TO Potential Subcontractors of Employment Opportunities in the

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					                                 TO:             Potential Subcontractors of Employment Opportunities in the
                                                 Northwest Region
Workforce Investment Board
  Northwest Region               FROM:           Lisa Hostetler, Director, Northwest Region Workforce Investment
   www.nwwib.org                                 Board, North Central Missouri College
North Central Missouri College   DATE:           February 15, 2011
    912 Main Street
    Trenton, MO 64683
    660-359-3622                 RE:             Request for Proposals (RFP)
    660-359-3082 Fax
    1-800-794-3535
   E-mail: (1st initial last     The Workforce Investment Board, comprised of the 18 contiguous counties of
name)@mail.ncmissouri.edu        Northwest Missouri, is seeking applications to subcontract with any group, agency, and
                                 institution, public or private to provide employment opportunities to eligible individuals
Staff:                           under the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA).
Lisa Hostetler
Jeanie Whitney
Cathie Chalfant
                                 A Request for Proposals application packet, with appropriate attachments, is enclosed
Miranda Brummett                 and consists of approximately $500,000 in Title I Workforce Investment Act funds for
Ashlie Stacy                     eligible youth and will be for the period beginning July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012.
Members:                         Although the Workforce Investment Board has not received final funding allocations,
Penny Adams
                                 we are choosing to release the RFP with projected dollar amounts based on Program
David Bell
Tom Bliss                        Year 2010 funding allocations, and the current performance targets. As funding
Bill Caldwell                    allocations become available, selected Subcontractor target levels / budgets will be
Terry Campbell                   adjusted as appropriate.
Gary Carlson
Anita Coulter                    Potential applicants may apply for any or all of the funding available for WIA Youth
Kim Critten                      Program services in the Northwest Workforce Investment Board area. However, all
Virgil Davison
                                 mandatory activities must be provided.
Gene Dinwiddie
Peggy Ellis
Don Gitthens                     Potential applicants must complete, and provide a copy of the enclosed Face Sheet with
Rick Gronniger                   their application. This will be used as the document to provide information at the public
Debbie Heldenbrand               opening for all applicants.
Darold Hughes
Kim Ireland                      The deadline for submitting applications will be 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, March 16,
Richard Kirkpatrick
Mike Laurence                    2011. Bids received after this deadline will not be considered. Bid responses will be
Dave Leyland                     opened at 9:00 a.m. March 16, 2011 at the Workforce Investment Board Office, 912
Scott Long                       Main Street, Trenton, MO 64683.
Lisa McGhee
Dr. Neil Nuttall                 A pre-bidders conference will be held Wednesday, February 23, 2011, 9:30 a.m. – noon,
Kent Osborn                      in Cross Hall, Room 207 located at 1324 Cedar on the North Central Missouri College
Mike Palmer
Randall Railsback
                                 campus, Trenton, MO. Attendance is not required in order to submit an application.
Ned Seymour
Deb Trautloff                    Any and all questions regarding specifications and requirements of the application
Mary Kay Vochatzer               should be raised during the pre-bidders conference. Any additional questions must be
Kim Warren                       directed in writing to Lisa Hostetler, Director, NW WIB, 912 Main Street, Trenton, MO
Lisa Weil                        64683. Responses will be gathered and posted on the WIB website, which will be
Priscilla Whitt
                                 updated each Wednesday during the open application period.
Daisy Workman
Yvonne Wright
John Zeliff
                                  Request for Proposals
                                       Application Packet
                                         WIA Youth

I.     SCOPE OF THE PROJECT

The Workforce Investment Board, comprised of the 18 contiguous counties of Northwest
Missouri, is seeking applications to subcontract with any group, agency, institution, public or
private, to implement services for economically disadvantaged youth who have barriers to
employment in the counties of: Andrew, Buchanan, Clinton, DeKalb, Nodaway, Atchison,
Worth, Gentry, Holt, Grundy, Livingston, Linn, Caldwell, Daviess, Harrison, Putnam, Mercer
and Sullivan.

Applicants must be able to coordinate with other partner resources as identified in the Workforce
Investment Act of 1998 (specifically WIA Title I), as well as be able to provide the services
identified in the Scope of Work, Attachment 1. They must also be able to demonstrate their
administrative management and personnel capabilities, their ability to implement the goals and
objectives of the program, meet performance standards and target outcomes, and ensure
compliance with the contract. Demonstrated past performance in similar programs will be
considered in any award.

Services must be offered during the funding period of July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012. A summer
youth element can occur anytime between April 1st and September 30th, with funding available
from April 1st to October 31st. Other youth activities/elements under WIA shall be initiated July
1, 2011. Any contract may be renewed for an additional one-year period if satisfactory
performance is provided and/or unless otherwise determined by the Workforce Investment Board
in concurrence with the Chief Elected Officials and consultation with the Youth Council for
youth services. A sample of the Contract Agreement is provided as Attachment 2.

This Request for Proposals (RFP) does not commit the Northwest Region Workforce Investment
Board, nor its agents, to pay for any costs incurred prior to the execution of a contract prior to
funds availability from the US Department of Labor (DOL) and DED (Department of Economic
Development)/DWD (Division of Workforce Development). The Workforce Investment Board
retains the right to accept, reject or negotiate any or all proposals received and the right to vary
(or to direct its agents to vary) the provisions set forth herein at any time prior to the execution of
a contract where it deems such variance to be in its best interest, and to act otherwise as it deems
in its sole discretion.

Any additional funds made available, in the future, for similar services with similar outcomes
may be delivered through mutual agreements with the selected contractor(s) without the need for
an additional procurement.




                                                                                                      1
A. Youth Services
The use of funds for youth activities in the Northwest Region must be in compliance with
Section 129 of the WIA and must serve youth who meet the criteria as outlined in the Scope of
Work, Attachment 1. All participants must be registered into the statewide management
information system (TOOLBOX) with EEO and E-Verify data collected for each. Section 129
identifies the following purposes to be provided to eligible youth.

       PURPOSES:
       1) To provide to eligible youth seeking assistance in achieving academic and
           employment success, effective and comprehensive activities, which shall include a
           variety of options for improving educational and skill competencies and provide
           effective connections to employers;
       2) To ensure on-going mentoring opportunities for eligible youth with adults committed
           to providing such opportunities;
       3) To provide opportunities for training to eligible youth;
       4) To provide continued supportive services for eligible youth;
       5) To provide incentives for recognition and achievement to eligible youth; and
       6) To provide opportunities for eligible youth in activities related to leadership
          development, decision-making, citizenship, and community service.

To achieve these purposes the following elements must be available for youth:

       ELEMENTS:
       1) Tutoring, study skills training, and instruction leading to secondary school
           completion, including dropout prevention strategies;
       2) Alternative secondary school offerings;
       3) Summer employment opportunities directly linked to academic and occupational
           learning;
       4) Paid and unpaid work experiences, including internships and job shadowing;
       5) Occupational skill training;
       6) Leadership development opportunities which may include such activities as positive
           social and soft skills;
       7) Supportive services;
       8) Adult mentoring for a duration of at least twelve (12) months that may occur both
           during and after program participation;
       9) Follow-up services; and
       10) Comprehensive guidance and counseling, including drug and alcohol abuse
           counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the
           individual youth.

The Northwest Region and Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Subcontractors will form linkages
with local education agencies, service providers and other mandated partners to effectively utilize
existing services and develop comprehensive service strategies.




                                                                                                 2
B. Next Generation Career Center Integrated Service Delivery Model
Integrated Service Delivery: The Northwest Workforce Investment Board Region delivers
workforce development services through the Missouri Career Centers and Rural Delivery System
sites by implementing the Next Generation Career Center Integrated Service Delivery model. It is
the goal that integrated staff services will result in increased customer employment and earnings,
increased educational and occupational skills, and decreased welfare dependency, thereby
improving the quality of the workforce and enhancing productivity and competitiveness.

General Definitions:
      Next Generation Career Center (NGCC): A Missouri Career Center model founded on
      service-based practices and concepts that value both skills and jobs. This “next steps”
      approach will provide the opportunity for continuous engagement of a customer rather
      than simply exiting a process at a particular service point. At each step, value can be
      added to the customer’s experience and skills set. In the NGCC model, every job seeker
      will know their skills, improve their skills and will leave the Missouri Career Center or
      Rural Delivery System office a better job candidate.

       Welcome Team: The mission of the Welcome Team is to greet each customer positively
       and promptly, gather pertinent information, initially assess the customer’s skills/needs
       and promote/schedule the first service.

       Skills Team: The Skills Team will continue service management until the customer
       obtains employment. A “product box” will provide the customer with a variety of self-
       learning and traditional educational experiences. Some services are available to all
       customers while some require eligibility determination.

       Employment Team: Employment Team services include, but are not limited to, providing
       job search information/tools to help the customer obtain employment. The “product box”
       will provide the customers a variety of job seeking skills and services. Some services are
       available to all customers while some require eligibility determination.

       Product Box: A “menu” of robust and comprehensive customer services. Examples
       include but are not limited to: assessments, basic skills on-line instruction, GED
       preparation on site, job search skills, education courses, English as a Second Language,
       certificate or degree programs, etc. Customers may choose from the menu of products
       and services in the “product box”; some services will require eligibility determination.

       Rural Delivery System: Services delivered to individuals outside of the physical confines
       of the Career Centers. Those services will include all the Next Generation Career Center
       services offered to individuals who visit a Missouri Career Center in the Northwest
       Workforce Investment Board region.

The potential to integrate the WIA Youth program with the Next Generation Career Center
model is an ultimate goal. This integration will broaden the services available to customers. The


                                                                                                  3
WIA Youth Program is a mandated partner to the comprehensive Missouri Career Center in St.
Joseph; WIA Youth staff must be located and available at that Career Center. In some instances,
youth staff may be co-located in the non-comprehensive centers (Chillicothe and Maryville) and
rural delivery system offices (Bethany, Cameron, Mound City and Trenton).


II.    BOARD INTENT

It is the intent of the Workforce Investment Board to invest in initiatives that expand workforce
options to individuals who are eligible for services under the Workforce Investment Act. The
Board must work within its mandatory parameters and invest only in those initiatives that are
congruent with the Workforce Investment Act, resulting in the achievement of the federally
mandated performance standards and youth elements.

It is the intent of the Workforce Investment Board to offer applicants the option to submit bids on
a regional or sub-regional basis. However, those proposals submitted for the entire 18-county
region must include a sub-regional break down to allow for comparative analysis. The 18-county
Northwest Region is divided into three sub-regions to include: the nine (9) Green Hills counties
of Caldwell, Daviess, Grundy, Harrison, Linn, Livingston, Mercer, Putnam and Sullivan; the five
(5) Northwest counties of Atchison, Gentry, Holt, Nodaway and Worth; and the four (4) ABCD
counties of Andrew, Buchanan, Clinton and DeKalb.

The ultimate goal of the Workforce Investment Board is for the WIA Youth program to be
integrated into the NGCC model. Proposers who plan to provide staff that supports the NGCC
model will be looked at favorably. The Northwest Workforce Investment Board offers services
to individuals in three (3) Career Centers (Chillicothe, Maryville and St. Joseph) and four (4)
Rural Delivery System offices (Bethany, Cameron, Mound City and Trenton).


III.   DESIGN OF THE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

The Northwest Region Workforce Investment Board has chosen to utilize the outcome based
funding method for its resource allocations. In this approach, the Workforce Investment Board
becomes the Investor, while the selected program operator becomes the Subcontractor. Givens,
which are the basic rules of a situation that are often specified in legislation or are in some way
statutory-based, and the Assumptions, which are the beliefs about a particular issue, are provided
as Attachment 3. The Assumptions and Givens are those that the Workforce Investment Board
feels may serve as a guide for applicants, and are offered in the spirit of helping to develop a
quality proposal. They represent what has been learned over the years regarding the employment
of hard-to-employ, long-term recipients.

A. Performance Targets and Outcomes
Your specific performance targets should tell us exactly how you would contribute to the
successful implementation of the WIA Program. Your challenge as an applicant is to define how
many customers will reach these targets and what outcomes you are committed to achieving for


                                                                                                    4
the customers you will serve. Listed are just a few of the generic outcomes in which we will
invest.

   Changes that build skills in individuals which lead to higher education or employment.
   Changes in employment that lead individuals to progressing into careers that have earning
   potential above subsistence wages.
   Changes that allow individuals to move out of poverty to become self-sufficient individuals.
   Changes in the career progression of individuals entering initial career fields. Such changes
   might include higher wage potential, employment benefits, career development and/or post-
   employment training.

Performance targets are literally the “aiming points” in the outcome funding approach. Reaching
the targets defines achievement for the customers, and return for the Investor.

The Northwest Region Workforce Investment Board, as the Investor, has defined the following
targets that must be achieved for the 18-county Northwest Region youth services for the period
July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012. These categories are in keeping with the federally mandated
common measurers for WIA services, with the performance targets representing the current
program year’s negotiated performance level.

Targets for Youth Services

   Placement in Employment or Education                                                    62%
   Of those who are not in post-secondary education or employment [including
   the military] at the date of participation:
   # youth who are in employment [including the military] or enrolled in post-
   secondary education and/or advanced training/occupational skills training in the
   1st qtr. after the exit qtr. -divided by- the # who exit during the quarter.

   Attainment of a Degree or Certificate                                                   43%
   Of those enrolled in education [at the date of participation or at any point during
   the program:
   # who attain a diploma, GED, or certificate by the end of the 3rd qtr. after the exit
   qtr. -divided by- the # who exit during the quarter.

   Literacy and Numeracy Gains                                                             35%
   Of those out-of-school youth who are basic skills deficient:
   # who increase one or more educational functioning levels -divided by- the
   # who have completed a year in the program [i.e., one year from the date of the
   first youth program service] plus the # who exit before completing a year in the
   Youth program.




                                                                                                   5
B. Projected Funds Available:                                               $471,906.00
These funds are being projected based on program year 2010-2011 funding levels. In addition, at
the time of the issuance of this RFP, final funding allocations have not been made available from
the Division of Workforce Development. No administrative funds are available through this RFP
application; however administrative functions at the Subcontractor level are included as part of
the program services funding. Applications may be submitted based on a regional or sub-
regional basis. However, if submitting an application for the entire 18-county region, a sub-
regional breakdown must be provided in order to allow for comparative analysis. The 18-county
Northwest Region is divided into three (3) sub-regions to include: the nine (9) Green Hills
counties of Caldwell, Daviess, Grundy, Harrison, Linn, Livingston, Mercer, Putnam and
Sullivan; the five (5) Northwest counties of Atchison, Gentry, Holt, Nodaway and Worth; and the
four (4) ABCD counties of Andrew, Buchanan, Clinton and DeKalb. The percentage allocations
for each sub-region are those that have been determined by the Workforce Investment Board and
are based primarily on unemployment data for that sub-region.

                        ABCD – 50%             Green Hills – 32%             Northwest – 18%
In-School:              $165,167.00            $ 105,707.00                  $ 59,460.00
Out-of-School:          $ 70,786.00            $ 45,303.00                   $ 25,483.00
       Total:           $235,953.00            $151,010.00                   $ 84,943.00

         * At least 30% of these funds must be spent for out-of-school youth.


IV.      SUBMITTING THE APPLICATION AND CLOSING DATE

A complete application must include:

A. FACE SHEET (provided as Attachment 4) – This must be the first page of your application.
   Please specify the performance targets you are committed to achieving with the funds
   requested. The original application must have an original signature of the person in your
   organization that is authorized to enter into contractual agreements.

B. ABSTRACT – Include a one-page (1) single-spaced, abstract. This summary will be used
   during the Workforce Investment Board’s joint Executive/ Program Oversight Committee
   and Youth Council sub-committee selection process and will be used to describe your
   project(s) to the public.

C. TARGET PLAN/NARRATIVE – This should be a single-spaced narrative which describes
      the following items:

      1. YOUR CUSTOMERS - Define the characteristics of the customers you will assist and
         the specific activities/elements (and duration of activities) they will be involved in.
         Indicate how the customers to be served are different from the broader population. In



                                                                                                   6
   other words, whom are you targeting with your idea? We don’t want to know the
   potential market of customers, e.g. “all people who were welfare recipients in x county.”

2. YOUR PRODUCT OR SERVICE - Specify your proposed “product” or service, its key
   features and its comparative advantages over other approaches used to achieve the same
   outcomes. What are the important and distinct functions of the product or service? How
   will the required 10 Youth elements (identified on page 2 of this RFP) be provided?

   If you propose integrating WIA Youth services into the Next Generation Career Center
   service delivery model, how will your services be aligned with the model and what will
   the impact be?

3. PERFORMANCE TARGETS - Specify the consumer-focused performance targets you
   are committed to achieving. Indicate the reason for not setting lower or higher levels.
   These targets state what changes will occur for the consumer – not what activities or
   processes you do – and should be stated in observable and verifiable terms. The numbers
   for this section should be identical to those on the Face Sheet, Attachment 4.

4. HOW THE PERFORMANCE TARGETS WILL BE REACHED - Specify the critical
   steps that will be achieved to reach your stated performance targets. Indicate specific
   service levels to include: a)total number of youth to be served; b)number who receive
   orientation; c)number who receive tutoring, study skills training, and instruction leading
   to secondary school completion, including dropout prevention strategies; d)number who
   receive alternative secondary school offerings; e)number who receive summer
   employment opportunities directly linked to academic and occupational learning;
   f)number who receive paid and unpaid work experiences, including internships and job
   shadowing; g)number who receive leadership development opportunities which may
   include such activities as positive social and soft skills; h)number who receive supportive
   services; i)number who receive adult mentoring for a duration of at least twelve (12)
   months that may occur both during and after program participation; j)number who receive
   follow-up services; and k)number who receive comprehensive guidance and counseling,
   including drug and alcohol abuse counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as
   appropriate to the needs of the individual youth.

5. KEY INDIVIDUALS AND INTERMEDIARIES - Profile those individuals who will
   have the most responsibility for the project, connecting it to the customers and achieving
   the performance targets. Describe why they are the right person(s) for the job. We do not
   want resumes. Instead, focus on their energy, capacity and commitment, emphasizing the
   special skills they bring to their jobs.

   If a team approach to managing and/or implementing is used, specify how strengths of
   individuals are complementary and not duplicative. Describe how staff will be organized
   to provide services and accomplish stated performance targets and goals.




                                                                                               7
       Name the intermediaries whose involvement is critical for your idea to work. Indicate
       why they will cooperate. We do not want letters of support.

   6. ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT - This section deals with your agency’s capacity to
      achieve your stated targets. Explain one or two similar projects your agency has
      undertaken and the extent to which you stated and achieved results. List specific
      resources that your group will contribute to the project and which are critical to success.
      State and justify the priority this project has for your agency.

D. ATTACHMENTS
   Applicants must submit one set, per agency, of the following Attachments which should be
   labeled in the following order:

   1. ASSURANCES - Signed by authorized personnel (provided as Attachment 5.)

   2. ADOPTED POLICY ON NON-DISCRIMINATION AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
      POLICY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PLAN - Must allow persons in all aspects of
      employment regardless of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability,
      political affiliation, belief, or WIA participation.

   3. E-VERIFY EMPLOYMENT ELIGIBILITY VERIFICATION PAGE OR A PAGE
      FROM THE E-VERIFY MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) listing the
      proposers name and the MOU signature page completed and signed by the proposer and
      the Department of Homeland Security – Verification division. ALSO INCLUDE a
      completed, notarized Affidavit of Work Authorization signed and dated on or after
      September 1, 2009.

   4. EVIDENCE OF INSURANCE - Must specifically demonstrate insurance protection for
      bonding, liability insurance and insurance for personal injury. The selected Proposer is
      responsible for all insurance covering its own acts and those of its employees.

   5. CERTIFICATE OF GOOD STANDING with the Missouri Secretary of State - Current
      and valid within one calendar year and required only if the Proposer is a corporation.

   6. DOCUMENTATION STATING WHOM IN THE ORGANIZATION IS AUTHORIZED
      TO LEGALLY SIGN CONTRACTS FOR THE ORGANIZATION - Submit policy or
      letter from governing board or other applicable entity.

   7. EVIDENCE OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY - Submit most recent annual
      independent financial audit and auditor’s management letter, or alternative applicable
      financial statement, unless one has been provided to the WIB within the last 12 months.
      If financial issues have been disclosed as a result of an audit report, financial monitoring,
      or program reviews, state how corrective action plans have been implemented.




                                                                                                    8
     8. PERSONNEL POLICY MANUAL - Submit the Table of Contents from your
        organization’s Personnel Policy Manual.

     9. FISCAL PROCEDURES - Submit the Table of Contents from your organization’s Fiscal
        Procedures Manual.

A Request for Proposals (RFP) pre-bidders conference will be held prior to the due date to
discuss and explain the application. This meeting will be held in Trenton, Missouri on February
23, 2011, in Cross Hall, Room 207 located at 1324 Cedar on the NCMC campus from 9:30 a.m. -
noon. Attendance is not required in order to submit a proposal.

Any and all questions regarding specifications and requirements should be raised at the RFP pre-
bidders conference or in writing to: Lisa Hostetler, Director, Northwest Region Workforce
Investment Board, North Central Missouri College, 912 Main Street, Trenton, MO 64683.
Response to written questions will be posted to a “RFP Frequently Asked Questions” link on the
WIB website (www.nwwib.org), and will be updated each Wednesday during the open
application period.

If amendments to the RFP are required due to changes in specifications or for clarification of the
RFP, these will be provided to all potential applicants to whom the original RFP was provided
and will also be posted on the WIB website.

The original and 25 copies of the application packet must be received by the Northwest
Region Workforce Investment Board, located at 912 Main Street, Trenton, MO 64683 by
9:00 a.m. Wednesday March 16, 2011. Bids received after the deadline will not be considered.
RFP applications should be addressed, and clearly marked on the envelope as follows:

               Sealed Bid: WIA Youth Program Bid
               Northwest Region Workforce Investment Board
               912 Main Street
               Trenton, MO 64683

Bids will be opened at 9:00 a.m., Wednesday March 16, 2011 at the above location. Applicants
and the public are invited, but not required to attend the opening of the applications. No decision
related to an award of a contract will be made at the opening.



V.      DUE DILIGENCE SELECTION PROCESS

After the application is submitted and bids are opened, the Workforce Investment Board, in
conjunction with their appropriate staff, will conduct a due diligence selection process to include:

1) Each application will be reviewed and evaluated in the following areas to include
   information on application content, cost per service levels, past program performance,
   quality of staffing, good organizational standing and overall likelihood to carry out the


                                                                                                  9
    proposed plan:

       ● Reasonableness of Cost /Return on Investment - To what extent does the project
          reflect an impressive relationship between dollars in and results out? 30 pts

       ● Performance targets - How clear, strong and compelling are they? 20 pts

       ● Compliance with WIA program and administrative requirements - To what extent
         does the project reflect a comprehensive understanding of WIA Youth requirements
         and the ability to fulfill them? 20 pts

       ● Integration with Next Generation Career Center model – How well does the
         proposer describe their process to carry out the objectives of the model, if at all? 20 pts

       ● Probability - What is the likelihood that the performance targets will be achieved and
         key individuals can produce the proposed outcomes? To what extent does the
         proposer’s staff appear to have strengths to serve the target population and work with
         other partners and intermediaries? 10 pts

2) Telephone Interview (if needed): Applicants will be contacted and given the opportunity to
   answer any questions reviewers may have about the target plan or to clarify any part of the
   plan.

3) Verification (if needed): Verification involves the review team contacting previous
   customers or other outside persons familiar with the provider’s work to ask for confirmation
   of any key claims made by the applicant.

Copies of the proposal(s) and evaluation criteria will be provided to members of the Youth
Council, Executive, and Program/Oversight Committees of the Workforce Investment Board
who will review and evaluate the proposals on March 29, 2011. At that time, recommendations
from the Committees will be presented to the full Workforce Investment Board for consideration
and vote. Notification of selected proposer(s) will be made the following day (March 30, 2011).

Proposals received by the Workforce Investment Board are public record. All proposals will
remain shielded from release to the public until contracts are executed.




                                                                                                 10
                                                                                       Attachment 1
                                                                                     Rev.02.09.2011



                   WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998,
                    As Amended (PL 105-220) WIA Section 129

                           EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING
                               YOUTH SERVICES
                                SCOPE OF WORK
PURPOSE:
The purpose of the Scope of Work is to define the parameters of work, and to clarify the Northwest
Region Workforce Investment Board’s expectations of contractors / program providers. The
Workforce Investment Act of 1998 and State of Missouri have specified certain actions that must
be taken by the Local Workforce Investment Board, and that must be taken by program providers
under contract to the Workforce Investment Board (WIB). When actions are defined in Department
of Labor (DOL) Training and Employment Guidelines (TEGLs) and in Division of Workforce
Development (DWD) Issuances, those documents will be passed directly to program providers for
implementation when they affect the parameters of work.
Additional parameters or requirements will be identified and communicated by the WIB on a
continuous basis. These changes or additions may be the result of changes in policies and
regulations, or changes needed in order to address issues uncovered in state and sub-state
monitoring of provider activities. These requirements provide guidance as subcontractors verify the
eligibility of and provide services to customers for the Adult, Dislocated Worker and Youth
programs; assure qualified employees when hiring Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Case
Managers and other counselors; assure equal access to services by those with disabilities; and
assure equal employment opportunities in both hiring practices and in serving customers, as
defined by federal law.
The Scope of Work is not meant to rewrite the Federal and State laws, regulations, or policies, but
is designed to inform contractors of actions the WIB expects in order to be in compliance with
those laws.

Youth Services are to provide eligible youth, ages 14-21, with effective and comprehensive
program activities designed to enhance and improve their opportunities to obtain and complete
education and training programs that will provide them with job readiness skills and competencies.
These opportunities are to include a wide variety of options for achieving success, and are to
provide effective connections to employers. In addition, youth services program activities are to:

Workforce Investment Act of 1998, as amended (PL 105-220), Section 129 identifies the following
purposes to be provided to eligible youth.

       PURPOSES:
       1) To provide to eligible youth seeking assistance in achieving academic and employment
          success, effective and comprehensive activities, which shall include a variety of options
          for improving educational and skill competencies and provide effective connections to
          employers;
       2) To ensure on-going mentoring opportunities for eligible youth with adults committed to
          providing such opportunities;
       3) To provide opportunities for training to eligible youth;




                                          1 of 20
                                                                                         Attachment 1
                                                                                       Rev.02.09.2011



       4) To provide continued supportive services for eligible youth;
       5) To provide incentives for recognition and achievement to eligible youth; and
       6) To provide opportunities for eligible youth in activities related to leadership
          development, decision-making, citizenship, and community service.

To achieve these purposes the following elements must be available for youth:

       YOUTH ELEMENTS:
       1) Tutoring, study skills training, and instruction leading to secondary school completion,
           including dropout prevention strategies;
       2) Alternative secondary school offerings;
       3) Summer employment opportunities directly linked to academic and occupational
           learning;
       4) Paid and unpaid work experiences, including internships and job shadowing;
       5) Occupational skill training;
       6) Leadership development opportunities which may include such activities as positive
           social and soft skills;
       7) Supportive services;
       8) Adult mentoring for a duration of at least twelve (12) months that may occur both
           during and after program participation;
       9) Follow-up services; and
       10) Comprehensive guidance and counseling, including drug and alcohol abuse counseling,
           as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the individual youth.

The Northwest Region and Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Subcontractors will form linkages
with local education agencies, service providers and other mandated partners to effectively utilize
existing services and develop comprehensive service strategies.

Requirements:
The Workforce Investment Act of 1998, as amended (PL 105-220), Missouri State, and Local
Northwest Region Workforce Investment Board policy clarifications to that act require the
following actions and services of Employment and Training Adult and Dislocated Worker and
Youth Program providers.

Coordination and Integration of Services:
Program subcontractors are encouraged to assure seamless integration and coordination of
services for individual employment, education and training customers, and business customers
utilizing services provided by local, regional, state, and federal sources.
Customers receiving workforce investment services authorized under this subtitle, including the
provision of employment, education and training, transportation, supportive, and business
services should be able to access services through a fully-integrated, single-point-of-contact
system.
The key to having a fully-integrated system is making customer service the centerpiece of the
provider’s organization goals for the WIA programs. This requires transparent boundaries and
provision of services through team work and development of effective relationships across
agencies. Services to be provided and their definitions follow.




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In-school and Out-of-school Determination
Youth will be enrolled as an In-School Youth or Out-of-School Youth based on the following
criteria:

   In-School Youth
         Attending secondary (middle or high) school; OR
         High school graduate (or attained a GED) attending post-secondary education and not
         basic skills deficient; OR
         Attending an alternative school.

   Out-of-School Youth
          An eligible youth who is a school dropout; OR
          A high school graduate (or attained a GED), but is basic skill deficient, or unemployed,
          or underemployed.
              o Basic Skills Deficiency can only be assessed and determined by the TABE test,
                 which may only be administered through our local AEL/Subcontractor MOU.

A. Eligibility
   In order to be eligible for any Youth Services the following parameters must be met:

   1. Individuals served must between the ages of 14-21; and

   2. All males who are at least 18 years old, born after December 31, 1959, and who are not in
      the armed services on active duty, must be registered with the Selective Service System.
      (DWD Issuance 13-99, page 13). Refer to Selective Service System website for more
      details, www.sss.gov.; N/A for females; males turning 18 during enrollment in the Youth
      program must register after their 18th birthday to remain eligible for WIA Youth services;
      and

   3. Eligible Youth must be low income individuals, as defined in WIA Section 101(25);
      a. Receive Federal, State, or local government cash payments for which eligibility is
          determined by a needs or income test; OR
      b. Have a total family* income for the six-month period prior to application, that in
          relation to family size, does not exceed the higher of:
              poverty guidelines established by the Office of Management and Budget, Self
              Sufficiency Guidelines, refer to yearly DWD Issuance
          OR
              70% of the lower living standard income level, refer to yearly DWD Issuance;

           *Note: “Family” is defined as two or more persons related by blood, marriage, or
           decree of court, who are living in a single residence, and are included in one or more
           of the following categories:
                       A husband, wife, and dependent children
                       A parent or guardian and dependent children (i.e. girlfriend and boyfriend
                       living together with a child in common.)
                       A husband and wife



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                Family income size must be supported by an Applicant Statement and
                documentation refer to DWD Issuance 13-99. OR
       c.   Receive or eligible to receive Food Stamps, within the last 6 months of enrollment;
            currently receiving TANF; OR
       d.   Qualify as a homeless individual (Stewart B. McKinney Act-Section 103(a)(c));
                Note: Homeless Children and Youth - as individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and
                adequate nighttime residence.
                The term includes :
                -Sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing economic hardship, or
                a similar reason (sometimes referred to as doubled-up);
                -Living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds due to lack of
                alternative adequate accommodations;
                -Living in emergency or transitional shelters;
                -Abandoned in hospitals;
                -Awaiting foster care placement; OR
       e.   Are a foster child on behalf of whom state or local government payments are made; OR
       f.   Are a disabled individual whose income would meet the eligibility requirements, but is
            a member of a family which income does not meet such requirements.

   4. AND at minimum have one of the following Youth Barriers:
      a. Deficient in basic literacy skills (at or below 8.9 grade level skill in Math, Language, or
         Reading) by a generally-accepted standardized test; OR
      b. School dropout (letter from school official); OR
      c. Homeless, runaway, or foster child (applicant statement and/or legal documents); OR
      d. Pregnant or Parenting (applicant statement and/or legal documents); OR
      e. Law Offender (applicant and/or legal documents); OR
      f. Individual, including those with disabilities, who require additional assistance to
         complete an educational program, or to secure and retain employment (applicant
         statement), OR
      g. Need for Additional assistance - Locally Defined Workforce Investment Region (WIR)
         Barrier: Proof is required for 2 or more of the following conditions (multiple
         occurrence of one condition is allowable):
             Fired / Terminated (applicant statement and/or letter from employer)
             At risk of school dropout (letter from school official)
             Acting as Head of Household and does not have a barrier (must be supported by
             lease agreement, utility bill or applicant statement declaring head of household)
             Has applied for and not eligible for Pell grant assistance (denial letter)
             No employment history (supported by Applicant Statement or UI Wage Data)

B. Eligibility Exceptions
   Up to five percent (5%) of youth assisted region wide may be individuals who do not meet the
   minimum income criteria. To be considered eligible, such individuals must fall within one of
   the following categories and must be approved by the LWIB prior to registration in the Youth
   Program:
   1. School dropout; OR




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   2. Basic skills deficient (skills at or below 8.9 grade level in Math, Language and Reading);
      OR
   3. Educational attainment that is one or more grade levels below the grade level appropriate to
      the age of the individual; OR
   4. Pregnant or Parenting; OR
   5. Individual with disabilities including learning disabilities; OR
   6. Homeless, run away, or foster child; OR
   7. Law Offender; OR
   8. Youth who face serious barriers to employment, as identified by the NW WIB:
      a. Individuals within families that receive food stamps; OR
      b. Individuals who have participated in Job Corps; OR
      c. Limited English language proficiency; OR
      d. Youth who are not runaway, but have been ―kicked out‖ or rejected by their parent(s)
          and are living elsewhere; OR
      e. Alcohol and drug abusers; OR
      f. Minorities; OR
      g. Youth with negative work histories, i.e., terminated due to performance or other work-
          related issues.

C. Service Priority
   At a minimum, thirty percent (30%) of the funds shall be used to provide activities to Out-of-
   School Youth who meet at least one of the following criteria:
       1. Have dropped out of school; OR
       2. Have a high school diploma or GED, but are still basic skills deficient, or unemployed,
          or under-employed.

D. Program Design
   Program services for eligible youth must include:
   1. Objective Assessment will provide assessment of the academic levels, skill levels, and
      service needs of each participant. The assessment shall include a review of basic skills,
      occupational skills, prior work experience, employability, interests, aptitudes (including
      interests and aptitudes for nontraditional jobs), supportive services needs, and
      developmental needs of such participant.

       These assessments will be documented in Toolbox 2.0 service 511 Youth Assessment and
       Youth Objective Assessment, Youth form #3.

       The Youth Objective Assessment is to be customer-centered, and is a diagnostic evaluation
       of educational and employment barriers, taking into account their:
           a. Family situation;
           b. Work history;
           c. Education;
           d. Occupational skills;
           e. Interests;
           f. Aptitudes;
           g. Attitudes toward work;




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       h.   Motivation;
       i.   Behavior patterns affecting employment potential;
       j.   Financial resources and needs;
       k.   Supportive service needs;
       l.   Personal employment information as it relates to the local labor market.

   Youth Objective Assessment Guidelines are as follows:
      a. In-School Youth: for those in-school youth that do not have a School Individual
         Education Plan (which identifies academic level, basic skills, and developmental
         needs), those areas will be assessed utilizing either TABE or WorkKeys or CASA
         or other identified assessment approved by the NW WIB. WIA Individual
         Employment Plan identifies service needs, academic level (grade level), prior work
         experience, employability, and supportive services needs.

       b. Out of School Youth: as of July 1, 2006, all Out of School Youth are to be TABE
          tested through our local AEL/Subcontractor MOU to assess the youth’s basic skills.
          If the participant is determined basic skills deficient (BSD) then they will need to be
          retested for three consecutive years on the anniversary date of their first test. The
          participant must raise their BSD level by one educational level until they are no
          long BSD. If they test BSD in more than one area the participant is only required to
          raise one BSD area per year.

       c. For both In-School and Out of School Youth:
          Interests and Aptitudes will be identified by using either Choices or
          Cops/Copes/Caps or Missouri Connections or other identified assessment approved
          by the NW WIB.


2. Individual Service Strategies (ISS) are developed for each participant to identify basic
   skill goals, occupational skills goals, work readiness goals, age appropriate employment
   goals and supportive services needs. You will also indentify the appropriate and attainable
   steps to accomplish the goals identified. Goals should assist the participant to:
       a. Prepare for postsecondary educational opportunities as appropriate;
       b. Create strong linkages between academic and occupational learning;
       c. Prepare for unsubsidized employment opportunities as appropriate;
       d. Develop effective connections to intermediaries with strong links to the job market
           and local and regional employers.

   The ISS activity will be used to link youth academic and employment goals by using the
   school IEP, if available, and/or the WIA basic skills assessment and WIA IEP employment
   goals. By linking these together we will be able to assist the youth in setting attainable
   goals, becoming more employable, as well as, working with the education system to obtain
   the academic goals. The ISS will be updated to reflect changes in participant goals or
   needs as identified during regular customer contact.




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   There are three categories within skill attainment goals for youth: basic skills, occupational
   skills, and work readiness. Goals are to be documented on the Individual Service Strategy
   Goal Planning Worksheet; Youth form #11 and Toolbox 2.0 service 512 WIA Youth
   Individual Service Strategies.
   An example of an occupational skills or work-readiness skills goal that can be set is: “On
   time for meetings with Case Manager scheduled for every other Tuesday at 4:00 p.m.,
   beginning (date).”

       a. A basic skills goal is required of all younger youth (ages 14 to 18) who are
          determined to be deficient in basic skills (defined as an individual who has Math,
          Language and Reading skills at or below 8.9 grade level as scored on a generally-
          accepted standardized test or a comparable score on a criterion-referenced test).
          Goals are to be documented on the Individual Service Strategy Goal Planning
          Worksheet; Youth form #11 and Toolbox 2.0 service 512 WIA Youth Individual
          Service Strategies.

           While the basic skills goal should be the first goal set for youth, it does not have to
           be the first goal achieved, when other goals are also set. For those youth who are
           basic skills deficient, at least one goal must be set upon initial assessment of the
           youth. An example of a basic skills goal that can be set while the Case Manager
           gets to know the youth is: “Increase reading skills one grade level by enrolling in
           an AEL class by (date) and completing the class with assessment documenting
           improvement within 12 months.”

       b. An occupational skills goal or a work-readiness skills goal is needed per DWD
          Issuance 11-01 if the youth is an in-school or out-of-school younger youth who is
          not basic skills deficient. If the participant is an out-of-school youth (not in need of
          basic skills), it is a local option to set a work readiness skills goal and/or an
          occupational skills goal.

       c. Once goals have been set, the youth has one year in which to achieve each goal
          (DWD Issuance 11-01).

   Youth participants may have any combination of the three types of skill goals: three in the
   same category; two goals in one category, one goal in another; or one skill goal in each
   category. However one skill goal must be related to the barrier that determined youth
   eligibility.

   All ISS services will be presented and signed by participants to address education goals,
   employment goals and other service needs. This will be accomplished with clear, detailed
   Toolbox 2.0 data entry (case note, Toolbox 2.0 service 512 WIA Youth Individual Service
   Strategies Goal Planning Worksheet form #11, Toolbox 2.0 Employment Plan) and
   appropriate documentation in client file.

3. Regular contact is essential when serving youth. The Northwest WIB believes that it is
   important for the case manager to make contact with the youth every month, 30 days. The




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   contact can be in a form of phone, text, social media, mail or in person meeting. The
   contact should include a review of ISS goals, assessing any new barriers and progress of
   overcoming noted barriers. Case notes must be entered into Toolbox 2.0 to document the
   contact or attempted contact with the youth. Updates to the ISS goals, services and IEP
   should also be done at that time.

4. The following 10 Youth Elements/Services must be available to all Youth participants as
   indicated in the Workforce Investment Act of 1998:
   YOUTH ELEMENTS:
     1) Tutoring, study skills training, and instruction leading to secondary school
         completion, including dropout prevention strategies;
     2) Alternative secondary school offerings;
     3) Summer employment opportunities directly linked to academic and occupational
         learning;
     4) Paid and unpaid work experiences, including internships and job shadowing;
     5) Occupational skill training;
     6) Leadership development opportunities which may include such activities as positive
         social and soft skills;
     7) Supportive services;
     8) Adult mentoring for a duration of at least twelve (12) months that may occur both
         during and after program participation;
     9) Follow-up services; and
     10) Comprehensive guidance and counseling, including drug and alcohol abuse
         counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the
         individual youth.

       501 Youth Tutoring/Dropout Prevention
          Coaching, teaching and guiding customers to increase academic success potential.
          This includes study skills, dropout prevention strategies and instruction leading to
          secondary school completion. This service also applies to assisting youth with
          basic skills improvement (remediation), and obtaining a high school diploma or
          GED.

       502 Alternative School
          Specialized, structured curriculum offered inside or outside the public school
          system, which may provide work/study and/or assist youth with obtaining a High
          School diploma or GED. This includes Basic Skills improvement activities for out-
          of-school Youth.

       503 Summer Youth Employment Opportunities
          A summer worksite learning experience, which provides direct linkages between
          academic and occupational learning. Subsidized or unsubsidized employment for
          youth during the summer months. Such employment may be either full or part time,
          in the public or private sector and may last for all or part of the summer months;
          April 1 – September 30.




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504 Paid Youth Internships/Work Site Learning
   An internship/work site learning activity is a short-term and usually part-time
   worksite learning assignment with a public or private organization for a customer
   who needs assistance in learning basic work-readiness skills and work
   requirements. Internships are designed to promote the development of good work
   habits and reinforcement of work-readiness. Both paid and unpaid internships are
   available.

505 Youth Occupational Skills Training
   Employment related education provided with the expectation of the customer
   obtaining specific occupational skills sufficient to be employed in an entry level,
   semi-skilled, or skilled job. Enrollment in Occupational Skills Training is a post-
   secondary education activity. (Even if the youth is taking ATC classes or advanced
   classes while in high school.) This service includes short term and certificate
   programs such as CNA, CPR, lifesaving, etc. This service is limited to 24 months
   of vocational training.

506 Leadership Development
   Exposure to post-secondary educational opportunities; community and service
   learning projects; peer-centered activities, including peer mentoring and tutoring;
   organizational and teamwork training; training in decision making; citizenship
   training including life skills training such as parenting, work behavior training and
   budgeting of resources; employability; and positive social behaviors.
   Job Search, Life Skills and other workshops, as well as Job Search Assistance; and
   assisting a customer with getting a Missouri Driver's License, fit into this category.
   Use this service to pay a Youth Incentive Bonus to recognize achievement.

507 Youth Supportive Services
   Services such as child care, dependent care, temporary housing, medical care,
   uniforms, tools, equipment and other types of assistance provided to the participant
   so they can reach their goal. Post employment services may also be provided to
   ensure success at the worksite. Local program operators are encouraged to develop
   a network of existing supportive services to assist the participant as needed.

508 Youth Mentoring
   Youth Mentoring. Regular contact between customers and trusted caring adults that
   will serve as role models and teach the youth skills, work habits, and/or responsible
   behavior.

Follow-up services
    Regularly scheduled informational and workplace counseling contact with youth,
    who have exited the program.
    Follow-up should be for not less than 12 months after the date of exit.
    Follow-up services for youth may include supportive services, employer services,
    further career and/or educational development, peer support, mentoring, tutoring
    and progress tracking; and



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       510 Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling, required service
          Services designed to benefit youth by addressing career, personal and educational
          needs. The developmental and sequential counseling activities will be designed to
          assist students in acquiring knowledge and skills in career planning, knowledge of
          self and others, and educational and vocational development. Local, state and
          national career and labor market information will be used to facilitate the youths¿
          career planning process. Networking among youth programs, business, labor and
          post-secondary institutions will also assist youth with career planning.

       511 Youth Assessment, required service
          This activity includes conducting the Initial Interview, completing Assessment tabs
          in MissouriCareerSource.com, providing skill testing such as reading, math, ESL,
          aptitude, interest, and other tests. This information is used to develop the
          Employment Plan.

           This is also the appropriate service to record health/treatment and/or legal issues
           that need to be tracked on the Employment Plan.

       512 WIA Youth Individual Service Strategies, required service
          Procedures that document assessed conditions, plan needed activities, and
          document the achievement of customers so that they might overcome barriers and
          progress toward achieving their educational and employment goals.

       513 WIA Youth Prepare Post Secondary Educational Opportunity
          Activities and services designed to prepare youth for training and educational
          opportunities beyond high school or for placement into unsubsidized employment.
          This activity may be used to increase a youth's literacy and numeracy skills in
          preparation for participation in our qualification for post secondary education. Such
          activities and services may be classroom or one-on-one and may include tutorial
          and counseling components. They may be structured to prepare the youth for the
          cultural changes in moving from a high school environment to that of a college or
          vocational school. This activity may also provide such services as labor market
          information, job search assistance (services that lead to the identification of job
          openings, completion of job applications, scheduling of job interviews and hiring
          into the identified jobs), job development, and job referrals.

5. Each participant or applicant who meets the minimum income criteria to be considered an
   eligible youth shall be provided:
       a. Information on the Full Array of Services,(Youth form #2) which explains the
          product box of services at the Missouri Career Center (MCC), other eligible
          providers or MCC partners;
       b. Referral to appropriate training and education programs that have the capacity to
          serve the participant or applicant either on a sequential or concurrent basis;
       c. Youth, 18-21 years of age, who are high school dropouts, high school graduates or
          seniors in high school will be provided information on available Job Corps services




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             by their Case Manager, or Job Corps staff on an individual basis or in a group
             presentation.
                 Printed brochures about Job Corps are available at the Missouri Career Center.
                 Job Corps information will be provided to the youth and will be documented in
                 Toolbox 2.0.

   6. Each subcontractor shall ensure that an eligible applicant who does not meet the enrollment
      requirements of the particular program, or who cannot be served, shall be referred for
      further assessment, as necessary, and referred to a program appropriate to meeting the basic
      skills and training needs of the applicant.
          a. Parents, participants and other members of the community with experience relating
             to programs for youth are to be involved in the design and implementation of
             program services being offered.
          b. No funds shall be used to provide an activity for eligible youth who are not school
             dropouts, if participation in the activity would interfere with or replace the regular
             academic requirements of the youth.

E. Recruiting and Retaining Out-of-School Youth
   1. WIA services for out-of-school youth should continue to focus on approved educational
      and occupational skills training that will prepare them for post-secondary education,
      advanced training, and jobs with a career path.

   2. Service strategies which may be useful in serving out-of-school youth:
      a. Help them find gainful employment (full-time or part-time), and provide available
         support services, such as child care;
      b. Help the youth understand that securing employment and increasing one’s career
         potential are directly related to completing education and/or skills training, and
         attainment of educational and or employment credentials;
      c. While employed, provide approved education and skills training to attain credentials,
         participate in post-secondary education, and become gainfully employed in a career
         with advancement opportunities;
      d. Focus on retention of those out-of-school youth engaged in the required education and
         skills training activities until program completion;
      e. Ask the youth to serve as an Outreach Worker and Recruiter (with incentives provided
         for recruiting friends into the program);
      f. Work with the local Juvenile Justice System to sponsor alternative sentencing programs
         for first-time offenders;
      g. Enroll youth returning from correctional facilities in the program; and
      h. Obtain lists of dropouts from high schools, etc. (Training and Employment Guidance
         Letter - TEGL 28-01)

   3. Strategies to connect out-of-school youth to One-Stop Career Centers or satellite sites:
      a. Develop One-Stop Career Centers specifically designed to engage out-of-school youth;
      b. Establish convenient and extended hours for youth (e.g., youth who have jobs);
      c. Conduct Out-of-School Forums and Focus Groups; and




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       d. Provide information presentations by One-Stop Staff in neighborhood places
          frequented by out-of-school youth. (TEGL 28-01)

G. In-school and Out-of-School Youth Marketing Strategies
   1. Develop and use youth-focused outreach marketing materials;
   2. Develop youth-based information websites;
   3. Presentations to youth and their families in traditional and non-traditional places; and
   4. Design and develop training programs for out-of-school youth that incorporate the required
       elements. (TEGL 28-01)

H. Engaging Community and Faith-Based Organizations
   1. The promotion of greater participation of faith-based and community organizations in the
      delivery of WIA services to eligible youth is now being strongly encouraged.

   2. Community and faith-based organizations can play an integral role in the delivery of
      training services under WIA, by providing (TEGL 28-01):
      a. Tutoring
      b. Literacy and math skills
      c. Training services
      d. Community service opportunities
      e. Leadership development opportunities
      f. Adult mentoring
      g. Specific guidance and counseling
      h. Child care
      i. Transportation
      j. Housing
      k. Supportive services

   3. No religious instruction or religious information may be imparted by community or faith-
      based organizations during provision of these services.

I. Dual Enrollment
    1. Under this Act eligible youth are ages 14-21 years. Adults are defined as individuals age 18
       and older, thus individuals ages 18-21, may be eligible for both adult and youth programs.

   2. Eligible youth who are 18-21 years old may participate in adult and youth programs
      concurrently.
      a. Such youth must be eligible under the criteria applicable to the services received.
      b. Local program subcontractors may determine the appropriate level and balance of
          youth and/or adult services.

J. Individual Training Accounts (ITA) for Older and Out-of-School Youth only
    1. DWD Issuance 08-06 allows Individual Training Accounts (ITA) for Older and Out-of-
       School Youth, who are 18 and older, without the need to co-enroll under the Adult
       program.




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   Training services must be directly linked to in-demand occupations, in our local area, or in
   another area to which an Adult, Youth, or Dislocated Worker receiving such services is
   willing to relocate, or a WIB approved training service for occupations determined by the
   Board that have a high potential for sustained demand or growth in the local area.

   Master degrees are not an allowed training cost. A customer that already has a Bachelors
   Degree and is seeking additional degree is typically not an allowed training cost. An
   exception to this policy requires written approval of the Workforce Investment Board
   (WIB).

2. Reference Northwest Region Policy on Individual Training Accounts, approved by WIB
   6/06
   Training services shall be provided through the use of an ITA, and shall be provided to
   eligible individuals through the local MCC. WIA Section 134 provides certain exceptions
   to the general use of the ITA. Exceptions ~ Training services authorized under this
   Paragraph may be provided pursuant to a contract for services in lieu of an ITA if the
   requirements of (F: Consumer Choice Requirements) are met and if: such services are on-
   the-job training provided by an employer or customized training.

   a. the local board determines there are an insufficient number of eligible providers of
      training services in the local area involved (such as in a rural area) to accomplish the
      purposes of a system of ITAs; or
   b. the local board determines that there is a training services program of demonstrated
      effectiveness offered in the local area by a community-based organization or another
      private organization to serve special participant populations that face multiple barriers
      to employment.

3. Training services shall be directly linked to occupations that are in-demand in the local
   area, or in another area to which the Older and Out-of-School Youth receiving such
   services is willing to relocate and are WIA approved through the Department of
   Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) and is an in-demand occupation. The local
   WIB may approve Training Services for occupations determined to be in sectors of the
   economy that have a high potential for sustained demand or growth in the local area.

   Acceptable documentation for in-demand occupations include: Missouri Economic
   Research and Information Center (MERIC) data, intent or letter of hire, posted job
   openings.

4. The Northwest WIB requires that any customer that is enrolled into a training activity that
   we are providing funding for must utilize the Worldwide Interactive Network (WIN),
   obtaining a Level 3; before being WorkKeys assessed. Each customer must complete the
   WorkKeys assessment in the areas of Locating Information, Reading for Information and
   Applied Mathematics prior to funds being spent on training level services. Beginning July
   1, 2009, compare WorkKeys scores with MERIC data (www.missouri.economy.org) go to
   Occupational Projections, Explore Careers, select region or statewide, Occupational Filter
   and compare required WorkKeys scores with the desired Occupation. Customers scores




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       should at a minimum meet MERIC data. If the customer’s scores do not meet the MERIC
       minimum requirements, the case manager should discuss information with customer about
       chosen occupational desire. Document WIN and WorkKeys assessment in Toolbox 2.0
       case notes and documentation placed in file. Both assessments are to be given when
       providing training level services, which include tuition, books and fees.

   5. WIA will provide support up to a prescribed amount not to exceed $5,000 per year per
      customer. Exceptions to this ceiling require written approval of the Workforce Investment
      Board (WIB). When possible the support should be obligated through the use of a DESE 6
      and/or should be a direct reimbursement to the WIA approved institution. This support
      may be used only for Older and Out-of-School Youth; not allowable for the Younger
      Youth.

       The following related education costs which may not exceed $5,000 per year per customer
       include:
       a. Tuition
       b. Books
       c. Fees

   6. The voucher amount will be reduced proportionate to other financial resources available to
      the customer. The voucher will also have an expiration period, determined by the issuing
      Title I (WIA) Operator. (Taken from the Northwest Region 5-Year Plan). The WIB allows
      for special funding directives which provide unlimited funds or higher caps for classroom
      and occupational training (reference Northwest Region Policy on Individual Training
      Accounts, approved by WIB 6/06).

K. Individual Employment Plan
      Creation of a documented strategy, which uses information gathered through self-
      assessment, initial assessment and comprehensive assessment, to identify the employment
      goals, appropriate achievement objectives, and appropriate combination of services for the
      customer to achieve the employment goals. These might include some combination or all
      of the following:
                  Educational attainment;
                  Employment history;
                  More in-depth information about basic literacy and occupational skill levels;
                  Interests and aptitudes;
                  Family and financial situation;
                  Emotional and physical health, including disabilities;
                  Attitudes towards work;
                  Motivation; and
                  Supportive service needs.

       Toolbox 2.0 Employment Plan must be completed and signed when the customer is
       enrolled in the program. When the Employment Plan is updated in Toolbox 2.0 to manage
       the system, so the customer does not exit, it does not need to be printed and signed. The
       Employment Plan must be updated with signatures when a customer changes directions in



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       services obtained, i.e. job search assistance to attending school or occupation goal Criminal
       Justice and changes to LPN.

L. Co-Enrollment
   1. One strategy to maximize youth access to the ten (10) required program elements is to
      develop procedures for co-enrollment in Youth Opportunity Grants and Job Corps
      Programs.
      a. For example, an ISS for a co-enrolled youth could include basic skills and occupational
         skills training in Job Corps.
      b. Upon graduation from Job Corps, WIA Formula Grant Funds could be used to provide
         services such as further leadership training, an occupational training mentor, and/or
         Supportive Services.

   2. By leveraging multiple youth program funding sources for needed services, including those
      available from other public and private organizations, the Case Manager can further ensure
      that youth will successfully achieve their education and skills training goals (TEGL 28-01).

M. Supportive Services
   1. These funds are allocated to provide supportive services to youth who are:
      a. Participating in authorized programs; and
      b. Unable to obtain Supportive Services through other programs providing such services.

   2. Supportive Services for youth may include the following:
      a. Assistance with transportation costs;
      b. Assistance with child care and dependent care costs;
      c. Assistance with housing costs;
      d. Linkages to community services;
      e. Referral to medical services: and
      f. Assistance with uniforms or other appropriate work attire and work-related tools costs,
         including eye glasses.

   3. Beginning July 1, 2009, Toolbox 2.0 service 403 Supportive Services, Child Care and
      Transportation must be opened within 30 days of the date(s) the cost was incurred. All
      documentation must support the service dates being paid for. All appropriate supportive
      documentation and voucher including appropriate signatures must be provided in the
      customers file. At the time, 403 Supportive Services, Child Care and Transportation is
      opened in Toolbox 2.0 a case note will indicate what has been offered to the customer
      including type of service, total amount offered and date(s) range and if it is a one-time
      payment or a reoccurring obligation. Once the expense is incurred a detailed case note
      must indicate type of supportive service, dates and amount provided. WIB annual
      compliance monitoring will note Questioned Costs that occurred beginning December 2,
      2008.

       Each agency will follow a Northwest Region-wide Supportive Services policy beginning
       July 1, 2010.




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       Supportive Services will not exceed $2,000 per person per program year for Childcare,
       Transportation or Other (with prior approval) items.

N. Planned Gap in Services
   1. To be used for customers whose services need to be interrupted for health/medical reasons,
      incarceration or waiting for a planned training element to begin. It is not to be used as
      ―holding‖ while waiting to see if the customer finds a job.

   2. Individuals are not to be placed into a Planned Gap if they are receiving non-WIA services
      such as Trade Act/NAFTA or Vocational Rehabilitation funded training. These partners
      require WIA subcontractors to document training and supportive service activities to
      prevent the customer from soft exiting in Toolbox.

   3. Planned Gaps can only be set in 30-day increments and have at least one activity posted
      between Planned Gap periods. There is no limit to the number of Planned Gaps that can be
      used.

   4. Staff must document in the ―case notes‖, why they are placing the customer in a Planned
      Gap. If the period of no services extends beyond the original estimated time needed, Staff
      must also document the reason for creating another Planned Gap in the case notes.

   5. No WIA services are to be provided during a Planned Gap. This includes WIA training
      funded Supportive Services.

O. Complaint and Grievance
   A Complaint and Grievance must be completed for each individual that is enrolled in WIA
   services. Each Individual Training Account (ITA) needs to have a Complaint and Grievance
   attached. In cases where an individual, agency or institution is working with more than one
   client of ours an original must be signed and copies may be placed in the appropriate files. For
   these files a case note needs to explain why a copy instead of the original of the Complaint and
   Grievance is being placed in the file. This also applies to Work Experience, Summer
   Employment and On-the-Job Training worksites.

P. Common Measures
   The following is in accordance with TEGL 17-05 and provides further definition/clarification.
   There is no longer a distinction between younger/older youth under Common Measures and
   will include all youth. However, Literacy/Numeracy Gains apply only to out-of-school youth.

   Participant:
   A participant is an individual who is determined eligible to participate in the program and
   receives a service funded by the program in either a physical location (One-Stop Career Center
   or affiliate site) or remotely through electronic technologies.

   Program Participation:
   Following a determination of eligibility for Youth and Dislocated Worker, participation in a
   program commences when the individual begins receiving a service funded by the program.
   This phrase has the same meaning as the ―date of participation‖ used in some of the measures.



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If the participant receives services from multiple programs, then states and grantees may use
the earliest date of service as the ―date of participation‖ when reporting on the measures in each
program.

Program Exits:
The term program exit means a participant has not received a service funded by the program or
funded by a partner program for 90 consecutive calendar days, and is not scheduled for future
services.

Youth Measures
1. Placement in Employment or Education
   Youth who are not in post-secondary education or employment (including the military) at
   the date of participation.
           Individuals who are in post-secondary education or employment at the date of
           participation are excluded from this measure.
           Employment and education status at the date of participation are based on
           information collected from the individual.
           Individuals in secondary school at exit will be included in this measure.

2. Attainment of a Degree/Certificate
   Youth who are enrolled in education (at the date of participation or at any point during the
   program). In accordance with TEGL 17-05 (Attachment B) ―certificate‖ is awarded in
   recognition of an individual’s attainment of measurable technical or occupational skills
   necessary to gain employment or advancement with on occupation.
          Education refers to participation in secondary school, post-secondary school, adult
          education programs or any other organized program of study leading to a degree or
          certificate.
          Individuals in secondary school at exit will be included in this measure
          Diploma means any credential that DESE accepts as equivalent to a high school
          diploma (Associate Degree & Bachelor’s Degree)
          Diplomas, GEDs, or certificates can be obtained while still receiving services or at
          any point by the end of the third quarter after exit.
          Certificates awarded by workforce investment boards and Work Readiness
          certificates will not be accepted.

3. Literacy/Numeracy Gains
   Out-of-school youth who are basic skills deficient
          In-school youth are excluded from this measure. (Note: determination of in-school
          or out-of-school status is only made at point of program participation.)
          It is allowable to use pre-test that are administered up to six months prior to the date
          of first WIA youth service, if such pre-test scores are available. If prior pre-test are
          not available, administration of the pre-test must occur with 60 days following the
          date of first youth program service.
          This measure is based on ―date of first youth program service‖ rather than date of
          participation.




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               Individuals determined not to be basic skills deficient based on pre-test results are
               excluded from this measure.
               When administering assessment tools, individuals with disabilities should be
               accommodated.
               Included individuals who are given an initial assessment but either (1) do not post-
               test before exiting the program, or (2) exit before completing a year in the youth
               program.
               All out-of-school youth must be assessed in basic reading/writing and math.
               DWD Issuance 04-06, All Youth participants who receive their first WIA Youth
               service on or after July 1, 2006, MUST be basic skills assessed. Assessments are to
               be administered within 60 days of the first Youth service or within six months if
               administered prior to that first service.

       Documentation to support the assessment scores must be maintained in the participant’s
       file and Toolbox 2.0 case notes and must provide the name of the test, specific areas tested
       (reading, math, etc.), date the test was administered, ―raw‖ test scores and name of the test
       administrator.

       Sources of the documentation should include one or more of the following:
              A copy of the test score sheet
              School records
              Detailed case note entered by the case manager or test administrator documenting
              the name, title, and phone number of the person relaying the test scores
              Verification by telephone or document inspection (in accordance with the
              requirements outlined in the Division of Workforce Development’s WIA Eligibility
              Technical Assistance Guide, Issuance 13-99 and 13-99, Change 1)

       Assessments that may be used for this measure:
             TABE (Test of Adult Basic Education) The complete battery of TABE tests. (The
             TABE locator and the TABE survey tests are not acceptable for calculating this
             measure).
             CASAS (Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System)
             WorkKeys (The full assessment, not the WorkKeys pre-test)

       Any of the above tests must be administered by individuals that are certified to administer
       these tests.

       Posting Assessment Results in Toolbox
       All assessment scores will be posted in Toolbox 2.0 under the Assessment tab, Basic Skills
       Test tab, ABE tab and on the Youth Objective Assessment Youth form #3.

Q. Required Credential Attainment
   1. In accordance with TEGL 17-05 (Attachment B), a ―credential‖ is defined as :
      A nationally recognized degree or certificate or state/locally recognized credentials that
      include but not limited to:
      a. High school diplomas



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       b. GED or other recognized equivalents
       c. Post-Secondary degrees/certificates
       d. Recognized skill standards
       e. Licensure or industry-recognized certificates
       (Please note: this term applies to the current WIA statutory adult, dislocated worker, and
       older youth measure only, it does not apply to the common measures.)

   2. Methods that may be used to collect data:
      a. Case management, follow-up services, or customer surveys to determine customer has
         received a credential and written documentation of that credential;
      b. Record sharing agreements and/or automated record matching with administrative/other
         databases to determine and document that the customer has received a credential.
         Databases may include:
             State Board of Education;
             State board governing community colleges;
             State board governing universities;
             State licensing boards for private schools;
             State education associations, integrated postsecondary education reporting unit;
             Higher education planning unit;
             State Department of professional or occupational regulation (possibly other units
             such as Health Care Administration or specific boards like the ―Board of Nursing‖);
             Employers;
             Training institutions and providers; and/or
             Adult Basic Education providers—GED or equivalent testing agencies.
      c. Computer records from automated record matching are considered a valid written
         record.
      d. A telephone response from the customer must be accompanied by a written document
         such as a certificate, degree, or other written documentation.
      e. Telephone contact forms documenting that either the training entity or the customer has
         been contacted, and the credential information is provided.
      f. A copy of the credential received.
      g. A letter from the institution or entity issuing the credential.

       All data and methods to determine achievement of credentials must be documented. A
       statistically valid sample of the documentation of supplemental credential achievement
       shall be included as in the customer file review process (DWD Issuance 02-01).

R. Customer Satisfaction Indicators
   The customer satisfaction indicator of performance for services received from the Missouri
   Career Center System is measured through surveys conducted during and after the conclusion
   of participation in services. The procedure for conducting Customer Satisfaction Surveys of
   individual participants and employers follows:




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   1. Customers must be informed during the registration process about the importance of
      satisfying customers and the possibility of being contacted for information on his/her
      experiences with the services.
   2. Customers must be informed they may also be called by the Division of Workforce
      Development about their experiences with staff and the services provided to them.
   3. Customers must be told the survey is voluntary, and responses are confidential.
   4. Staff will need the consent of a youth’s guardian or parent to survey youth under 18 years.

S. Volunteers
   Opportunities shall be made available for youth who have successfully participated in
   programs carried out through youth services, to volunteer assistance to participants in the form
   of mentoring, tutoring, and other activities.

T. Follow-up Services
   1. Follow-up services may be provided for all youth up to 12 months after the completion of
       participation.

   2. Follow-up may include:
      a. Leadership development opportunities
              Exposure to post-secondary educational opportunities;
              Community service learning projects;
              Peer-centered activities, including peer mentoring and tutoring;
              Organizational and team work training, including team leadership training;
              Training in decision-making, including determining priorities;
              Citizenship training, including life skills training such as parenting
              Work Behavior training and budgeting of resources;
              Employability; and
              Positive social and soft skills:
                    o Developing a positive attitude;
                    o Self esteem building;
                    o Cultural diversity training; and
                    o Work simulation activities.
      b. Regular contact with a youth’s employer, including assistance in addressing work-
          related problems that arise;
      c. Assistance in securing better paying jobs, career development and further education;
      d. Work-related peer support groups;
      e. Adult mentoring; and
      f. Tracking the progress of youth in employment after training.




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