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Food Handlers Training

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					Food Handler’s Class
     Foodborne Illness (FBI)
•   76 million illnesses
•   323,000 hospital visits
•   5,000 deaths
•   $7.7-$23 billion annual cost
•   $77,000 average cost per incident
People Most Vulnerable to
    Foodborne Illness
• Very old

• Very young

• Weak Immune System
  What Causes Foodborne
         Illness
• Bacteria
• Viruses
• Parasites
• Chemicals
          You Can’t
• See
• Smell
• Taste


 Bacteria, Viruses or Parasites
  Germs May Come From
• Raw foods
• Soil and water
• Food handlers
• Insects and rodents
Bacteria          Viruses       Parasites
Bacillus Cereus   Hepatitis A   Giardia
Campylobacter     Norovirus     Cryptosporidium
                                Anisakiasis
Clostridium
Perfringens
E-coli
Listeria
Staph
Salmonella
Shigella
Botulism
    You must not work if you
     have one of the “Big 4”:

•   Salmonella Typhi
•   Shigella
•   E. coli 0157:H7
•   Hepatitis A
  You are restricted from
handling food if you have any
      of the following:
• Diarrhea
• Vomiting
• Fever
• Jaundice
• Sore throat
  w/fever
• Lesions or boils
• Individuals in contact with a
  family member diagnosed
  with one of the “Big 4” are
  also restricted from handling
  food.
   Practice Good Hygiene
• Keep personal food & drinks out of
  food preparation areas.
• Wear hair restraints and clean
  clothing.
• Clean and trim fingernails
• Don’t wear jewelry.
• Don’t wear polished or fake nails.
• Cover open cuts and burns with
  finger cots and gloves.
Hand Washing Is Important !
• Keep hand sinks clean and useable.

         Wash hands after:
  When Food Handlers Need
      to Wash Hands
AFTER:
• Using the bathroom
• Breaks, smoking, eating, drinking
• Chewing gum
• Coughing, sneezing, blowing or touching
  nose
• Touching head, hair, mouth, wounds or sores
• Touching meats, raw poultry or fish
• Touching trash, floors, soiled linens
• Touching dirty dishes, equipment, and
  utensils
• Using chemicals
• Food preparation
• Handling money
Wash Your Hands!

   Wet hands with warm water.




   Apply soap.
Rub hands and arms
vigorously for 20
seconds.


Rinse completely.
Dry hands and arms
with single-use
towels.


Use towel to shut off
water and open door.
       Double Hand Wash
• Required:
  – After using a restroom

• A hand wash occurs:
  – In the restroom AND
  – When entering the kitchen
No Bare-Hand Contact with
   Ready-To-Eat food.




Viruses and parasites are NOT
easily washed from the hands.
    Minimize Bare-Hand Contact
     by Using Suitable Utensils
•   Deli tissues
•   Spatulas
•   Tongs
•   Forks
•   Dispensing equipment
•   Single-use gloves
        Cross-Contamination
Transfer of harmful substances to food from:

•Equipment
•Utensils
•Hands
•Other foods
Potentially Hazardous Food
 Any food capable of supporting the
  rapid growth of harmful bacteria.
                       Meat/meat products
                       Eggs
                       Dairy
                       Baked potatoes
                       Rice
                       Cooked vegetables
                       Sprouts
                       Garlic in oil
                       Melons
  Cooking Temperatures
• Cook poultry, stuffed meats, and
  stuffed pasta to 165ºF
• Cook, ground beef and ground pork to
  155ºF
• Cook eggs, fish, and pork products to
  145ºF
• Reheat ALL foods (leftovers) to 165ºF
  Hold Potentially Hazardous
 Foods at Proper Temperatures
                Hot foods 135ºF or
                higher




Cold foods 41ºF or lower
  Conditions for Bacterial Growth


• The DANGER ZONE is 41ºF to
 135ºF.

•Time in the danger zone must not
 exceed 4 hours -- includes time
 spent preparing, and reheating.
Monitor Potentially Hazardous
    Food Temperatures




                      Calibrate
                   thermometers
                     frequently!
             Date Marking
• If prepared onsite

• After opening the
  original container

• If held for more than
  24 hours
    Must use or discard within 7 days
Refrigerator Storage
     Ready-To-Eat     TOP

          Fish

      Roasts/Steaks
                      BOTTOM
     Ground Meats

      Poultry/Eggs
     Food and Equipment Storage


•Clean, dry location

•Protect from contamination

•Store items 6” above floor
  Four Ways to Thaw Food Safely

                            Cold, running
          Refrigerator      water



Cooking
process
                         Microwave
 Two-Stage Cooling
     Method

Stage 1: 135ºF - 70ºF in
       first 2 hours

Stage 2: 70ºF - 41ºF in
       next 4 hours
  Right Ways to Cool Food

•Shallow pans
•Ice bath
•Freezer sticks
•Smaller portions
  Wrong Ways To Cool Food

• Large and/or deep
  containers
• On counter
• Covering while hot
     Cleaning vs. Sanitizing
Cleaning
• Remove food
particles.

Sanitizing
• Reduce harmful
germs to a safe level.
Washing and Sanitizing
 in 3 Compartment Sink

   •Scrape/spray
   •Wash
   •Rinse
   •Sanitize
   •Air dry
      Dishwashing Machines

• Follow
  manufacturer’s
  directions
     Chemical Sanitizers
• Chlorine
• Quaternary Ammonia (Quats)
• Iodine
      Chemical Sanitizing
• Wash hands before handling clean
  items
• Follow manufacturer’s label
   – Use 50-200 parts per million
     (ppm) chlorine
   – 200 ppm Quats
• Soak items for 30 seconds
• Air dry
Sanitizer Test Strips
      Surfaces Should be
         Sanitized…
• After preparing raw foods

• When changing tasks

• Every 4 hours
       Wiping Cloths
• Wiping cloths
  must be clean.
  –Store in
   sanitizing
   solution
   between uses.
 Wiping cloths used for cleaning
surfaces in contact with raw meat
 may not be used for surfaces in
 contact with ready-to-eat foods.
       Cleaning Chemicals
• Chemicals must
  be properly
  labeled


• Chemicals must
  be properly
  stored
Insect & Rodent Control
            •Protect openings to the
            outside
            •Keep the kitchen clean
            •Eliminate storage of
            unneeded equipment
            •Exterminate regularly
            (with an approved
            company)
Food Handler Examination
                      •
1. Who are the MOST IMPORTANT
  individuals for preventing foodborne
  illness?
A. Health inspectors
B. Customers
C. Manager, cooks, and other employees
D. Delivery people
2. Infected cuts and burns
A. are painful, but not a food safety
      hazard.
B. need to be uncovered.
C. often contain bacteria that cause
      foodborne illness.
D. are not a serious problem.
3. Food handlers MUST notify their manager
  if they have
A. diarrhea.
B. a headache.
C. blurred vision.
D. a sinus infection.
4. The Temperature Danger Zone for
  potentially hazardous foods is
A. 95-120°F.
B. 85-160°F.
C. 41-135°F.
D. 140-165°F.
5. Foods previously prepared and refrigerated
  MUST be reheated to a MINIMUM
  temperature of
A. 140°F.
B. 165°F.
C. 180°F.
D. 212°F.
6. Which method for cooling foods MUST
  NOT be used?
A. Cut in smaller pieces and refrigerate
B. Cool at room temperature, then
    refrigerate
C. Divide into shallow pans, then
    refrigerate
D.   Utilize ice bath method
7. Which of the following is a SAFE
  METHOD to thaw food?
A. In the refrigerator
B. On the counter
C. In warm standing water
D.   In a bucket of water with sanitizer.
8. Which of the following is an APPROVED
  METHOD for preventing bare-hand
  contact with food?
A. Tongs
B. Reusable rubber gloves
C. Cloth towels
D. Powdered latex gloves
9. What is the MAXIMUM accumulated
  time that potentially hazardous foods can
  safely be exposed to the TEMPERATURE
  DANGER ZONE?
A. One hour
B. Two hours
C. Three hours
D. Four hours
10. What is the MINIMUM period of time
  required for hand washing?
A. 10 seconds
B. 20 seconds
C. 30 seconds
D. 40 seconds
11. What is the proper procedure for
  washing hands after using the restroom?
A. Rinsing with warm water
B. Washing with soap and cold water
C. Double hand washing, once in the
     restroom and once in the kitchen, with
     soap and warm water.
D. Rinsing with cold water
12. The Cold-Holding Temperature for
  potentially hazardous foods MUST be
A. 41°F or lower.
B. 32°F or lower.
C. 165°F or higher.
D.    0°F or lower.
13. Where MUST raw meat be placed in the
  refrigerator?
A. On top of cooked foods
B. Below ready-to-eat foods
C. Next to the refrigeration coils
D. Above fruits and vegetables
14. When wiping cloths are NOT in use they
   MUST be
A.   stored in hot water.
B.   washed, rinsed, and soaked in a sanitizing
     solution for at least five minutes, then
     rinsed and allowed to air dry.
C.   soaked in cold water.
D.   stored in a sanitizing solution.
15. The proper procedure for cleaning and
  sanitizing food equipment and utensils is
A. scrape, sanitize, wash, rinse, and air-dry.
B. scrape/spray, wash, rinse, sanitize, and
     air-dry.
C. air-dry, rinse, wash, and sanitize.
D. wash, air-dry, sanitize, and rinse.
16. Which of the following may be used to
  sanitize eating utensils?
A. Soap and water
B. Warm water
C. Chlorine bleach
D. Silver polish
17. The BEST way to ensure that sanitizing
  solution remains at the proper concentration
  is
A. smelling it.
B. using sanitizer test strips.
C. making a large batch each week.
D. feeling how slippery it is.
18. Which of the following is classified as a
  potentially hazardous food?
A. Dry wheat
B. Shell egg
C. Fresh orange
D. Raw Celery
19. Chemical spray bottles MUST be
 A. stored away from all food products.
 B. stored close to food preparation areas.
  C. stored above the grill.
 D. stored above utensils and equipment.
20. Insecticides/pesticides may be stored in
    all of the following ways EXCEPT
A. in a metal locked cabinet.
B. on the lowest shelf in the storage room.
C. above the three-compartment sinks.
D. in the basement separate from food and
      other chemicals.
Answers
                         •
1. Who are the MOST IMPORTANT individuals
   for preventing foodborne illness?
A.     Health inspectors
B.     Customers
C.     Manager, cooks, and other
       employees
D. Delivery people
2. Infected cuts and burns
A. are painful, but not a food safety
      hazard.
B. need to be uncovered.
C. often contain bacteria that cause
      foodborne illness.
D. are not a serious problem.
3. Food handlers MUST notify their manager
  if they have
A. diarrhea.
B. a headache.
C. blurred vision.
D. a sinus infection.
4. The Temperature Danger Zone for
  potentially hazardous foods is
A. 95-120°F.
B. 85-160°F.
C. 41-135°F.
D. 140-165°F.
5. Foods previously prepared and refrigerated
  MUST be reheated to a MINIMUM
  temperature of
A. 140°F.
B. 165°F.
C. 180°F.
D.   212°F.
6. Which method for cooling foods MUST
  NOT be used?
A. Cut in smaller pieces and refrigerate
B. Cool at room temperature, then
     refrigerate.
C. Divide into shallow pans, then
    refrigerate.
D.   Utilize ice bath method
7. Which of the following is a SAFE
  METHOD to thaw food?
A. In the refrigerator
B. On the counter
C.   In warm standing water
D.   In a bucket of water with sanitizer.
8. Which of the following is an APPROVED
  METHOD for preventing bare-hand
  contact with food?
A. Tongs
B. Reusable rubber gloves
C. Cloth towels
D. Powdered latex gloves
9. What is the MAXIMUM accumulated
  time that potentially hazardous foods can
  safely be exposed to the TEMPERATURE
  DANGER ZONE?
A. One hour
B. Two hours
C. Three hours
D.    Four hours
10. What is the MINIMUM period of time
  required for hand washing?
A. 10 seconds
B. 20 seconds
C. 30 seconds
D. 40 seconds
11. What is the proper procedure for washing
  hands after using the restroom?
A. Rinsing with warm water
B. Washing with soap and cold water
C. Double hand washing with soap and
     warm water
D. Rinsing with cold water
12. The Cold-Holding Temperature for
  potentially hazardous foods MUST be
A. 41°F or lower.
B. 32°F or lower.
C. 165°F or higher.
D.    0°F or lower.
13. Where MUST raw meat be placed in the
  refrigerator?
A. On top of cooked foods
B. Below ready-to-eat foods
C. Next to the refrigeration coils
D. Above fruits and vegetables
14. When wiping cloths are NOT in use, they
   MUST be
A. stored in hot water.
B.   washed, rinsed, and soaked in a sanitizing
     solution for at least five minutes, then
     rinsed and allowed to air dry.
C.   soaked in cold water.
D.   stored in a sanitizing solution.
15. The proper procedure for cleaning and
  sanitizing food equipment and utensils is
A. scrape, sanitize, wash, rinse and air-dry.
B. scrape/spray, wash, rinse, sanitize,
      and air-dry.
C. air-dry, rinse, wash, and sanitize.
D. wash, air-dry, sanitize, and rinse.
16. Which of the following may be used to
  sanitize eating utensils?
A. Soap and water
B. Warm water
C. Chlorine bleach
D. Silver polish
17. The BEST way to ensure that sanitizing
  solution remains at the proper concentration
  is
A. smelling it.
B. using sanitizer test strips.
C. making a large batch each week.
D. feeling how slippery it is.
18. Which of the following is classified as a
  potentially hazardous food?
A. Dry wheat
B. Shell egg
C. Fresh orange
D. Raw celery
19. Chemical spray bottles MUST be
A. stored away from all food products.
B. stored close to food preparation areas.
C. stored above the grill.
D.   stored above clean equipment.
20. Insecticides and pesticides may be stored
  in all of the following ways EXCEPT
A. in a metal locked cabinet.
B. on the lowest shelf in the storage room.
C. above the three-compartment sinks.
D.     in the basement separate from food and
       other chemicals.

				
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