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PH2004 An Introduction to Political Philosophy

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PH2004 An Introduction to Political Philosophy Powered By Docstoc
					SECOND YEAR POLITICS

PO2001 Political Analysis [COMPULSORY] (1st and 2nd semesters)
Staff, Departments of History, Government and Philosophy

Module Objective: Develop critical awareness of different approaches to the study of politics

       Thursday 12 noon – 1p.m.            Kane G1

ES2024 Simulation Exercise (1st and 2nd semesters)
Ms. Katherine McGarry, Department of History

Module Objective: To give students an opportunity to develop communication and negotiating
skills by participating in a simulated European Council of Ministers Summit Meeting over two days.

       Monday:       4p.m. – 5p.m.         ORB 123

*Please note: You have to take ES2029 also if you take ES2024, unless you have completed
ES1001 in first year.

FIRST SEMESTER MODULES
ES2027 Comparative European Politics I
Ms. Katherine McGarry, Department of History.

Module Content: This module introduces the vocabulary and tools used in comparative politics.
Definitions of politics, political and socio-economic cleavages, political ideologies, political parties,
electoral systems, governmental systems, political institutions, forms of political communication
and political culture are all debated in a European context.

       Wednesday: 9 a.m. – 10 a.m.         West Wing 9
       Thursday:  1 p.m. –2 p.m.           Aras na Laoi G18

ES2029 EU: Political & Institutional Development
Ms. Katherine McGarry, Department of History.

Module Content: Examination of the main issues and themes in the development of the EU since
1945; appreciation of the unique nature of this polity.

       Tuesday:   3 p.m. – 4 p.m.          CPB LG52
       Wednesday: 1pm – 2pm                Kane B10A

ES2022 The European Union & the International System

Dr Mervyn O'Driscoll, Department of History.

Module Content: This module will provide an introduction to the study of international relations
with special reference to the role of Europe in world politics. A variety of international institutions
and issues will be examined, including an in-depth study of EU foreign policy and the EU as an
actor in the international system.

       Wednesday: 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.         Connolly Bldg. J1
       Thursday:  10a.m. to 11a.m.         ORB 156
GV2001 Politics of the USA l
Prof. Neil Collins, Department of Government

Module Content: This module examines various policy issues from a political science
perspective.

       Monday:       3p.m. – 4p.m.               Windle Anatomy Lecture theatre
       Tuesday:      4p.m. – 5p.m.               Geography Lecture theatre

GV2003 Political Corruption l

Prof. N. Collins, Department of Government

Module Content: An examination of the issues in political corruption, looking particularly at rival
explanations of its causes, effects and remedies.

       Monday:       1p.m. – 2p.m.         Geography Lecture Theatre
       Tuesday:      9a.m. – 10a.m.            ORB 212


GV2007 Perspectives on Politics lll

Fiona Buckley, Department of Government

Module Content: The module will examine the theory and practice of political science from a
gendered perspective.

       Tuesday: 10a.m. – 11a.m.           WW8
       Wednesday: 5p.m. – 6p.m.           ORB 212

PH2016 Models of Democracy

Dr Jason Dockstader, Department of Philosophy.

Module Content: The course will involve discussion about the nature and value of democracy,
and evaluate models of democracy.

       Monday:    10a.m. – 11a.m.         Conn S5
       Wednesday: 11a.m. – 2noon          CE G10


PH2028 Applied Ethics

Dr Cara Nine, Department of Philosophy.

Module Content: Through case studies from contemporary politics and society, this module
addresses questions and topics such as: What ethical obligations do I have as a member of a
polity? What ethical obligations do I have as a professional? Which ethical and political theories
can be adapted to address real world situations?

       Wednesday: 2p.m. – 3p.m.           Conn S2
       Thursday:  4p.m. – 5p.m.           ORB 212
SECOND SEMESTER MODULES
ES2028 Comparative European Politics ll

Ms. Katherine McGarry, Department of History.


Module Content: The democratic politics of European countries are examined using the
comparative political method. Among the national political systems receiving particular attention
are those of France, Spain, Germany, Italy, Britain and Ireland.

      Wednesday: 9 a.m. – 10 a.m.        Elect Eng. L1
      Thursday:  1 p.m. to 2 p.m.        WW9



HI2007 War, State and Society since 1450
Lecturer: Dr Michael Cosgrave, Department of History

      Monday:       10a.m. – 11a.m.             Boole 2
      Tuesday:      4p.m. – 5p.m.               Kane G18


GV2002 Politics of the USA ll

Prof. N. Collins, Department of Government

Module Content: The origin, development and structure of the American political system with
particular reference to the institutions of the United States.

      Monday:       3p.m. – 4p.m.               Windle Physiology Lecture Theatre
      Tuesday:      1p.m. – 2p.m.               ORB 244

GV2004 Political Corruption ll

Prof. N. Collins, Department of Government

Module Content: This module examines political corruption from a political science perspective
drawing on recent research.

      Monday:       1p.m. – 2p.m.        Windle Anatomy Lecture Theatre
      Tuesday:      9a.m. – 10a.m.             WW6




GV2005 Political Perspectives l
Dr Emmanuelle Schon-Quinlivan, Department of Government

Module Content: The module will focus on varying themes of importance in politics.

      Thursday:     10a.m. – 11a.m.      ORB 326
      Thursday:     2p.m. – 3p.m.        ORB 123
PH2004 An Introduction to Political Philosophy

Dr Hans-Georg Moeller, Department of Philosophy.

Module Content: This module is an introduction to political philosophy with a special focus on
modern society. In particular we will look at how various theories of democracy have emerged
since the 17th century and how they are now modified and/or challenged by some contemporary
Western and/or Asian authors.

      Wednesday: 3p.m. – 4 p.m.                ORB 123
      Thursday:  11a.m. – 12noon               ORB 156

PH2017 Feminist Philosophy

Dr Lilian O’Brien, Department of Philosophy.

Module Content: This module introduces students to a discussion of philosophical concerns that
refuses to identify the human experience with the male experience. Writing from a variety of
perspectives, feminist philosophers challenge several areas of traditional philosophy. The aim of
this course is to explore some of these areas and their respective feminist challenges

      Tuesday:   3p.m. – 4p.m.                 Conn S3A
      Wednesday: 10a.m. – 11a.m.               Conn J5


PH2027 Mass Media Philosophy
Dr Hans-Georg Moeller, Department of Philosophy
Module Objective: To acquaint students with major philosophical perspectives on theories of the
mass media.

      Wednesday: 1p.m. – 2 p.m.                FSB 322
      Thursday:  9a.m. – 10 a.m.               Kane B10A

				
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