmes owned by the School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures:

American and Latin American Studies
A Modern Language and Business and Management
A Modern Language and Screen Studies
Arabic Studies
Islamic and Arabic Studies
Chinese Studies
European Studies and Modern Languages
English Language
English Language and a Modern Language
English Literature and a Modern Language
English Literature and Linguistics
French Studies
German Studies
Hebrew Studies
Jewish and Hebrew Studies
History and a Modern Language
History of Art and a Modern Language
Islamic Studies and Muslim Societies
Italian Studies
Japanese Studies
Linguistics
Linguistics and a Modern Language
Linguistics and Social Anthropology
Linguistics and Sociology
Master of Modern Languages (MML)
Middle Eastern Language and A Modern Language
Middle Eastern Languages
Modern Languages (Joint Honours)
Modern Middle Eastern History
Persian Studies
Russian Studies
Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies
Turkish Studies




                                            20
The University of Manchester has as its „mission‟ the pursuit of excellence through the
advancement of research, scholarship, teaching and learning, and those are the things that the
School and its constituent disciplines set out to achieve in all areas of study. The main aim of
the Honours degree programmes is to give students experience of excellence in teaching and
learning, in an environment where they will benefit from the fact that all constituent subjects
of study are also a home to world-leading research.

The School aims to offer academically coherent, challenging and up-to-date programmes of
study in ways which encourage students to develop as independent and self-reliant learners.
As well as this it is our aim to foster students‟ personal, intellectual and organisational skills,
so that when they leave the University they will take with them a range of skills that will be
readily applicable to their chosen career.

4.1    Aims and learning outcomes

Each programme of study has a set of Programme Specifications which lay out in detail its aims
and learning outcomes, and the teaching methods used to achieve these. The Programme
Specifications will assist students in reflecting on what they have achieved, and are expected to
achieve, during their programmes of study. In particular, they help to show how the learning
outcomes for individual course units contribute to the aims of the programme as a whole.
Individual programme structures and regulations may consulted on pages 39 – 93, or in the
individual discipline course unit handbooks at
http://www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug/handbooks/

The Programme Specifications are under review (2008-09) and will be posted on the intranet in
due course (please contact Elizabeth Nolan, the Undergraduate Manager, for further information).

4.2     Planning your choice of course units

With the aid of the handbooks and Directories of Course Units, in conjunction with support from
their Personal Tutor or from members of the Undergraduate Support staff, students will be able to
plan their progress through their chosen degree programme. Each programme allows considerable
flexibility. Students should however particularly note that a number of course units in the second
and final year can only be taken if they have passed „prerequisite‟ course units earlier in the
programme. It is therefore important, if students intend to take particular course units later in the
programme, to make sure that they also plan to take the necessary prerequisites. Please note that
the respective Directories of Course Units for each subject of study (Linguistics and English
Language, French, German, etc.) will only contain lists of course units available in one particular
academic session. The course units which may be available in any subsequent year are not
necessarily identical: alterations may arise as a result of programme revisions and changes in
staffing.

4.3     Years, Semesters, Levels and Credits

Degree programmes in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures involve either three or
four years of full-time study. The four-year programmes are those which combine with a language,
with the third year spent abroad. In each of the three years (four years in the case of MML) which
are spent in Manchester, you follow a set of prescribed course units over two semesters. Some
course units are compulsory, and others are optional. Course units are assigned a level (1, 2, 3 or

                                                 21
4) and have a credit rating.

In each year, you will normally take course units which make a total of 120 credit points. You
should aim to select an equal balance of course units over the year, the ideal balance being a set of
course units totalling 60 credits in each semester. The credit ratings for course units vary. There
are some course units which have a credit rating of 20 points and are taught over both semesters,
some which have a credit rating of 20 points and taught in one semester only (known as „short fat‟
units that are taught in either Semester One or Semester Two), and some which have a credit
rating of 10 points and are taught in one semester only (either Semester One or Semester Two).

You should try to plan your options so that the ideal balance of 60 credit points per semester is
achieved in a year. An imbalance of 40 credit points in one semester and 80 credits in the other is
permitted by the University, but in practice this alternative should be avoided. An imbalance of
50-70 can be warranted if this allows you to follow your preferred course units. Students are not
permitted to ‘swap’ a year-long course unit or Semester One only course unit that they have
already taken but consider they might have failed for a course unit being delivered in
Semester Two only. Similarly, halfway through the academic year, they cannot decide to
swap a year-long course unit for another year-long course unit. If this were to be allowed, an
extra tuition fee would be payable to the University. This stipulation is necessary to allow the
School to plan ahead for staffing and resource purposes.

Students will only be permitted to change course units as follows:

(i) All course units (year long and per semester) up to end of week 2 Semester One (or week 2
of Semester Two for Semester Two only course units) can be changed without permission,
dependent on whether course units already have full quotas.

(ii) Semester One course units to be swapped to year-long or Semester Two course units (same
credit rating) no later than end of week 4 Semester One with special permission from the Head
of Discipline Area or Programme Director.

(iii) Year-long course units to be swapped to other year-long course units (including the
dissertation), no later than end of week 6 Semester One with special permission.

If you are unable to change the course unit on the Student Campus Solutions website, please
ensure that you contact your Programme Support Officer, who will be able to do it for you.
Changes after these dates can only be made if they involve mitigating circumstances and in
most cases, students will be restricted to the programme regulations.

Course units generally have a code which begins with a prefix which is relevant to the discipline
area of study:

       EALC = East Asian Studies (including Chinese and Japanese),
       FREN = French
       GERM = German
       ITAL = Italian
       LELA = Linguistics and English Language
       MEST = Middle Eastern Studies
       RUSS = Russian

                                                 22
       SPLA = Spanish, Portuguese and Latin-American Studies
       LALC = School-wide course units

       UL** etc = LEAP course units (delivered through the Institution-Wide Language
       Programme).

Each course unit prefix is followed by five numbers. The first number in the course unit code
corresponds to the level of the course unit (e.g. 1=Level 1) and the last number corresponds to the
semester in which the course unit can be taken (e.g. 1=Semester One only, 2=Semester Two only
and 0=all year long), e.g. FREN30510 commences with a „3‟ therefore is a third level/final year
course unit, has a unique identifying number of its own („051‟) and is delivered across the entire
academic year in both semesters (ends in a zero).

For all course units the level of the course unit corresponds to the year in which it must be taken.
There are exceptions to this rule. Some programmes allow students to take course units „out of
turn‟, i.e. a Level 1 course unit in second year (Level 2) or a Level 2 course unit in final year
(Level 3). Students are not permitted to take Level 1 course units in their final year (Level
3). This allows for some flexibility in choosing your favoured pathways through the programme.
Please note, however, that these exceptions are subject to the general rule that no more than
20 credits of ‘lower-level’ course units are permitted in a given year. For example, students
registered for a degree programme in Linguistics and a Modern Language would not be permitted
to take both a 10-credit Level 2 Linguistics option and a 20 credit Level 2 language option in their
final year.

4.4    Learning and teaching

Learning and teaching in the School generally involve a combination of lectures, seminars,
tutorials, language classes, and practical language or oral classes. Each of these methods fosters
the acquisition of particular skills and calls for a different mode of student participation.

In addition, Blackboard is a web-based system that complements and builds upon traditional
learning methods used at The University of Manchester. By using the Blackboard system you can
view course materials and learning resources, including multimedia, for any units that you are
taking that have a Blackboard module. The software also provides tools for communicating and
collaborating with your lecturer or other students about the course using discussions, chat or
email. See the following website for further information:

http://www.studentnet.manchester.ac.uk/blackboard/getting_started/what-is-blackboard/

Lectures

Lectures provide essential factual and background information relating to specific texts or topics.
Lecturers will review avenues of approach to these texts or topics and may suggest new
approaches. Importantly, they will also introduce and explain concepts, without which informed
discussion cannot proceed very far. Lectures serve to guide your study of the subject of a given
course unit, by making available informative or explanatory handouts and suggestions for reading,
and by providing a framework that should help you organize your notes, responses, and ideas in
some coherent manner.


                                                23
•       Make sure that you prepare by reading set texts in advance: lectures will be that much
        more meaningful and easier to follow.
•       Don't try to write down everything the lecturer says: you will miss important points
        and end up with jumbled, unhelpful notes. The only valuable thing you bring away
        from a lecture is not what the lecturer said but what you have correctly understood.
    •   Participate by listening and thinking. There will be a structure to the lecture involving
        the points the lecturer wishes to make and the illustrative material introduced to make
        these points clear. Try to understand the points being made, and the connections
        between them, and make a note of these: interesting illustrations may be followed up
        later.
    •   Ask questions where need be (after the lecture if there is not opportunity to do so
        during it).
    •   Follow up the lecture with independent study, reading, making more notes on the basis
        of those taken in the lecture, organizing your material into rational structures which
        you can later come back to and find meaningful.

    Seminars and tutorials

    Tutorials review and develop the understanding at which a student or small group of
    students have arrived in connection with a given topic. Seminars pursue the same basic
    aim, but involve larger groups and so generally have a more formal structure. Both, as
    instruments of teaching and learning, depend for their success on students participating
    actively in discussion.

    Seminars frequently demand that students take the lead in setting the agenda and
    promoting discussion within the group. This usually involves a student or small subgroup
    of students in preparing and making an oral presentation. Thus, over and above the
    acquisition of specialist knowledge, the seminar has value as an opportunity for the
    development of an important transferable skill: the ability to convey information
    effectively to an audience and to stimulate and guide discussion. The seminar should not
    be a lecture; nor should it serve merely to impart information. The aim is to present a
    topic or debate in a way that is well informed and stimulates discussion. The whole group
    will benefit more from a session in which there is active participation than from one in
    which their allotted role is simply to listen and take notes. The success of your
    presentation will be judged largely on your ability to encourage participation and to guide
    debate.

    •   Consult your course unit tutor about the approach you should adopt and organize
        yourself well in advance.
    •   Present your argument in a series of clear points, supported by a few relevant
        illustrations: speak to your listeners, don't read to them.
    •   Formulate your points as questions which you address to your audience: just as
        important as finding the right answer is learning to ask the right questions.
    •   Provide brief, clear, and helpful aids such as a handout or overhead projections.
    •   Have a fall-back strategy in case discussion fails to get going; for example, a passage
        from a set text which everyone should have read and which can be discussed in the
        light of your seminar topic.
    •   Don't underestimate your fellow students by assuming that they won't participate or
        don't want to be challenged.

                                             24
       Seminar discussion only works with an active group of participants. Having listened to a
       presentation and jotted down points for clarification or discussion, be prepared to respond,
       ask questions, and formulate ideas. Lack of confidence in one's knowledge and opinions is
       a widespread problem, but one which seminar discussion should help to overcome.
       Preparation on the part of all those involved (not just those responsible for an oral
       presentation) and informal discussion outside the seminar hour will stimulate interest and
       help to build confidence.

       Language classes and oral practice

       Here again success depends on preparation, active participation, and thorough follow-up,
       with independent grammar revision, vocabulary learning, and assimilation of the lessons
       to be learned from feedback on the quality of your work. One of the ways in which
       language classes differ from lectures is that the more you can write down the better. For
       they are a useful source of vocabulary and idiom, and serve to reinforce your study of
       grammar. When you read short texts in language classes, you should be practising the
       skill of active reading: not reading merely for the gist of the passage, but developing an
       awareness of syntactical structures, idiomatic usage, and correct collocations. These
       should be rehearsed in your own notes and vocabulary lists, and put to use on the first
       appropriate occasion, so that you are able to transform passive understanding into active
       language production and make new structures and vocabulary genuinely your own. Make
       sure that you also learn from your mistakes: every piece of corrected work should be a
       source of information about which areas require special effort on your part.

       •   In written language work emphasis should be placed on quality of expression,
           grammatical accuracy, formal cohesion, and sensitivity to register and idiomatic usage.

       •   In oral work the emphasis lies predominantly on communicative competence, with
           grammatical accuracy, command of idiom, fluency, and accurate pronunciation also
           taken into account.

4.5    Skills acquisition

Every effort is made by teaching staff to deliver their course units effectively and to encourage
active learning. Ultimately, however, the quality and success of the learning experience depends
on a corresponding commitment on the part of students. University education demands that you
assume a high degree of responsibility for your own learning. If you are to benefit from this
education, not only acquiring specialist knowledge but also developing your capacity for analytical
thought, clear self-expression, and other generic or transferable skills, then you individually and
your peers collectively must contribute to the creation of an active learning environment. Some of
the ways in which you can do this are outlined in the previous section. Think in terms of
acquiring skills and developing your intellectual capacities, not just of amassing and regurgitating
information; and remember that although assessment is based mainly on individual achievement,
the way to maximize learning resources and prepare for life after university is by learning to work
collaboratively.

Instruction in library skills and information technology forms part of the induction process (see 6.2
below), and each discipline area will offer further guidance on studying and on the presentation of

                                                 25
written work and oral presentations as your programme of study proceeds. To help you study
effectively and make the most of the opportunities the University provides for intellectual and
personal growth, an online Personal Development Portfolio (PDP) has been developed specifically
for all students in the School. A PDP is a personal record of the progress you make in learning
and in the acquisition of skills as you advance through your degree programme. Learning includes
learning how to become an effective, independent, and self-directed learner; and skills include
generic skills like handling information, using a computer, expressing yourself well in speech and
in writing, and working co-operatively with others, as well as subject-specific skills like
proficiency in your modern language or languages, and competence in such disciplines as
linguistic, literary, and historical analysis. By directing your attention to the processes whereby
you learn and improve your skills, the PDP will help you to monitor and reflect on your progress
in these areas and to plan your academic and personal development. It will also furnish you with
the materials from which, ultimately, you will be able to create an effective curriculum vitae. The
PDP is constantly under development but is currently available for students in all years and as the
Year Abroad Learning Log in Year 3. It can be found on the School website:
www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug/pdp .

4.6     Regulations

Degree Programme Regulations are in two parts. Part 1 is covered in the University of
Manchester Undergraduate Regulations information below and comprises the general regulations
governing progression through undergraduate degree programmes in the Faculty of Humanities.
These regulations apply to all full-time undergraduate students regardless of programme. Part 2
relates to specific named programmes of study. These regulations contain the rules applying to
particular programmes and are to be read in conjunction with Part 1.


4.6.1   University Undergraduate Regulations


For the attention of all First Years in the School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures
who entered the University of Manchester in September 2008

School explanatory notes and decisions to be read in conjunction with the University
undergraduate regulations (in force from 19 September 2005, pp. 30-36 below)

Paragraph 10: This does not mean that the student has a „right‟ to take course units „out of
turn‟; it is only possible where permitted by the Programme Specification.

Paragraph 20: Schools have the right to specify certain course units as non-compensatable. See
paragraph 28 information below.

Paragraph 28: Up to 20 credits can be carried over in each year. Where a course unit is carried
over the School will specify whether it must be the same course unit, or a different course unit
at the same or at the higher level. If it is the same course unit, then it must be passed at the first
attempt, and no resit will be permitted. If it is a different course unit, resits will be permitted in
the normal way. Following the resit examinations, students will be informed if they will be
permitted to carry over credits into the subsequent year. Students will be informed if they are
required to „make-up‟ the credits by taking the same course unit or a different course unit at

                                                 26
the same or at a higher level. It is permitted for certain course units to be excluded from this
provision and the School has decided that failure in the course units listed below will not be
permitted and credits for these course units cannot be carried over to subsequent years of
study:

Chinese
EALC10140 Mandarin Chinese I & II
EALC10150 Year One Mandarin Chinese for Advanced Learners
EALC20140 Mandarin Chinese III & IV
EALC20150 Year 2 Mandarin Chinese for Advanced Learners

French
FREN10210 French Language I
FREN20210 French Language II
FREN10050 French for A Modern Language and Business and Management
FREN20050 French for A Modern Language and Business and Management

German
GERM10210 German Language Skills I
GERM20210 German Language Skills II
GERM10100 Beginners‟ German Language Skills
GERM20100 German Language Skills for Ex-Beginners

Italian
ITAL10200 Italian Language 1A
ITAL10210 Italian Language 1B
ITAL20200 Italian Language 2A
ITAL20210 Italian Language 2B

Japanese
EALC10080 Japanese Language and Linguistics I
EALC10090 Japanese Language and Linguistics for Advanced Learners
EALC20080 Japanese Language and Linguistics II
EALC20090 Japanese Language and Linguistics for Advanced Learners

Linguistics and English Language
No course units identified that cannot be carried over.

Middle Eastern Studies
MEST10110 Arabic Language 1 and MEST20110 Arabic Language II for students taking the
following degrees: Arabic Studies, Arabic and Islamic Studies, Middle Eastern Languages
(where one language is Arabic), A Middle Eastern Language and a Modern Language (where
one language is Arabic) or Linguistics and a Middle Eastern Language or English Language
and a Middle Eastern Language (where the Middle Eastern language is Arabic);

MEST10410 Persian Language 1 and MEST20410 Persian Language II for students taking the
following degrees: Persian Studies, Persian and Islamic Studies, Middle Eastern Languages
(where one language is Persian), A Middle Eastern Language and a Modern Language (where
one language is Persian) or Linguistics and a Middle Eastern Language or English Language

                                                27
and a Middle Eastern Language (where the Middle Eastern language is Persian);

MEST10210 Hebrew Language 1 and MEST20210 Modern Hebrew Language II for students
taking the following degrees: Hebrew Studies, Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Middle Eastern
Languages (where one language is Hebrew), A Middle Eastern Language and a Modern
Language (where one language is Hebrew) or Linguistics and a Middle Eastern Language or
English Language and a Middle Eastern Language (where the Middle Eastern language is
Hebrew);

MEST10310 Turkish Language 1 and MEST20310 Turkish Language II for students taking
the following: Turkish Studies, Turkish and Islamic Studies, Middle Eastern Languages
(where one language is Turkish), A Middle Eastern Language and a Modern Language (where
one language is Turkish) or Linguistics and a Middle Eastern Language or English Language
and a Middle Eastern Language (where the Middle Eastern language is Turkish);

Aramaic/Syriac 1A (MEST10611), 1B (MEST10622), 2A (MEST20611), 2B (MEST20622)
simply for students taking the following degrees: Middle Eastern Languages (where one
language is Aramaic/Syriac), A Middle Eastern Language and a Modern Language (where one
language is Aramaic/Syriac)

Russian
RUSS10540 Beginners‟ Russian
RUSS10210 Russian Language Skills I
RUSS20450 Post-Beginners‟ Russian
RUSS20010 Russian Language II


Spanish and Portuguese
SPLA10110/20110 Introductory Portuguese Language
SPLA10020 Portuguese Language I
SPLA10210 Spanish Language I
SPLA10200 Ab Initio Spanish Language
SPLA20100 Portuguese Language 2
SPLA20210 Spanish Language 2

Failure in the course units listed above has two consequences. Firstly, automatic compensation
cannot be applied, so students who have received a mark below 40% in a core language course
unit will have to resit it, even if the mark is 30% or above. Secondly, a student who fails a core
language unit in the resit examination will not be able to carry the credits into a subsequent
year of study.

This ruling means that students taking any of the core course units listed above must pass the
course unit with a minimum mark of 40% in order to proceed to the next year of study.

Paragraph 29: Power to permit students to restart a programme is given to the Board of
Examiners. The qualification referring to „special circumstances‟ means that there is no
automatic right to restart after a failed Year One.

Paragraph 31: Students who consider that mitigating circumstances (such as illness) have

                                                28
affected their performance in examinations, or in preparation for submission of assessed
coursework or for examinations, should submit a „Notification of Mitigating Circumstances
form‟ via the following weblink:
http://windev.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/surveys/TakeSurvey.asp?SurveyID=511m731J479KGl
(hard copies also available from the School Reception (S3.8)) which should be submitted, with
the appropriate certified evidence, as close in time as possible to the relevant examination(s) or
deadline(s) for submission. This will be considered by the Examinations Committee and if the
evidence supplied is accepted, penalties for late coursework submission will be waived (or if
applicable, extensions granted) and in respect of examinations allowance may be made by the
School Board of Examiners.

Paragraph 35: Degree classification is based solely on the “programme mark” (a percentage
mark to one decimal point). The programme mark in the final year will be reached by the
weighted average for the overall marks for Year 2 and Year 3 or 4 (weighted 25% to 75%).
(For MML it will be Year 3 and Year 4 weighted 50-50, and the class of the full range of
papers will be included in the provisions under paragraphs 36-37.)

Paragraph 36: The School has agreed that the default version of the new regulations will be
used and that no further more stringent criteria will be applied.

Paragraph 37: Method A will be used by the School. There is a possibility that Method B may
be used for candidates for the degree of Master of Modern Languages (under review).

General Points of Note:

(i)     Matters like penalties for late submission of coursework and treatment of mitigating
        circumstances are not formally „regulations‟, and may therefore be amended from year to
        year, provided they are announced in time and put in Handbooks (the School Handbook
        will be available to all first-year students within the next couple of weeks and will contain
        details which will cover your entire degree programme).

(ii)    It has been decided that the School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures will operate the
        following penalty scheme for late submission of assessed course work: the work will lose
        10 marks for the first day it is late and then 5 marks per day thereafter, including
        weekends. However, please note that the Faculty will operate two schemes for late
        submission of coursework, i.e. the one listed above and the other being that a zero penalty
        will be applied (the late work would be marked zero for the first day it is late). Other
        Schools with which this School shares joint honours students (such as Arts, Histories and
        Cultures) will be applying the zero penalty. Please make sure that you are aware of the
        penalties that will be imposed for late course work submission for each course unit you
        have chosen as the course units may be administered by different Schools operating
        different penalty schemes.

Updated Oct 08




                                                  29
                        IMPORTANT NOTE FOR STUDENTS

    These regulations apply generally to undergraduate degrees at the
 University of Manchester. For some specific programmes in the Faculty of
    Humanities, variations to these regulations have been approved, in
    accordance with University policy. These will be highlighted in your
   Programme/School Handbook and it is important that you read these
          regulations in conjunction with the relevant Handbook.

 Text which appears in a box or in the running text in bold below has been
   added by the Faculty of Humanities to clarify certain points or make
                           them more specific.


The University of Manchester: Regulations for Undergraduate Awards
Faculty of Humanities

Except where specified, these regulations apply only to full-time programmes.

DEFINITIONS

(a) Credit framework

1.     Credit is a measure of units and programmes of study according to the volume of student
       work required. One credit corresponds to a notional ten hours of student workload.

2.     Level describes the intellectual demands of units and programmes of study. A unit will be
       assigned a level as follows: 0 corresponding to the typical demands of a foundation year;
       1, 2, or 3 corresponding to the typical demands of successive years of a bachelor‟s Degree
       programme; or 4 corresponding to the typical demands of a master‟s Degree programme.

3.     The standard undergraduate academic year comprises 120 credits for programmes with
       honours, and 100 credits for Ordinary programmes. The credits are normally divided
       equally between the semesters.

4.     In undergraduate programmes, a Unit will be worth 10 credits (or an integral multiple of
       this figure), except for a Unit at level 4, which will be worth either 10 or 15 credits (or an
       integral multiple of these figures). Any variations in these credit values will require the
       permission of Senate.

(b) Award framework

5.     Award of the Certificate of Higher Education requires 120 credits, with at least 100 credits
       at level 1 or above.



                                                30
6.     Award of the Diploma of Higher Education requires 240 credits, with at least 100 credits
       at level 2 or above.

7.     Award of the Ordinary Degree of Bachelor for a programme of standard length (three
       years full-time study or its part-time equivalent) requires 300 credits, with at least 60
       credits at level 3 or above.

8.     Award of the Degree of Bachelor with honours for a programme of standard length (three
       years full-time study or its part-time equivalent) requires 360 credits, with at least 100
       credits at level 3 or above.

9.     Award of the integrated Degree of Master for a programme of standard length (four years
       full-time study or its part-time equivalent) requires 480 credits, with at least 90 credits at
       level 4.

10.    For longer programmes, the total credit requirements for each award are increased pro rata
       to the length.

This means that in any year, a student is allowed to take 20 credits (or, in the final year of an
integrated Masters programme, 30 credits) at a level different from the level appropriate to that
year. This applies only to course units otherwise permitted within the programme. A student will
normally only be allowed to take credits at a neighbouring level, so that it would not be permitted
to take level 1 credits in year 3. However, exceptionally, by permission of the Programme
Director, a student may be allowed to take level 1 credits in year 3 where this is permitted by the
programme.

Sections 11–15 are not of direct relevance to students already admitted to the University and have
been removed from this document.

MINIMUM STUDY PERIOD
.
16.  The award of the Degree of Bachelor or the integrated Degree of Master for a student
     admitted to a programme with advanced standing in respect of learning completed prior to
     entry (see Paragraph 13) requires completion of at least the final year of full-time study (or
     its part-time equivalent) at the University of Manchester.

MAXIMUM STUDY PERIOD

17.    A student will not be allowed to interrupt full-time study except with permission from
       Faculty. The full-time programme for the award of a degree will normally be completed
       within two academic years of the intended completion date following first registration for
       the programme.

Within the Faculty of Humanities, the right to grant permission to interrupt is delegated to
Schools.




                                                31
ASSESSMENT

18.   A student successfully completes a unit by demonstrating achievement of specified
      intended learning outcomes. For numerical assessment, marks are determined by the extent
      to which the student achieves the intended learning outcomes, such that in principle the
      full range from 0 to 100% is available. Where there is numerical assessment, the normal
      pass mark will be 40%. Where there is no numerical assessment the unit will be graded
      pass or fail.

19.   The Board of Examiners may determine from evidence available to it that a student who
      has been prevented by good cause from completing the assessment for a unit will be
      awarded the percentage mark from the completed assessment as the mark for the unit
      as a whole if at least half of the assessment has been completed or a pass if less than half
      of the assessment has been completed.

20.   For the purposes of determining progression, the percentage mark that represents a
      compensatable fail will be not less than 30%. Where a unit is graded simply pass or fail
      there is no compensatable fail mark.

PROGRESSION

21.   The overall mark for a given year of a programme will be calculated as an average of the
      numerical marks awarded for each unit in that year weighted by the credits for that unit,
      with suitable provision for marks from any assessments that relate to more than one unit or
      to study outside the standard programme. Units graded pass or fail are excluded from the
      calculation.

22.   The minimum overall pass mark will be 40% to progress from one year of a programme
      for the Degree of Bachelor to the next and to progress to Years 2 and 3 of a programme for
      the integrated Degree of Master. The minimum overall pass mark will be 50% to progress
      to Year 4 of a programme for the integrated Degree of Master.

23.   To progress from one year of a programme to the next, a student must
       reach the minimum pass mark overall; and
       reach the pass mark in individual units totalling at least two thirds of the credits for
          that year; and
       reach the compensatable fail mark in all remaining units.

      Faculties may allow Schools on discipline-specific grounds to adopt more stringent
      requirements, including (but not restricted to):
       limiting the number of credits for which a compensatable fail mark will be available
          in each of the separate components of a joint degree programme;
       specifying core units for which no compensatable fail mark will be available;
       increasing the proportion of the total credit that must reach the pass mark (ultimately
          to the total credits available, thus allowing no compensatable fails);
       setting a compensatable fail mark greater than 30% as allowed under Paragraph 20;
       setting a higher pass mark overall.



                                               32
These requirements are specified in the programme documentation and it is the responsibility of
the student to ensure they familiarise themselves with these.

24.    A student who fails to progress to a subsequent year of a programme for the Degree of
       Bachelor, or to a subsequent year other than the final year of a programme for the
       integrated Degree of Master, will be reassessed in all units for which the unit pass mark
       was not attained. Such reassessment must be designed to assess achievement of the same
       intended learning outcomes but need not be of the same form as that originally used. It will
       normally take place in time for the student to progress at the time originally intended. In
       order to progress, a student will be required to pass each unit reassessed. The student will
       then be deemed to have obtained the credits necessary for progression. However, the
       marks originally obtained will be used to calculate the overall mark for the year.

Normal compensation rules apply to resit exams, except where this is not in line with the
requirements of professional bodies.

25.    A student who progresses to a subsequent year of a programme according to Paragraph 23,
       having obtained compensatable fail marks for some units, may be reassessed in those units
       in order to achieve higher marks where such marks are required by a relevant professional,
       statutory or regulatory body. However, the marks originally obtained will be used to
       calculate the overall mark for the year.

26.    A student who fails to progress to the final year of a programme for the integrated Degree
       of Master will not be reassessed but instead will be considered forthwith for the award of
       the Degree of Bachelor.

27.    A student who fails after reassessment (and application of compensation allowed as in
       Paragraph 24) to progress to a subsequent year of a programme for an Honours Degree but
       has passed units totalling at least 100 credits (after compensation where allowed) will
       progress to the subsequent year of the programme for the Ordinary Degree of Bachelor,
       except as allowed under Paragraph 28.

28.    A student who fails to progress to a subsequent year of a programme having failed after
       reassessment to reach the unit pass mark (or the compensatable mark where compensation
       is allowed) in units totalling no more than 20 credits may be allowed by the Board of
       Examiners to progress to the next year taking additional units of the same credit value and
       at the same level (or a higher level if the programme specification allows) as the failed
       credits, in addition to the full set of units for that year. To complete that year successfully,
       the student must satisfy the usual criteria for the year and reach the unit pass mark for the
       additional credits. Depending on the programme, there may be a requirement that the
       student retakes the same unit that was failed, in which case the student must pass it
       at the first attempt. A student who satisfies the criteria for the year but fails to pass the
       additional credits will be treated as having completed successfully that year of the
       programme for the Ordinary Degree of Bachelor.

29.    A student who fails to progress to Year 2 of a programme after reassessment may be
       allowed by the Board of Examiners to re-start Year 1 of that or a cognate programme.



                                                 33
Normally, this will only be permitted under special circumstances.

30.    To progress to a subsequent year of a programme for the Ordinary Degree of Bachelor, a
       student must:
        reach the pass mark overall in units totalling 100 credits; and
        reach the pass mark in individual units totalling at least 60 credits; and
        reach the compensatable fail mark in all remaining units.

MITIGATION

31.    The Board of Examiners, or other cognate body constituted for this purpose, may
       determine from evidence of good cause shown before an assessment period (or
       exceptionally after the assessment period if the cause was not then known to the student or
       could not then have been shown by the student) that a student‟s performance was likely to
       have been impaired. It may then judge that without the impairment the student would have
       reached higher marks sufficient to demonstrate the necessary learning outcomes and
       thereby satisfy the requirements for progression under the criteria in Paragraphs 21 to 30 or
       for a given degree classification under the criteria in Paragraphs 32 to 37. It will not adjust
       the mark of the student in individual units or overall, but will treat the unadjusted marks
       separately in any subsequent computations.

CLASSIFICATION

32.    The Degree of Bachelor with Honours will normally be awarded in classes 1, 2i, 2ii and 3.
       The integrated Degree of Master will be normally awarded in classes 1, 2i and 2ii, unless
       approval by a professional, statutory or regulatory body requires the use of class 3. The
       Ordinary Degree of Bachelor will be awarded without any classes or divisions.

33.    The Board of Examiners may determine from evidence available to it that a candidate for
       an honours degree who has been prevented by good cause from completing the final
       examination or assessment will be awarded a class of degree the Board judges to be
       suitable, or unclassified honours if the Board judges that no class can be determined.

34.    A candidate for any award who fails to satisfy the requirements for the intended award but
       satisfies those for a lower award will be eligible for the lower award. The programme title
       of the lower award will normally be the same as that of the intended award, but an
       appropriate alternative programme title will be used:
       (i) when the student has not satisfied the credit requirements for one of two subjects
             studied in combination; or
       (ii) when at least part of the title of the degree is associated with a right to practise; or
       (iii) for other good cause.

       The Certificate of Higher Education or Diploma of Higher Education may be awarded
       without a programme title.

35.    The overall mark for a programme is a weighted average of the overall marks for different
       years of the programme. For the different classes the overall mark ranges are:
              for class 1, not less than 70.0%;
              for class 2i, less than 70.0% but not less than 60.0%;

                                                 34
              for class 2ii, less than 60.0% but not less than 50.0%;
              for class 3, less than 50.0% but not less than 40.0%.
Only years 2, 3 and, where relevant, 4 may be counted towards degree classification. The
weighting of each year towards the final degree classification is determined by Schools for each
programme.


       For the different classes boundary zones are:
        for class 1, less than 70.0% but not less than 68.0%;
        for class 2i, less than 60.0% but not less than 58.0%;
        for class 2ii, less than 50.0% but not less than 48.0%;
        for class 3, less than 40.0% but not less than 38.0%.

36.    A student who obtains an overall mark in the range required for class 1, 2i or 2ii and
       obtains at least two-thirds of the credits for the final year with a mark not less than 40.0%
       will be awarded that class of degree. A student who obtains the overall mark in the range
       required for class 3 and obtains at least half of the credits for the final year with a mark not
       less than 40.0% will be awarded that class of degree, unless the Faculty has approved more
       stringent requirements for such an award. Except as provided under Paragraph 37, a
       student who obtains an overall mark in the range for that class but obtains less than the
       specified fraction of the credits for the final year with a mark not less than 40.0% will be
       awarded the next class lower, or for class 3 will be considered under the criteria in
       Paragraph 38.

In line with these regulations, the Faculty of Humanities has agreed that some Schools may apply
more stringent criteria and it is the responsibility of students to check these provisions in the
programme documentation.

37.    A student may be considered for the next higher class of degree than determined by
       Paragraph 36 by one of two methods approved for each programme by the relevant
       Faculty.

The Faculty of Humanities employs Method B only under very exceptional circumstances.
      Method A (by mark distribution)
      A student who obtains an overall mark in the boundary zone for that class and obtains
      at least two-thirds of the credits for the final year with a mark not less than 40.0% will
      obtain that class if at least two thirds of the credits for the final year are in or above the
      range required for that class.

       Method B (by mark review)
       For a student who either
       (i) obtains an overall mark in the range required for a given class but does not obtain the
            fraction of the credits for the final year with a mark not less than 40.0% (as specified
            in Paragraph 36); or
       (ii) obtains an overall mark in the boundary zone for that class and obtains the fraction of
            the credits for the final year with a mark not less than 40.0% (as specified in
            Paragraph 36),
       the relevant External Examiners will review the marks, and may conduct an oral (viva

                                                 35
       voce) examination of the student. On the basis of that review, the External Examiners
       may recommend that the student obtains that class of degree.

38.   The Ordinary Degree of Bachelor will be awarded to a student who at the end of the
      honours programme obtains an overall mark of not less than 40.0%, averaged over final-
      year units totalling 60 credits, and obtains at least half of those credits with a mark of not
      less than 40.0%.

39.   The Ordinary Degree of Bachelor will be awarded to a student who at the end of the
      Ordinary programme obtains an overall mark of not less than 40.0% averaged over final-
      year units totalling 100 credits, and obtains at least half of the credits with a mark of not
      less than 40.0%.

40.   A student who fulfils the requirements for the award of a degree may seek to be reassessed
      in some units in the final year in order to achieve higher marks required by a relevant
      professional, statutory or regulatory body. However, the marks originally obtained will be
      used to determine the class of degree awarded to such a student.


Paper for Senate
29 June 2005
Revised 4 August 2005
FoH revisions incorporated 21 August, 2005




                                               36
4.6.2 Regulations for Degree Programmes administered by the School

      The degree programmes for which the School has overall academic responsibility are as
      follows and the programme structures are detailed below. Please note that in most
      degree programme structures listed below, especially those involving the study of a
      modern language, there are certain course units for which the School has decided
      that failure will not be permitted and credits for these course units cannot be carried
      over to subsequent years of study (see pp. 27-28).

      The regulations of degree programmes to which the School contributes but which are
      managed by other departments of the Faculty of Humanities or by those of the Faculty of
      Life Sciences are to be found in the programme handbooks issued by the discipline areas
      in question. For details of course units available in each discipline area within the School,
      consult the Directories of Course Units, available on the School website:
      http://www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug/handbooks




                                               37
AMERICAN AND LATIN-AMERICAN STUDIES – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE



 Year 1   Language study (compulsory) - 40 credits
          Related studies - 20 credits
          60 credits taken in English and American Studies
 Year 2   Language study (compulsory) - 40 credits
          Related studies - 40 credits
          40 credits taken in English and American Studies
 Year 3                          Compulsory Year Abroad
                                        120 credits
 Year 4   Language study (compulsory) – 20-40 credits
          Related studies – 40-60 credits
          40 credits taken in English and American Studies




                                         38
ARABIC STUDIES – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE


BA (Hons.) in Arabic Studies (Year 1)
 Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                  Year 1
                  You must take:
 MEST 10110       Arabic Language 1                                                         40
 MEST 10711       The Contemporary Middle East                                              20

                  You choose 60 credits from the Level 1 Faculty Course Unit Database,
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:                60
                                                                            1
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/



Notes:
   1    Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
        programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
        following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
        Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
        course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
        you will be able to register and attend

   2.   If you are studying Aramaic/Syriac, you must choose MEST 10811 The Middle East Before Islam (20
        credits) in year 1.




                                                     39
BA (Hons.) in Arabic Studies (Years 2,3 & 4)
 Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                  Year 2
                  You must take:
 MEST 20110       Arabic Language 2                                                         40
 MEST 20001                                                                                 20
 MEST 20122       Literatures of the Middle East                                            20
                  Modern Arabic Texts
                                                                                            40
                  You choose 40 credits from the Level 2 Faculty Course Unit Database,
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,2
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

                  Year 3
                  Study in Egypt                                                            120
                  Year 4
                  You must take:
 MEST 30160       Arabic Language 4                                                         20
 MEST 30010       Dissertation                                                              20
                  You choose 40 credits from:
 MEST 30031       Introduction to Qur’an and Hadith Studies                                20
 MEST 30122       Modern Arabic Literature                                                 20
 MEST 31042       Arabic Aural Comprehension                                               20
 MEST 30061       Arab Women’s Writing in Translation                                      20
 MEST 30172       Classical Arabic Islamic Texts                                           10
 MEST 30181       Media Arabic                                                             10

                  You choose 40 credits from the Level 3 Faculty Course Unit Database,     40
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,3
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

Notes:
1      Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
       programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
       following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
       Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
       course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
       you will be able to register and attend.
2      In the second year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 1 course units.
3      In the final year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 2 course units.




                                                     40
ARABIC & ISLAMIC STUDIES (YEARS 2 & 3)

BA (Hons.) in Arabic and Islamic Studies (Years 2 & 3)
 Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                  Year 2
                  You must take:
 MEST 20110       Arabic Language 2                                                         40
 MEST 20001       Literatures of the Middle East                                            20
 MEST 20501       Issues in Contemporary Islam                                              20
                  You choose 20 credits from:
 MEST 20122       Modern Arabic Texts                                                      20
 MEST 20711       The Middle East in the Nineteenth Century                                20
 MEST 20721       Revolutions in the Twentieth Century Middle East                         20
 MEST 20732       The Middle East and the Cold War                                         20
 MEST 20742       The Middle East and World War I                                          20
 MEST 20272       Fundamental Debates in Israeli Studies                                   20
 RELT 21011       Women in Middle Eastern Societies                                        20
 RELT 21002       Islam in Practice: Ethnographic Approaches to Islam                      20

                  You choose 20 credits from the Level 2 Faculty Course Unit Database,     20
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,2
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

                  Year 3
                  You must take:
 MEST 30110       Arabic Language 3                                                         20
 MEST 30031       Introduction to Qur’an and Hadith Studies                                 20
 MEST 30010       Dissertation                                                              20
                  You choose 40 credits from:
 MEST 30122       Modern Arabic Literature                                                 20
 MEST 30641       The Middle East in Late Antiquity, NOT AVAILABLE IN 08-09                20
 MEST 30721       Themes in the Formation of Jewish and Arab Nationalisms                  20
 MEST 30061       Arab Women’s Writing in Translation                                      20
 MEST 30172       Classical Arabic Islamic Texts                                           10
 MEST 30181       Media Arabic                                                             10
 RELT 31002       The Arab World and the West                                              20
 RELT 30112       Islamic Mystical Traditions and Texts                                    20

                  You choose 20 credits from the Level 3 Faculty Course Unit Database      20
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,3
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

Notes:
1      Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
       programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
       following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
       Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
       course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
       you will be able to register and attend.
2      In the second year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 1 course units.
3      In the final year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 2 course units.




                                                     41
  CHINESE STUDIES: PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

  Level 1:




                                                                  (Post-A-level)
                                                   (Ab Initio)




                                                                                   Semester
                                                     Credits




                                                                     Credits
Compulsory courses
EALC10140 or EALC10150 Chinese Language                      40      20                       1&2
EALC10051 Introduction to Chinese Studies                    20      20                        1
HIST10151 Modern China: From the Opium                       20      20                        2
War to the Post-Mao Era
POLI10200 Government I: Introduction to                      20      20                       1&2
Comparative Politics
Total compulsory credits                                   100       80
Optional:
Remaining 20 / 40 credits to be taken from the
following list of introductory units in relevant
disciplines
ECON10041 Microeconomic Principles                           10      10                        1
ECON10042 Macroeconomic Principles                           10      10                        2
SOAN10312 Cultural Diversity in Global                       10      10                        2
Perspective
SOAN10301 Culture, Power and Language                     10       10                          1
SOAN10320 Culture & Society                                20      20                         1&2
BMAN10011 Fundamentals of Management                       10      10                          1
BMAN21012 Global Contexts of Business and                  10      10                          2
Management
POLI10601 Introduction to International Politics             20      20                        1
EALC10111 Introduction to Japanese History                   20      20                        1
and Culture
EALC10122 Introduction to Modern Japanese                    20      20                        2
Society
Total optional credits                                      20      40
Total credits                                              120     120


  Level 2:
                                                                  (Post-A-level)
                                                   (Ab Initio)




                                                                                   Semester
                                                                     Credits
                                                     Credits




Compulsory courses
EALC20140 Chinese Language Programme                         40      20                       1&2
EALC20061 Modern Chinese Culture and                         20      20                        1
Society
Total compulsory credits                                    60       40


                                                      42
Core courses: (Students must take 40 credits
from the following list):
Economic Development of China                              20        20        1
Chinese literature/film (provisional title)                20        20        2
POLI20911 Comparative European Politics                    10        10        1
POLI20612 Chinese politics today                           10        10        2
Chinese Business (provisional title)                       20        20        2
HIST20421 Late Imperial China                              20        20        1
Total core credits                                         40        40
Optional: Remaining 20 / 40 credits to be taken
from the following list of introductory units in
relevant disciplines
LELA20031Introduction to Typology                          10        10        1
LELA20332 World Englishes                                  10        10        2
SOAN20821 Political and economic                           20        20        1
anthropology
POLI20511 The Politics of Globalisation                     20       20        1
POLI20872 The Politics of Development                       20       20        2
EALC20112 Religion in Japan                                 20       20        2
Total optional credits                                      20       40
Total credits                                              120      120

   Level 3
Compulsory

YEAR ABROAD                                                                    120

TOTAL FOR THE YEAR                                                             120

   Year 4
Compulsory

Mandarin Language Programme                                                    20
Dissertation                                                                   40

Optional - PLEASE NOTE THE LIST BELOW MAY BE ALTERED AND IS
INDICATIVE ONLY AT THIS STAGE
(60 credits’ worth from the following list)

Topics in Translation Studies (LALC30011)                                      10
Linguistic Field Methods (LELA30211)                                           10
Language Contact (LELA30292)                                                   10
Topics in Phonetics (LELA30352)                                                10
Language Endangerment and Language Death (LELA30371)                           10
Language and Gender (LELA30901)                                                10

Out of China: The History and Cultural Politics of Chinese Transnationalism    20
Identity and Security in East Asia
Ethical Issues in World Politics)                                              20
International Organisation and Global Governance                               20
                                                                               20
NB: Students are permitted to take a maximum of 40 credits in cognate areas.
TOTAL FOR THE YEAR                                                             120


                                                      43
ENGLISH LANGUAGE (SINGLE HONOURS) – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE




YEAR 50 credits Level 1 units            50 credits Level 1 units       20 credits Level 1 units

           English Language              English Language               English Language
1
           (LELA10011, LELA10041,        (may include one 20-credit     or
           LELA10191, LELA10061 and      foreign language course)
           LELA10082)
                                                                        “Free choice”


YEAR 40 credits Level 2 units            60 credits Level 2 units       20 credits Level 2 units

           English Language              English Language               English Language
2
           (four from LELA20051,                                        or
           LELA20091, LELA20181,
           LELA20661, LELA20332 and
           LELA20172)                                                   “Free choice”



YEAR 100 credits Level 3 units                          20 credits Level 3 units

           English Language                             English Language
3
                                                        or

                                                        “Free choice” (at level 2 or 3)


Students following the TESOL pathway in English Language must, in addition to the obligatory
units, take at least 30 credits of LELA options and at most 40 credits of Advanced EFL or TESOL
options.

All students should note that, in second year, they may take up to 20 credits of Level 1 LELA units
that they did not take in first year. They should note however the overall requirement that no more
than 20 credits may be taken at Level 1, so that it is not permitted, in particular, to take this option
in addition to taking a 20-credit free-choice or language option at Level 1




                                                  44
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND A MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGE – PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE

                  English Language                                Language
 Year 1    Level 1 course units                   Level 1 course units
  120
 credits   English Language – 40 credits          Language study - 20 credits* (compulsory)
 overall   (compulsory)

           Related studies – 20 credits           Related studies - 40 credits
                                                  (See Directories of Course Units for list of
                                                  compulsory/optional units), except students
                                                  studying Japanese at ab initio level (see
                                                  below) for whom content course units in
           See Directories of Course Units for    related studies will be a co-requisite
           list of compulsory/optional units      (attendance only) for which no credits will
                                                  be awarded. Students taking Arabic,
                                                  Hebrew, Persian or Turkish must take the
                                                  compulsory 20 credit course unit
                                                  Contemporary Middle East.

                                                  *40 credits compulsory language for
                                                  students studying ab initio Arabic, Chinese,
                                                  German, Hebrew, Italian, Persian,
                                                  Portuguese, Russian, Spanish or Turkish
                                                  with only 20 credits related studies, and 60
                                                  credits compulsory language for students
                                                  studying Japanese at ab initio level (see
                                                  above re. attendance only of content course
                                                  units in related studies).


 Year 2    Level 2 course units                   Level 2 course units
  120      (Students are permitted to take
 credits   Level 1 course unit(s) worth up to a   Language study - 20 credits* (compulsory)
 overall   maximum of 20 credits only in
           Year 2 included within the total of
           120 credits)                           Related studies – 20-60 credits
                                                  (See Directories of Course Units for list of
           English Language – 40 credits          compulsory/optional units)
           (compulsory)
                                                  *40 credits compulsory language study for
           Related studies 0-40                   students who were beginners in Arabic,
           (See Directories of Course Units       Chinese, Hebrew, Japanese, Persian, and
           for list of compulsory/optional        Turkish in Year 1
           units)


 Year 3                                   Compulsory Year Abroad
  120
 credits
 overall




                                                  45
    Year 4    Level 3 course units                        Level 3 course units
     120
    credits   English Language – 40-80 credits            Language study - 20 credits* (compulsory)
    overall
              (See Directories of Course Units for        Related studies – 20-60 credits
              list of compulsory/optional units)
                                                          (See Directories of Course Units for list of
              Students are permitted to take Level        compulsory/optional units)
              2 course unit(s) worth up to a
              maximum of 20 credits only in Year 4        Students are permitted to take Level 2
              (included within the total of 120           course unit(s) worth up to a maximum of
              credits). If students take 20 credits at    20 credits only in Year 4 (included within
              Level 2 in English Language they            the total of 120 credits). If students take 20
              must only take credits at Level 3 in        credits at Level 2 in their chosen language
              their chosen language of study or           of study or related studies they must only
              related studies.                            take credits at Level 3 in English
                                                          Language.
.




                                                         46
ENGLISH LITERATURE AND LINGUISTICS (JOINT HONOURS) – PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE




YEAR 60 credits Level 1 units                             60 credits Level 1 units

           Linguistics                                    English Literature
1
           (must include LELA10011, LELA10021,
           LELA10032, and one of LELA10041 or
           LELA10142; may include one 20-credit foreign
           language course)


YEAR 40 credits Level 2 units            40 credits Level 2 units       40 credits Level 2 units

2          English Literature            Linguistics                    English Literature

                                         (must include LELA20012,       or
                                         LELA20021, and one of
                                         LELA20031 or LELA20042)
                                                                        Linguistics

                                                                        (may include one 20-credit
                                                                        foreign language course)




YEAR 40 credits Level 3           40 credits Level 3      20 credits Level 3   20 credits Level 3
           units                  units                   units                units
3
           English Literature     Linguistics             English Literature   English Literature

                                                          or                   or
                                                                               Linguistics
                                                          Linguistics
                                                                               or
                                                                               “Free choice” (at
                                                                               level 2 or 3)


All students should note that, in second year, they may take up to 20 credits of Level 1 LELA units
that they did not take in first year. They should note however the overall requirement that no more
than 20 credits may be taken at Level 1, so that it is not permitted, in particular, to take this option
in addition to taking a 20-credit free-choice or language option at Level 1.




                                                  47
ENGLISH LITERATURE AND A MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGE – PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE


            English Literature and American                      Language
                         Studies
 Year 1   ENGL10021 “Reading Literature” - 20      Language study - 20 credits*
          credits (compulsory)                     (compulsory)

          ENGL10032 “Contexts of Writing” –        Related studies – 40 credits
          20 credits (compulsory)
                                                   (See Directories of Course Units for
          Optional Course Unit – 20 credits        list of compulsory/optional units)
          ONE of the following:
          ENGL10051 Mapping the Medieval           *40 credits compulsory language for
          OR                                       students studying ab initio language
          ENGL10042 Textual Communities            with only 20 credits related studies

          (See Faculty of Humanities Course
          Unit database for course unit details)


 Year 2   English Literature and American          Language study - 20 credits
          Studies – 40 credits (compulsory)        (compulsory)

          Related studies 0-40                     Related studies – 20-60 credits

          (See Directories of Course Units for     (See Directories of Course Units for
          full list of course units)               list of compulsory/optional units)


 Year 3                               Compulsory Year Abroad

 Year 4   English Literature and American          Language study - 20 credits
          Studies – a minimum of 40 up to a        (compulsory)
          maximum of 80 credits
                                                   Related studies – 20-60 credits
          (See Directories of Course Units for
          full list of course units)               (See Directories of Course Units for
                                                   list of compulsory/optional units)




                                            48
EUROPEAN STUDIES AND MODERN LANGUAGES – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

Please note that these regulations are under revision. You should consult the European
Studies and Modern Languages Programme Handbook (to be found on the School website
www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug).

Year      Language                                Government
1
          Language Skills in main language        POLI10200 Government 1: An
          (compulsory 20 credits)                 introduction to Comparative Politics
          Other course unit(s) from main          (20 credits) PLUS
          language discipline (optional 20        EITHER:
          credits)                                POLI10702 Introduction to Political
                                                  Theory (20 credits )
          Second language (20 credits)            AND/OR
          chosen from LEAP course units.          POLI10601 Introduction to
          Students studying Russian as their      International Politics
          first language and are beginners are If a further 20 crediots is required,
          NOT required to study a second          students must choose from course
          language in Years 1 and 2.              units offered by History (HIST) and
                60 credits in total              Economics (ECON), details
                                                  available on the Faculty of
                                                  Humanities course unit database.
                                                       60 credits in total
2         Language Skills in main language        20 credits from a specified choice of
          (compulsory 20 credits)                 Politics options (see European
          Other course unit(s) in main            Studies and Modern Languages
          language discipline (optional 20        Handbook at
          credits)                                www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/
          Second language (20 credits)            ug/handbooks)
          chosen from LEAP course units.          PLUS
                                                  20 credits from any other Politics-
                60 credits in total              run Level 2 course units
                                                  AND
                                                  20 credits from a choice of History
                                                  or Economics course unit(s)
                                                  Choice of course unit(s) in History,
                                                  Economics or Int. Relations (20
                                                  credits )
                                                   60 credits in total
3                                      Residence abroad
                (Study or placement in a country where target language is spoken)
            All students required to complete Learning Log and provide evidence of
                 satisfactory completion of study programme or work placement
                                          ● 120 credits




                                             49
4   Language Skills in main language       POLI30032 Politics of the European
    (20 credits)                           Union (compulsory 20 credits)
    Plus                                   Plus
    Either: a combination of course        Either: a combination of approved
    units from main language discipline    course units drawn from Politics,
    totalling 40 credits;                  History, Economic History or
    Or: a combination of course units      Economics which total 40 credits;
    from main language discipline          Or: a combination of approved
    worth 20 credits, together with a      course units drawn from Politics,
    Dissertation (20 credits). NB.         History, Economic History or
    Students who choose to write a         Economics which total 20 credits,
    Dissertation in conjunction with       together with a Dissertation (20
    one of the language course units       credits) in one of these disciplines.
    CANNOT also take the                   NB. Students who choose to write a
    Dissertation on the European           Dissertation in conjunction with a
    Studies side of the programme,         course unit drawn from Politics,
    however, undertaking a                 History, Economic History or
    dissertation on one side of the        Economics CANNOT also take the
    programme or the other is              Dissertation on the language side of
    compulsory.                            the programme, however,
                                           undertaking a dissertation on one
                                           side of the programme or the
          60 credits in total             other is compulsory.


                                                 60 credits in total




                                      50
FRENCH STUDIES – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE


 Year 1   Level 1 course units
          Language study (compulsory) - 20 credits
          Related studies (compulsory) - 80 credits
          Free choice course unit(s) - 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)

 Year 2   Level 2 course units
          Language study (compulsory) - 20 credits
          Related studies - 80 credits
          Free choice course unit(s) - 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)

 Year 3                         Compulsory Year Abroad
                                     120 credits
 Year 4   Level 3 course units
          Language study (compulsory) - 20 credits
          Related studies – 80 or 100 credits
          If only 80 credits come from related studies, students take one or two
          free choice course units to the total value of 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)
          Students are permitted to take Level 2 course unit(s) worth up to a
          maximum of 20 credits only in Year 4 (included within the total of 120
          credits).




                                          51
GERMAN STUDIES – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE


 Year 1   Level 1 course units
          Language study (compulsory) - 20 credits
          Related studies - 80 credits
          Free choice course unit(s) - 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)

 Year 2   Level 2 course units
          Language study (compulsory) - 20 credits
          Related studies - 80 credits
          Free choice course unit(s) - 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)

 Year 3                         Compulsory Year Abroad
                                     120 credits
 Year 4   Level 3 course units
          Language study (compulsory) - 20 credits
          Dissertation (compulsory) – 20 credits)
          Related studies – 60 or 80 credits
          If only 60 credits come from related studies, students take one or two
          free choice course units to the total value of 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)
          Students are permitted to take Level 2 course unit(s) worth up to a
          maximum of 20 credits only in Year 4 (included within the total of 120
          credits).




                                          52
HEBREW STUDIES – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

BA (Hons.) in Hebrew Studies (Year 1)
 Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                  Year 1
                  You must take:
 MEST 10210       Modern Hebrew Language 1                                                  40
 MEST 10711       The Contemporary Middle East                                              20

                  You choose 60 credits from the Level 1 Faculty Course Unit Database,
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:                60
                                                                            1
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

Notes:
    1 Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
       programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
       following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
       Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
       course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
       you will be able to register and attend.
    3. If you are studying Aramaic/Syriac, you must choose MEST 10811 The Middle East Before Islam (20
       credits) in year 1.

 Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                  Year 2
                  You must take:
 MEST 20210       Modern Hebrew Language 2                                                  40
 MEST 20001       Literatures of the Middle East                                            20
 MEST 20222       Modern Hebrew Texts                                                       20

                  You choose 40 credits from the Level 2 Faculty Course Unit Database,     40
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,2
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

                  Year 3
                  Study in Israel                                                           120
                  Year 4
                  You must take:
 MEST 30270       Modern Hebrew Language 4                                                  20
 MEST 30010       Dissertation                                                              20
                  You choose 40 credits from:
 MEST 30221       Modern Hebrew Literature                                                  20
 MEST 30051       Biblical Hebrew Texts                                                     20

                  You choose 40 credits from the Level 3 Faculty Course Unit Database,      40
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,3
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

Notes:
1      Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
       programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
       following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
       Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
       course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
       you will be able to register and attend.
2      In the second year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 1 course units.
3      In the final year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 2 course units.


                                                     53
HEBREW AND JEWISH STUDIES (YEARS 2 & 3) – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

BA (Hons.) in Hebrew and Jewish Studies (Years 2 & 3)
 Code             Title                                                                    Credits
                  Year 2
                  You must take:
 MEST 20210       Modern Hebrew Language 2                                                 40
 MEST 20001       Literatures of the Middle East                                           20
 MEST 20241       Talmudic Judaism: Its Sources and Concerns                               10
 MEST 20252       Readings in Talmudic Judaism                                             10
                  You choose 20 credits from:
 MEST 20222       Modern Hebrew Texts                                                      20
 MEST 20272       Fundamental Debates in Israeli Studies                                   20
 RELT 20382       Sources of Holocaust Studies                                             20

                  You choose 20 credits from the Level 2 Faculty Course Unit Database,     20
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,2
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

                  Year 3
                  You must take:
 MEST 30210       Modern Hebrew Language 3                                                 20
 MEST 30010       Dissertation                                                             20
 RELT 30192       History of Jewish Law                                                    20
                  You choose 20 credits from:
 MEST 30721       Themes in the Formation of Jewish and Arab Nationalisms                  20
 MEST 30221       Modern Hebrew Literature                                                 20
 MEST 30200       Jewish Aramaic Texts NOT AVAILABLE IN 08-09                              20
 MEST 30051       Biblical Hebrew Texts                                                    20
 RELT 30332       Holocaust Theology                                                       20
 RELT 30282       Modern Jewish Thought                                                    20
 RELT 30922       Israelites and Canaanites: Archaeology, Rivalry and Religion             20

                  You choose 40 credits from the Level 3 Faculty Course Unit Database,     40
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,3
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/


Notes:
1      Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
       programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
       following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
       Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
       course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
       you will be able to register and attend.
2      In the second year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 1 course units.
3      In the final year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 2 course units.




                                                     54
HISTORY AND A MODERN LANGUAGE – PROGRAMME STRUCTURES
(for further details please see the History and a Modern Language Programme
Handbook available at www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug/handbooks)

 Year              Programme structure and credits                                        Credits

Year 1
 Compulsory
 Core History course (with personal tutor)                                                20
 Language Study I (non ab-initio)                                                         20
 Language Study II (ab-initio)                                                            40

 Optional
 History Course Units                                                                     40
 Target-Language Related Studies I (non ab-initio)                                        40
 Target-Language Related Studies II (ab-initio)                                           20
                                (with combined credits of 120)

Year 2
 Compulsory
 Long essay                                                                               20
 Language Study I                                                                         20
 Language Study II (post ab-initio Russian)                                               40
 Optional (Choice of 4 from 18). Level 2 options, in combination with those at level 1,
 must include at least one course from 3 of 4 historical areas, „Medieval‟, „Modern‟,
 „Economic‟ and „Ancient‟:
 History Course Units                                                                     20-60
 Target-Language Related Studies                                                          20-60
                                                   (with combined credits of 120)

Year 3
 Compulsory
 Year abroad spent under approved circumstances in a country or countries where           120
 the target language is spoken.


Year 4
 Compulsory
 Dissertation (on either the History or the language side)                                20
 Language Study                                                                           20
 Optional
 History Course Units                                                                     20-60
 Target-Language Course Units                                                             20-60
                                                   (with combined credits of 120)




                                                   55
HISTORY OF ART AND A MODERN LANGUAGE – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE


                 History of Art                            Language
 Year 1   Level 1 course units                  Level 1 course units

          Compulsory Units:         Language study - 20 credits*
          AHVS10211 Introduction to (compulsory)
          Art History (20 credits)
                                    Related studies – 40 credits
          AHVS10212 Frameworks for
          Art History (20 credits)  (See Directories of Course Units
                                    for list of compulsory/optional
          Optional Units:           units)

          To make up the remaining 20           *40 credits compulsory language
          credits,   students    must           for students studying ab initio
          choose ONE of the following           language with only 20 credits
          course units:                         related studies

          AHVS10032         Cities     (20
          credits)

          AHVS10331 Works in Focus
          1: Description (20 credits)

          AHVS10352 Works in Focus
          2: Interpretation (20 credits)



 Year 2   Level 2 course units                  Level 2 course units

          Compulsory Course Units: Language study - 20 credits*
                                    (compulsory)
          AHVS20431 Perspectives in
          the History of Art 1 (20 Related studies – 20/40 credits
          credits)
                                    (See Directories of Course Units
          AHVS20432 Perspectives in for list of compulsory/optional
          the History of Art 2 (20 units)
          credits)

          To make up the remaining 0
          to 40 credits, students can
          choose from the list of course
          units in History of Art available
          on the Faculty of Humanities
          Course       Unit      database
          http://courses.humanities.manchest


                                               56
         er.ac.uk/undergraduate/#ahc
         (listed under the School of
         Arts, Histories and Cultures).


Year 3                     Compulsory Year Abroad
                                120 credits
Year 4   Level 3 course units       Level 3 course units

         Compulsory Course Unit:              Language study - 20 credits
                                              (compulsory)
         AHVS 30000 History of Art
         Dissertation (40 credits) Related studies – 20-60 credits

         Optional Course Units:               (See Directories of Course Units
         0-40 further credits in History      for list of compulsory/optional
         of Art from the choice               units)
         available on the Faculty of
         Humanities Database:                 Students are permitted to take
         http://courses.humanities.manchest   Level 2 course unit(s) worth up to
         er.ac.uk/undergraduate/#ahc          20 credits only in Year 4 (included
                                              within the total of 120 credits).
         Students are permitted to
         take Level 2 course unit(s)
         worth up to 20 credits only
         in Year 4 (included within
         the total of 120 credits).




                                           57
ISLAMIC STUDIES AND ARABIC – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE (YEAR 1)

BA (Hons.) in Islamic Studies and Arabic (Year 1)
    Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                     Year 1
                     You must take:
    MEST 10110       Arabic Language 1                                                         40
    MEST 10061       Introduction to Islam                                                     20
    MEST 10711       The Contemporary Middle East                                              20

                     You must choose at least 20 credits from the following list:
    MEST 10031       Introduction to Classical Islamic History                                 10
    MEST 10022       Middle Eastern History AD1000-1800                                        10
    MEST 10731       Introduction to the Study of Modern Middle Eastern History                20
    MEST 10811       The Middle East before Islam NOT AVAILABLE 08-09                          20
    MEST 10042       The Question of Palestine/Israel (1882-1967)                              20
    RELT 10192       Introduction to Judaism                                                   20
    RELT 10641       Introduction to Muslim Societies                                          20

                     You have to choose 120 credits overall so if you have chosen only 20      20
                     credits from the list immediately above, you also need to choose 20
                     credits from the Level 1 Faculty Course Unit Database, located online
                     via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                               1
                     http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

Notes:
1          Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
           programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
           following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
           Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
           course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
           you will be able to register and attend.

      4.   If you are studying Aramaic/Syriac, you must choose MEST 10811 The Middle East Before Islam (20
           credits) in year 1.




                                                        58
ISLAMIC STUDIES AND MUSLIM SOCIETIES (YEAR 1) – PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE

BA (Hons.) in Islamic Studies & Muslim Societies (Year 1)
    Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                     Year 1
                     You must take:
    MEST 10061       Introduction to Islam                                                     20
    RELT 10641       Introduction to Muslim Societies                                          20
    MEST 10711       The Contemporary Middle East                                              20
    RELT 10311       Intro to the Study of Religion and Theology I                             20

                     You choose 40 credits from the Level 1 Faculty Course Unit Database,      40
                     located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                               1
                     http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

Notes:
1          Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
           programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
           following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
           Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
           course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
           you will be able to register and attend.

      5.   If you are studying Aramaic/Syriac, you must choose MEST 10811 The Middle East Before Islam (20
           credits) in year 1.




                                                        59
ITALIAN STUDIES – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE


 Year 1   Level 1 course units
          Language study (compulsory) - 40 credits (beginners) 20 credits
          (post-A-level)
          Related studies – 60/40 credits
          Free choice course unit(s) - 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)

 Year 2   Level 2 course units
          Language study (compulsory) - 20 credits (Beginners or Post-A-level)
          Related studies - 80 credits
          Free choice course unit(s) - 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)

 Year 3                         Compulsory Year Abroad
                                     120 credits
 Year 4   Level 3 course units
          Language study (compulsory) - 40 credits (ITAL30200 Italian
          Language 3 and ITAL30210 Italian for Business Purposes)
          Related studies – 60-80 credits
          If only 60 credits come from related studies, students take one or two
          free choice course units to the total value of 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)
          Students are permitted to take Level 2 course unit(s) worth up to a
          maximum of 20 credits only in Year 4 (included within the total of 120
          credits).




                                          60
  JAPANESE STUDIES: PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

  Level 1:




                                                                 (Post-GCSE-
                                                  (Ab Initio)




                                                                                             Semester
                                                    Credits




                                                                 Credits

                                                                 level)
Compulsory courses
EALC10080 Japanese Language and Linguistics                 60            N/A                            1&2
1
EALC10090 Japanese Language and Linguistics               N/A               40                           1&2
1b
EALC10111 Introduction to Japanese History             20                   20                            1
and Culture                                       (0 for joint
                                                   honours)
EALC10122 Introduction to Modern Japanese              20                   20                            2
Society                                           (0 for joint
                                                   honours)
EALC10132 Cultural Contexts of Japanese               N/A                   20                            2
Language: Reading the Television
                                                          100             100
Optional:
Remaining 20 credits to be taken from those
available in the Faculty

  Level 2:
                                                                 (Post-A-level)
                                                  (Ab Initio)




                                                                                  Semester
                                                    Credits




                                                                    Credits




Compulsory courses
Japanese Language and Linguistics 2                       40     N/A                                    1&2
Japanese Language and Linguistics 2a                      N/A     40                                    1&2
Readings in Japanese                                      20      20                                     2
Total compulsory credits                                  60      60
Core courses:
Students must take 40 credits from the courses
available in Japanese studies. This list is not
fixed at the time of writing but will include
courses on modern Japanese culture, society and
related issues, such as the emergence of Japan
as a modern state and society
Total core credits                                          40      40
Optional:
Remaining 20 credits to be taken from the


                                                     61
courses available in the faculty
Total optional credits                                         20     20
Total credits                                                 120    120


  Year 3
Compulsory

YEAR ABROAD                                                                          120

TOTAL FOR THE YEAR                                                                   120

  Final year:




                                                                    Semester
                                                    Credits




Compulsory courses
Japanese Language Programme (All)                             20               1&2
Dissertation (Single Honours)                                 40               1&2
Advanced Readings in Japanese (All)                           20                1
Total compulsory credits                                      80
Core courses: (NB indicative titles only)
Single honours students must take 20 credits
from the list of courses available in Japanese
Studies
Japanese Society in Comparative Perspective                   20                1
Gender in the Japanese Context                                20                1
Buddhism and modernity in East Asia                           20                2
Total core credits                                            20
Optional:
Remaining 20 credits to be taken from the list of
courses available in Japanese Studies or from
other units available in the faculty
A dissertation is optional for joint honours
Total optional credits                                         20
Total credits                                                 120




                                                         62
JEWISH STUDIES AND HEBREW – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE (YEAR 1)

BA (Hons.) in Jewish Studies and Hebrew (Year 1)
    Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                     Year 1
                     You must take:
    MEST 10210       Modern Hebrew Language 1                                                  40
    RELT 10192       Introduction to Judaism                                                   20
    MEST 10711       The Contemporary Middle East                                              20

                     You must choose at least 20 credits from the following list:
    MEST 10811       The Middle East before Islam NOT AVAILABLE 08-09                          20
    MEST 10042       The Question of Palestine/Israel (1882-1967)                              20

                     You have to choose 120 credits overall so if you have chosen only 20      20
                     credits from the list immediately above, you also need to choose 20
                     credits from the Level 1 Faculty Course Unit Database, located online
                     via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                               1
                     http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

Notes:
1          Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
           programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
           following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
           Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
           course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
           you will be able to register and attend.

      6.   If you are studying Aramaic/Syriac, you must choose MEST 10811 The Middle East Before Islam (20
           credits) in year 1.




                                                        63
LINGUISTICS (SINGLE HONOURS) – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE




YEAR 50 credits Level 1 units            50 credits Level 1 units       20 credits Level 1 units

           Linguistics                   Linguistics                    Linguistics
1
           (LELA10011, LELA10021,        (may include one 20-credit     or
           LELA10032, LELA10061 and      foreign language course)
           one of LELA10041 or
           LELA10142)                                                   “Free choice”



YEAR 30 credits Level 2 units                           90 credits Level 2 units

           Linguistics                                  Linguistics
2
           (LELA20012, LELA20021, and one of            (may include one 20-credit foreign language
           LELA20031 or LELA20042)                      course)



YEAR 100 credits Level 3 units                          20 credits Level 3 units

           Linguistics                                  Linguistics
3
                                                        or

                                                        “Free choice” (at level 2 or 3)



All students should note that, in second year, they may take up to 20 credits of Level 1 LELA units
that they did not take in first year. They should note however the overall requirement that no more
than 20 credits may be taken at Level 1, so that it is not permitted, in particular, to take this option
in addition to taking a 20-credit free-choice or language option at Level 1.




                                                  64
LINGUISTICS AND A MODERN LANGUAGE – PROGRAMME STRUCTURES

                      Linguistics                                           Language
 Year 1   Level 1 course units                     Level 1 course units

          Linguistics – 40 credits                 Language study - 20 credits* (compulsory)
          (compulsory)
                                                   Related studies – 40 credits
          Related studies – 20 credits
                                                   (See Directories of Course Units for list of
                                                   compulsory/optional units)

                                                   *40 credits compulsory language for students studying
          See Directories of Course Units          ab initio language with only 20 credits related studies,
          for list of compulsory/optional          apart from Japanese, where students must take 60
          units                                    credits compulsory language and no related studies


 Year 2   Level 2 course units (Students are       Level 2 course units
          permitted to take Level 1 course
          unit(s) worth up to a maximum of         Language study - 20 credits* (compulsory)
          20 credits only in Year 2 included
          within the total of 120 credits)         Related studies – 20-60 credits

          Linguistics – 30 credits                 (See Directories of Course Units for list of
          (compulsory)                             compulsory/optional units)

          Related studies 10-50                    *40 credits for students who were beginners in Arabic,
                                                   Chinese, Hebrew, Japanese, Persian, and Turkish in
          (See Directories of Course Units         Year1
          for list of compulsory/optional
          units)
 Year 3                                        Compulsory Year Abroad

 Year 4   Level 3 course units                     Level 3 course units

          Linguistics – 40-80 credits              Language study - 20 credits* (compulsory)

          Students are permitted to take           Related studies – 20-60 credits
          Level 2 course unit(s) worth up to a
          maximum of 20 credits only in Year       Students are permitted to take Level 2 course unit(s)
          4 (included within the total of 120      worth up to a maximum of 20 credits only in Year 4
          credits). If students take 20 credits    (included within the total of 120 credits). If students take
          at Level 2 in Linguistics they must      20 credits at Level 2 in their chosen language of study or
          only take credits at Level 3 in their    related studies they must only take credits at Level 3 in
          chosen language of study or              Linguistics.
          related studies.
                                                   (See Directories of Course Units for list of
          (See Directories of Course Units         compulsory/optional units)
          for list of compulsory/optional
          units)
                                              Free choice – 0-20 credits




                                                  65
LINGUISTICS AND SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY (JOINT HONOURS) –
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE




YEAR 60 credits Level 1 units                              60 credits Level 1 units

           Linguistics                                     Social Anthropology
1
           (must include LELA10011, LELA10021,
           LELA10032, and one of LELA10041 or
           LELA10142; may include one 20-credit course
           unit in a foreign language)



YEAR 40 credits Level 2 units              40 credits Level 2 units        40 credits Level 2 units

2          Linguistics                     Social Anthropology             Linguistics

           (must include LELA20012,                                        (may include one 20-credit course
           LELA20021, and one of                                           unit in a foreign language)
           LELA20031 or LELA20042)
                                                                           or

                                                                           Social Anthropology


YEAR 40 credits Level 3            40 credits Level 3      20 credits Level 3      20 credits Level 3
           units                   units                   units                   units
3
           Linguistics             Social                  Linguistics             Linguistics
                                   Anthropology            or
           (must include                                   Social                  or
           LELA30000 whose                                 Anthropology
           topic may be a Social
           Anthropology one by
                                                                                   Social Anthropology
           arrangement)
                                                                                   or
                                                                                   “Free choice”
                                                                                   (at level 2 or 3}

Second Year: see Social Anthropology handbook for Social Anthropology second-year options. These include
SOAN10320 (Culture and Society), normally a Level 1 option but available to Linguistics students in Year 2).




                                                    66
LINGUISTICS AND SOCIOLOGY (JOINT HONOURS) – PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE




YEAR 60 credits Level 1 units                          60 credits Level 1 units

         Linguistics                                   Sociology
1
         (must include LELA10011, LELA10021,
         LELA10032, and one of LELA10041 or
         LELA10142; may include one 20-credit course
         unit in a foreign language)



YEAR 40 credits Level 2 units          40 credits Level 2 units      40 credits Level 2 units

2        Linguistics                   Sociology                     Linguistics

         (must include LELA20012,                                    (may include one 20-credit course
         LELA20021, and one of                                       unit in a foreign language)
         LELA20031 or LELA20042)
                                                                     or

                                                                     Sociology


YEAR 40 credits Level 3        40 credits Level 3      20 credits Level 3    20 credits Level 3
         units                 units                   units                 units
3
         Linguistics           Sociology               Linguistics           Linguistics
                                                       or
                                                       Sociology             or

                                                                             Sociology

                                                                             or
                                                                             “Free choice”
                                                                             (at level 2 or 3)




                                                67
A MIDDLE EASTERN LANGUAGE & A MODERN LANGUAGE –
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

BA (Hons.) in A Middle Eastern Language & A Modern Language (Year 1)
 Year 1
 You must take the relevant one of the following five course units (40 credits in total):
 Arabic: MEST 10110 Arabic Language 1 (40 credits)
 Hebrew: MEST 10210 Modern Hebrew Language 1 (40 credits)
 Persian: MEST 10410 Persian Language 1 (40 credits)
 Turkish: MEST 10310 Turkish Language 1 (40 credits)
 You must also take (20 credits):
 MEST 10711 The Contemporary Middle East (20 credits)

 The other 60 credits will be made up of courses from the other part of your Joint Honours Degree.

N.B. Students taking the MLBM and Arabic, Linguistics and a Middle Eastern Language or
English Language and a Middle Eastern Language degrees should follow the same rules for the
Middle Eastern part of their course as are listed above for the Middle Eastern Language and a
Modern Language degree.

 Year 2
 You must take one of the following five sets of course units, continuing the study of your
 Middle Eastern language (60 credits in total):
 Arabic: MEST 20110 Arabic Language 2 (40 credits) & MEST 20122 Modern Arabic Texts (20
    credits).
 Hebrew: MEST 20210 Modern Hebrew Language 2 (40 credits)
 (20 credits) & MEST 20222 Modern Hebrew Texts (20 credits).
 Persian: MEST 20410 Persian Language 2 (40 credits) & MEST 20422 Modern Persian Prose
    Literature Translation (20 credits).
 Turkish: MEST 20310 Turkish Language 2 (40 credits) & MEST 20321 Turkish Literature in
    Translation (20 credits).

 The other 60 credits may be made up of courses from the other part of your Joint Honours Degree.
 However, if you only have to take 40 compulsory credits from the other part of your Joint Honours
 Degree, you may choose 20 credits from the Level 2 Faculty Course Unit Database, located online
 via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
 http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/1,2

 Year 3
 Study in the Middle East and the other relevant Country (120 credits)




                                                     68
 Year 4
 You must take one of the following course units relating to the Middle Eastern
 Language you are studying (20 credits):
 Arabic: MEST 30160 Arabic Language 4 (20 credits)
 Hebrew: MEST 30270 Modern Hebrew Language 4 (20 credits)
 Persian: MEST 30420 Persian Language 4 (20 credits)
 Turkish: MEST 30380 Turkish Language 4 (20 credits)
 In addition you must take at least 20 credits from the following sets of course units, selecting
 the ones that again correspond to your Middle Eastern Language (20 credits in total):
 Arabic: MEST 30122 Modern Arabic Literature (20 credits), MEST31042 Arabic Aural
 Comprehension (20 credits), MEST 30061 Arab Women’s Writing in Translation (20 credits),
 MEST 30172 Classical Arabic Islamic Texts (10 credits), MEST30181 Media Arabic (10 credits).
 Hebrew: MEST 30221 Modern Hebrew Literature (20 credits), MEST 30051 Biblical Hebrew Texts
 (20 credits).
 Persian: MEST 30451 Modern Persian Literature: Women in Contemporary Persian Short Stories (20
 credits), MEST 30432 Medieval Persian Texts (20 credits), RELT 30112 Islamic Mystical Traditions
 & Texts (20 credits).
 Turkish: MEST 30041 Contemporary Turkey (20 credits), MEST 30322 Modern Turkish Literature
 (20 credits), MEST 30922 Readings in Azerbaijani, Turkmen and Uzbek (20 credits) , NOT
 AVAILABLE IN 08-09

 The other 80 credits may be made up of courses from the other part of your Joint Honours Degree.
 However, if you only have to take 40 or 60 compulsory credits from the other part of your Joint
 Honours Degree, you may choose 20 or 40 credits from the Level 3 Faculty Course Unit Database,
 located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
 http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/, to bring your overall total up to the
 required level of 120 credits1,3


Notes:
1      Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
       programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree. Note that
       Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for course units not coded
       under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that you will be able to
       register and attend.
2      In the second year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 1 course units.
3      In the final year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 2 course units.




                                                       69
MIDDLE EASTERN LANGUAGES – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

BA (Hons.) in Middle Eastern Languages (Year 1)
    Year 1
    You must take any two of the following five course units (80 credits in total):
    Arabic: MEST 10110 Arabic Language 1 (40 credits)
    Aramaic/Syriac: MEST 10611 Aramaic/Syriac Language 1 (A) (20 credits), MEST 10622
    Aramaic/Syriac Language 1 (B) (20 credits) NOT AVAILABLE 08-09
    Hebrew: MEST 10210 Modern Hebrew Language 1 (40 credits)
    Persian: MEST 10410 Persian Language 1 (40 credits)
    Turkish: MEST 10310 Turkish Language 1 (40 credits)
    You must also take (20 credits):
    MEST 10711 The Contemporary Middle East (20 credits)
    You choose 20 credits from the Level 1 Faculty Course Unit Database, located online via the
    Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                              1, 2
    http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

Notes:
1           Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
            programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
            following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
            Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
            course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
            you will be able to register and attend.

       7.   If you are studying Aramaic/Syriac, you must choose MEST 10811 The Middle East Before Islam (20
            credits) in year 1.

    Year 2
    You must take two of the following five course units, continuing the study of the same two
    languages as in the first year (80 credits in total):
    Arabic: MEST 20110 Arabic Language 2 (40 credits)
    Aramaic/Syriac: MEST 20611 Aramaic/Syriac Language 2 (A) (20 credits), MEST 20622
    Aramaic/Syriac Language 2 (B) (20 credits) NOT AVAILABLE IN 08-09
    Hebrew: MEST 20210 Modern Hebrew Language 2 (40 credits)
    Persian: MEST 20410 Persian Language 2 (40 credits)
    Turkish: MEST 20310 Turkish Language 2 (40 credits)
    You must also take (20 credits):
    MEST 20001 Literatures of the Middle East (20 credits)
    You choose 20 credits from the Level 2 Faculty Course Unit Database, located online via the
    Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                              1,2
    http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

    Year 3
    Study in the Middle East (120 credits)




                                                         70
  Year 4
  You must take two of the following course units, continuing the study of the same two
  languages as in the first, second and third years (40 credits in total):
  Arabic: MEST 30160 Arabic Language 4 (20 credits)
  Aramaic/Syriac: MEST 30610 Aramaic/Syriac Language 3 (20 credits) NOT AVAILABLE IN 08-
  09
  Hebrew: MEST 30270 Modern Hebrew Language 4 (20 credits)
  Persian: MEST 30420 Persian Language 4 (20 credits)
  Turkish: MEST 30380 Turkish Language 4 (20 credits)
  You must also take (20 credits):
  MEST 30010 Dissertation (20 credits)
  You must take 20 credits each from two of the following sets of course units, selecting from the
  sets of course units that correspond to the languages you are studying (40 credits in total):
  Arabic: MEST 30122 Modern Arabic Literature (20 credits), MEST31042 Arabic Aural
  Comprehension (20 credits), MEST 30061 Arab Women’s Writing in Translation (20 credits), MEST
  30172 Classical Arabic Islamic Texts (10 credits), MEST 30181 Media Arabic (10 credits).
  Aramaic/Syriac: MEST 30200 Jewish Aramaic Texts (20 credits)NOT AVAILABLE IN 08-09,
  MEST 30641 The Middle East in Late Antiquity (20 credits), NOT AVAILABLE IN 08-09.
  Hebrew: MEST 30221 Modern Hebrew Literature (20 credits), MEST30051 Biblical Hebrew Texts
  (20 credits)
  Persian: MEST 30451 Modern Persian Literature: Women in Contemporary Persian Short Stories (20
  credits), MEST 30432 Medieval Persian Texts (20 credits), RELT 30112 Islamic Mystical Traditions
  and Texts (20 credits).
  Turkish: MEST 30041 Contemporary Turkey (20 credits), MEST 30322 Modern Turkish Literature
  (20 credits), MEST 30922 Readings in Azerbaijani, Turkmen and Uzbek (20 credits) NOT
  AVAILABLE IN 08-09
  You choose 20 credits from the Level 3 Faculty Course Unit Database, located online via the
  Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                               1,3
  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/
Notes:
1         Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
          programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
          following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
          Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
          course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
          you will be able to register and attend.
2         In the second year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 1 course units.
3         In the final year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 2 course units.
4         If you are studying Aramaic/Syriac, you must choose MEST 10811 The Middle East Before Islam (20
          credits) in year 1.




                                                      71
MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES (YEAR 1) – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

BA (Hons.) in Middle Eastern Studies (Year 1)
    Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                     Year 1


Notes:
1          Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
           programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
           following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
           Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
           course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
           you will be able to register and attend.

If you are studying Aramaic/Syriac, you must choose MEST 10811 The Middle East Before Islam
(20 credits) in year 1




                                                        72
A MODERN LANGUAGE AND BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT– PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE

                        Language                                Business and Management
 Year 1   Level 1 course units                         Level 1 course units

          Language study - 20 credits*                 Compulsory:
          (compulsory)
                                                       Semester 1
          Related studies – 20-40 credits (for         For pre-A level Economics students:
          Japanese, course units in related studies    ECON10041 Microeconomic Principles (10
          to be audited only)                          credits)
          (See Directories of Course Units at          For post-A level students (pre-requisite of
          http://www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/u   A-level Economics):
          g/handbooks/ for list of                     ECON10081 The UK Economy –
          compulsory/optional units)                   Microeconomics (10 credits)
                                                       For all students:
          *40 (60 credits for Japanese) credits for    BMAN10011 Fundamentals of Management (10
          students studying languages at ab initio     credits)
          level                                        BMAN10721 Transferable Management and
                                                       Study Skills (10 credits)
          (overall 60 credits)
                                                       Semester 2
                                                       For pre-A level students:
                                                       ECON10042 Macroeconomic Principles (10
                                                       credits)
                                                       For post-A level students (pre-requisite of
                                                       A-level Economics):
                                                       ECON10082 The UK Economy -
                                                       Macroeconomics (10 credits)

                                                       For all students:
                                                       BMAN10552 Fundamentals of Finance (10
                                                       credits) (a pass mark of 60% or above is
                                                       required to take dependent course unit
                                                       BMAN20081)

                                                       Optional course unit – 10 credits

                                                       (See MLBM Handbook at
                                                       http://www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug/han
                                                       dbooks/ for list of available course units)

                                                       (overall 60 credits)




                                              73
Year 2   Level 2 course units                                   Level 2 course units

         Language study - 20 credits*                   Compulsory:
         (compulsory)
                                                        Semester 1-2
         Related studies – 20-60 credits                BMAN22000 Firms and Management in
                                                        Comparative Perspective (compulsory 20
         (See Directories of Course Units at            credits)
         http://www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/u
         g/handbooks/ for list of                       Optional course units – 20-60 credits
         compulsory/optional units)
                                                        (See MLBM Handbook at
         *40 credits for students of Arabic, and for    http://www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug/han
         students who were beginners in Chinese         dbooks/ for list of available units)
         and Japanese in Year 1
                                                        (overall max 80 credits; min 40 credits)
         (overall max 80 credits; min 40 credits,
         except for beginners in certain languages,
         who are required to take 60 credits; see
         Directories of Course Units for details)
Year 3                                      Compulsory Year Abroad
                                               (overall 120 credits)
Year 4   Level 3 course units                           Level 3 course units

         Language study - 20 credits (compulsory)       Compulsory:

         Related studies – 40-60 credits                Semester 1
         (See Directories of Course Units for list of   BMAN31031 Organisational Analysis* (10
         compulsory/optional units)                     credits)

         (overall max 80 credits; min 40 credits)       Semester 2
                                                        BMAN30042 Human Resource Management*
                                                        (10 credits)

                                                        * Students must take ONE of these units, but
                                                          may choose to take both

                                                        Optional course units – 20-70 credits

                                                        (See MLBM Handbook at
                                                        http://www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug/han
                                                        dbooks/ for list of available units)

                                                        (overall max 80 credits; min 40 credits)




                                             74
MODERN LANGUAGES (JOINT HONOURS) – PROGRAMME STRUCTURES

                       Language 1                                         Language 2
 Year 1   Level 1 course units                     Level 1 course units

          Language study - 20 credits*             Language study - 20 credits* (compulsory)
          (compulsory)
                                                   Related studies - 40 credits
          Related studies - 40 credits             (See Directories of Course Units for list of
          (See Directories of Course Units for     compulsory/optional units)
          list of compulsory/optional units)
                                                   *40 credits compulsory language for students
          *40 credits compulsory language for      studying ab initio language (except Japanese) with
          students studying ab initio language     only 20 credits related studies– only one language
          (except Japanese) with only 20           can be taken at ab initio level
          credits related studies – only one       *60 credits compulsory language study for students
          language can be taken at ab initio       studying Japanese (other course units in related
          level                                    studies should be attended only but not for credit)

          *60 credits compulsory language
          study for students studying Japanese
          (other course units in related studies
          should be attended only but not for
          credit)


 Year 2   Level 2 course units                     Level 2 course units
          Language study - 20 credits*             Language study - 20 credits* (compulsory)
          (compulsory)
                                                   Related studies - 40/60 credits**
          Related studies - 40/60 credits**        (See Directories of Course Units for list of
          (See Directories of Course Units for     compulsory/optional units)
          list of compulsory/optional units)
                                                   *40 credits for students who were beginners in
          *40 credits for students who were        Chinese, or,Japanese in Yr1
          beginners in Chinese or Japanese, in
          Yr1


 Year 3                                      Compulsory Year Abroad

 Year 4   Level 3 course units                     Level 3 course units

          (Students are permitted to take up to    (Students are permitted to take up to 20 credits free
          20 credits free choice at Level 2 or 3   choice at Level 2 or 3 included within the total of 120
          included within the total of 120         credits).
          credits).
                                                   Language study - 20 credits (compulsory)
          Language study - 20 credits
          (compulsory)                             Related studies - 40/60 credits*

          Related studies - 40/60 credits*         (See Directories of Course Units for list of
          (See Directories of Course Units for     compulsory/optional units)
          list of compulsory/optional units)

          Students are permitted to take Level 2   Students are permitted to take Level 2 course unit(s)
          course unit(s) worth up to a maximum     worth up to a maximum of 20 credits only in Year 4
          of 20 credits only in Year 4 (included   (included within the total of 120 credits).
          within the total of 120 credits).



                                              75
MASTER OF MODERN LANGUAGES – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE


4.1 The four years of study in Manchester (Study-periods 1-4) are structured as follows
regardless of residence abroad pathways followed by students:

                             Language 1                                        Language2
Study Period 1   Level 1 course units                   Level 1 course units

                 Language study - 20 credits            Language study - 20 credits (compulsory)
                 (compulsory)

                 Related studies - 40 credits           Related studies - 40 credits
                 (See Directories of Course Units for   (See Directories of Course Units for list of
                 list of compulsory/optional units)     compulsory/optional units)


Study Period 2   Level 2 course units                   Level 2 course units

                 Language study - 20 credits            Language study - 20 credits (compulsory)
                 (compulsory)

                 Related studies - 40 credits           Related studies - 40 credits
                 (See Directories of Course Units for   (See Directories of Course Units for list of
                 list of compulsory/optional units)     compulsory/optional units)


Study Period 3   Level 3/4 course units                 Level 3 course unit(s)

                 Language study at Level 3 - 20         Related studies at Level 3 - 20 credits (except if
                 credits (compulsory)                   transferred with ab-initio language, must take
                                                        language course unit)
                 Level 4 units in Research Methods      (See Directories of Course Units for list of optional
                 (20 credits) and Language 1            units)
                 Dissertation (20 credits)
                 (compulsory)

                 Related studies at Level 3 - 40
                 credits
                 (See Directories of Course Units for
                 list of compulsory/optional units)

Study Period 4                                          Level 3/4 course units

                                                        Language study at Level 3- 20 credits (compulsory)

                                                        Level 4 units in Critical Theory (30 credits) and
                                                        Language 2 Dissertation (30 credits) (compulsory)

                                                        Related studies at Level 3 - 40 credits
                                                        (See Directories of Course Units for list of
                                                        compulsory/optional units)




                                                  76
4.2 MML students will follow one of the following Residence Abroad Pathways through the
programme:

(i) MML 4 (Duration: 4 years)

     Year 1            Study-period 1: L1 & L2

     Year 2            Study-period 2: L1 & L2
                       Vacation residence (L1)
                       8 weeks
     Year 3            Study-period 3: primarily L1
                       Vacation residence (L2)
                       8 weeks
     Year 4            Study-period 4: L2



The residence abroad requirement for students on the 4-year MML pathway (MML 4) is to spend a
minimum of eight weeks under approved conditions in countries where L1 and L2, respectively, are spoken.
These eight-week periods abroad normally take place in the summer preceding study-period 3 for L1 and in
the summer preceding study-period 4 for L2. Details of how the two eight-week periods may be spent can
be found in Section 5 of the School Handbook.

(ii) MML 5 (Duration: 5 years)

 Year 1       Study-period 1: L1 & L2        Study-period 1: L1 & L2        Study-period 1: L1 & L2

 Year 2       Study-period 2: L1 & L2        Study-period 2: L1 & L2        Study-period 2: L1 & L2

                                                                            Vacation residence (L1)
                                                                            8 weeks
 Year 3       Year abroad (L1)               Year abroad (L1 & L2)          Study-period 3: primarily L1
              32 weeks                       16 weeks L1
                                             16 weeks L2
 Year 4       Study-period 3: primarily L1   Study-period 3: primarily L1   Year abroad (L2)
                                                                            32 weeks
              Vacation residence (L2)        Vacation residence (L2)
              8 weeks                        8 weeks [OPTIONAL]
 Year 5       Study-period 4: L2             Study-period 4: L2             Study-period 4: L2



Students on the 5-year MML pathway (MML 5) will incorporate a year abroad into their programme. This
may be done in one of the following three ways:

a) by spending 32 weeks between study-period 2 and study-period 3 in a country where L1 is spoken.
   Students choosing this option will then spend eight weeks in a country where L2 is spoken in the
   summer preceding study-period 4.
b) by spending 16 weeks in a country where L1 is spoken and 16 weeks in a country where L2 is spoken,
   consecutively between study-period 2 and study-period 3. If this option is chosen, spending another
   eight weeks in a country where L2 is spoken in the summer preceding study-period 4 is highly
   recommended, but not compulsory.
c) by spending 32 weeks between study-period 3 and study-period 4 in a country where L2 is spoken.
   Students choosing this option will spend eight weeks in a country where L1 is spoken in the summer
   preceding study-period 3.

Details of how 16-week and 32-week periods of residence abroad may be spent can be found in Section 5

                                                      77
of the School Handbook.

(iii) MML 6 (Duration: 6 years)

          Year 1       Study-period 1: L1 & L2

          Year 2       Study-period 2: L1 & L2

          Year 3       Year abroad (L1)
                       32 weeks
          Year 4       Study-period 3: primarily L1

          Year 5       Year abroad (L2)
                       32 weeks
          Year 6       Study-period 4: L2


Students on the 6-year MML pathway (MML 6) will incorporate two years abroad into their programme, so
that they spend 32 weeks between study-periods 2 and 3 in a country where their L1 is spoken and 32
weeks between study-periods 3 and 4 in a country where their L2 is spoken.

N.B. A 16 or 32-week period of residence abroad in a country where their L2 is spoken is compulsory for
students who have transferred into MML as ab initio learners of their L2. That is to say, these students will
register for MML5 or MML6 (but not MML4).



`




                                                      78
MODERN MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

BA (Hons.) in Modern Middle Eastern History (Year 1)
    Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                     Year 1
                     You must take:
    MEST 10711       The Contemporary Middle East                                              20
    MEST 10031       Introduction to Classical Islamic History                                 10
    MEST 10022       Middle Eastern History AD1000-1800                                        10
    MEST 10731       Introduction to the Study of Modern Middle Eastern History                20
    MEST 10061       Introduction to Islam                                                     20

                     You choose 40 credits from the Level 1 Faculty Course Unit                40
                     Database, located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                               1
                     http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/




Notes:
1          Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
           programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
           following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
           Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
           course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
           you will be able to register and attend.

      8.   If you are studying Aramaic/Syriac, you must choose MEST 10811 The Middle East Before Islam (20
           credits) in year 1.

BA (Hons.) in Modern Middle Eastern History (Years 2 & 3)
    Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                     Year 2
                     You must take:
    MEST 20711       The Middle East in the Nineteenth Century                                 20
    MEST 20721       Revolutions in the Twentieth Century Middle East                          20
    MEST 20732       The Middle East and the Cold War                                          20
    MEST 20742       The Middle East and World War I                                           20

                     You choose 40 credits from the Level 2 Faculty Course Unit                40
                     Database, located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                     http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/1,2


                     Year 3
                     You must take (80 credits):
    MEST 30680/      Documentary Special                                                       40
    MEST 30690
    MEST 30000       Dissertation                                                              40

                     You choose 40 credits from the Level 3 Faculty Course Unit Database,      40
                     located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                               1,3.
                     http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/


Notes:
1      Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable


                                                        79
    programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
    following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
    Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
    course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
    you will be able to register and attend.
2   In the second year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 1 course units.
3   In the final year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 2 course units.




                                                 80
MODERN MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY AND ARABIC

BA (Hons.) in Modern Middle Eastern History and Arabic (Year 1)
 Code         Title                                                        Credits
              Year 1
              You must take:
 MEST 10110   Arabic Language 1                                            40
 MEST 10711   The Contemporary Middle East                                 20
 MEST 10031   Introduction to Classical Islamic History                    10
 MEST 10022   Middle Eastern History AD1000-1800                           10
 MEST 10731   Introduction to the Study of Modern Middle Eastern History   20
 MEST 10061   Introduction to Islam                                        20




                                                81
PERSIAN STUDIES – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

BA (Hons.) in Persian Studies (Year 1)
 Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                  Year 1
                  You must take:
 MEST 10410       Persian Language 1                                                        40
 MEST 10711       The Contemporary Middle East                                              20

                  You choose 60 credits from the Level 1 Faculty Course Unit Database,
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:                60
                                                                            1
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/



BA (Hons.) in Persian Studies (Years 2, 3 & 4)
 Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                  Year 2
                  You must take:
 MEST 20410       Persian Language 2                                                        40
 MEST 20001       Literatures of the Middle East                                            20
 MEST 20422       Modern Persian Prose Literature in Translation                            20

                  You choose 40 credits from the Level 2 Faculty Course Unit Database,      40
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,2
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

                  Year 3
                  Study in Iran                                                             120
                  Year 4
                  You must take:
 MEST 30420       Persian Language 4                                                        20
 MEST 30010       Dissertation                                                              20
                  You choose 40 credits from:
 MEST 30432       Medieval Persian Texts                                                    20
 MEST 30451       Modern Persian Literature: Women in Contemporary Persian Short            20
                  Stories
 RELT 30112       Islamic Mystical Traditions and Texts                                     20
                  You choose 40 credits from the Level 3 Faculty Course Unit Database,      40
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,3
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/
Notes:
1      Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
       programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
       following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
       Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
       course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
       you will be able to register and attend.
2      In the second year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 1 course units.
3      In the final year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 2 course units.




                                                     82
PERSIAN & ISLAMIC STUDIES (YEARS 2 AND 3) – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

BA (Hons.) in Persian and Islamic Studies (Years 2 & 3)
 Code             Title                                                                    Credits
                  Year 2
                  You must take (80 credits):
 MEST 20410       Persian Language 2                                                       40
 MEST 20001       Literatures of the Middle East                                           20
 MEST 20501       Issues in Contemporary Islam                                             20
                  You choose 20 credits from:
 MEST 20422       Modern Persian Prose Literature Translation                              20
 MEST 20711       The Middle East in the Nineteenth Century                                20
 MEST 20721       Revolutions in the Twentieth Century Middle East                         20
 MEST 20732       The Middle East and the Cold War                                         20
 MEST 20742       The Middle East and World War I                                          20
 MEST 20272       Fundamental Debates in Israeli Studies                                   20
 RELT 21011       Women in Middle Eastern Societies                                        20
 RELT 21002       Islam in Practice: Ethnographic Approaches to Islam                      20

                  You choose 20 credits from the Level 2 Faculty Course Unit               20
                  Database, located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,2
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

                  Year 3
                  You must take:
 MEST 30410       Persian Language 3                                                       20
 MEST 30031       Introduction to Qur’an and Hadith Studies                                20
 MEST 30010       Dissertation                                                             20
                  You choose 40 credits from:
 MEST 30432       Medieval Persian Texts                                                   20
 MEST 30451       Modern Persian Literature: Women in Contemporary Persian Short           20
                  Stories
 MΕST 30641       The Middle East in Late Antiquity, NOT AVAILABLE IN 08-09                20
 RELT 30112       Islamic Mystical Traditions and Texts                                    20

                  You choose 20 credits from the Level 3 Faculty Course Unit Database      20
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,3
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

Notes:
1      Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
       programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
       following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
       Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
       course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
       you will be able to register and attend.
2      In the second year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 1 course units.
3      In the final year, up to 20 credits of options from other Disciplines may be Level 2 course units.




                                                     83
RUSSIAN STUDIES – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE


 Year 1   Level 1 course units
          Language study – 40 credits (Beginners), 20 (Post-A level)
          Related studies – 60 credits (Beginners) or 80 credits (Post-A level)
          Free choice course unit(s) - 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)

 Year 2   Level 2 course units
          Language study – 20 credits (ex-Beginners and Post-A level)
          Related studies – 80 credits
          Free choice course unit(s) - 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)
 Year 3                          Compulsory Year Abroad
                                         120 credits
 Year 4   Level 3 course units
          Language study - 20 credits
          Dissertation – 20 credits)
          Related studies – 60 - 80 credits
          Free choice course units to the total value of 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)
          Students are permitted to take Level 2 course unit(s) worth up to a
          maximum of 20 credits only in Year 4 (included within the total of 120
          credits).




                                          84
SCREEN STUDIES AND A MODERN LANGUAGE, ENGLISH LANGUAGE, OR
LINGUISTICS – PROGRAMME STRUCTURES

Year 1
 Compulsory
 Language Study I (non ab-initio) *40 credits compulsory language for students        20-40*
 studying Japanese post ab-initio
 *40 credits compulsory language for students studying ab initio language with only   40-60
 20 credits related studies, apart from Arabic, Hebrew, Japanese, Persian, and
 Turkish, where students must take 60 credits compulsory language and no related
 studies. 40 credits compulsory units for Linguistics and English Language.
 Introduction to World Cinema 1                                                       20
 Introduction to World Cinema 2                                                       20
 (See Programme Handbook for list of further compulsory units depending on            10 - 30
 pathway/foreign language e.g. French and Screen Studies includes compulsory
 units Ways of Reading (20 Credits) and Images in French Culture (10 Credits))


 Optional
 The remaining credits are taken from Target-Language or Linguistics and English      Up to
 Language Related Studies (with combined credits of 120)                              60
 See Programme Handbook for list of optional units depending on pathway

Year 2
 Compulsory
 Language Study I                                                                     20*
 *40 credits for students who were beginners in Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Persian,     30-40
 and Turkish in Year 1, and for ALL students studying Japanese. 40 credits for
 English Language. 30 credits for Linguistics.
 Screen, Culture and Society                                                          20
 Trends in World Cinema                                                               20
 (See Programme Handbook for list of compulsory units depending on                    0 - 20
 pathway/foreign language e.g. French and/with Screen Studies includes compulsory
 units at level 2 Introduction to French Film (20 Credits)

 Optional
 Screen Studies options                                                               Up to 20
 The remaining credits are taken from Target-Language or Linguistics and English      *Min of 20
 Language Related Studies (with combined credits of 120)                              Max of 60
 See Programme Handbook for list of optional units depending on pathway

Year 3
 Compulsory (for ML)
 Residence abroad spent under approved circumstances in a country or countries        120
 where the target language is spoken.

Final Year
 Compulsory (for ML)
 Language study 1                                                                     20




                                                  85
Optional
Screen Studies options                                                             Min of 40
                                                                                   Max. of
                                                                                   60 credits
The remaining credits are taken from Target-Language or Linguistics and English    Min of 40
Language Related Studies (with combined credits of 120)                            Max of
                                                                                   80credits
(with combined credits of 120) See Programme Handbook for list of optional units
depending on pathway




                                                86
SPANISH, PORTUGUESE AND LATIN-AMERICAN STUDIES – PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE


 Year 1   Level 1 course units
          Language study (compulsory) - 40 credits
          Related studies - 60 credits
          Free choice course unit(s) - 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)
 Year 2   Level 2 course units
          Language study (compulsory) - 20 credits
          Related studies - 80 credits
          Free choice course unit(s) - 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)
 Year 3                          Compulsory Year Abroad
                                         120 credits
 Year 4   Level 3 course units
          Language study (compulsory) - 20 credits
          Related studies – 80 - 100 credits
          If only 80 credits come from related studies, students take one or two
          free choice course units to the total value of 20 credits
          (See Faculty of Humanities Course Unit Database for full choice of
          possible units)
          Students are permitted to take Level 2 course unit(s) worth up to a
          maximum of 20 credits only in Year 4 (included within the total of 120
          credits).




                                          87
TURKISH STUDIES – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

BA (Hons.) in Turkish Studies (Year 1)
 Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                  Year 1
                  You must take:
 MEST 10310       Turkish Language 1                                                        40
 MEST 10711       The Contemporary Middle East                                              20

                  You choose 60 credits from the Level 1 Faculty Course Unit Database,
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:               60
                                                                            1
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

Notes:
1      Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
       programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
       following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
       Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
       course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
       you will be able to register and attend.

 Code             Title                                                                     Credits
                  Year 2
                  You must take:
 MEST 20310       Turkish Language 2                                                        40
 MEST 20001       Literatures of the Middle East                                            20
 MEST 20321       Turkish Literature in Translation                                         20

                  You choose 40 credits from the Level 2 Faculty Course Unit Database,
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,2
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

                  Year 3
                  Study in Turkey                                                           120
                  Year 4
                  You must take:
 MEST 30380       Turkish Language 4                                                        20
 MEST 30010       Dissertation                                                              20
                  You choose 40 credits from:
 MEST 30041       Contemporary Turkey                                                      20
 MEST 30322       Modern Turkish Literature                                                20
 MEST 30922       Readings in Azerbaijani, Turkmen and Uzbek NOT AVAILABLE IN              20
                     08-09
                                                                                            40
                  You choose 40 credits from the Level 3 Faculty Course Unit Database,
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,3
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

Notes:
1      Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
       programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
       following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
       Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
       course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
       you will be able to register and attend.
2      In the second year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 1 course units.
3      In the final year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 2 course units.


                                                      88
TURKISH AND ISLAMIC STUDIES (Years 2 and 3) – PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

BA (Hons.) in Turkish and Islamic Studies (Years 2 & 3)
 Code             Title                                                                    Credits
                  Year 2
                  You must take:
 MEST 20310       Turkish Language 2                                                       40
 MEST 20001       Literatures of the Middle East                                           20
 MEST 20501       Issues in Contemporary Islam                                             20
                  You choose 20 credits from:
 MEST 20321       Turkish Literature in Translation                                        20
 MEST 20711       The Middle East in the Nineteenth Century                                20
 MEST 20721       Revolutions in the Twentieth Century Middle East                         20
 MEST 20732       The Middle East and the Cold War                                         20
 MEST 20742       The Middle East and World War I                                          20
 MEST 20272       Fundamental Debates in Israeli Studies                                   20
 RELT 21011       Women in Middle Eastern Societies                                        20

                  You choose 20 credits from the Level 2 Faculty Course Unit               20
                  Database, located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,2
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

                  Year 3
                  You must take:
 MEST 30310       Turkish Language 3                                                       20
 MEST 30031       Introduction to Qur’an and Hadith Studies                                20
 MEST 30010       Dissertation                                                             20
                  You choose 40 credits from:
 MEST 30041       Contemporary Turkey                                                      20
 MEST 30322       Modern Turkish Literature                                                20
 MEST 30922       Readings in Azerbaijani, Turkmen and Uzbek , NOT AVAILABLE IN            20
                  08-09                                                                    20
 MEST 30641       The Middle East in the Roman Period & Late Antiquity, NOT                20
                  AVAILABLE IN 08-09
 RELT 30112       Islamic Mystical Traditions and Texts                                    20

                  You choose 20 credits from the Level 3 Faculty Course Unit Database
                  located online via the Faculty of Humanities Home Page at:
                                                                            1,3
                  http://courses.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/undergraduate/

Notes:
1      Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director that the units chosen contribute to a suitable
       programme. We would strongly advise students to choose courses related to their degree from one of the
       following subject areas: Religions and Theology, History, Classics, Sociology, Government or
       Philosophy. Note that Middle Eastern Studies has no control over the timetabling and registration for
       course units not coded under MEST; you must check with the Discipline offering such course units that
       you will be able to register and attend.
2      In the second year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 1 course units.
3      In the final year, up to 20 credits of options may be Level 2 course units.




                                                     89
5 Residence abroad

Most of the degree programmes within the School involve a compulsory period of residence
abroad in the country/countries of the target language(s). Any queries regarding residence abroad
issues should be directed to the following members of staff:

Chair of the School Residence Abroad and Exchanges Committee: Dr Wiebke Brockhaus-Grand
(Room S3.26; wiebke.brockhaus-grand@manchester.ac.uk;

School Residence Abroad Coordinator: Mr Daniel Herman (Room S3.6;
daniel.herman@manchester.ac.uk)

Please note that students are expected to check regularly the appropriate residence abroad
noticeboards, web pages and Blackboard sites for further details (such as the dates of meetings).

5.1   Residence Abroad Regulations

The Residence Abroad Regulations can be found on the School website:

http://www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug and click on Residence Abroad. Hard copies of the
regulations will also be circulated to students during their second year of study.

6      Student progression

6.1    Registration

Each year you will be required to register with the University via its online Academic (personal
details) and Financial (in respect of tuition fees) Registration facility through the University
Student Record System (Campus Solutions/Peoplesoft). You will be required also to see
administrative members of staff in the School to ascertain and finalise timetable information and
course unit choices, etc. Pre-registration details are sent to all students by the School prior to
registration in September/October and students will be asked to select their course unit choices,
again using the online facility, in July/August (for joint honours programmes with the School of
Arts, Histories and Cultures, pre-registration for course units in English Literature, History, Art
History, will take place in mid-May). On registration with the University you will be issued with
an identity swipe card which is your library card and holds details of your degree programme, year
of study, etc. For details about registration, please consult the Undergraduate Manager/
Coordinator.

If you need to change your course units for any reason, you must make sure that you obtain
the permission of the course tutors concerned and that you inform the relevant
Undergraduate Support Officer (please see page 22 above for important information
regarding course unit changes).

6.2    Induction

Your first few weeks at Manchester may be quite daunting, and it is important that you adjust to
life at the University as quickly as you can. Members of staff of the School are willing to help
with any queries you may have, but make sure you ask, at the earliest opportunity. The School

                                                90
runs formal induction programmes for new students, which include during Registration Week:

       •   an address to new students by the Head of School;
       •   an initial meeting with your personal tutor, which you must attend.

There may also be other events on your induction programme, such as receptions in your
particular discipline(s) of study. Ensure that during Registration Week you also register with the
Language Centre (see 3.1 above), and sign up for two fundamental elements in the academic
induction programme:

       •   introduction to the John Rylands University Library: at the start of the session
           members of staff of the JRULM organize guided tours of the Library's resources –
           books, periodicals, catalogues, databases, computer facilities – for new students, taken
           in manageable groups according to subject of study;
       •   information technology: Information about IT services in the University is available
           in the Crucial Guide which you should have received with information about
           Registration. You should also have received „Guide to IT services at The University
           of Manchester 2008/9‟ after registration. You are also recommended to visit the
           „Getting Started‟ section at the following website:
           www.manchester.ac.uk/itservices/gettingstarted


All new students are strongly urged to take full advantage of the IT training outlined in these
publications , which will prove extremely valuable throughout your time as a student, and also
when you come to choose a career once you graduate. You would also be given the opportunity of
obtaining the European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL), a valuable addition to your CV.

It is essential that you keep yourself informed about what is going on in your area of study, about
teaching arrangements, and about what is expected of you, by regularly checking noticeboards,
student pigeon-holes and your e-mail (see 2.2 above) for communications from tutors and other
important information.

If by the middle of the first semester you still feel lost, make sure that you speak to someone,
initially your personal tutor. The University has support services that offer help to students with
academic and personal problems, but your personal tutor is the person to whom, in the first
instance, you can turn if you are experiencing difficulty (see 2.1 above and section 8 below).

6.3    Accreditation of prior learning

If you have entered the University with relevant post-A-Level educational achievements which
you wish to have counted as credits towards your degree, you should consult the School‟s
Admissions and Recruitment Office about making a case for the accreditation of your prior
learning. Until credit for such learning has been agreed with the School, you must follow all the
course units stipulated in your degree programme.

6.4   Attendance requirements

You are normally expected to attend all classes (lectures, seminars, tutorials and language
classes), and your attendance will be monitored. Attendance at less than 50% of the classes

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for which you are registered will be deemed unacceptable and may lead to your being
refused permission to sit University examinations.

The University has a duty to report to Local Education Authorities students who are
      absent at the beginning of a semester;
      absent without permission;
      absent through illness for a period of more than 28 days.

You are required to be in attendance throughout the academic year, including Reading Week.
Permission for absence may be given only by the Head of School and is normally restricted to
cases of illness and/or compassionate leave.

For absence from classes you should provide a written explanation, which is to be submitted to the
School Reception (room S3.8), within one week of your absence. Suitable supporting evidence
(e.g. a medical certificate) should be included with your explanation. For absences of less than
one week, a medical certificate is not required, but you should submit a Self-Certification notice,
available from the following website:
http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug/assessment/documents/CertificationofStudentsickhealth.pdf

(The same form may be used to obtain medical certification for absences of more than a week by
asking your doctor to complete the third part of the form.) For further information on how to deal
with problems of ill health, (see 8.5 below). If the absence is due to problems which are not of a
medical nature, a „Notification of Mitigating Circumstances‟ form can be completed online.
Unless this procedure is followed, no allowances will be made by boards of examiners. If you
miss a class, you will nevertheless be expected to prepare adequately for the next class of that
course unit. For guidance on Mitigating Circumstances see the following website:
http://www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug/mitcircs/

Students who fail to attend for a formal assessment (such as a class test or an examination)
are required to report the circumstances to their Personal Tutor or to a member of the
Undergraduate Support staff as soon as possible. Failure to attend a formal assessment
because of illness must be corroborated by a medical certificate (see the preceding paragraph),
which should be submitted at once to the School Reception (S3.8) or the Undergraduate
Coordinator (Room S3.6). If you are taken ill during an examination and are unable to
complete it, you should report immediately, or as soon as you are able, to the Student Health
Service, which will provide a note for the discipline concerned, if you wish.

6.5   Unsatisfactory progress

Students' attendance is monitored, and the School will take action in response to absences, as set
out below. These guidelines on unsatisfactory progress should be read in conjunction with section
6.4 above. Further details of disciplinary procedures can be found on the University website
http://www.staffnet.manchester.ac.uk/policies/student/.

1. If, in either semester, you have missed 50% or more of all classes for which you are registered,
you will be asked to provide an explanation of these absences to your Personal Tutor, unless you
have already submitted medical evidence (in the form of a doctor‟s certificate or the „Certification
of Student Ill Health‟ form) or completed the „Notification of Mitigating Circumstances‟ form.
(Your Personal Tutor may still want to see you if the Tutor believes that it would be useful to do

                                                      92
so.) Failure to respond to this request to contact the Personal Tutor is a serious matter, so
students must ensure that they check their pigeon-holes and their University e-mail accounts
at least twice each week during teaching periods.

2. If you do not contact your Personal Tutor within seven days, your failure to do so will be noted,
and if your attendance does not improve, whether or not you saw your Personal Tutor the first
time, you will again be instructed to contact the Tutor within a week.

3. Should you fail to respond this time, or, having responded, do not improve your level of
attendance, an official early warning letter will be issued by the Undergraduate Manager on
behalf of the Chair of the Undergraduate Programmes Committee. This letter will inform you that
unless there is an improvement you will not be permitted to take the prescribed examinations.
(You will not be refused permission to enter for your examinations on the grounds of
unsatisfactory work and attendance unless you have been sent an early warning letter.)

4. If you receive an early warning letter and fail to comply with the requirements laid down in it, a
letter of refusal will be issued by the Undergraduate Manager on behalf of the Chair of the
Undergraduate Programmes Committee, which will exclude you from all formal assessment
and thus terminate your degree programme. Letters of refusal are issued in consultation with
the relevant Heads of Discipline Area.

5. A student who has been refused permission to take an examination or other form of assessment
on the grounds of unsatisfactory work and attendance may submit an appeal against that decision
within ten working days of the notification of the decision in accordance with the provisions of
Regulation XIX [Academic Appeals].

6. A student‟s first semester record of work and attendance will be carried forward into the
second semester, and continuing unsatisfactory attendance in the second semester will result in
that student being issued with an early warning letter, which may be followed by a letter of refusal.

6.6   Transfer between programmes of study within the School

Applications for transfer between programmes of study within the School are considered in
accordance with the following guidelines.

Principles

1.           Applications from students who have sound academic or personal reasons for wishing
             to transfer between programmes of study within the School will be considered on their
             merits, with due regard to the integrity of the School‟s degree programmes and the
             best interests of the applicant.

2.           Transfer at the end of Year 1 will normally be allowed provided the applicant: (i)
             meets the minimum requirements for progression to Level 2 of an honours degree
             programme; (ii) completes in Year 2 any Level 1 course unit integral to the new
             programme not followed in Year 1; and (iii) makes good any shortfall in the number
             of credits awarded in Year 1 either by satisfying provision (ii), if applicable, or by
             following another course unit (or units) approved for the purpose.


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3.          Students who, at the beginning of their Second Year, decide to change from Joint
            Honours solely within the School to Single Honours (again within the School) will
            not be required to choose any „make-up‟ course units from First Year in their Single
            Honours subject, but must use their „Free Choice‟ in Second and Final Year within
            rather than outside their chosen discipline so that they are assured of the requisite
            number of credits.

4.          Transfer between programmes of study within the School after Year 2 will normally
            be allowed provided the requirements for entry upon the new programme at Level 3
            are satisfied with respect to credit accumulation and prerequisites (including, where
            applicable, the year abroad requirement). A credit deficit in a particular subject will
            normally be considered compensated for by credits gained in another subject prior to
            transfer.

5.          Any additional accredited study required of a student upon transfer to a new
            programme should be the minimum compatible with the nature of the programme
            (e.g. Portuguese in the case of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin-American Studies) or
            with progression to successful completion of the programme (e.g. a foundation course
            unit in a particular discipline indispensable for further study in that discipline) and
            should not normally involve course units with a total value of more than 20 credits.
            (Regulations permit 20 Level 1 credits to be taken as part of the Level 2 programme.
            In appropriate cases, a Level 1 course unit might be followed contemporaneously with
            a Level 2 course unit for which it is normally a prerequisite.)

Procedure

     1. A student who wishes to transfer to a different programme of study within the School,
        having consulted his or her Personal Tutor or the Programme Director of the discipline
        area concerned, should submit a written application via the Transfer of Programme form
        to the Undergraduate Manager for the School, outlining the reasons for the application.
     2. The Programme Director(s) of the relevant discipline area(s) concerned will consider
        the application in the light of the guidelines for transfer and current practice within the
        School and come to a decision as to the feasibility and appropriateness of the transfer.
     3. The Undergraduate Manager will notify the applicant in writing of this decision and
        advise the applicant of the consequences of a decision to allow the transfer.
     4. For all transfers the Undergraduate Coordinator will make the necessary online
        amendments to the student‟s record and will notify the Student Services Centre. It will
        be the responsibility of the student to notify their LEA and the Student Loan Company
        (if applicable).




                                                94
7      Assessment

7.1    Methods of assessment

In most course units student performance is normally assessed by a combination of examination
and assessed coursework.

7.1.1 Assessed coursework

To ensure that all candidates are treated alike, that the anonymous marking of work can be carried
out efficiently and effectively, and that appropriate feedback can be given, it is most important
that items of assessed coursework are submitted by the due date and in the manner specified
by your tutors or area of study. All coursework must be submitted by hand, in person, in
duplicate. The Undergraduate Reception Support Assistant will not accept any coursework
if it is not to be submitted in duplicate. Students will be expected to take coursework away
and obtain a photocopy of it before submitting it again but will be penalised, according to
the guidelines, if the work is then submitted after the deadline. NB. Course unit assessed
coursework deadlines are staggered during the week of submission (as already advertised in
Course Unit Directories) as follows:

Chinese and Japanese ~ Monday
Middle Eastern Studies ~ Tuesday
Spanish, Portuguese and Latin-American Studies ~ Tuesday
French ~ Wednesday
Linguistics and English Language ~ Wednesday
Italian, ~ Thursday
German ~ Friday

Unless good cause is shown, students who do not submit assessed coursework will be deemed to
have failed this part of the assessment. Any assessed coursework submitted after the deadline
without good cause will incur a penalty determined by the lateness of its arrival: ten percentage
points will be deducted for the first working day after the deadline, and five additional percentage
points for each day thereafter (including weekends). However, please note that the Faculty will
operate two schemes for late submission of coursework, i.e. the one listed above and the other
being that a zero penalty will be applied (the late work would be marked zero for the first day it is
late). Other Schools with which this School shares joint honours students (such as Arts,
Histories and Cultures) will be applying the zero penalty. Please make sure that you are aware
of the penalties that will be imposed for late course work submission for each course unit you
have chosen as the course units may be administered by different Schools operating different
penalty schemes.

When coursework is submitted after the deadline, or where a candidate is aware in advance that
the deadline will not be met, then a Notification of Mitigating Circumstances form explaining the
reasons for the late submission, together with supporting documentary evidence (e.g. medical
certification, counselling or police reports) as appropriate, must be submitted via the online form
available at www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug/mitcircs (see above, Section 6.4.). Such
evidence should be submitted to the Undergraduate Coordinator (Room S3.6) or via School
Reception (Room S3.8). The Undergraduate Manager, Chair of the Examinations Committee and


                                                 95
Undergraduate Coordinator will discuss with Examinations Officers, as necessary, to adjudicate
on whether the penalties for late submission that would otherwise apply should be waived. The
decisions will be communicated to the School Boards of Examiners and marks will be amended
accordingly.

All coursework is to be written to a prescribed word limit. Students should note that writing to a
prescribed limit is one of the criteria for assessment. Any excessive infringement (i.e. more than
10% over the limit) will be considered a failure to complete the prescribed task according to the
specified criteria, and this will be reflected in the mark. All coursework should include a statement
of the number of words (excluding bibliography and footnotes).

Students who without good cause fail to hand in assessed coursework, or do so late, run the risk of
failing the overall assessment for the course unit in question.

Penalties for late submission of assessed coursework may be different in other Schools and
disciplines. Students whose degrees include a subject taught outside the School of Languages,
Linguistics and Cultures should consult the handbook of the School or discipline concerned.

7.1.2   Examinations

Examinations are held at the end of the Semester in which they are taught (for the relevant dates
see 1.11 above). In the case of written examinations the anonymity of candidates is preserved
throughout the marking process.

Students will be entered for examinations on the basis of the course units they choose at
registration (for Year 1) or pre-registration/course unit selection (for later years), or about which
they subsequently notified the School (see section 6.1 above). Notices of examination entries and
dates will be displayed on noticeboards, and students are personally informed through the Student
Intranet by the Student Services Centre. It is entirely the responsibility of students to ensure
that they are correctly registered for the appropriate examinations, and that they attend at
the appropriate time.

Copies of past examination papers are available on the University website for consultation and
information and via Blackboard.

7.1.3   Take-away examination paper

Some course units are examined by take-away examination papers, which students have a
specified time to complete where and how they choose. Such examinations permit longer time
for reflection and the use of materials normally excluded from the examination room. The
discipline that applies to assessed coursework applies to take-away examination papers too:
scripts must be submitted within the time allotted for the examination, otherwise any
mark awarded may be reduced or the paper discounted altogether.

7.1.4   Study project

All students in the Honours School of Italian Studies undertake an independent study project as
part of their first year programme. In consultation with one of the first year tutors they must
identify a suitable topic, which they then plan, research, and write up largely on their own

                                                 96
initiative, with a maximum of one hour's supervision time from the tutor concerned. The project
must be submitted by a specified date during the first year of study. As with any kind of assessed
coursework, failure to submit by the due date may result in any mark awarded being reduced or the
submission being discounted altogether.

7.1.5   Dissertation

        20 credit Dissertation and 40 credit Dissertation

        These course units are guided research modules, in which the student submits an 8,000-
        word (20 credits) or 12,000 word (40 credits) dissertation on a subject of her or his own
        choosing. A dissertation supervisor provides guidance as to research methods, writing
        skills and analysis of data. The student is expected to identify and develop a dissertation topic
        appropriate to the scale of the project which is focused into a specific research question providing
        scope to explore the most sophisticated kind of evaluative and critical issues. Thus, these course
        units aff the student the opportunity to design and undertake a research project, and will
        involve significant independent research.

        To enrol, students must submit their dissertation topic proposal form to the discipline area
        Undergraduate Support Officer by the end of week 2 of the final year of study. It is
        expected that in most circumstances students will have already undertaken preparatory
        research, especially taking advantage of sources available during the period of residence
        abroad (if applicable), before beginning the course module. The course convenor will then
        allocate a supervisor based on 1) staff expertise and 2) fair distribution of workload among
        staff. When, because of workload distribution, it is not possible to allocate students to the
        supervisor whose expertise is most appropriate, students will be offered the choice of
        changing their topic. In cases in which particular expertise is highly popular, students may
        be allocated a supervisor based on their second year average mark or based on the strength
        of their proposal. Allocation of supervisors will be finalised by week 3. In cases in which
        a supervisor has more than one student, there may be a group-work component to the
        course unit. Any such groups will normally be 3-6 students, who may meet to discuss
        research findings and review each other‟s work, under the guidance of their supervisor.
        Additionally, students will have one to one meetings with their supervisor

        Contact hours will vary between the two dissertations and a written record of the meetings
        kept by the student, countersigned by the supervisor.

        20 credit version: 3 lectures plus 4 meetings with supervisor (7 hours in total)
        40 credit version: 3 lectures plus 5 meetings with supervisor (8 hours in total)

        Students should consult their individual subject handbooks for the relevant submission
        deadlines.

        7.1.6   Oral examinations

        Proficiency in speaking the language you are studying is tested by means of an oral
        examination held at the end of the second semester, before the written examinations begin.
        The oral examination forms part of the assessment in the use of the language and the result
        is incorporated with the mark awarded for the corresponding written paper. Those who

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   gain a First Class mark in the oral examination in any modern language at the Final
   Examination are awarded a Distinction in the spoken language, and this is recorded on
   the degree certificate.

   7.2 Feedback on students’ work

   Feedback on assessed coursework is provided on the relevant forms, which indicate the
   criteria of assessment used (see 7.3 below) and have space for the course tutor‟s
   comments. These forms will normally accompany the coursework when it is returned to
   the student (though for language work it may not be necessary to provide separate forms
   on every occasion). The tutor‟s comments may then form the basis of a discussion of the
   coursework between the student and the tutor. Tutors will return marked coursework as
   soon as possible, normally within three working weeks, but the timing may vary according
   to circumstances. Where coursework is submitted and assessed anonymously, it will be
   returned anonymously, with written feedback. Students may, if they wish, however,
   discuss the work with the course tutor to gain further feedback, although they should be
   aware that this will mean a loss of anonymity. For precise information, you should consult
   the tutor concerned. Please note that arrangements regarding the provision and
   improvement of feedback to students are under review in SLLC and new versions of
   feedback forms may be piloted in certain discipline areas.

   End-of-year results normally are available online, and provisional results for Semester 1
   course units are communicated by the online student system and/or by notices on School
   noticeboards, usually by the end of February. Should you not receive these for any reason,
   consult your personal tutor. More detailed information about your performance may
   normally be obtained thereafter by consulting the relevant course tutors. Students will be
   given the opportunity to receive feedback on their dissertations after the final examiners‟
   meeting, and should approach their supervisors about this.

7.3 Criteria of assessment and Samples of Feedback Forms

See below indications of the assessment criteria used in SLLC and samples of feedback
forms used to provide indications of how a certain mark has been achieved and how
improvements may be made when submitting coursework in the future.




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Assessment criteria for translation into English


86% +        Virtually faultless. Full understanding of the passage and entirely accurate
High 1st     rendition of the material into authentic English of the appropriate register.
76-85%       Excellent understanding of the passage, and the English of the translation is
Good 1st     extremely appropriate.
70-75%       Mostly excellent understanding of the passage, and the English of the
Low 1st      translation is for the most part extremely appropriate. Only one or two
             imperfections.
60-69%       Good understanding of most of the passage and largely accurate translation. A
2: 1         few mis-translations and/or awkwardness‟s of style.
50-59%       Satisfactory understanding of at least two thirds of the passage, which is
2: 2         translated accurately, though without much sensitivity. Despite
             misunderstandings, the general sense of the passage is conveyed.
40-49%       Satisfactory understanding of at least half of the passage, which is rendered
3rd          adequately into English. The overall effect is disjointed, however, and the
             general sense is poorly conveyed.
30-39%       Only about one third of the passage is understood and rendered approximately
marginal     into English. The overall effect is extremely disjointed, and the general sense is
fail         not adequately conveyed.
20-29%       There are only isolated examples of understanding and adequate translation.
clear fail
10-19%       No attempt has been made to translate the majority of the passage, and in the
very         portion that has been attempted there are only isolated examples of
clear fail   understanding and adequate translation.
5-9%         No real effort has been made to provide a translation of the passage. Only a few
almost       short phrases or sentences have been attempted.
total fail
0-4%         No answer has been provided, or else one which contains only totally irrelevant
total fail   material.




                                                99
Assessment criteria for translation into the language being studied


86% +        Virtually faultless. Entirely accurate rendition of the material into authentic
High 1st     language of the appropriate register.
76-85%       The lexis, morphology and syntax of the foreign language are extremely
Good 1st     appropriate. A few imperfections, which are amply compensated by strengths
             elsewhere.
70-75%       The lexis, morphology and syntax of the foreign language are mostly very
Low 1st      appropriate. Some imperfections, which are compensated by strengths
             elsewhere.
60-69%       A generally accurate version. Some mis-translations and/or inappropriate use of
2: 1         lexis, morphology and syntax, but the general sense of the passage is conveyed,
             and there are some strengths evident.
50-59%       A generally accurate translation of at least two thirds of the passage. Fairly
2: 2         frequent mis-translations and inappropriate use of lexis, morphology and syntax.
             The general sense of the passage is not fully conveyed.
40-49%       At least half of the passage is rendered adequately, despite frequent mis-
3rd          translations and inappropriate use of lexis, morphology and syntax. The overall
             effect is disjointed, and the general sense is poorly conveyed.
30-39%       Only about one third of the passage is rendered intelligibly. The overall effect is
marginal     extremely disjointed, and the general sense is not adequately conveyed.
fail
20-29%       There are only isolated examples of adequate translation.
clear fail
10-19%       No attempt has been made to translate the majority of the passage, and in the
very         portion that has been attempted there are only isolated examples of
clear fail   understanding and adequate translation.
5-9%         No real effort has been made to provide a translation of the passage. Only a few
almost       short phrases or sentences have been attempted.
total fail
0-4%         No answer has been provided, or else one which contains only totally irrelevant
total fail   material.




                                                100
Assessment criteria for composition in the language being studied


86% +        Virtually faultless command of lexis, morphology and syntax. Outstanding
High 1st     powers of critical reasoning, exceptionally effective expression of ideas and a
             wholly authentic use of idiom.
76-85%       Excellent command of lexis, morphology and syntax. Extremely good powers
Good 1st     of critical reasoning and expression of thought, and an authentic use of idiom. A
             few imperfections, which are amply compensated by strengths elsewhere.
70-75%       Mostly very good command of lexis, morphology and syntax. Very good powers
Low 1st      of reasoning and expression, and a generally authentic use of idiom. A few
             errors, which are compensated by strengths elsewhere.
60-69%       A generally good command of lexis, morphology and syntax, despite some
2: 1         errors. Powers of reasoning and expression are generally good, and the use of
             idiom is mostly authentic, though the sense may not always be fully clear and
             some of the phrasing is awkward.
50-59%       A generally adequate command of lexis, morphology and syntax, but there are
2: 2         quite frequent errors. Powers of reasoning and expression are only fair and the
             use of idiom is uncertain. The sense is unclear in places and much of the
             phrasing is awkward.
40-49%       Command of lexis, morphology and syntax is poor, and there are frequent
3rd          errors. Powers of reasoning and expression are limited, the sense is often
             unclear and there is little feel for idiom.
30-39%       Command of lexis, morphology and syntax is inadequate, and there are very
marginal     frequent errors. Powers of reasoning and expression are very limited, the sense
fail         is mostly unclear, and there is little or no feel for idiom.
20-29%       Command of lexis, morphology and syntax is extremely inadequate, and the
clear fail   work is full of errors. Powers of reasoning and expression are extremely
             deficient, the work makes very little sense, and there is no feel for idiom at all.
10-19%       Command of lexis, morphology and syntax is extremely inadequate, and the
very         work is full of errors. Powers of reasoning and expression are extremely
clear fail   deficient, the work makes very little sense, and there is no feel for idiom at all.
             The answer is also seriously deficient in quantity.
5-9%         No real effort has been made to provide an answer. Only a few short phrases or
almost       sentences have been attempted.
total fail
0-4%         No answer has been provided, or else one which contains only totally irrelevant
total fail   material.




                                                101
Assessment criteria for essays and similar work assignments


86% +        Exemplary in all respects: presentation, style, relevance and clarity of argument,
High 1st     range and aptness of exemplification, exploitation of background knowledge.
             Extremely clear understanding of the issues; all aspects covered. Exceptionally
             impressive evidence both of preparatory reading and of personal response.
76-85%       Excellent in all respects: presentation, style, relevance and clarity of argument,
Good 1st     range and aptness of exemplification, exploitation of background knowledge.
             Very clear understanding of the issues; all aspects covered. Impressive evidence
             both of preparatory reading and of personal response.
70-75%       Very good in most respects: presentation, style, relevance and clarity of
Low 1st      argument, range and aptness of exemplification, exploitation of background
             knowledge. Clear understanding of the issues; nearly all aspects covered.
             Substantial evidence both of preparatory reading and of personal response.
60-69%       Good presentation, style, relevance and clarity of argument. Range and aptness
2: 1         of exemplification good. Generally clear understanding of the issues; most
             major aspects covered. Clear evidence both of preparatory reading and of
             personal response.
50-59%       Satisfactory presentation and style. Reasonable understanding of the issues, but
2: 2         some significant aspects are inadequately covered or not addressed at all. Clarity
             and relevance of argument not always maintained. Limited and/or sometimes
             inappropriate exemplification. Some evidence of preparatory reading and of
             personal response.
40-49%       Presentation and style poor. Lack of clarity and relevance of argument. Broadly
3rd          appropriate, but largely unfocussed knowledge. Little evidence of real
             engagement with the issues.
30-39%       Inadequate in most respects. Argument difficult to follow and/or mostly
marginal     irrelevant. Only isolated instances of attempts to engage with the topic and/or of
fail         limited appropriate knowledge.
20-29%       Extremely inadequate in all respects. Argument virtually impossible to follow
clear fail   and/or totally/almost totally irrelevant. No serious attempt to engage with the
             topic nor appreciable evidence of appropriate knowledge.
10-19%       Extremely inadequate in all respects. Argument virtually impossible to follow
very         and/or totally/almost totally irrelevant. No serious attempt to engage with the
clear fail   topic nor appreciable evidence of appropriate knowledge. The answer is also
             seriously deficient in quantity.
5-9%         No real effort has been made to provide an answer. Only a few short sentences
almost       have been written.
total fail
0-4%         No answer has been provided, or else one which contains only totally irrelevant
total fail   material.




                                               102
Assessment criteria for written examinations (content course units)


86% +        Exemplary in all respects: presentation, style, relevance and clarity of argument,
High 1st     range and aptness of exemplification, exploitation of background knowledge.
             Extremely clear understanding of the issues; all aspects covered. Exceptionally
             impressive evidence both of preparatory reading and of personal response.
76-85%       Excellent in all respects: presentation, style, relevance and clarity of argument,
Good 1st     range and aptness of exemplification, exploitation of background knowledge.
             Very clear understanding of the issues; all aspects covered. Impressive evidence
             both of preparatory reading and of personal response.
70-75%       Very good in most respects: presentation, style, relevance and clarity of
Low 1st      argument, range and aptness of exemplification, exploitation of background
             knowledge. Clear understanding of the issues; nearly all aspects covered.
             Substantial evidence both of preparatory reading and of personal response.
60-69%       Good presentation, style, relevance and clarity of argument. Range and aptness
2: 1         of exemplification good. Generally clear understanding of the issues; most
             major aspects covered. Clear evidence both of preparatory reading and of
             personal response.
50-59%       Satisfactory presentation and style. Reasonable understanding of the issues, but
2: 2         some significant aspects are inadequately covered or not addressed at all. Clarity
             and relevance of argument not always maintained. Limited and/or sometimes
             inappropriate exemplification. Some evidence of preparatory reading and of
             personal response.
40-49%       Presentation and style poor. Lack of clarity and relevance of argument. Broadly
3rd          appropriate, but largely unfocussed knowledge. Little evidence of real
             engagement with the issues.
30-39%       Inadequate in most respects. Argument difficult to follow and/or mostly
marginal     irrelevant. Only isolated instances of attempts to engage with the topic and/or of
fail         limited appropriate knowledge.
20-29%       Extremely inadequate in all respects. Argument virtually impossible to follow
clear fail   and/or totally/almost totally irrelevant. No serious attempt to engage with the
             topic nor appreciable evidence of appropriate knowledge.
10-19%       Extremely inadequate in all respects. Argument virtually impossible to follow
very         and/or totally/almost totally irrelevant. No serious attempt to engage with the
clear fail   topic nor appreciable evidence of appropriate knowledge. The answer is also
             seriously deficient in quantity.
5-9%         No real effort has been made to provide an answer. Only a few short sentences
almost       have been written.
total fail
0-4%         No answer has been provided, or else one which contains only totally irrelevant
total fail   material.




                                               103
Assessment criteria for oral examinations

86% +      A near flawless and natural performance, indistinguishable from the standard of an
high 1st   educated native speaker employing an appropriate register.
76-85%     A virtually flawless and natural performance, though not necessarily of native-
good 1st   speaker standard in every respect.
70-75%     Excellent overall. Not without minor errors but coherent, fluent and sustained
low 1st    communication.
60-69%     Good. Some weaknesses, errors or limitations, but candidate generally at ease in
2:1        the language and in control of the dialogue. Good flow maintained.
50-59%     Satisfactory. Candidate copes generally and maintains dialogue, but not without
2:2        hesitation, difficulty, and errors in a good number of instances.
40-49%     Barely satisfactory. Some limited ability to manipulate the language and express
3rd        ideas, but performance marred by frequent failure to maintain communication
           and/or understand examiners‟ questions. Frequent errors in all or most areas.
30-39% Unsatisfactory overall. Serious errors in all or most areas, but isolated instances of
marginal basic communication.
fail
20-29% Totally unsatisfactory as a performance. No meaningful exchange of ideas. Serious
clear fail errors and inadequacies in all areas. No redeeming features.
10-19% Inability to conduct any dialogue. Gross errors and inadequacies in all areas.
very
clear fail
5-9%       No effort to engage in dialogue. Only a few disconnected utterances.
almost
total fail
0-4%       No intelligible statements made.
total fail

Note: Individual disciplines will supply more detailed information as to format and structure
of oral examinations and how these criteria relate to the various aspects, e.g. pronunciation,
grammatical accuracy, vocabulary, register, range etc.




                                              104
                                                          School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures

Essay Feedback Sheet                                                      XYZ Studies

       Reg Nº                        Course Code                                    Date

 First Marker                       Second Marker                         Agreed Mark                  %

The ticked categories do not represent exact marks and are purely indicative. Remember that the
internally agreed mark is provisional and subject to moderation.

Indicators of high quality    86+   76-85 70-75 60-69 50-59 40-49 30-39   0-29   Indicators of poor quality
Excellent understanding of                                                       No appreciable understanding of
topic/issues                                                                     topic/issues




Firm grasp of key                                                                Little or no awareness of key
concepts                                                                         concepts




Addresses the question
                                                                                 Fails to address the question set
set explicitly and directly




Logical and effective                                                            Argument confused, ineffectual or
argumentation                                                                    wholly derivative



Supports argument                                                                No examples given or not deployed
effectively with examples                                                        effectively


Comprehensively and
                                                                                 Lacks references
correctly referenced


Well presented and clear                                                         Muddled and poorly written




Other comments (both markers)




                                                   105
                                                            School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures
Feedback Sheet for Composition in                                           XYZ Studies
the Target Language

      Reg Nº                          Course Code                                  Date

 First Marker                        Second Marker                     Agreed Mark                    %

The ticked categories do not represent exact marks and are purely indicative. Remember that the
internally agreed mark is provisional and subject to moderation.

Indicators of high quality     86+    76-85 70-75 60-69 50-59 40-49 30-39   0-29   Indicators of poor quality
Excellent command of                                                               No real command of
morphology and syntax                                                              morphology or syntax




Excellent use of appropriate                                                       No use of appropriate lexis,
lexis, register and idiom                                                          register or idiom




Diverse range of structures                                                        Very limited or no range of
used                                                                               linguistic structures used




Addresses the question set                                                         Fails to address the set
explicitly and directly                                                            question




Firm grasp of key concepts                                                         No awareness of key concepts




Outstanding critical                                                               No evidence of critical
reasoning                                                                          reasoning




Supports argument                                                                  No examples given or not
effectively with examples                                                          deployed effectively




                                                   106
                                                           School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures

Commentary Feedback Sheet                                                XYZ Studies
(Text/Film sequence)


      Reg Nº                           Course Code                                  Date

 First Marker                         Second Marker                     Agreed Mark                     %

The ticked categories do not represent exact marks and are purely indicative. Remember that the
internally agreed mark is provisional and subject to moderation.

Indicators of high quality      86+    76-85 70-75 60-69 50-59 40-49 30-39   0-29   Indicators of poor quality
Literary and socio-historical                                                       Little sense of contextual
context of passage/clip                                                             location of selected
clearly identified                                                                  passage/clip



Clear focus on form of                                                              Little attention paid to formal
text/clip                                                                           aspects of the text/clip



Addresses issues of style,
                                                                                    Fails to address stylistic,
technique, and expression
                                                                                    technical or expressive issues
and how deployed


Relates content to wider                                                            No sense in which content
frames of reference (social                                                         relates to wider socio-cultural
& cultural presuppositions)                                                         issues.



Argument well illustrated:
                                                                                    Overly descriptive with little
aware of contradictions and
                                                                                    analytical argumentation.
ambiguities



Well presented and clear                                                            Muddled and poorly written



Other comments (both markers)




                                                    107
                                                           School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures

Oral Examination Feedback Sheet                                             XYZ Studies

      Reg Nº                          Course Code                                  Date

 First Marker                        Second Marker                     Agreed Mark                    %

The ticked categories do not represent exact marks and are purely indicative. Remember that the
internally agreed mark is provisional and subject to moderation.

Indicators of high quality     86+    76-85 70-75 60-69 50-59 40-49 30-39   0-29   Indicators of poor quality
                                                                                   Poor pronunciation makes
Near flawless pronunciation
                                                                                   comprehension difficult



Excellent use of appropriate                                                       Inability to determine and/or
register(s)                                                                        maintain appropriate register



Meaningful exchange of                                                             No meaningful exchange of
complex ideas                                                                      even simple ideas



Near perfect grammatical
                                                                                   Consistent basic errors
accuracy



Diverse range of structures                                                        Limited or no range of
used                                                                               linguistic structures used


Broad vocabulary range
                                                                                   Vocabulary seriously limited
used entirely appropriately



Fluent delivery                                                                    Halting speech/long pauses



Other comments (both markers)




                                                   108
                                                         School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures

Poster/Website Feedback Sheet                                          XYZ Studies

      Reg Nº                         Course Code                                  Date

 First Marker                       Second Marker                     Agreed Mark                    %

The ticked categories do not represent exact marks and are purely indicative. Remember that the
internally agreed mark is provisional and subject to moderation.

Indicators of high quality    86+    76-85 70-75 60-69 50-59 40-49 30-39   0-29   Indicators of poor quality
Excellent layout and design                                                       Poor layout and design



Excellent use of images                                                           No use of images




Firm grasp of key issues                                                          No awareness of key issues




Clear and logical structure                                                       No obvious structure




Logical and effective                                                             Argument confused,
argumentation                                                                     ineffectual or wholly derivative


Excellent use of examples                                                         No examples/evidence given
and/or other evidence                                                             or used ineffectually


Correct and appropriate
                                                                                  Lacks references
referencing



Well written and presented                                                        Poorly written and presented



Other comments (both markers)




                                                  109
                                                             School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures
Feedback Sheet for Oral
                                                                             XYZ Studies
Presentations in the Target Language

      Reg Nº                           Course Code                                  Date

 First Marker                         Second Marker                     Agreed Mark                   %

The ticked categories do not represent exact marks and are purely indicative. Remember that the
internally agreed mark is provisional and subject to moderation.

Indicators of high quality      86+    76-85 70-75 60-69 50-59 40-49 30-39   0-29   Indicators of poor quality
Excellent command of                                                                No real command of
morphology and syntax                                                               morphology and syntax


Excellent use of appropriate                                                        No use of appropriate lexis,
lexis, register and idiom                                                           register or idiom


Diverse range of structures                                                         Very limited or no range of
used                                                                                linguistic structures used



Coherent, logical structure
                                                                                    No evident structure and main
with main points clearly
                                                                                    points not clear
expressed



Excellent evidence base                                                             Limited or no evidence base or
and/or examples                                                                     examples


Excellent use of visual aids,                                                       No supporting material or not
handouts, etc                                                                       used effectively



Audible and delivered at an                                                         Poor delivery makes it
appropriate pace                                                                    impossible to follow


Convincing and appropriate                                                          Cannot or does not answer
response to questions                                                               questions


Other comments (both markers)




                                                    110
                                                          School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures

Translation Feedback Sheet                                              XYZ Studies

       Reg Nº                         Course Code                                  Date

 First Marker                        Second Marker                     Agreed Mark                    %

The ticked categories do not represent exact marks and are purely indicative. Remember that the
internally agreed mark is provisional and subject to moderation.

Indicators of high quality     86+    76-85 70-75 60-69 50-59 40-49 30-39   0-29   Indicators of poor quality
Entirely accurate rendition
of material into authentic                                                         No rendition of material into
language and appropriate                                                           authentic language
register




Excellent understanding of
                                                                                   No understanding of text
text‟s nuances




Flawless morphology, lexis                                                         No real command of
and syntax                                                                         morphology, lexis and syntax




                                                                                   No, or only inaccurate,
High level of sensitivity to
                                                                                   knowledge of the cultural
the cultural context
                                                                                   context




                                                                                   Mistakes make translation
Virtually error free
                                                                                   incomprehensible




Other comments (both markers)




                                                   111
                                                             School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures

Oral Presentation Feedback Sheet                                             XYZ Studies

      Reg Nº                           Course Code                                  Date

 First Marker                         Second Marker                     Agreed Mark                   %

Remember that the internally agreed mark is provisional and subject to moderation.

Indicators of high quality      86+    76-85 70-75 60-69 50-59 40-49 30-39   0-29   Indicators of poor quality
Coherent, logical structure                                                         No evident structure




Keeps to time                                                                       Too long or too short




Main points clearly
                                                                                    Main points not clear
expressed




Excellent evidence base                                                             Limited or no evidence base or
and/or examples                                                                     examples




Excellent use of visual aids,                                                       No supporting material or not
handouts, etc.                                                                      used effectively




Audible and delivered at an                                                         Poor delivery makes it
appropriate pace                                                                    impossible to follow



Convincing and appropriate                                                          Cannot or does not answer
response to questions                                                               questions



Other comments (both markers)




                                                    112
                                                            School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures

  Dissertation Feedback Sheet                                              XXX Studies

         Reg Nº                         Course Code                                   Date

   First Marker                    Second Marker                          Agreed Mark                    %

  The ticked categories do not represent exact marks and are purely indicative. Remember that the
  internally agreed mark is provisional and subject to moderation.

Indicators of high quality        86+    76-85 70-75 60-69 50-59 40-49 30-39   0-29   Indicators of poor quality
Excellent subject knowledge
                                                                                      Poor knowledge of the topic,
founded on impressive breadth
                                                                                      extremely limited reading
of reading and research


Full and sophisticated analysis
with impressive critical                                                              Little or no in-depth analysis
perspective on sources



Clearly enunciated, appropriate
                                                                                      Fails to set out and/or answer
questions addressed explicitly
                                                                                      appropriate questions
and directly throughout


Logical and well thought-out
                                                                                      Incoherent and ineffective
structure (chapterisation, sub-
                                                                                      structure,
divisions, paragraphing)




Clear and persuasive
                                                                                      Confused or ineffectual
argumentation supported by
                                                                                      argument, no detailed evidence
detailed evidence


Comprehensively and correctly
                                                                                      Inadequate referencing
referenced


Immaculately presented; clearly
                                                                                      Messy and poorly written
and fluently written




Other comments (both markers)




                                                     113
7.4      Second marking

To ensure the maintenance of consistent standards of assessment, the School operates a system of
selective second marking for all second-year and final-year course units, whereby the assessment
of the first marker is checked by a second marker, who discusses the outcome with the first
marker. In the case of dissertations all work is marked twice. Any unresolved cases are referred
for a decision to the external examiner, an academic from another institution, whose job is to see
that the standards of assessment applied by the constituent disciplines of the School are in line
with those to be found elsewhere in the UK.

7.5     Guidance to students on plagiarism and other forms of academic malpractice -
        Introduction

7.5.1    As a student, you are expected to cooperate in the learning process throughout your
         programme of study by completing assignments of various kinds that are the product of
         your own study or research. For most students this does not present a problem, but
         occasionally, whether unwittingly or otherwise, a student may commit what is known as
         plagiarism or some other form of academic malpractice when carrying out an assignment.
         This may come about because students have been used to different conventions in their
         prior educational experience or through general ignorance of what is expected of them.

7.5.2    This guidance is designed to help you understand what we regard as academic malpractice
         and hence to help you to avoid committing it. You should read it carefully, because
         academic malpractice is regarded as a serious offence and students found to have
         committed it will be penalized. At the very least a mark of only 30% would be awarded
         for the piece of work in question, but it could be worse; you could be awarded zero (with
         or without loss of credits), fail the whole unit, be demoted to a lower class of degree, or be
         excluded from the programme.

7.5.3    Academic malpractice includes plagiarism, collusion, fabrication or falsification of
         results and anything else intended by those committing it to achieve credit that they do not
         properly deserve. In addition to the advice that follows, your School will give you advice
         on how to avoid academic malpractice in the context of your discipline. It will also design
         assessments so as to help you avoid the temptation to commit academic malpractice. The
         School reserves the right to submit any work handed in by students for assessment to
         electronic systems for detecting plagiarism or other forms of academic malpractice. This
         includes the JISC plagiarism detection service, details of which can be found at:
         http://www.jiscpas.ac.uk/

7.6      Plagiarism

7.6.1    Plagiarism is presenting the ideas, work or words of other people without proper, clear
         and unambiguous acknowledgement. It also includes „self-plagiarism‟ (which occurs
         where, for example, you submit work that you have presented for assessment on a
         previous occasion), and the submission of material from „essay banks‟ (even if the authors
         of such material appear to be giving you permission to use it in this way). Obviously, the
         most blatant example of plagiarism would be to copy another student‟s work. Hence it is
         essential to make clear in your assignments the distinction between:


                                                  114
      the ideas and work of other people that you may have quite legitimately exploited and
         developed, and
      the ideas or material that you have personally contributed.

7.6.2 To assist you, here are a few important do‟s and don‟ts:
      Do get lots of background information on subjects you are writing about to help you form
        your own view of the subject. The information could be from electronic journals,
        technical reports, unpublished dissertations, etc. Make a note of the source of every piece
        of information at the time you record it, even if it is just one sentence.
      Don’t construct a piece of work by cutting and pasting or copying material written by
        other people, or by you for any other purpose, into something you are submitting as your
        own work. Sometimes you may need to quote someone else‟s exact form of words in
        order to analyse or criticize them, in which case the quotation must be enclosed in
        quotation marks to show that it is a direct quote, and it must have the source properly
        acknowledged at that point. Any omissions from a quotation must be indicated by an
        ellipsis (…) and any additions for clarity must be enclosed in square brackets, e.g.
        “[These] results suggest… that the hypothesis is correct.” It may also be appropriate to
        reproduce a diagram from someone else‟s work, but again the source must be explicitly
        and fully acknowledged there. However, constructing large chunks of documents from a
        string of quotes, even if they are acknowledged, is another form of plagiarism.
      Do attribute all ideas to their original authors. Written „ideas‟ are the product that authors
        produce. You would not appreciate it if other people passed off your ideas as their own,
        and that is what plagiarism rules are intended to prevent. A good rule of thumb is that
        each idea or statement that you write should be attributed to a source unless it is your
        personal idea or it is common knowledge. (If you are unsure if something is common
        knowledge, ask other students: if they don‟t know what you are talking about, then it is
        not common knowledge!)

7.6.3 As you can see, it is most important that you understand what is expected of you when you
      prepare and produce assignments and that you always observe proper academic
      conventions for referencing and acknowledgement, whether working by yourself or as part
      of a team. In practice, there are a number of acceptable styles of referencing depending, for
      example, on the particular discipline you are studying, so if you are not certain what is
      appropriate, ask your tutor or the course unit coordinator for advice! This should ensure
      that you do not lay yourself open to a charge of plagiarism inadvertently, or through
      ignorance of what is expected. It is also important to remember that you do not absolve
      yourself from a charge of plagiarism simply by including a reference to a source in a
      bibliography that you have included with your assignment; you should always be
      scrupulous about indicating precisely where and to what extent you have made use of such
      a source.

7.6.4 So far, plagiarism has been described as using the words or work of someone else (without
      proper attribution), but it could also include a close paraphrase of their words, or a
      minimally adapted version of a computer program, a diagram, a graph, an illustration, etc
      taken from a variety of sources without proper acknowledgement. These could be lectures,
      printed material, the Internet or other electronic/AV sources.




                                                115
7.6.5    Remember: no matter what pressure you may be under to complete an assignment, you
         should never succumb to the temptation to take a „short cut‟ and use someone else‟s
         material inappropriately. No amount of mitigating circumstances will get you off the hook,
         and if you persuade other students to let you copy their work, they risk being disciplined as
         well (see below).

7.7     Collusion

7.7.1 Collusion is any agreement to hide someone else‟s individual input to collaborative work
      with the intention of securing a mark higher than either you or another student might
      deserve. Where proved, it will be subject to penalties similar to those for plagiarism.
      Similarly, it is also collusion to allow someone to copy your work when you know that they
      intend to submit it as though it were their own and that will lay both you and the other
      student open to a charge of academic malpractice.

7.7.2 On the other hand, collaboration is a perfectly legitimate academic activity in which students
      are required to work in groups as part of their programme of research or in the preparation of
      projects and similar assignments. If you are asked to carry out such group work and to
      collaborate in specified activities, it will always be made clear how your individual input to
      the joint work is to be assessed and graded. Sometimes, for example, all members of a team
      may receive the same mark for a joint piece of work, whereas on other occasions team
      members will receive individual marks that reflect their individual input. If it is not clear on
      what basis your work is to be assessed, to avoid any risk of unwitting collusion you should
      always ask for clarification before submitting any assignment.

7.8     Fabrication or falsification of results

7.8.1    For many students, a major part of their studies involves laboratory or other forms of
         practical work, and they often find themselves undertaking such activity without close
         academic supervision. If you are in this situation, you are expected to behave in a
         responsible manner, as in other aspects of your academic life, and to show proper integrity
         in the reporting of results or other data. Hence you should ensure that you always
         document clearly and fully any research programme or survey that you undertake, whether
         working by yourself or as part of a group. Results or data that you or your group submit
         must be capable of verification, so that those assessing the work can follow the processes
         by which you obtained them. Under no circumstances should you seek to present results or
         data that were not properly obtained and documented as part of your practical learning
         experience. Otherwise, you lay yourself open to the charge of fabrication or falsification
         of results.

Finally…

7.8.2    If you commit any form of academic malpractice, teaching staff will not be able to assess
         your individual abilities objectively or accurately. Any short-term gain you might have
         hoped to achieve will be cancelled out by the loss of proper feedback you might have
         received, and in the long run such behaviour is likely to damage your overall intellectual
         development, to say nothing of your self-esteem. You are the one who loses.




                                                  116
Extracts from Regulation XVII: Conduct and Discipline of Students

3.         Without prejudice to the generality of Statute XXI.1, a student may be liable to
           disciplinary action in respect of conduct which:

     (i)          involves the possession of unauthorised material or the use or attempted use of
                  unauthorised or unfair means (including academic malpractice such as plagiarism
                  or collusion with other students or fabrication or falsification of results) in
                  connection with any examination or assessment;

7.         If a breach under paragraph 3(i) has been established, the penalties imposed may be one or
           more of the following. When determining the penalty to be imposed, account shall be
           taken of the consequences which the penalty will have for the academic progress of the
           student concerned:

     (a)          a reprimand and warning about future behaviour;

     (b)          the Board of Examiners to be informed that the piece of work be marked, if not
                  already marked, and the mark awarded for the piece of work or for the course unit
                  be reduced by a specified amount;

     (c)          cancellation (i.e. a recorded mark of zero), with or without loss of credit, of the
                  examination paper or other assessed work in which unfair practice occurred, or of
                  the course units(s) in which the unfair practice occurred;

     (d)          cancellation (i.e. recorded marks of zero), with or without loss of credit, of all
                  examination papers and other assessed work taken during the particular
                  examination period (i.e. end of first semester (January); end of second semester
                  (May/June); resit (August/September)) in which unfair practice occurred or of all
                  examination papers and other assessed work taken during the academic year;

     (e)          the Board of Examiners to be required to reduce the class of degree by one or more
                  classes from that which would have been awarded on the basis of the student‟s
                  academic progress, or to award a lesser qualification;

     (f)          the student being not allowed a re-assessment;

     (g)          the student being not allowed a re-assessment and being not allowed to substitute
                  any other course unit(s);

     (h)          suspension from the University for a fixed period, up to a maximum of twelve
                  months. A student who is so suspended will be prohibited from entering University
                  premises and from participating in University activities although the suspension
                  may be subject to qualification;

     (i)          expulsion from the University, which means that the student shall cease to be a
                  Member of the University and will lose all rights and privileges of Membership.



                                                  117
7.9   Emergencies affecting examinations or other assessments

      If for any reason you are unable to attend or to complete an examination, or feel that your
      performance has been adversely affected by circumstances beyond your control, you
      should immediately contact the Undergraduate Support Officer for your discipline
      or School Reception and, if appropriate, the Student Health Service. You must ensure
      that a Notification of Mitigating Circumstances form and full documentation (medical
      notes and relevant correspondence) reaches the Undergraduate Coordinator / Manager in
      time to be taken into consideration by the Board of Examiners. The same applies in the
      case of assessed coursework whose completion you feel has been affected by medical or
      other problems. See section 6.4.
      What is mitigation?

      1. Sometimes circumstances or events beyond your control may adversely affect your
      ability to perform in an assessment to your full potential or to complete an assignment
      by the set deadline. In such cases mitigation may be applied, i.e. treating marks or
      results in a way that recognizes the adverse impact that may have resulted from those
      circumstances or events, or waiving penalties that would arise from late submission.

      2. Mitigation will not result in the changing of any marks, unless penalties for late
      submission are waived after an assignment has already been marked. Instead,
      mitigation may result in some marks being disregarded and the assessment being
      excused because it was adversely affected. You may also be given a mark for a whole
      unit based on your performance in the parts that were not adversely affected.
      Mitigation may also mean treating your overall performance as borderline even though
      the marks you obtained would not normally be high enough, and so considering you for
      a more favourable result such as a higher degree class.

      Approaching the School

      3. The School will consider granting an extension for self-certified illness within two
      weeks before a submission deadline. You should approach the appropriate officer in
      your School as soon as possible if you consider that some serious illness or misfortune
      has adversely affected your ability to complete one or more assignments even within
      the extended deadline, or if you believe that the results you might obtain from one or
      more assessments will be adversely affected.

      4. You should first seek advice from the Undergraduate Manager or Coordinator or
      your Personal Tutor as to whether the adverse circumstances are sufficient to warrant
      consideration by the School's Mitigating Circumstances Committee. You should also
      seek advice as to whether it is in your interest to consider alternative remedies such as
      a deadline extension, re-scheduling of an assessment within a current assessment
      period, or sitting an examination at the next available opportunity. In very serious
      cases, you might even be best advised to interrupt your studies for a period.

      Nature of mitigating circumstances

      5. It is important to remember that, in order to qualify for consideration, the adverse
      circumstances or events must be unforeseeable or unpreventable as far as you are
      concerned, and sufficiently disruptive to have a significant adverse effect on your
      academic performance or your ability to complete assignments by the due date.

                                             118
6. Circumstances or events that merit consideration may include: suffering a serious illness or
injury; the death or critical illness of a close family member; a significant family crisis leading
to acute stress; and unplanned absence arising from such things as jury service or maternity,
paternity or adoption leave.

7. Circumstances or events that would not normally merit consideration include: holidays or
other events that were planned or could reasonably have been expected; assessments that are
scheduled close together or on the same day; misreading the timetable for examinations or
otherwise misunderstanding the requirements for assessment; inadequate planning or time
management; failure, loss or theft of a computer or other equipment, including inability to
print off work for whatever reason; consequences of paid employment (except in some special
cases for part-time students); exam stress or panic attacks not diagnosed as illness; and minor
disruption in an examination room during the course of an assessment.

Claiming mitigation

8. If the School Undergraduate Manager or Coordinator confirms that your circumstances
merit consideration by the School Mitigating Circumstances Panel, you should complete the
online Notification of Mitigating Circumstances form. (See section 6.4). This should be
completed as soon as possible, together with independent third-party supporting or
corroborative documentation which should be submitted to the Undergraduate Coordinator (in
Room S3.6) separately. The nature of such documentation will vary according to the nature of
the circumstances, but it must sufficiently independent to confirm the veracity of the case you
are making (e.g. a letter or medical certificate signed by a medical practitioner, a document
from an outside agency etc.). Information of a confidential nature should be included in a
sealed envelope.

9. You must submit the form as soon as possible and always before the beginning of an
examination period (except for circumstances arising during the course of that assessment
period, in which case the application must be made in time for consideration before the
relevant meeting of the Board of Examiners). Late requests for mitigation will not be
considered without a credible and compelling explanation as to why the application was not
made at the appropriate time. Requests made after the publication of results will be treated as
appeals under Regulation XIX, but again there should be a credible and compelling
explanation as to why you did not bring the circumstances to the attention of your School at an
earlier stage.

10. The School Mitigating Circumstances Committee will need to agree that your
circumstances were unforeseeable and unpreventable and that the effect on your academic
performance would have been significant. If so, it will advise the Board of Examiners how
serious it judges the effect was, and the Board will then decide how to apply mitigation, on the
evidence available on your performance (coursework marks and examination marks either for
individual course units or for the assessment period as a whole, as appropriate). Mitigation will
depend on how serious the adverse circumstances were and how far you are from any
borderline on the basis of the existing mark, or profile of marks: the farther you are from a
borderline, the more serious the adverse circumstances need to be to change the Board's
overall decision. However, even if the decision does not change, a note will be added to the
relevant marks on any transcript you receive to indicate that the assessment was subject to
circumstances that may have had an effect on your performance.



                                                119
7.10 Resit arrangements
Students in the Faculty of Humanities are permitted to resit most failed course units on no more
than one occasion. The opportunity to pass a resit is given in order to allow the student to proceed
to the following year of the degree programme. In the calculation of final averages, the fail
mark obtained at the first sitting will be used.

Please see the information above (4.6.1 University Regulations) for further information regarding
resit opportunities.

       •   First-Year and Second-Year Examination: students may be permitted to resit failed
           course units up to a value of 120 credits in the August/September following the first
           attempt.
       •   Final Examination: there are no resit opportunities for the award of a Degree
           with Honours. Students who by the end of their degree programme have accumulated
           a minimum of 300 credits but fewer than the 360 (480 for degrees involving a period
           (normally an academic year in length) of residence abroad) credits required for the
           award of a Degree with Honours will be recommended for the award of an Ordinary
           Degree of Bachelor.

Students who, after the application of compensation rules and/or any resit, have accumulated 100
or 110 credits in the First-Year or Second-Year Examination, may be given permission by the
School Board of Examiners, to take additional course units during the following year to a
maximum value of 20 credits.

7.11   Reassessment of coursework

Where a course unit is assessed both by examination and by coursework, a student who passes the
examination but fails the coursework may be permitted to submit fresh coursework in lieu of
failed coursework by the start of the August/September examination resit period or may be
required to take an examination in lieu of re-submission of coursework. Where a course unit is
assessed by coursework alone, such a student may be permitted to submit fresh coursework or
required to take an examination instead. All decisions regarding resit requirements will be made
at the discretion of the course unit convenor concerned. These opportunities are given in order to
allow the student to proceed to the following year of the degree programme. In the calculation of
final averages, the fail mark of the original coursework will be used.

7.12   Contribution of the Second-Year Examination to the degree result

Degree classification is based solely on the “programme mark” (a percentage mark to one
decimal point). The programme mark in the final year will be reached by the weighted average
for the overall marks for Year 2 and Year 3 or 4 (weighted 25% to 75%). (For MML it will be
Year 3 and Year 4 weighted 50-50, and the class of the full range of papers will be included in
the provisions under paragraphs 36-37 of the University Undergraduate Degree Regulations).

7.13   Classification of Degrees

Please see the section above 4.6.1 University Undergraduate Degree Regulations, p.26, paragraphs
32-40 for information regarding the procedures involved to obtain degree classification.


                                                120
7.14   Mitigating circumstances (see also paragraph 7.9 above)

The Examinations Committee, together with the Undergraduate Manager/Coordinator, will
constitute the Mitigating Circumstances Committee. The Committee will normally meet
regularly during each semester and certainly as soon as practicable after the end of each
examination period The remit of the Committee is to consider any mitigating circumstances that
might have influenced a student‟s performance (including coursework), and to make
recommendations for action to be taken by the Board of Examiners.

The Mitigating Circumstances Committee will consider a student‟s circumstances submitted in
writing by the student completing an online Notification of Mitigating Circumstances Form.
Where appropriate, supplementary documentation such as police records, medical or counselling
reports will form part of this submission. All such evidence must be independent. Such
submissions should normally be made by the end of the examination period. Normally,
circumstances brought up retrospectively, when marks are known, should be disregarded.

The School and its constituent disciplines must ensure that copies of any relevant documentation
reach the Secretary to the Examination Board in good time.

Discussions in the Mitigating Circumstances Committee will be held in the knowledge of the
student‟s identity and with reference to the student‟s marks. Decisions reached will be minuted
and recommendations referred to the Examination Board only by reference to the student‟s
registration number, as Examination Boards which make decisions on progression and degree
classification are conducted anonymously. Recommendations may vary, including the possibility
of allowing exceptional compensation or to allow a failed assessment to be sat as a first attempt.
The Board of Examiners may determine from evidence available to it that a student who has been
prevented by good cause from completing the assessment for a unit will be awarded the
percentage mark from the completed assessment as the mark for the unit as a whole if at least
half of the assessment has been completed or a pass if less than half of the assessment has been
completed (see also paragraph 7.9 above).

7.15   Examination results

Results lists relating to the examinations are displayed on the noticeboards in the School and are
available online via the student record system as soon as possible after the results have been
ratified by the Board of Examiners. In the case of the January examinations this ratification does
not take place until the results of the May/June examinations are available, but provisional marks
are published by each subject in the course of the second semester, normally by the end of
February. Individual breakdowns of marks from the January and May/June examinations are
available online. Notification of any resits will be communicated to all students as a matter of
priority. Students should consult their personal tutors and/or course unit convenors for further
details of their examination performance. An official transcript of all course units taken and
results achieved over the course of a student's entire degree programme is obtainable from the
Student Services Centre or using the online Academic Transcript facility. It is University policy
that administrative support staff and academic staff must not communicate results by
telephone.




                                               121
7.16   Review procedure

There is no provision for appeal against the academic judgement of the Examiners. An
application for a review of the result of an examination may be made only on grounds alleging
that:

       •   there exist or existed circumstances affecting the student's performance of which the
           examiners had not been made aware when their decision was taken;
       •   there were procedural irregularities in the examination process;
       •   there is evidence of prejudice or bias or of inadequate assessment on the part of one or
           more of the examiners.

Before taking a final decision as to whether to request a review or not, a student is advised to
contact the Undergraduate Manager or the Chair of the School Examinations Committee in the
first instance to attempt to resolve the issue at School level.

If the student decides to make a formal request for a review, an application for review must be
submitted in writing with supporting evidence to the Faculty Head of Academic Services as soon
as possible and not later than 20 days after the publication of the student's examination results.

7.17   Prizes and awards

Details of University awards can be obtained from the Student Services Centre in the John Owens
Building. Awards specifically linked to achievements in languages are listed below.

       French

       Brian Blakey Memorial Prize (1983): a prize of £125 awarded for distinguished
       performance in the Final Examination in French Studies or a Joint Honours degree
       involving French
       Keith Millward Prize (1958): a prize in books to the value of £10 awarded to students in
       French Studies.
       Keith Millward Scholarship (1958): a scholarship of £30 towards travel and study in
       France, awarded on the results of the First-Year Examination in French Studies.
       Frederick West Prize (1947): a book prize of £15 awarded on the results of the First-Year
       Examination in French Studies.

       French, German, Italian

       Swiss Book Prizes: annual book prizes donated by the Swiss Consulate on the basis of
       results in the Final Examinations in French, German, and Italian.

       French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish

       Hubert Ben Tarbuck Bursary Fund (1935): bursaries awarded to students in the former
       School of Modern Languages who are in need of financial assistance in order to proceed to
       their final year of study. Applications should be made to the Academic Registrar no later
       than 1 May.
       Walters Scholarships (1890): two scholarships of £75, one of which is awarded in

                                               122
alternate years on the recommendation of the Heads of Discipline Area in French and
German and the other annually on the recommendation of the Heads of Discipline Area in
Italian, Russian and Spanish. In both cases the award is made to a student who has not
entered upon the final year of a degree programme involving the language concerned.

German

Dr L. E. Foulger Memorial Prize: award made to support research.
S. S. Kerry Memorial Prize (1980): a book prize of £65 awarded for excellence in modern
literature papers in the First-Year Examination in German Studies or a Joint Honours
degree involving German.
Arwid Johannson Exhibition (1937): books to the value of £50 awarded to students
studying Germanic Philology on the basis of the results of the Final Examination in
German Studies.

German, Spanish

María Guadalupe Reyes Ponce Memorial Prize: an award of £50 made on the basis of
results in the Final Examination, alternately in Spanish (even years) and German (odd
years).

Middle Eastern Studies

Arie Rubinstein Prize (Hebrew) (Subsidiary I)
Arie Rubinstein Prize (Hebrew) (Subsidiary II)
David S. Bles Hebrew Prize
Edward Robertson Modern Hebrew Prize
J.D. Latham Arabic Language Prize

Portuguese

Instituto Camões bursaries: the Instituto Camões in Lisbon offers two competitive
bursaries for study in Portugal during the summer vacation following the first year of study
in the discipline area of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin-American Studies.

Spanish, Portuguese

J. W. Rees Memorial Prize (1977): a prize or prizes of a value not exceeding £50 awarded
on the recommendation of the Board of Examiners in Spanish, Portuguese and Latin-
American Studies.




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8     Student support and guidance

8.1   University support services

      The Student Services Centre

      The SSC is a single point of contact for most of the administrative tasks you need to carry
      out as a student, including registration/fees, and documentation. The SSC is open Monday
      to Friday, 9.00-6.00 on 0161 275 5000 or you can the visit the Centre on Burlington Street,
      between the library and the refectory. You can also serve yourself on-line - just click on
      the 'SSC Portal' link to the left of the Student Services Centre web page
      http://www.campus.manchester.ac.uk/ssc/ .


      Central Academic Advisory Service
      Student Advice and Information Hub, First Floor, University Place, Oxford Road
      Telephone (0161) 275 3033
      Web: http://www.campus.manchester.ac.uk/academicadvisoryservice/

      The University of Manchester Central Academic Advisory Service is a service of
      information and advice open to all University of Manchester students, who can use the
      service at any time. The advisers have extensive experience of dealing with student
      problems and offer confidential advice on any matters relating to students' academic work.

      Counselling Service
      Crawford House, Precinct Centre
      Telephone (0161) 275 2864
      Web: http://www.campus.manchester.ac.uk/counselling/

      The Counselling Service for the University offers confidential, individual counselling to
      both undergraduate and postgraduate students, and a consultative and advisory service to
      staff. The seven members of the team have qualifications in counselling and
      psychotherapy and provide a range of therapeutic responses to all kinds of personal
      problems.

      Student Health Service
      Note that you must register to use this service.
      Waterloo Place, Oxford Road, near the University Precinct Centre
      Telephone (0161) 275 2858

      For primary health care, students need to register with an NHS general practitioner, and
      should locate one near their term-time residence.

      The Student Health Service for the University provides an accessible occupational health
      service for all students. A doctor and nursing staff offer advice and support on any health
      problem affecting studies. The service accepts referrals from academic disciplines and
      from other welfare services. A wide range of health promotion, vaccination, and

                                             124
contraceptive services are also offered.

Office of Student Support and Services webpage:
http://www.campus.manchester.ac.uk/studentexperience/a2z.htm

Disability Support Office
Block 2, 2nd Floor, University Place, Oxford Road
Telephone (0161) 275 7512/8518
Web: http://www.campus.manchester.ac.uk/disability/

The Disability Support Office exists to help all students who have a disability of any kindIt
will provide students with practical support and guidance, assist them to make use of
technological aids and inform disciplines where special provisions need to be made for
them.

Careers and Employability Division
Crawford House, Precinct Centre, Booth Street East
Telephone (0161) 275 2828
Web: http://www.careers.manchester.ac.uk/

The University Careers Service is open between 09.00 and 17.00, Monday to Friday,
throughout the year. The careers adviser who deals with students studying modern
languages and Linguistics and English Language is Chris Hughes
(chris.hughes@manchester.ac.uk).

It is important that you think about life after university and plan ahead. The Careers
Service exists to help you clarify your career aspirations and develop a strategy for
fulfilling them. The University‟s Careers Centre is one of the largest and most active in
the UK and offers three principal types of service.

•   Information. The Careers Centre has material on a huge range of careers, employers,
    and courses in book, video and computer formats. It also organizes information
    sessions, a series of skills workshops and courses, such as its Insight into Media and
    Insight into Management courses.
•   Advice. Career counselling is available throughout the year: simply book an
    appointment. In addition, a duty adviser is available on a daily basis to respond to
    brief queries.
•   Employer contact. The Careers Service organizes and/or promotes career fairs,
    employer presentations, and employer on-campus recruitment activities (such as the
    Milkround). Thousands of vacancies are advertised in regular fortnightly bulletins,
    which are circulated widely within the University and are available free of charge from
    the Careers Service. Please consult the website above for the most up-to-date
    information.

Security
Precinct Security Office
Telephone (0161) 275 2728 / 2730



                                        125
      Security cameras are fitted across the campus and there are regular security patrols. Please
      read the advice on security given in Streetwise, which is issued to all students in their
      induction pack.

8.2   Personal Tutors

      Although all members of staff are available to help you, you have a Personal Tutor who
      should in most instances be your first point of contact if you have anything you want to
      discuss. You will have a meeting with your Personal Tutor at the beginning and at the end
      of your first semester, and thereafter at least once every semester you spend in Manchester,
      for the duration of your programme of study. (While abroad you will normally be visited
      by a member of staff, but not necessarily your Personal Tutor: see Residence Abroad
      Regulations on the School website.) Your Personal Tutor will do his or her best to help
      you with any problems you may encounter and may direct you to sources of more
      specialized help if necessary. It is important that you see your Personal Tutor regularly,
      and that your Personal Tutor is enabled to form a clear picture of your progress. Besides
      being a point of human contact in a very large institution, he or she is someone you will
      probably rely upon to provide you with references when you come to look for a job; and
      the better Personal Tutors know their students, the more effectively they are able to
      represent their interests.

      Students as well as Personal Tutors are expected to adopt a professional attitude to what is
      a professional relationship and not to allow personal motives to interfere with it.
      However, it is important that you feel comfortable and confident in your dealings with
      your Personal Tutor, and there may be circumstances in which it is appropriate to request a
      change. Should such circumstances arise, you should discuss the matter with the Head of
      the language discipline area to which the Personal Tutor assigned to you belongs and he or
      she will make the necessary arrangements.

8.3   Withdrawal from study

      If you are considering withdrawing from your programme of study, speak to your Personal
      Tutor immediately. Your Tutor may be able to present an alternative perspective on your
      situation and can offer advice on how to proceed. If, for whatever reason, you have firmly
      decided to withdraw from the programme, inform your Personal Tutor as soon as possible.
       It is important that you keep your members of staff (academic and support) fully informed
      of your intentions or actions, and the University is obliged to inform your Local Education
      Authority of your decision. You will also be required to complete a Withdrawal Form and
      an Exit Questionnaire.

8.4   Harassment

      The University of Manchester is committed to creating a working and studying
      environment which is free of harassment and which protects the dignity of staff and
      students, female and male, irrespective of their sexual orientation, racial or ethnic
      background, religion, or disabled status. Harassment is offensive and prejudicial to a
      productive working and studying environment. It is indicative of a lack or respect for the
      person harassed, undermines his or her position, and may have a negative impact upon


                                              126
      health, job performance, coursework, examinations, and one‟s sense of personal security.

      The University regards sexual, racial, or personal harassment as an extremely serious
      matter. Observance of the University‟s policy with respect to harassment is a condition of
      service for all members of staff and is required of students. Formal complaints will be
      thoroughly investigated in such a way as to protect the privacy of those who complain and
      those who are the subject of complaint. In cases where the complaint is substantiated, the
      individual responsible may be subject to action under the appropriate disciplinary
      procedure.

      Any students who have been subjected to harassment should inform their Personal Tutor,
      who will be able to offer help and support.


8.5   Ill Health

      A      It is a requirement of your registration with the University of Manchester that you
             register with a local general practitioner. A list of GP practices can be obtained
             from the Student Health Service, any University hall of residence or a local
             pharmacy. According to guidance issued by the General Medical Council it would
             not be regarded as good practice for a family member to be the registered GP or to
             offer treatment except in the case of an emergency.


      B      You should always consult your GP (or for emergencies the Accident and
             Emergency Department of a hospital) if your illness is severe, if it persists or
             if you are in any doubt about your health. You should also consult your GP if
             illness keeps you absent from the University for more than 7 days including
             weekends. If you do consult a GP and the GP considers that you are not fit for
             attendance at the University, then you should obtain a note from the doctor to that
             effect or ask them to complete Part III of the University form ‘Certification of
             Student Ill Health’ copies of which are available from the School Reception
             (Room S3.8), halls of residence and at local GP surgeries. You should hand
             this certificate to School Reception or the School Undergraduate Coordinator at
             the earliest opportunity.

      C      If your condition is not sufficiently serious to cause you to seek medical help, then
             the University will not require you to supply a doctor‟s medical certificate, unless
             you are absent from the University due to illness for more than 7 days (in which
             case see B above). You must however contact the School as soon as possible and
             certify the illness yourself (that is complete and sign the „Certification of Student
             Ill Health‟ form to state that you have been ill) as soon as you are able to attend.
             You should do this if your illness means you are absent from the University for
             any period up to 7 days (see D (i)) or if you are able to attend the University but
             your illness is affecting your studies (see D (ii) and (iii)).

      D      The following sub-paragraphs explain what you should do if your illness affects
             your attendance at compulsory classes or if you consider that your performance in
             your studies/examinations has been impaired.

                                             127
(i)      If you are unwell and feel unable to attend the University to take a compulsory
         class, assessment or examination then you must seek advice by contacting your
         School Reception or your relevant subject area Undergraduate Support Officer
         immediately, in person, through a friend or family member, by telephone or by e-
         mail. This is to ensure that you understand the implications of being absent and the
         consequences for your academic progress, which might be quite serious. You must
         do this as soon as possible so that all options can be considered and certainly
         no later than the day of your compulsory class, assessment or examination. If
         you do not do this then you will normally be considered to have been absent from
         the class without good reason, or to have taken the assessment or examination, in
         which case you will be given a mark of zero. You must also complete and hand in
         a „Certification of Student Ill Health‟ form on your return.

(ii)     You may be unwell but are able to proceed with an assessment or examination and
         yet you feel that your performance will have been impaired. If you wish this to be
         taken into account as a mitigating/special circumstance, you must inform your
         School about this on the day of the assessment or examination and hand in to
         Undergraduate Reception (Room S3.8) a completed „Certification of Student Ill
         Health‟ form, to be submitted with a Notification of Mitigating Circumstances
         form (available online www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug/mitcircs). If you
         leave this until later it will not normally be possible to take your illness into
         account when assessing your performance.

(iii)    If, as a consequence of your illness, you wish to seek an extension to a deadline for
         submitting assessed coursework, you must complete a Notification of Mitigating
         Circumstances Form and a „Certification of Student Ill Health‟ form and discuss it
         with your Personal Tutor. The application for extension must be made before the
         deadline and not retrospectively.

(iv)     You may be under occasional and ongoing medical attention which affects your
         studies. If so, you should obtain a letter from your physician which should be given
         to the before the end of the January, May/June or August/September examination
         period, as appropriate, if you wish your condition to be taken into account as an
         extenuating circumstance.

E        For further guidance on the effects of absence or under-performance according to
         the School‟s programme requirements, see 6.4 and 6.5 above.

Notes:

1.       Your personal tutor will give you guidance on the effect of any absence from your
         studies or if you consider your illness has affected your studies. If you have
         repeated episodes of ill health which is affecting your studies, the School may refer
         you to the Student Health Centre.

2.       If you are found to have been deceitful or dishonest in completing the
         „Certification of Student Ill Health‟ form you could be liable to disciplinary action

                                          128
     under the University‟s General Regulation XVII: Conduct and Discipline of
     Students: http://www.staffnet.manchester.ac.uk/policies/

3.   The use of the „Certification of Student Ill Health‟ forms by GPs as described
     above has been agreed by the Manchester Local Medical Committee. A GP may
     make a charge for completing the form.




                                   129
8.6
QUESTIONS AND PROBLEMS: WHO SHOULD I GO AND SEE?

The Student Services Centre is a single point of contact for most of the administrative tasks you need to
         carry out as a student, including registration/fees, documentation, loans and grants, exams and
         graduation. It can be accessed at
         http://www.intranet.man.ac.uk/rsd/ssc/
         It is situated on Burlington Street, between the library and the refectory and is open Mon–Fri, 9:00–
6:00; tel.: 0161 275 5000.
In a wide variety of areas, the Students' Union Advice Centre can serve as a useful starting-point: Tel:
(275) 2989; http://www.manchester.ac.uk/international/supportservices/studentsunionandadvicecentre/


Question/       Academic/
Problem         Disability           Personal/ Medical                   Examinations Visiting Students
Discipline
/School         Course Unit Tutor Personal Tutor                         Personal Tutor
Support         Personal Tutor    UG Manager                             UG Manager Visiting
                Programme
                Director                                                 Examinations Student
                                                                         Officer      Officer
                Central Academic
University      Advisory Services                                        Student        International
Support         (CAAS)            University Counselling Service         Services       Students' Welfare
                                  Tel: (275)2864                         Centre         Officer
                                                                         Burlington
                                                                         Street
                Student Advice and
                Information Hub,
                1st Floor,
                University Place                                         275 5000       (International
                                                                                        and Public
                Tel (275) 3033                                                          Relations
                                                                                        Office, Beyer
                                                                                        Building)
                                     Nightline                                          (275)2196
                                     (A student-run
                                     listening and
                                                                                        International
                Disability           information                                        Society
                Support Office       service sponsored
                                                                                        William Kay
                Block 2, 2nd Floor, by the Student                                      House
                University Place Union)                                                 Oxford Road
                (275) 7512/8515 (275) 2983/4                                            (275) 4959/7697
                                    www.nightline.man.ac.uk

                                     Student Health
                                     Service
                                     Waterloo Place
                                     Mon-Fri: 9-1 & 2-5
                                     (275)2858 NB you also have to
                                     register
                                     with a local GP

                                                         130
9     Student feedback and representation

9.1   Evaluation of course units and programmes of study

      At various times in the course of your studies at the University you will be asked to
      complete anonymous questionnaires concerning specific course units and the degree
      programme as a whole. You are strongly advised to complete and return these forms, from
      which a summary report is prepared that is discussed by the discipline area Programme
      Director and the relevant course tutor. Feedback detailing an agreed response and
      consequential action to be taken will be communicated to the student body by means of
      notices on School noticeboards and via Staff-Student Committees and the student
      representatives on Academic Discipline Committees. The questionnaires also ask you to
      assess your own contribution to the course, and in this connexion you are asked to read
      and consider what the present Handbook has to say about learning and teaching (see 4.2
      above).


9.2   Student representation

      Student representation and feedback are vital to the continued development of the
      provision offered by the academic disciplines and by the School as a whole. Student
      representatives are elected from Years 1, 2, and 3/4 to the following committees:

      •      The Academic Board of the School of Languages, Linguistics and Cultures.
             The Board is chaired by a senior academic member of staff (chosen through a
             democratic nomination process) and shall normally meet twice a semester. The
             Academic Board advises the Head of School on academic matters. Membership of
             the Academic Board shall consist of all staff in the rank of Lecturer or above,
             research staff, the Executive Director and Associate Directors for Academic
             Enterprise and Academic Management of the University Language Centre, the
             Head of School Administration, teaching fellows, and six student representatives,
             three undergraduates and three postgraduates, including at least one research
             postgraduate student.

      •      Academic Committees. Each of the constituent disciplines of LLC shall have
             an Academic Committee, chaired by the Head of Discipline, consisting of all
             staff in the rank of Lecturer or above, research staff, teaching fellows, two
             postgraduate representatives, of whom at least one should normally be a
             research postgraduate, and one undergraduate representative from each year of
             study in Manchester. Academic committees shall have the power to co-opt
             other members. Academic committees shall review:
             1. the teaching and study of the subjects assigned to the discipline;
             2. the welfare and academic progress of the students within the discipline;
             3. developments relating to the discipline with a view to their implementation
                 subject to the approval of the School.

      •      Staff-Student Consultative Committees. Each discipline also has a Staff-
             Student Consultative Committee that reports to the Academic Committee. Its

                                            131
             student members too are elected within disciplines. It provides a forum in which
             students may put forward their views on academic matters or on any other aspect
             of university life. It has access to the summary reports that are prepared in
             response to student evaluation of course units (see section 9.1 above). Student
             members represent their year and are expected actively to canvass opinion among
             their colleagues and to bring their suggestions and concerns to the attention of the
             Committee. Equally importantly, it is the responsibility of students in general to
             keep themselves informed and to contact their representatives if they want any
             issue discussed.


9.3   Channels for complaint

      Minor problems may be brought to the attention of course tutors or personal tutors, but
      more serious complaints will normally be reported through the student representatives to
      the Staff-Student Consultative Committee or the Academic Committee. If no satisfactory
      action is taken, the Head of Discipline should be approached. The nature and outcome of
      any complaint should be recorded by the Programme Director and made available for the
      annual programme review. Students may also approach the Undergraduate Manager or the
      Head of School if necessary. A student who is dissatisfied with the Discipline's or
      School‟s response should consult the Associate Dean for Teaching and Learning who may
      be contacted through the Faculty of Humanities Office.




                                        *******




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