FCC by Qrs30pHB

VIEWS: 25 PAGES: 36

									             Smarter       Faster       More Accountable

 31,000 diversion cases referred by protective investigators to
  community-based care, shifting $30 million in spending to keeping
  children out of the system.

 Reduced number of children in system by nearly 12,000 (from 48,636 to
  36,949).

 Children in out-of-home care reduced by 28% (8,415).

 Children in paid placements reduced by 11.5% (1,305).

 Number of young adults served increased by 174% (1,940).

 Number of adoptions has doubled from almost 1,500/year to more than
  3,500/year).

 Monthly home visits at 99% - highest rate in the country.

 System has professionalized the workforce through accreditation,
  certification, and use of advanced degree holding frontline supervisors.

 Caseloads reduced by 40% (from average of 40 to average of 26).

 More than 18,000 children have received mental health services since
  an innovative partnership was formed in 2007.
Budget Issues .......................................................................................... 6
Maintenance Adoption Subsidy ............................................................................... 6
Independent Living.................................................................................................. 6
Child Welfare Workforce ......................................................................................... 6
Agency for Persons with Disabilities – Cost Sharing ............................................... 6
Substance Abuse Joint Pilot Project ....................................................................... 6

Substantive Issues .................................................................................. 7
Health Care for Dependent Children ....................................................................... 7
Presumptive Eligibility of Medicaid .......................................................................... 7
Health Insurance Portability .................................................................................... 7
Medicaid for Illegal Immigrant Children ................................................................... 7
Liability for State Services ....................................................................................... 7
Legal Services “Party Status”.................................................................................. 7
Definition of “Homeless” .......................................................................................... 7

Executive Branch Issues ................................................................................ 8
Title IV-E Waiver ..................................................................................................... 8
Contracting Efficiency Model................................................................................... 8
Behavioral Health Overlay Services (BHOS) .......................................................... 8
Training Requirements – Department of Juvenile Justice ....................................... 8
Coordination of Agency Rules ................................................................................. 8




Title IV-E Waiver: Flexibility in Funding ................................................................ 10
Investment in Child Welfare Workforce Yields Greatest Returns .......................... 11
Child Welfare System: Function & Challenges ...................................................... 12
Child Welfare Financing Plan: The Problem.......................................................... 14
Child Welfare Financing Plan: The Solution .......................................................... 16
Accreditation: What’s It Worth? ............................................................................. 18
Party Status .......................................................................................................... 19
Behavioral Health Overlay Services ...................................................................... 20
Meeting the Health Needs of Foster Children ....................................................... 22
The CBC Partnership ............................................................................................ 22



Map of the Child Welfare System .......................................................................... 26
Component Descriptions ....................................................................................... 27



Florida Coalition for Children (FCC) ...................................................................... 30
Florida’s People, Florida’s Promise ....................................................................... 31
FCC Board of Directors ......................................................................................... 32
FCC Foundation Board of Directors ...................................................................... 32
FCC Staff Directory ............................................................................................... 32



FCC Resources .................................................................................................... 34
Other Resources (Websites) ................................................................................. 34
Acronyms .............................................................................................................. 35




                   200 West College Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida 32301
          Main Phone: (850) 561-1102 • Fax: (850) 222-7117 www.FLChildren.org
1-   Restoration of Recurring Funds ($9.8 million)
     The Coalition requests that the Legislature restore or fund $9.8 million that were shifted from
     recurring to non-recurring dollars during the special session in January 2009. Otherwise the
     state will not meet the Maintenance of Effort for the Title IV-E Waiver. (See Page 10 for
     more information on the threats of budget cuts to the child welfare system)

2-   Maintenance Adoption Subsidy ($30.9 million)
     The Coalition supports the DCF request in funding for Maintenance Adoption Subsidy funding
     in response to the increase in adoptions in FY 2007-2008. We also anticipate that the
     Department will request a supplemental amount for fund growth in MAS program.

3-   Independent Living ($10.3 million)
     The Coalition supports DCF legislative budget request (LBR) for the Independent Living
     Program. Even though the current LBR is $6.9 million we anticipate that the Department will
     request a supplemental amount that is significantly higher.

4-   Child Welfare Workforce ($16.6 million)
     The Coalition requests increase in funding for child welfare workers’ salaries in order to
     provide workforce stability. (See the chart on Page 11 for the results of a 2003 Wisconsin
     study)

5-   Agency for Persons with Disabilities – Cost Sharing ($10 million)
     The Coalition requests that the Agency of Persons with Disability share the cost of children
     that are both in the child welfare system and are developmentally disabled.

6-   Substance Abuse Joint Pilot Project ($5.4 million)
     The Coalition proposes a pilot project with the Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association
     (FADAA) to provide substance abuse services to caregivers of children in the child welfare
     system.
1-   Health Care for Dependent Children
     The Coalition strongly supports a system of health care that provides and ensures all
     dependent children in the foster care system receive appropriate and timely health care.
     (See page 22 for more information)

2-   Presumptive Eligibility of Medicaid of Child Welfare Recipients from Date
     of Removal
     The Coalition requests statutory change to establish presumptive Medicaid eligibility for
     children removed from their homes due to abuse or neglect from the date of their removal.

3-   Health Insurance Portability
     The Coalition strongly encourages a portability of health insurance for children in state care.
     There should be a requirement that once a child is in the child welfare system and has
     Medicaid that the child’s eligibility and managed care payor not change regardless of where
     the child is residing.

4-   Medicaid for Illegal Immigrant Children in the Dependency System
     The Coalition supports including immigrant children that have been ordered into the foster
     care system to the list of those eligible for Medicaid.

5-   Liability for State Services
     The Coalition requests statutory change to provide both lead agencies and providers with
     sovereign immunity or some other ability to cap damages for direct state services.

6-   Legal Services “Party Status”
     The Coalition requests statutory change to provide both lead agencies and providers with
     legal party status. (See page 19 for more information)

7-   Definition of “Homeless”
     The Coalition requests statutory change to change the definition of “homeless” to include
     children in the foster care system.
1-   Title IV-E Waiver
     The Coalition strongly encourages the continuation of the current policy which allows Florida
     flexibility in its use of federal child safety and permanency funds and to maintain the funding
     level needed to do so. (See pages 10 - 13 for more information)

2-   Contracting Efficiency Model
     The Coalition encourages changes of the current contract monitoring model to a more cost-
     effective and efficient contracting model. (See the Child Welfare Financing Plan Charts on
     pages 14 - 17 for more information)

3-   Behavioral Health Overlay Services (BHOS)
     The Coalition strongly encourages the preservation of this current, cost-effective system of
     care. (See page 20 for more information)

4-   Coordination of Agency Rules
     The Coalition requests that the Department of Children and Families have exclusive
     jurisdiction to approve rules for health standards established by the Department of Health
     specific to foster homes, residential child-caring agencies and child-placing agencies.

5-   Training Requirements
     The Coalition proposes that the Department of Juvenile Justice reimburse providers for the
     training hours required for their new Community Based Intervention Services programs.
.
 Florida cannot take any further reductions in child welfare and still meet
  the Title IV-E Waiver terms and conditions related to maintenance of
  effort (MOE).

 The Waiver provides flexibility in funding so that funds can also be used
  for in-home, diversion services; keeping children out of foster care and
  the state’s cost down.

 Major risk of failing to meet the MOE requirement is termination of the
  Waiver.

 What happens if the Waiver is terminated?
      The successes highlighted on Page 2 would be in jeopardy -- caseloads
       would increase, adoptions decrease, less monthly home visits,
       increase number of children in out-of-home care

      Florida would lose $18 million from the feds

 Since the base year, an additional $24.4 million has been appropriated
  to the child welfare system, making this is the maximum reduction that
  could be taken without violating the MOE requirement. This is the
  amount that was cut during the 2008 Legislative Session so any
  additional reductions would violate the MOE requirement.

 Independent Living and Maintenance Adoption Subsidy are not
  considered as “countable” towards the Title IV-E MOE requirement.

 Florida is the only state that has been granted this Waiver and is seen as
  a model in the nation.
Stabilizing the child welfare workforce is the single biggest driver of successful outcomes for children
in protective care. The warning signs, such as continuing problems with placement stability and
caseworker turnover, are already present. Currently, only 80% of children in care have fewer than 2
placements within 12 months of removal, while the state target is 87%.
               Nationally, the average length of employment for child welfare caseworkers is less
                than two years.

               Caseworker job satisfaction is key. We must stabilize the workforce by maintaining
                manageable caseloads, increasing salaries and allowing more time for direct
                services to children by limiting paperwork and other administrative obligations.

               Research shows that a stable workforce results in positive outcomes for children,
                reduces the length of time children remain in the system, and fosters positive
                relationships with families. Current turnover rates undermine the establishment of
                long-term, trusting relationships between caseworkers and families, thus negatively
                impacting outcomes.




According to a 2003 Wisconsin study by the Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare, children who had
one caseworker had a 74.5% probability of achieving a permanent home within 12 months, while the
rate dropped to 17.5% for children with two caseworkers and to a dismal 2.2% for children with four
or more caseworkers.

                   Fewer Changes in Caseworkers Increases the
                      Chances of Permanency for Children
 The two center green rings are the core services required by Florida statutes –
  safety, well-being and permanency of children in the foster care system

 The outer green ring represents the diversion services that keep children out
  of foster care and the dependency court system.

 More than 31,000 children receive diversion services (according to a survey of
  the community-based care lead agencies conducted in Fall 2008).

 Title IV-E Waiver provides flexibility in funding so that funds can also be used for
  in-home, diversion services. Before the Waiver, the state could only spend these
  funds on the core services.

 The number of children in the inner two circles has decreased by 12,000 since
  2004, either because children are finding permanency or because they are not
  entering the system.

 The inner green ring includes the most expensive services.

 Reductions to child welfare are first felt in the outer green ring because these are
  not statutorily required services. The immediate effect would be an increase in
  the number of children that enter into out-of-home care.

 Any reductions to Community-Based Care threaten the Title IV-E Waiver
  Maintenance of Effort (MOE). A major risk of failing to meet the MOE
  requirement is termination of the Waiver.

 The purple wedge represents the cost of compliance with monitoring and other
  administrative mandates at every level. NOTE: During the 2008 Legislative
  Session, there was a 15% reduction in administration to community-based care
  lead agencies and service providers.
 When people talk about efficiency, they usually refer to the CBC lead agencies
  and service providers; the bottom third of the chart. The basic question seems to
  be, how do we make them more efficient?

 In order for these contracted agencies to be more efficient, the state needs to
  streamline the executive agency monitoring system.

 Currently, contract providers are monitored by multiple agencies.

 A survey completed by the Children’s Home Society of Florida (CHS) showed the
  following:

         (1) 36% of the documents requested by monitoring/reviewing agencies
         were duplicative,

         (2) This duplicative effort would equate to 1,360 hours of staff time,

         (3) During on-site evaluations, reviewers evaluated the exact same policies
         and procedures reviewed by other agencies,

         (4) In total, 2,281 hours of CHS program staff time was spent last year on
         duplicative requests and duplications in site visits by state and lead
         agencies.

 Many local programs go to great lengths to get national accreditation. This
  intensive evaluation covers much and, in some instances, more than any other
  state or local monitoring process yet they get no credit for this activity. (See page
  18 for more information on Accreditation)

 There has to be a more efficient and effective method to monitor contracted
  providers.
 Suggest that DCF take the lead of monitoring CBC lead agencies and providers
  since the clients are DCF dependents.

 This model does not remove the ability of an agency to spot check a contracted
  provider.

 FCC members are working together to become more efficient and streamline
  monitoring functions between lead agencies and service providers.

      o Within residential group contracts, now have system agreed to by DCF.

      o When a provider contracts with multiple lead agencies throughout the state, they
        then have all of these lead agencies monitoring them individually.

      o With the new system, the lead agency where the provider is located is the agency
        responsible for monitoring and then shares their report with the other agencies.

 FCC has created a Document Vault to make the sharing of documents a simpler
  process:
     1. Providers upload commonly requested documents to the Vault (no
        confidential information is contained in these documents; examples are
        board meeting minutes, rosters, policies and procedures, audits,
        accreditation reports, budget, etc.)

      2. When a lead agency wants a document, their point person logs onto the
         Document Vault and checks off the documents they would like.

      3. The process does two things:
             (1) Courtesy notification to the provider that an agency is requesting
             the documents, and
             (2) Ensures that the documents released are the correct version.

      4. The entire system is electronic.

      5. State agencies can use this system; DCF has been invited to try it out.
Many child welfare lead and provider agencies are either accredited or in the process of
becoming accredited. Yet the state still duplicates much of the monitoring that is done
by these accrediting agencies. The main accreditation body recognized nationwide for
child welfare providers is the Council on Accreditation (COA).

      COA's accreditation process involves a detailed review and analysis of an organization's
       administrative operations and service delivery against national standards of best practice.

      10 States currently either recognize COA Accreditation as the equivalent of state licensing
       requirements or require it as a condition of providing child welfare services in that state.

      36 States currently recognize COA Accreditation in some area of health and human services
       credentialing.

      The typical agency will invest hundreds of hours of staff time annually in preparation for
       accreditation or in compliance activities related to ongoing accreditation


                          Since 1977, the Council on Accreditation (COA) has partnered with human services
                          organizations worldwide to improve service delivery outcomes by developing, applying,
                          and promoting appropriate best practice standards. Over 1,800 organizations –
                          voluntary, public, and proprietary; local and statewide; large and small – have
                          successfully achieved or are seeking COA accreditation.




In a side-by-side comparison of standards between the Florida Administrative Code (FAC) and COA
we found the following:

    More than 30 standards are required by COA and not by the FAC
    In fact, COA standards are much more stringent than the minimum standards in FAC


The state should recognize the value of accreditation in the child welfare system the same way it
values accreditation in education and with health care facilities. Instead of duplicative monitoring of
certain standards, it would be in the best interest of the state to rely on the COA monitoring reports.
Protecting children, providing services to children and families, and preserving families requires:

1. A professional child welfare workforce (case managers and frontline supervisors) with adequate
   compensation, working conditions, training, mentoring, supervision, and casework supports
   including access to community services vital to achieving safety, permanency, and well-being.

   a. Compensation commensurate with training, job requirements, and job expectations

   b. Caseloads that meet generally recognized standards of excellence, workloads that do not
      require uncompensated extra time to accomplish, up-to-date workplace technology, and
      ongoing opportunities for professional growth and development

   c. Training and mentoring over a period of time sufficient to master the complexities of the tasks
      and responsibilities

   d. Ongoing regular supervision from master practitioners using evidence-based adult learning
      principles

   e. Access to an integrated, coordinated system of health care, including physical, mental, and
      dental health; access to vital community supports including substance abuse and domestic
      violence services; and readily available concrete services including food, housing, and short
      term financial assistance.

2. A fully functioning array of system of care components including primary prevention and diversion
   services, in-home services, and placement options based on individualized needs assessments.

3. Client data and quality of care systems that support frontline service providers with valid, reliable,
   and timely information designed to support decision-making and problem solving.

4. Professional respect and equality of standing with participants from other components of the child
   welfare system.

Recommendation: As a key participant in the child welfare system the case manager should
have party status in all hearings related to their cases.
    Behavioral Health Overlay Services (BHOS) in child welfare settings are mental health,
     substance abuse, and supportive services designed to meet the behavioral health treatment
     needs of recipients who are placed in the care of Medicaid enrolled, certified residential group
     care agencies under contract with the Department of Children and Families, Child Welfare
     and Community Based Care organizations.

    The service is approved for a rate of $32.75 per day.

    BHOS provider organizations must meet stringent requirements established by AHCA for staff
     levels, policies and procedures, and training in order to be approved and certified as a BHOS
     provider.




This service was designed to address, on-site and on a child specific basis, medically necessary
mental health and substance abuse treatment needs of children are placed in residential care by the
CBC organizations.

BHOS was developed in response to concerns raised by providers in 1997 in AHCA Area 6 when the
first prepaid mental health plan was rolled out in the Tampa/Lakeland area. Child welfare residential
organizations that had been providing mental health and substance abuse services to the children in
their group homes were told that the only services these children could receive were outpatient
services in the mental health centers’ offices. One individual therapy a month and two group therapy
sessions a month were the standard services available to these children.

AHCA, the Department of Children and Families’ Children’s Mental Health Office and Family Safety
Program Office met with providers to develop a strategy for providing services to this population of
high-risk children. The children were removed from the prepaid mental health plan and providers
were allowed to bill fee-for-service until BHOS was developed. The current rate for this service of
$32.75 has not been adjusted since the inception of the service.


         The Coalition strongly encourages the preservation of this current,
                            cost-effective system of care.
As children enter the child welfare system, they come in, by definition, bruised, beaten
and broken. They require mental health and physical health assessments and care –
almost immediately upon entry to the system.

In October 2008, new legislation known as the Fostering Connections Act took effect.
One of the requirements is that states have a plan “for the ongoing oversight and
coordination of health care services” of foster children.

Below is a summary of a project (CBC Partnership) that has allowed for the child’s best
interest and permanency goals to be a priority when mental health requests are made.
The Florida Coalition for Children would like to replicate the CBC Partnership
success for healthcare services. Several options are available to extend this project
so that successful health care goals are linked to positive child welfare outcomes.




Mental health services to children who have been abused and neglected is critical to their well-being
and to any hope of finding them a permanent home. Historically these services have been
disconnected from the goals of permanency and safety. In 2004 the Florida Legislature authorized
the development of a Medicaid funded mental health services plan managed by the child welfare
community based care (CBC) lead agencies. Under this new Child Welfare Prepaid Mental Health
Plan (CWPMHP), mental health services to these children are directly connected to preparing them
for a successful life and a permanent home.

The plan was implemented in February 2007 under a contract with the Community Based Care
Partnership, LTD (the CBC Partnership). The CBC Partnership has two general partners,
Community Based Care of Seminole, Inc. (a CBC lead agency) and Magellan Behavioral Health of
Florida (the managed care organization) with the other community based care lead agencies as
limited partners. This is a shared governance model with the Operating Committee made up of 50%
Magellan representatives and 50% CBC lead agency representatives.

This major change in services to children in the child welfare system has dramatically changed the
mental health service delivery system for abused and neglected children. Prior to these changes a
child welfare worker referred a child and/or family to a provider for mental health services. The
provider determined the appropriate services and level of care needs. With the newly implemented
system, the CBC lead agency leads a family case conference with family members, child advocates,
community and family supports, legal representatives including Guardians ad Litem, and mental
health providers to determine what services best address the needs of the child. This process
provides a first line of review for services as well as assuring that everyone involved in the
community are reviewing the child’s progress and are informed.

From February 1, 2007 through December 31, 2007, the CBC Partnership has been responsible for
service delivery to over 20,000 enrollees across Florida who are in the care or custody of the CBC
lead agencies. The CBC Partnership paid claim during that same period of time in excess of $3
million per month for direct care with an average of 300,000 services provided each month.

During the 2008 Florida legislative session, the Legislature voted to add Hillsborough County to the
Plan, due to that community’s awareness of the success of the CWPMHP in other areas of the state
and their need to have the same integrated system.




* A partnership of CBC Lead Agencies       * A risk-bearing managed care partnership
* A network of services                    * A partnership with Magellan Health Services
* A network of service coordinators        * A project with 2 years of documented success



Manage and operate a $47 million Medicaid prepaid specialty plan that provides comprehensive
behavioral health care services for 18,000 children in Florida’s child welfare system (except for those
in Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Highlands, Hardee, Polk, Broward and Manatee
counties). The CBC Partnership spends 99%+ of its services budget annually.



The CBC Partnership functions through two primary relationships: the first is a partnership of CBC
Lead Agencies who coordinate the services side of the project and the second is a partnership with
Magellan Health Services who operates the accounting/administrative side of the project. A
statewide network of coordinators, known as Points of Contact, are located in each CBC to insure
that children are linked with appropriate services and that mental health service providers are in
place to meet the needs of children in child welfare. Magellan provides state-of-the-art technology to
monitor the system.
For years in child welfare the best interests of children and the financial incentives to the agencies
who serve them have not been aligned. With the coming of community based care this problem was
solved by putting agencies that would not or could not achieve the outcomes associated with the
best interests of children at financial risk.

The CBC Partnership extends this same concept to mental health services in a managed care
environment. The lead agency partners have ultimate responsibility for a wide range of outcomes for
children including their mental health outcomes. Thus their incentive is to truly manage care, not
simply manage money. At the same time the lead agency partners bear financial risk in the CBC
Partnership and thus their incentive is to provide the right amount of care in the most efficient
manner possible. This alignment of financial incentives with positive outcomes for children is the key
to the project’s success.
The Florida Coalition for Children (FCC) has grown from a long respected history of advocating for
children, families, and the agencies that care for them. It was established in 1952 as the Florida
Association of Child and Family Agencies (FACFA) and is one of the states oldest group child care
associations. In March 2002, FACFA was restructured to form an unprecedented partnership
between child welfare service providers and the emerging Community Based Care Lead Agencies. It
was at that time that the association adopted its current name.

Along with the name changes and growing number of member agencies, the Coalition's mission has
evolved as well. The goal has always been to advocate for the protection of children and build strong
families but the words have changed somewhat to accommodate all that our child welfare system
encompasses. Our mission is stated as follows: The Florida Coalition for Children advocates for
Florida's abused and neglected children and supports the agencies and individuals who work
on their behalf.

 Our member agencies care for nearly 50,000 children and families in crisis, providing critical
services and programs to this vulnerable population throughout the state. For example, residential
and group care homes; emergency shelters; residential treatment centers, therapeutic wilderness
camps; counseling; foster family care; adoption; maternity care; early intervention and in-home
services; independent living and many more. In addition to contracting for services with various state
agencies (Department of Children and Families, Department of Juvenile Justice and Department of
Education), our members raise approximately $80 million per year from private sources which are
used to provide programs and facilities for the children in their care.

We aspire to achieve safety, stability and security for the children and families in need. As such, our
vision is a system of Child Welfare in Florida that is fully resourced, well managed and fulfills
the needs of our abused and neglected children.

FCC strives for a climate of decision making responsive to the needs of Florida's children, young
adults and families; and to promote quality systems of care through value-based and fiscally
accountable programs. Our FCC staff facilitate member collaboration and resource sharing and,
along with members, educate state and local policy makers regarding issues affecting children and
families in crisis and the agencies involved in caring for them. Maintaining a strong presence in
Tallahassee, the location of our corporate headquarters, FCC works with lobbyists, our Legislative
Committee, members of the Legislature and other child welfare agencies and advocates to monitor
and affect legislation relevant to our members and the children and family whom they serve.
Florida’s People, Florida’s Promise is an initiative founded by FCC, Children’s Home Society of
Florida, CBC of Seminole, Florida TaxWatch and AARP. Its purpose is to encourage state elected
leaders to find fresh solutions to the state’s immediate and long-term budget challenges. Currently,
more than 75 other organizations and agencies have joined this effort.

For more information on Florida’s People, visit our website: www.floridaspeople.org.



                           Declaration of Inter-Dependence

          We, the people of Florida, hold this truth to be self-evident, that all of
             Florida’s People are endowed with certain rights, chiefly among
          them, the right to bold leadership in good times and in bad. Declining
          revenues shall never be allowed to force the Sunshine State to leave
                          its most vulnerable citizens in the dark.

              Florida’s legislative leaders, deriving their just powers from the
           consent of the governed, will be held accountable by the People to
            find fresh, effective solutions that will restore Florida’s Promise; to
           provide Florida’s citizens with tools and opportunities for success in
           all stages of life; and to eliminate barriers to individual safety, well-
                              being and personal development.

          We, Florida’s People, in the Name of, and by Authority of, Florida’s
          most vulnerable citizens, therefore, do solemnly publish and declare
             that our legislative leaders must restore Florida’s Promise by
              realigning priorities and by embracing bold, compassionate
                                        leadership.
Chairman: Glen Casel (CBC Seminole)
Vice-Chairman/Secretary: Bill Frye (Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches)
Treasurer: Nadereh Salim (Child Services of Southwest Florida)

Dave Bundy                                              Cynthia Schuler
Children’s Home Society of Florida                      KidCentral, Inc.
Marcie Biddleman                                        Amy Simpson
Eckerd Youth Alternatives                               Boys Town, South Florida
Steven Murphy                                           Sam Sipes
Devereux                                                Lutheran Services Florida
Patricia Nellius                                        Don Stewart
CBC of Brevard                                          The Haven
Jeff Rainey                                             Mike Watkins
Hillsborough Kids, Inc.                                 BigBend Community Based Care
Arie Sailor
One Church, One Child



Chairman: Steven Murphy (Devereux)
Vice-Chairman: Jeff Rainey (Hillsborough Kids, Inc.)
Treasurer: Amy Simpson (Boys Town, South Florida)

Emilio Benitez                                          Mike Galloway
ChildNet                                                Florida United Methodist Children’s Home
Kim Brien                                               Shelly Katz
Eckerd Youth Alternatives                               Children’s Home Society of Florida
Paul Buxbaum                                            Teri Saunders
Carlton Manor                                           Heartland for Children
Jim Clark                                               Judith Warren
Daniel                                                  Children and Families
Chad Collins
United for Families




Michael Cusick                       President/CEO                         Mike@flchildren.org
Deborah P. Mortham                   Governmental Affairs Director         Debbie@flchildren.org
Tracy Heller                         Policy Director                       Tracy@flchildren.org
John Haines, Ed.D.                   Director of Research                  John@flchildren.org
Diane DeMark                         CWPMHP Statewide Director             Diane@flchildren.org
MaryAnn Davenport, M.S.              CWPMHP Coordinator                    MaryAnn@flchildren.org
Renetta Williams, M.B.A.             CWPMHP Coordinator                    Renetta@flchildren.org
Milton Burns                         Office Manager                        Milt@flchildren.org
All of the charts, graphics and other documents in this handbook are also available on the FCC
website. Just visit www.FLChildren.org and go to the Public Library. There you will also find other
reports and materials we have created in preparation for the 2009 Legislative Session, as well as
archived documents from the 2008 Legislative Session.




Governor’s Adoption Initiative – Explore Adoption   Governor’s Office of Adoption and Child Protection
www.adoptflorida.org                                www.flgov.com/adoption_abuse_prevention

Department of Children and Families                 The Florida Legislature
www.myflorida.com/cf_web/                           www.leg.state.fl.us

Department of Health, Child Protection Teams        Florida Administrative Code Chapter 65-C
www.doh.state.fl.us/AlternateSites/CMS-             www.flrules.org/gateway/Division.asp?DivID=342
Kids/CPTHome.htm

Agency for Health Care Administration               Agency for Persons with Disabilities
www.myflorida.com/cf_web/                           www.myflorida.com/cf_web/

Florida Guardian ad litem Program                   Florida State Courts/Office of Court Improvement,
www.guardianadlitem.org                             Dependency Publications
                                                    www.flcourts.org/gen_public/family/publications.shtml

Florida Children’s Services Council                 Florida State Foster Adoptive Parent Association
www.FloridaCSC.org                                  www.FSFAPA.org

U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services,              Children's Bureau, Child Welfare Information Gateway
Administration for Children & Families              www.childwelfare.gov
www.acf.hhs.gov

Child Welfare League of America                     Family and Youth Services Bureau, National
www.cwla.org                                        Clearinghouse on Families and Youth
                                                    www.ncfy.com

Annie E. Casey Foundation                           Florida’s Center for the Advancement of Child Welfare
www.aecf.org                                        Practice
                                                    http://centerforchildwelfare.fmhi.usf.edu/Pages/Default.aspx
         Below is a list of acronyms commonly used in the child welfare system in Florida.


ACCESS        Automated Community                    ESS          Economic Self-Sufficiency
              Connection to Economic Self-           FAC          Florida Administrative Code
              Sufficiency                            FCC          Florida Coalition for Children
AHCA          Agency for Health Care                 FSFN         Florida Safe Families Network
              Administration
                                                     GAL          Guardian ad Litem
APD           Agency for Persons with
              Disabilities                           IL           Independent Living Program
ASFA          Adoption& Safe Families Act            MAS          Maintenance Adoption Subsidy
AWI           Agency for Workforce                   MH           Mental Health Program
              Innovation                             MOE          Maintenance of Effort
CAPPAC        Child Abuse Prevention and             PI           Protective Investigator
              Permanency Advisory Council            POC          Point of Contact
CBC           Community-Based Care                   SA           Substance Abuse Program
CFSR          Child and Family Services              SACWIS       State Automated Child Welfare
              Review                                              Information System
CINS/FINS     Children in Need of                    SAMH         Substance Abuse Mental Health
              Services/Families in Need of
                                                     SIPP         Statewide Inpatient Psychiatric
              Services
                                                                  Program
CLS or
                                                     TANF         Temporary Assistance for Needy
CWLA          Child Legal Services
                                                                  Families
COA           Council on Accreditation               Title IV-E   Statewide waiver providing
CPT           Child Protection Team                               flexibility for foster care funds
CSC           Children's Services Council            TPR          Termination of Parental Rights
CWLS          Child Welfare League of
              America
CWPMHP        Child Welfare Prepaid Mental
              Health Plan
DCF           Department of Children and
              Families
DHHS          U.S. Department of Health &
              Human Services
DJJ           Department of Juvenile Justice
The Florida Coalition for Children advocates for Florida’s abused and neglected children
          and supports the agencies and individuals who work on their behalf.



The Florida Coalition for Children’s vision is a system of Child Welfare in Florida that is
             fully resourced, well-managed, and fulfills the needs of our
                            abused and neglected children.




                                    Michael D. Cusick
                                     President/CEO

                                  Deborah P. Mortham
                               Governmental Affairs Director

                   200 West College Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida 32301
         Main Phone: (850) 561-1102 • Fax: (850) 222-7117 • www.FLChildren.org


                                This publication has been printed and donated by
                               the Florida Insurance Trust (FIT).

                               1525 International Parkway, Suite 2021
                               Lake Mary, FL 32746
                               Main Phone: 407-936-2132 • Fax: 407-936-2482

                               www.FloridaInsuranceTrust.com

								
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