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									Disabled Student Programs and Services

               Program Review

                   2002 - 2007




                Patrick Schwab, Ed.D.
           Director, Academic Skills/DSPS


     Mark Tomes, Learning Disabilities Specialist
             – Chief Author and Editor
                        –
           DSPS Contact Information
   Mail    Disabled Student Programs and Services
           P.O. Box 8106
           San Luis Obispo, CA 93403-8106
 Phone     Voice: 805–546–3148
           TTY: 805–546–3149
           Fax:   805–546–3930
 Email     dspsinfo@cuesta.edu
Internet   http://academic.cuesta.edu/acasupp/dsps/



           Internet Link
           This program review document can be
           accessed on the Internet as pdf and
           Microsoft Word files at
           http://academic.cuesta.edu/acasupp/dsps/0
           programreview.htm.



           Acknowledgments
           The editor would like to thank Ryan
           Cartnal, Director of Institutional
           Research at Cuesta College, for his
           invaluable data-gathering and technical
           assistance with this project. Also, the
           flexibility shown and assistance given by
           Pat Schwab, Director of DSPS, is much
           appreciated. Finally, to all the DSPS
           students, staff, and faculty – thank you;
           your hard work, talents, and compassion
           are unsurpassable.
                           Disabled Student Programs and Services
                                      Program Review
                                         July 2007


Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................................1
   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .......................................................................................................................................1
     Brief Overview of DSPS .................................................................................................................................1
     Methodology ..................................................................................................................................................1
     Satisfaction and Feedback .............................................................................................................................1
     Students..........................................................................................................................................................1
     Staffing ...........................................................................................................................................................2
     Courses ..........................................................................................................................................................2
     Academic Accommodations ...........................................................................................................................2
     Budget ............................................................................................................................................................3
     Planning.........................................................................................................................................................3
   PROGRAM REVIEW 2002 .....................................................................................................................................3
   PROGRAM REVIEW 2007 .....................................................................................................................................4
     Methodology ..................................................................................................................................................4
   OVERVIEW OF DISABLED STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES ..........................................................................6
     Overview of DSPS..........................................................................................................................................6
     Location .........................................................................................................................................................6
     Brief History of DSPS ....................................................................................................................................6
     Purpose of DSPS............................................................................................................................................7
     Mission...........................................................................................................................................................7
     Legal Basis and Requirements .......................................................................................................................7
     Budget ............................................................................................................................................................8
WHO WE ARE ................................................................................................................................................... 10
   ORGANIZATION OF DSPS WITHIN CUESTA COLLEGE ........................................................................................ 10
   DSPS STUDENTS .............................................................................................................................................. 10
     Overview ...................................................................................................................................................... 10
     DSPS Student Demographics....................................................................................................................... 10
           DSPS Student Goals Compared to All Cuesta Students ........................................................................................... 10
           Ages of DSPS and District Students ......................................................................................................................... 11
           Race/Ethnicity of DSPS And District Students ........................................................................................................ 12
           DSPS Student Types of Disabilities ......................................................................................................................... 12
           Students Receiving Financial Aid ............................................................................................................................ 13
           Students Receiving Matriculation Services .............................................................................................................. 13
           Academic Success of DSPS Students ....................................................................................................................... 14
       Changing Demographics of DSPS Students ................................................................................................ 14
           National Student Demographic Changes .................................................................................................................. 14
           State-wide Student Demographic Changes ............................................................................................................... 15
           County-wide Student Demographic Changes ........................................................................................................... 15
           District- and Department-wide Student Demographic Changes ............................................................................... 15
     Recommendations As a Result of Changing Demographics of DSPS Students ........................................... 16
   DSPS CLASSIFIED STAFF .................................................................................................................................. 17
   DSPS FACULTY ................................................................................................................................................ 17
   DSPS CONTRACT EMPLOYEES AND VOLUNTEERS ............................................................................................ 18
   CHANGES IN DSPS STAFFING ........................................................................................................................... 18
   RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DSPS STAFFING ....................................................................................................... 19
     All DSPS Personnel ..................................................................................................................................... 19


                                                                                    i
     Classified Staff ............................................................................................................................................. 19
     Faculty ......................................................................................................................................................... 20
     Contract Workers......................................................................................................................................... 20
     District Personnel ........................................................................................................................................ 20
   DSPS ADVISORY COMMITTEE .......................................................................................................................... 20
     Recommendations for DSPS Advisory Committee ....................................................................................... 21
WHERE WE ARE .............................................................................................................................................. 22
   INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................................. 22
   SAN LUIS OBISPO CAMPUS AND DSPS OFFICE ................................................................................................. 22
     The Setting, Staffing, and Courses Offered .................................................................................................. 22
     Fall and Spring Semesters and Summer Sessions at the SLO Campus ........................................................ 23
           DSPS Courses .......................................................................................................................................................... 23
           Services .................................................................................................................................................................... 23
     Recommendations for the San Luis Obispo Campus and DSPS Office ....................................................... 23
   NORTH COUNTY CAMPUS AND DSPS OFFICE ................................................................................................... 24
     The Setting, Staffing, and Courses Offered .................................................................................................. 24
     Fall and Spring Semesters and Summer Sessions at the North County Campus ......................................... 25
           DSPS Courses .......................................................................................................................................................... 25
           Services .................................................................................................................................................................... 25
     Recommendations for the North County Campus and DSPS Office ............................................................ 25
   SOUTH COUNTY CENTERS AND LOCAL HIGH SCHOOLS .................................................................................... 26
     The Setting, Staffing, and Courses Offered .................................................................................................. 26
     Fall and Spring Semesters and Summer Sessions ........................................................................................ 27
     Recommendations for the South County Sites and Local High Schools ...................................................... 27
   DISTANCE EDUCATION ..................................................................................................................................... 27
     The Setting, Staffing, and Courses Offered .................................................................................................. 27
     Recommendations for Distance Education and DSPS Courses ................................................................... 28
WHAT WE DO ................................................................................................................................................... 29
   INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................................. 29
     Learning Disabilities Program .................................................................................................................... 29
     Assistive Technology Center ........................................................................................................................ 30
   ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATIONS / SERVICES ...................................................................................................... 30
     Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 30
     Alternative Testing ....................................................................................................................................... 30
     Priority Registration .................................................................................................................................... 31
     Alternative Media ........................................................................................................................................ 31
     Other DSPS Service Areas ........................................................................................................................... 31
     List of Academic Accommodations / Services .............................................................................................. 31
     Academic Accommodations / Services Rates ............................................................................................... 33
           Methodology ............................................................................................................................................................ 33
           Results ...................................................................................................................................................................... 33
     Changes in DSPS Accommodations / Services ............................................................................................ 35
     Recommendations For Academic Accommodations / Services .................................................................... 35
   ACADEMIC COURSES ........................................................................................................................................ 35
     Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 35
     List of DSPS Courses ................................................................................................................................... 36
     DSPS Course Data ...................................................................................................................................... 37
           Enrollment Rates Compared with District / History ................................................................................................. 37
           Course Fill Rates / History ....................................................................................................................................... 37
           DSPS Student Retention Rate Compared to District ................................................................................................ 37
           Course Grade Rates Compared to the District .......................................................................................................... 38
           Drop Rates Compared to the District........................................................................................................................ 39
           DSPS Students Who Receive Associate Degrees, Certificates, and Transfer Status ................................................ 40
           FTES/FTEF for DSPS and District Courses ............................................................................................................. 40
           Early Alert Rates and Use by DSPS Instructors ....................................................................................................... 41
           Persistence of DSPS and District Students ............................................................................................................... 41
       Curriculum Review ...................................................................................................................................... 42


                                                                                           ii
           Course Content ......................................................................................................................................................... 42
           Course Pre-requisites, Co-requisites, and Advisories ............................................................................................... 42
     Changes in DSPS Courses ........................................................................................................................... 42
     Recommendations for DSPS Courses .......................................................................................................... 43
   OUTREACH........................................................................................................................................................ 43
     Cuesta College Departments ....................................................................................................................... 43
     Agencies, Community Organizations, and Private Practitioners ................................................................ 44
     Local and Out-of-Town High Schools ......................................................................................................... 44
     Catalog and Course Schedules .................................................................................................................... 44
     Central Coast Learning Disabilities Conference ......................................................................................... 44
     Newsletter .................................................................................................................................................... 45
     Web Site ....................................................................................................................................................... 45
     Recommendations for Outreach to Departments, Agencies, and Community Groups ................................ 45
SATISFACTION AND FEEDBACK SURVEYS ............................................................................................ 46
   SATISFACTION AND FEEDBACK SURVEYS SUMMARY ....................................................................................... 46
     Overall Summary ......................................................................................................................................... 46
   SURVEY METHODOLOGY .................................................................................................................................. 47
   DSPS STUDENT SURVEY .................................................................................................................................. 47
     Summary ...................................................................................................................................................... 47
     Student Survey Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 48
     Specific Student Survey Results ................................................................................................................... 48
     Recommendations from DSPS Student Survey............................................................................................. 50
   DSPS FACULTY AND STAFF SURVEY ................................................................................................................ 51
     Summary ...................................................................................................................................................... 51
     DSPS Faculty and Staff Survey Methodology .............................................................................................. 51
     DSPS Faculty and Staff Survey Results ....................................................................................................... 51
     Recommendations from DSPS Staff and Faculty Survey ............................................................................. 53
   CUESTA EMPLOYEE SURVEY ............................................................................................................................ 53
     Summary of Survey and Data Analyses ....................................................................................................... 53
     Employee Survey Methodology .................................................................................................................... 53
     Employee Survey Results ............................................................................................................................. 53
     Recommendations from Cuesta College Employee Survey .......................................................................... 54
   COMMUNITY SURVEY ....................................................................................................................................... 54
     Summary ...................................................................................................................................................... 54
     Community Survey Methodology and Results .............................................................................................. 54
     Recommendations from Community Survey ................................................................................................ 55
REVIEW OF ADA COMPLIANCE ISSUES .................................................................................................. 56
   INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................................. 56
   2002 GALVIN GROUP COMPLIANCE ISSUES, RECOMMENDATIONS, AND DISTRICT FOLLOW-UP........................ 56
   2007 COMPLIANCE ISSUES ................................................................................................................................ 57
     Facilities / Physical Plant Compliance Issues ............................................................................................. 57
           Recommendations for Facilities / Physical Plant Compliance Issues ....................................................................... 57
       Programs and Services Compliance Issues ................................................................................................. 58
           Recommendations for Programs and Services Compliance Issues ........................................................................... 58
CONCLUSIONS / RECOMMENDATIONS ................................................................................................... 59
   RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DSPS AND DISTRICT STAFFING ................................................................................ 59
     DSPS Director and Classified Staff ............................................................................................................. 59
     DSPS Faculty ............................................................................................................................................... 60
     DSPS Contract Workers and Volunteers ..................................................................................................... 61
     DSPS Advisory Committee........................................................................................................................... 61
     District Personnel ........................................................................................................................................ 62
   RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DSPS ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATIONS ..................................................................... 62
   RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DSPS AND DISTRICT ACADEMIC COURSES .............................................................. 63
   RECOMMENDATIONS FOR OUTREACH TO DEPARTMENTS, AGENCIES, AND COMMUNITY GROUPS .................... 63
   RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CUESTA COLLEGE CAMPUSES AND CENTERS........................................................... 64


                                                                                        iii
     Recommendations for the San Luis Obispo Campus and DSPS Office ....................................................... 64
     Recommendations for the North County Campus and DSPS Office ............................................................ 65
     Recommendations for the South County Sites and Local High Schools ...................................................... 65
     Distance Education ...................................................................................................................................... 66
   DSPS PROGRAM REVIEW FOLLOW-UP ............................................................................................................. 66
APPENDICES ..................................................................................................................................................... A
   APPENDIX A STAFF, FACULTY, AND ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERS.......................................................... A
     List of DSPS Staff and Faculty ..................................................................................................................... A
     List of DSPS Advisory Committee Members ................................................................................................. A
     Organizational Chart: Academic Support / DSPS ........................................................................................ A
     Organizational Chart: Student Support Staff and Directors ........................................................................ A
     Organizational Chart: San Luis Obispo County Community College District (Cuesta College) ................. A
   APPENDIX B POLICIES, PROCEDURES, BROCHURES, NEWSLETTERS, ETC......................................................... B
     Cuesta College Board Policy 6520 “Programs and Services for Students with Disabilities” ..................... B
     DSPS Application and Verification Forms ................................................................................................... B
           Application for Services .............................................................................................................................................B
           Verification of Disability ............................................................................................................................................B
           Eligibility Letter .........................................................................................................................................................B
           Disability Categories Defined ....................................................................................................................................B
           Documentation Required for Verification of Disability .............................................................................................B
           Psychologist Referral List ..........................................................................................................................................B
       Student Educational Contract ....................................................................................................................... B
       DSPS Academic Accommodations Policies and Procedures ........................................................................ B
           Academic Accommodations for Students with Disabilities (General) .......................................................................B
           Alternative Testing .....................................................................................................................................................B
           DSPS Testing Room Rules .........................................................................................................................................B
           Adaptive Equipment Loan/Use ..................................................................................................................................B
           Adapted Physical Education .......................................................................................................................................B
           Alternate Media/Taped Texts .....................................................................................................................................B
           Taped Texts ................................................................................................................................................................B
           Counseling Services ...................................................................................................................................................B
           Course Substitution/Waiver Process...........................................................................................................................B
           Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing Student Responsibilities .........................................................................................................B
           Learning Disabilities Eligibility Testing Procedure....................................................................................................B
           Notetaking Services ....................................................................................................................................................B
           Priority Registration ...................................................................................................................................................B
           Petition for Substitution/Waiver of Associate Degree or Certificate Requirements ...................................................B
           Suspension of DSPS Services.....................................................................................................................................B
       Grievance Procedures .................................................................................................................................. B
           Student Complaints of Discrimination (Summary and Procedures) (blue) .................................................................B
           Cuesta College Board Policy on Unlawful Discrimination and Complaint Form (BP 1565) (green) .........................B
       Brochures and Handouts .............................................................................................................................. B
           Disabled Student Programs and Services ...................................................................................................................B
           Programas y Servicios para Estudiantes Minusvalidos DSPS ....................................................................................B
           A Parent’s Guide to College (Transition from High School with a Disability) ..........................................................B
           Guidelines for Students and Staff with Disabilities for a Safe Evacuation from the College Campus .......................B
           Access to Success: A Guide for Students Entering the LD Program ..........................................................................B
       2006-2007 Cuesta College Catalog (DSPS References and Courses) (tan) ................................................. B
       Fall 06 through Fall 07 Course Schedule Pages (DSPS References and Courses) (tan) ............................. B
       DSPS Newsletters ......................................................................................................................................... B
           March 27, 2006 (Volume 1, Issue 1) ..........................................................................................................................B
           September 25, 2006 (Volume 2, Issue 1)....................................................................................................................B
           March 15, 2007 (Volume 2, Issue 2) ..........................................................................................................................B
     DSPS Web Site Home Page .......................................................................................................................... B
   APPENDIX C PROGRAM REVIEW SATISFACTION AND FEEDBACK SURVEYS AND DATA.................................... C
     2007 Program Review Surveys, Data, and Charts ....................................................................................... C
           DSPS Student Survey, Data, Written Comments, and Charts (yellow) ......................................................................C
           DSPS Staff and Faculty Survey, Data, Written Comments, and Charts (green) .........................................................C
           Cuesta College Employee Survey, Data, Written Comments, and Charts (blue) .......................................................C
           Community Survey (lavender) ..................................................................................................................................C


                                                                                         iv
   2002 Galvin Group Program Review ........................................................................................................... C
       March 2002 Galvin Group Program Review Narrative (ivory) ..................................................................................C
       March 2002 Galvin Group Program Review Data, Charts, and Tables (ivory) ..........................................................C
       District Response to March 2002 Galvin Group Program Review (ivory) .................................................................C
APPENDIX D PROGRAM REVIEW STUDENT DEMOGRAPHIC AND DSPS COURSE DATA AND CHARTS .............. D
  Cuesta College Student Demographic Data ................................................................................................. D
       “Student Characteristics and Enrollment Trends, Fall 2006” .................................................................................... D
       “Student Services Program Review Technical Assistance Site Visit – Data Elements” (pink) ................................. D
       DSPS Students Who Received an AA/AS Degree, by Semester (pink) .................................................................... D
       Student Demographic Charts ..................................................................................................................................... D
   DSPS Course Data ....................................................................................................................................... D
       Final Course Grades, by Instructor – Data and Chart (gray) ..................................................................................... D
       Enrollments, Fill Rates, Retention Rates, Success Rates, Early Alerts, and FTES/FTEF by Course and Semester –
              Data and Charts (buff) .................................................................................................................................... D
       Comparison of Courses (Success Rates in Cuesta Courses Subsequent to DSPS Courses) (tan) .............................. D
APPENDIX E DSPS 2006-2007 UNIT PLAN....................................................................................................... E
  DSPS 2006-2007 Unit Plan .......................................................................................................................... E
APPENDIX F EXECUTIVE SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS, AND RECOMMENDATIONS .............................................. F
APPENDIX G COMPACT DISC (CD) OF PROGRAM REVIEW DOCUMENT, DATA FILES, CHARTS, ETC. ............... G




                                                                                 v
                                           Introduction

                                        Executive Summary
Brief Overview of DSPS
        The Disabled Student Programs and Services department of Cuesta College is
the enabling office to serve students with disabilities. Its Disability Specialists
authorize reasonable and appropriate academic accommodations („services”) for students
with documented and verified disabilities of all types, and its support staff then
administers those services.* In addition, DSPS offers basic academic skills and computer
access courses.
        DSPS also provides accommodations for community members with disabilities
when they attend Cuesta College functions and activities; provides expertise to the
district in accessibility issues; provides outreach to local high school students who have
disabilities; and provides information and assistance to agencies, community groups,
parents of students with disabilities, and others. Finally, DSPS sponsors the well-
received annual Central Coast Learning Disabilities Conference.

Methodology
       A comprehensive program review was conducted for the Disabled Student
Programs and Services (DSPS) department at Cuesta College during the Fall 2006 and
Spring 2007 semesters.
       The review began with staff meetings to discuss the format of the program
review, specific issues to address, etc.
       Next, in-house and district statistical data, multiple opinion
surveys, and formal and informal staff discussions were used to       “Cuesta gives 110%+
provide a picture of where the department is now and where it is      to anyone who seeks
headed. A full curriculum and course outline review was completed     out their dreams, no
by DSPS faculty members. Also, compliance issues and                    matter what they
recommendations from the 2002 DSPS program review were                      may be!”
reviewed.                                                                – DSPS Student
       Finally, a department staff retreat and subsequent
discussions were used to analyze the data, discuss trends and goals, and formulate
recommendations.

Satisfaction and Feedback
       Opinion surveys show that Cuesta College‟s DSPS program is well-regarded by
the DSPS students and the staff and faculty of Cuesta College. Across the board,
satisfaction ratings in nearly all areas are very high, both in services and courses
provided.

Students
      Statistical data shows that DSPS students are as varied as any Cuesta College
student in age, gender, race/ethnicity, goals, and earning degrees and certificates. The

*   All students with verified disabilities have the legal right to receive academic accommodations–“services”–
       and participate in all Cuesta College programs and activities, both on and off campus.



DSPS Program Review 2007                                    1                                      July 11, 2007
exception is that DSPS has a somewhat higher percentage of students under the age of
20 and between the ages of 40 and 49.
       While the great majority of DSPS students receive academic accommodations for
a learning disability, students in all disability areas are served.
       The college is experiencing growth in the number of students with disabilities
(and especially, hearing impairments), and hence, DSPS‟s student growth is increasing,
                       as well.

                           Staffing
                              DSPS staff and faculty are well-seasoned, the majority
                      having been in the department over 3 years and a significant
                      amount 8 years or more. Staffing includes a division assistant, two
                      secretaries (one at the San Luis Obispo campus and one at the
                      North County Campus), six full-time and/or temporary Disability
                      Specialists, support personnel (such as a support services
                      coordinator, an alternate media facilitator, instructional
                      assistants, etc.), and contract workers, including American Sign
                      Language interpreters and notetakers. Also, DSPS is fortunate to
                      have a large cadre of volunteers who read texts, proctor tests, and
                      tutor students.
                              Significant staffing cuts implemented in DSPS in 2003 are
                      gradually being replaced, particularly in areas critical to directly
                      serving students with disabilities. Recent staffing hires and
                      increases include a replacement full-time tenure-track Learning
Disabilities Specialist, a part-time temporary support service assistant to assist in
Dear/Hard-of-Hearing services coordination, an increase in the Speech and Language
Specialist position from 50% to 60%, and many classified staff returning to an 11 or 12
month work year.

Courses
        DSPS offers specialized courses in basic skill core academic areas and in
computer access.
        DSPS courses meet or exceed the district average in all measured areas,
including fill rates, enrollment, student retention, student persistence, course grade
rates, drop rates, and use of Early Alerts.
        Curriculum review is an on-going activity in DSPS. For this program review, all
courses have been thoroughly reviewed. Pre-requisites, co-requisites, and advisories in
all courses are validated. Two courses (ACA SK 50 Writing Fundamentals and ACA SK
140 Diagnostic Testing for Learning Disabilities) are undergoing revisions and have
been forwarded into the curriculum approval process.
        DSPS courses consistently contribute more funding to the district from student
enrollment than its percentage of students in the district.

Academic Accommodations
       All standard academic accommodations are used by DSPS students. Alternative
testing is used more than any other DSPS service, followed by priority registration.
Other services include providing classroom notetakers, American Sign Language
interpreters, alternatives to print media (such as Braille), and special equipment or



DSPS Program Review 2007                        2                               July 11, 2007
furniture. Some “not-so-standard” accommodations are used as well, such as e-text (e.g.,
MP3 format) and private rooms for verbalizing test answers.

Budget
        The 2006-2007 DSPS operating budget was $1,318,000, a 15.5% increase over
the previous year. The state of California share of that was $947,600, distributed as
“categorical” funding (restricted for direct or indirect disabled student use). Cuesta
College provided the remaining $370,500 (a 72%/28% split). The Cuesta College “match”
is distributed as unrestricted funds.
        While DSPS has not fully recovered from budget and staffing cuts implemented
throughout the department three years ago, the staff and faculty continue to provide
high quality courses and services that match the best of any college in the nation.
Special funding streams, such as on-going 2007 Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing funds, help offset
budget difficulties to provide services to certain populations and/or programs.

Planning
        DSPS staff and faculty are adept at the “analyze–evaluate–implement” planning
cycle process, and hence, see this program review as another opportunity to refine the
process and methods of serving students with disabilities. The following encapsulates
what we believe we need to do to continue providing excellent services and programs.
        The primary planning goal is to continue to meet the increasing number of
requests for accommodations by students with disabilities as student growth continues.
Increased staffing is a priority method for meeting those requests, particularly in the
areas of support services (such as American Sign Language interpreters, notetakers,
alternate media facilitators, and clerical assistance) and in district sites which have no
DSPS presence (such as the South County sites). Restoring the classified and faculty
positions that were lost in the 2003 budget cuts is largely, but not totally, complete and
will continue to be examined and prioritized. Filling upcoming open positions due to
retirements and transfers will also be a priority.
        The DSPS faculty continually modify its courses to improve delivery and
efficiency of instruction. Hence, as this point, only minor modifications to DSPS courses
are needed, including a course outline change to ACA SK 50 Writing Fundamentals to
reflect its collaborative efforts with faculty members in the English and English as a
Second Language departments and ACA SK 140 Diagnostic Testing for Learning
Disabilities to reflect changes recently made in the testing process.
        Finally, DSPS staff and faculty will continue to provide outreach to local high
school students, agencies, community groups, parents, and professionals in private and
public practice, focusing on more “advertising” both in the district and in the community
in order to spread the word of its excellent programs and services and to continue to
improve on its already stellar record.


                              Program Review 2002
       The Galvin Group, under contract with the California Community College
Chancellor‟s Office, conducted a program review of Cuesta College DSPS in March 2002
as part of a regular quintennial review of community college Disabled Student
Programs and Services departments throughout California. The closing remarks of the
Galvin Group March 2002 Program Review state


DSPS Program Review 2007                        3                               July 11, 2007
            “There is an extremely high level of sensitivity shown toward students
            with disabilities at Cuesta College. Students are being well served by
            a caring and competent staff. The DSP&S program provides an
            excellent model for other colleges in the system for efficient and
            effective use of resources.”
         The 2002 Galvin Group DSPS Program Review also had a number of compliance
issues, recommendations, and suggestions for better student access to Cuesta College‟s
facilities, courses, programs, and support services. These issues and recommendations
are discussed in more detail later in this report.


                              Program Review 2007
Methodology
        The DSPS program review process began in the Fall 2006 semester when
department-wide meetings were held to determine what information was needed for a
comprehensive program review. The program review facilitator then began developing
surveys and requesting data regarding DSPS students and courses in order to
determine “where we are.”
        The following list of materials outlines the tools and materials used for this stage
of the review, organized by various categories:
        DSPS and District Student Data
        • Cuesta College Institutional Research DSPS-specific reports
        • Cuesta College Institutional Research, “Student Services Program Review
          Technical Assistance Site Visit Data Element”
        • San Luis Obispo County Office of Education “2007 San Luis Obispo County
          Schools Annual Education Report
        • DSPS Support Services database (“Marv”)
        • DSPS Program Review Report, March 2002 (Galvin Group, under contract to
          The California Community College Chancellor‟s Office)
        • World Wide Web research (for demographic trends)
        DSPS Staffing Data
        • In-house data-gathering
        • Satisfaction/Feedback Surveys, individually tailored for
          DSPS students, DSPS Staff and Faculty, all Cuesta College
          employees, and community members
        • “Categorical Programs Self-Evaluation for Cuesta College,
          Spring 2007”
        • DSPS Unit Plan 2006-2007 and DSPS Unit Plan 2007-2008
          department meetings
        • DSPS Program Review Report, March 2002 (Galvin Group,
          under contract to The California Community College Chancellor‟s Office)
        DSPS Academic Accommodations („Services”) Data
        • DSPS Support Services database (“Marv”)



DSPS Program Review 2007                         4                               July 11, 2007
        • Satisfaction/Feedback Surveys, individually tailored for DSPS students, DSPS
          Staff and Faculty, all Cuesta College employees, and community members
        • DSPS Program Review Report, March 2002 (Galvin Group, under contract to
          The California Community College Chancellor‟s Office)
        DSPS Course Data
        • Cuesta College Institutional Research DSPS-specific reports
        • Reviews by DSPS faculty of DSPS course curriculum/outlines
        • Reviews by DSPS faculty of DSPS course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and
          advisories
        • DSPS Unit Plan 2006-2007 and DSPS Unit Plan 2007-2008 department
          meetings
        • Satisfaction/Feedback Surveys, individually tailored for DSPS students, DSPS
          Staff and Faculty, all Cuesta College employees, and community members
        DSPS Satisfaction and Feedback Data
        • In-house data-gathering
        • Satisfaction/Feedback Surveys, individually tailored for DSPS students, DSPS
          Staff and Faculty, all Cuesta College employees, and community members
        • DSPS Program Review Report, March 2002 (Galvin Group, under contract to
          The California Community College Chancellor‟s Office)
        DSPS and District Facilities, Physical Plant, Campuses, Centers, and
          Compliance Issues Data
        • In-house data-gathering
        • DSPS Program Review Report, March 2002 (Galvin Group, under contract to
          The California Community College Chancellor‟s Office)
        • Satisfaction/Feedback Surveys, individually tailored for DSPS students, DSPS
          Staff and Faculty, all Cuesta College employees, and community members
        • DSPS Unit Plan 2006-2007 and DSPS Unit Plan 2007-2008 department
          meetings
       The final step of the program review consisted of DSPS department-wide, in-
depth analyses of the data; discussions of the DSPS purpose, goals, and vision of the
future; recommendations from staff and faculty for addressing the needs of the
department and meeting the department goals (based on the data and survey results);
and a final write-up of the results.




DSPS Program Review 2007                       5                            July 11, 2007
          Overview of Disabled Student Programs and Services
Overview of DSPS
        Disabled Student Programs and Services (DSPS) is the enabling department of
Cuesta College in San Luis Obispo, California* to provide to students with disabilities a
variety of support services and specialized classes which allow the students to
participate in and benefit from courses and programs at the college.# Services include
program advising, academic counseling, alternative testing, alternative media, sign
language interpreters, specialized tutoring, mobility assistance, adaptive furniture, and
assistive technology. DSPS classes include phonics, reading comprehension, writing,
arithmetic and math study skills, and computer skills.
        In addition, DSPS provides outreach and consultation to local and out-of-town K-
12 and high school students and confers with the personnel at the Department of
Rehabilitation, community agencies and volunteer organizations, other community
colleges, universities, and state licensing agencies. DSPS sponsors the annual Central
Coast Learning Disabilities Conference, maintains a web site on the Cuesta College
server, and publishes a newsletter for the Cuesta College faculty and staff.+
        DSPS staff and faculty meet as a combined staff at regular monthly meetings
and with the Academic Skills staff and faculty (as a division) at separate monthly
meetings, as well.

Location
       Cuesta College has two campuses in San Luis Obispo County (one in San Luis
Obispo and one in the north county in Paso Robles). DSPS maintains permanent offices
at these campuses.
       In addition, Cuesta College offers courses at south county “centers” (staff in a
dedicated office area) at Nipomo High School and Arroyo Grande High School and at a
number of local high schools throughout San Luis Obispo County. Currently, there are
no DSPS offices or personnel at any of the high school centers or campuses.

Brief History of DSPS
        Disabled Student Programs & Services began at Cuesta College on the San Luis
Obispo campus in 1972 with a modest budget of $4,775. The department included a
part-time counselor and 34 students with a wide variety of disabilities. The first
director, Lynn Frady, Ed.D., was hired in 1973 and stayed with the program through
2001. Linda Long, Ellen Young (interim Director), and the current director, Patrick
Schwab, Ed.D., were the subsequent Directors.
        In 1989, DSPS held the first annual Central Coast Learning Disabilities
Conference, and it has been held continually ever since.
        Over the last 35 years, Cuesta College‟s DSPS department has served more than
15,000 students, developing into one of the strongest programs for students with
disabilities (especially learning disabilities) in the country.




* Cuesta College is the only college in the San Luis Obispo County Community College District.
#  See Appendix B for Cuesta College Board Policy 6520 “Programs and Services for Students with
      Disabilities.”
+ See the sections, “Who We Are, “Where We Are,” and “What We Do” for an in-depth discussion of these

      topics.


DSPS Program Review 2007                              6                                  July 11, 2007
Purpose of DSPS
           The purpose of Disabled Students Programs and Services (DSPS) is threefold:#
           1) To assist students with disabilities to be able to participate in and benefit
              from courses and programs at the college.
           2) To assist the district/college administration, staff, and faculty in complying
              with legal mandates regarding access to all of its programs, courses, and
              services for students, staff, and members of the public who have disabilities.
              (See Legal Basis and Requirements, below.)
           3) To provide outreach, education, and collaboration to community agencies and
              members of the public who serve current and future students with
              disabilities.

Mission
       Disabled Student Programs and Services (DSPS) promotes the full participation
of students with disabilities in all aspects of their postsecondary education. DSPS
advocates and facilitates equal educational opportunities through
appropriate support services, curricula, instruction, policies and
funding allocations. DSPS works to eliminate discrimination              “DSPS is a mandatory
                                                                            program for the
against students with disabilities and to promote their
                                                                             success of lost
independence, growth, productivity and equality. Our goal is to           humans, so that they
provide academic accommodations and other services to assist               may become useful
students with disabilities in achieving their academic goals.               assets to society,
       DSPS assists the college in complying with Section 504 of                HUGE!!”
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which states, "no qualified                 – DSPS Student
individual with disabilities shall, on the basis of their disability, be
excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of or be
subject to discrimination under any post-secondary program or activity receiving federal
financial assistance.”

Legal Basis and Requirements
       Agencies and organizations that accept federal dollars (such as Cuesta College,
which receives student financial aid and other program dollars from the federal
government) are mandated to provide access to its programs, services, and facilities for
students and employees with disabilities. Cuesta College is subject to this legislative
mandate from two federal laws, the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504),
as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended.
       California laws also specify that educational programs must be accessible, and
where disparity exists because of a handicapping condition, the educational institution
must provide services to “level the playing field.” Title V of the California Code of
Regulations provides the primary basis for the state mandate for colleges to provide
services to students with disabilities.
       In addition, the federal Department of Education Office for Civil Rights has the
legal authority to adjudicate discrimination complaints and prescribe mandatory
solutions in cases where discrimination or access has been at issue Finally, a variety of
judgments and resolutions from legal cases have provided guidance and decisions for
determining the rights of and mandates for colleges and students with disabilities.

#   As revised at a DSPS retreat on May 4, 2007.


DSPS Program Review 2007                           7                              July 11, 2007
       Cuesta College has designated its Disabled Student Programs and Services
(DSPS) department as its avenue to provide services and accommodations to students
with disabilities. (Note, however, a student does not have to go through DSPS to request
a service or accommodation.)

Budget
       The 2006-2007 DSPS operating budget is approximately $1,318,000. The
California Community College Chancellor‟s Office (through California state legislative
action) provides $947,600 and the college provides $370,500 of the dollars. (See budget
history charts below.) California Community College Chancellor‟s Office funds are
deemed “categorical” (restricted for service to DSPS students), while district funds are
unrestricted.


                              Total DSPS Annual Expenditures

1,400,000
1,200,000
1,000,000
  800,000
  600,000
  400,000
  200,000
      -
     19 991

     19 992

     19 993

     19 994

     19 995

     19 996

     19 997

     19 998

     19 999

     20 000

     20 001

     20 002

     20 003

     20 004

     20 005

     20 006

               7
             00
           -1

           -1

           -1

           -1

           -1

           -1

           -1

           -1

           -1

           -2

           -2

           -2

           -2

           -2

           -2

           -2

           -2
        90

        91

        92

        93

        94

        95

        96

        97

        98

        99

        00

        01

        02

        03

        04

        05

        06
     19




                              DSPS vs. District Matching Funds

1,000,000
  900,000
  800,000
  700,000
  600,000
  500,000
  400,000
  300,000
  200,000
  100,000
      -
            1996-   1997-   1998-   1999-   2000-   2001-   2002-   2003-    2004-   2005-   2006-
            1997    1998    1999    2000    2001    2002    2003    2004     2005    2006    2007

                      DSPS (Restricted) Funds       District (Unrestricted) Funds


       DSPS reports annually via MIS (Management Information System, a software
reporting application) to the California Community Colleges Chancellor‟s Office the


DSPS Program Review 2007                               8                                       July 11, 2007
number of students it serves within each disability category. The DSPS budget is
determined in large part by the amount of services provided to students and by their
disability category.
        One can ascertain from the charts above that DSPS incurs steadily increasing
costs. The district matching funds, however, dropped significantly three years ago and
have remained flat since then.
        District matching funds are important in qualifying for one-time and on-going
funds that become available from time-to-time (such as funds recently specified for
Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing programs) and in providing services and staff beyond the
minimum required by the California Community College Chancellor‟s Office and
legislative mandates.




DSPS Program Review 2007                      9                             July 11, 2007
                                         Who We Are

                 Organization of DSPS within Cuesta College
       Organizational charts of the Disabled Student Programs and Services
department and its placement in the Cuesta College organizational scheme are provided
in Appendix A. In 2003, the administration of Cuesta College re-organized, and at that
time DSPS moved from the Vice President of Instruction‟s office to the umbrella of the
Vice President of Student Support.
       DSPS is in the Academic Support/DSPS division. It works closely with its “sister”
department, Academic Support, and shares a Director with that department.


                                        DSPS Students
Overview
       DSPS currently serves about 850 students (about 7.7 % of the Cuesta College
population), a 33% increase since the 2002 DSPS program review. All ages of students
are served, as long as the student is taking at least one Cuesta College course on any
campus, center, or high school site or is enrolled in any distance
education course.
       The largest group of disability type is learning disability, followed
by “other” disability (including Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder),
psychological disability, mobility disability, and others.
       Despite declining enrollment in the San Luis Obispo County K-12
school population,* the Cuesta College and DSPS student populations
continue to grow steadily. This is attributed to the fact that DSPS and
Cuesta College both have highly-regarded reputations and attract many
students from other areas of the state and country. DSPS‟s phonics
program, for example, is nationally-recognized, and some out-of-area students have
mentioned they come to Cuesta College just for that program. In addition, Cuesta
College is a bridge for many students hoping to transfer to the local university, the
California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo (a nationally-recognized
institution in its own right).

DSPS Student Demographics
       The current DSPS student demographic descriptions closely match the Cuesta
College student population demographics as a whole. The following shows how DSPS
students compare to Cuesta College students in a variety of areas. Also, see Appendix D
for additional data and charts on this topic.

DSPS Student Goals Compared to All Cuesta Students
      DSPS students are as varied as all other students on campus. Their goals include
improving their basic academic skills, gaining skills to enter (or re-enter) the job

*See “2007 San Luis Obispo County Schools Annual Education Report,” San Luis Obispo County Office of
Education (available on-line at www.slocoe.org) and “Student Characteristics and Enrollment Trends, Fall
2006,” Research Product #0607002 10/20/06, Cuesta College.


DSPS Program Review 2007                                10                                    July 11, 2007
market, transferring to a university, and all the other goals that students bring to a
community college. Most DSPS students (83.5%) do not have an Associate degree when
first entering the DSPS program.
Ages of DSPS and District Students
       A solid majority of DSPS students are 24 years of age or less (56% of all DSPS
students). The remaining students are divided rather evenly in older age groups, except
for a jump in the percentage of students between the ages of 40 and 49 (15%; see
accompanying chart).


                           Ages of DSPS and District Students,
                                    as of October 2006

    50%

    40%                       35%
                            35%

    30%          27%
              21%
    20%                                                             15%
                                       10%                                     9%10%
                                     8%                                8%
    10%                                      5%5%        6%
                                                           4%

     0%
                 1            2        3        4          5          6           7

                                    % of DSPS       % of District

       These figures match closely with the percentage of all students in the district in
the various age groups, except that DSPS has a higher percentage of students under the
age of 20 years old (27% for DSPS vs. 21% for the district) and those students between
the ages of 40 and 49 (15% and 8%, respectively).
       The former statistic might be a result of the outreach that DSPS Specialists have
with each high school in San Luis Obispo County. Specialists are assigned two or three
of the high schools (so that every high school has a Specialist liaison) to visit the
Resource Specialist Program students in the fall or spring in order to discuss the
various procedures to apply for DSPS services and to answer the students‟ questions
about going to college. This outreach might result in an overall larger percentage of
students in the under 20 years of age group in DSPS.
       DSPS also serves local (San Luis Obispo County) high school students who are
taking “High School Enrichment” courses (any course taken while also attending senior
high school, often used for high school graduation credit requirements) and
homeschooled and private school students taking Cuesta College courses. The latter in
particular often request learning disabilities assessment, as their usual avenues for
such assessments are more limited than students in public schools.




DSPS Program Review 2007                       11                              July 11, 2007
Race/Ethnicity of DSPS And District Students
       The percentages of self-reported race/ethnicity of DSPS students and all students
in the district closely match. Note that the percentage of Cuesta College students who
identify themselves as “white” is decreasing, while the percentage of students who
identify themselves as “Hispanic” is increasing, particularly at the South County
Centers.


                 Percentage of Students in DSPS and
                               District,
                          by Race/Ethnicity

       70%
       60%
       50%
       40%
       30%
        20%
        10%
          0%
               Afric Asia                                                       D i s tric t S tudents
                          Filipi Hisp                                          D S P S S tudents
                an-   n                Nati Othe
                           no anic               Pacif Whit
               Ame                      ve    r                       Unk
                                                   ic   e
               rican                  Ame Non-                        now
                                                 Islan
                                      rican Whit                       n
                                                  der
                                             e


                           DSPS Students               District Students



DSPS Student Types of Disabilities
        Any student with a verified disability can request academic accommodations.
Some types of disabilities, by their very nature, require more assistance and/or budget
allocation to provide a consequent accommodation. For example, most deaf students‟
primary language is American Sign Language (ASL), and ASL interpreters are needed
for them to access their courses. However, every student has individual needs and
individual requests for accommodations and is treated as such by DSPS personnel.
        The following chart and table describe the number and percentage of students
with different disabilities served by DSPS from 2001 to 2006.*




*   Data and chart provided by Ryan Cartnal, Director of Institutional Research and Assessment, Cuesta
     College.


DSPS Program Review 2007                              12                                   July 11, 2007
                                                                           2001/02                                  2002/03                        2003/04                         2004/05          2005/06
 Students with Disabilities
                                                                           N                   %                    N            %                 N             %                 N     %          N      %
 Mobility Impairment                                                       76                  11.8                 82           12.3              53            8.5               49    7.6        72     10.1
 Visual Impairment                                                         16                  2.5                  16           2.4               14            2.3               8     1.2        20     2.8
 Hearing Impairment                                                        14                  2.2                  15           2.3               15            2.4               8     1.2        13     1.8
 Speech & Language Impairment                                              4                   0.6                  5            0.8               4             0.6               3     0.5        5      0.7
 Learning Disability                                                       264                 40.9                 278          41.8              270           43.4              315   48.8       295    41.3
 Acquired Brain Impairment                                                 25                  3.9                  25           3.8               31            5.0               29    4.5        39     5.5
 Developmentally Delayed Learner                                           8                   1.2                  9            1.4               9             1.4               11    1.7        18     2.5
 Psychological Disability                                                  77                  11.9                 80           12.0              76            12.2              69    10.7       80     11.2
 Other (including AD/HD)                                                   162                 25.1                 155          23.3              150           24.1              154   23.8       173    24.2
 TOTAL                                                                     646                 100.0                665          100.0             622           100.0             646   100.0      715    100.0



                                                 350


                                                 300


                                                 250
                            Number of Students




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Students Receiving Financial Aid
        45.4% of DSPS students are receiving some form of financial aid to attend
college, compared to 27.2% of all students in the district (2005-2006 academic year).

Students Receiving Matriculation Services
        DSPS students receive similar amounts of college orientations, course placement
tests, and other matriculation services as other Cuesta College students. One difference
between the groups, however, is that DSPS students receive significantly higher
amounts of counseling services than Cuesta College students as a whole (74.3% vs.
53.6%, respectively). This perhaps can be explained by the fact that DSPS has its own
full-time, “in-house” academic counselor who is readily available to students via
appointment and drop-in times. This trend in higher counseling rates is comparable to
other categorical programs that have full-time counselors, such as Extended
Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS, 91.1% counseling rate).




DSPS Program Review 2007                                                                                                 13                                                                     July 11, 2007
Academic Success of DSPS Students
                                 DSPS students achieve the same or greater academic
                          success than most other Cuesta College students. In 2006, for
                          example, 72.3% of DSPS students completed their degree-
                          applicable courses compared to 70.9% of all Cuesta College
                          students. English and math courses showed similar
                          comparisons: 100% of DSPS students completed their English
                          courses compared to 80.8% of all Cuesta College students, and
                          63.2% completed their math courses compared to 63.6% of
                          Cuesta College students.
                                 Similar rates of academic success are evident at the
degree and transfer level, as well. In 2006, 5% of DSPS students earned Associate
degrees compared to 3% of all Cuesta College students. 13% of DSPS students were
“transfer prepared” compared to 10% of all Cuesta College students, and 18% were
“transfer directed” compared to 17% of Cuesta College students.
       In the Spring 2007 semester, 10.8% of the graduates were DSPS students (77 of
the 711 graduates), despite being only 7.7% of the Cuesta College student population.

Changing Demographics of DSPS Students
      There are several societal factors changing the numbers and types of students
who attend college and, hence, the numbers and types of students with disabilities that
DSPS will serve. In addition, DSPS staff and faculty are seeing a number of other, more
anecdotal and unexplained, student demographic changes.

National Student Demographic Changes
         Technological advances in the country and the world provide
an opportunity for people with disabilities to have more of chances
for equal access to jobs, education, recreation, and all other aspects
of life. As bio-electronics, nanotechnology, digital input and output
devices, Internet-based information search engines and storage
servers, and other technologies become more mainstream and
inexpensive, DSPS more opportunities to help students gain
educational access and reach their goals.
         Medical advances increase the ability for human beings to survive life-
threatening diseases, medical conditions, accidents, and injuries, but they also increase
the number of people who survive such conditions with a resultant disability. As a
portion of these citizens decide to attend college, DSPS offices will be responsible for
providing services for them.
         In addition, our nation, in 2007, is involved in protracted international conflicts,
particularly in Iraq and Afghanistan, in which large numbers of soldiers are surviving
what were once fatal violations to their bodies and minds. While physical disabilities
such as loss of limbs, hearing, and eyesight are obvious types of disabilities resulting
from war-time activities, there are also increased numbers of “hidden” psychological
disorders expressed in soldiers returning from war, particularly as it has become more
acceptable for people to report such difficulties in adjusting to after-war activities.
These disabilities include general and severe anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress
disorders, and major depression.*

*   For example, see Hoge, Charles, et al., New England Journal of Medicine, July 1, 2004 (Vol. 351:13-22).


DSPS Program Review 2007                                   14                                     July 11, 2007
        Similarly, a larger number of soldiers are returning from overseas military
actions with traumatic brain injuries (a type of disability that is highly individual and
particularly difficult to treat).
        Many of these returning soldiers will enroll in community colleges for retraining,
increased education for job advancement, and clinical post-war re-socialization. DSPS
staff and faculty expect an increase in enrollment by students with these physical and
psychological challenges.
        Also on the national level, homelessness and poverty rates have risen in the past
five years, and while homelessness and poverty are not disabilities in and of themselves,
they bring their own concomitant hardships and psychological and emotional
challenges. Likewise, poverty itself can increase a person‟s chances of acquiring a
disability as people postpone requesting medical attention for disability-causing
conditions because they do not have the funds to pay for such care. DSPS can expect to
see an increase in the number of students who are homeless and/or without funds to pay
for their basic care.
        One unexplained phenomenon at the national level is an increase in the number
of diagnoses of Asperger‟s Syndrome and other psychological disorders of the autistic
spectrum. Cuesta College is experiencing a similar increase in the number of students
with these disorders, as well.

State-wide Student Demographic Changes
       California‟s population is ever-growing. The number of people in California who
identify themselves as “white” or “Caucasian” has recently dropped below 50% for the
state, while we see a greater increase in the Asian and Hispanic populations.
Additionally, much of the population growth results from immigration.
       The result is a state-wide community college population of students who are ever
more diverse in ethnicity and native languages. As we know, disabilities are not bound
by ethnicity, national origin, or the language one speaks, and DSPS staff can expect an
increase in students with disabilities from a wide range of backgrounds, including
students with disabilities whose primary (and perhaps only) language is not English.

County-wide Student Demographic Changes
       The trend of a state population of greater diversity of ethnic backgrounds and
native languages is evident in San Luis Obispo County, as well. However, due to the
county‟s high costs of living and housing and other factors, the county population is not
growing as quickly as in the state, and actually (as noted earlier), the number of San
Luis Obispo County K-12 district students has been declining for a number of years. The
Cuesta College student population has subsequently followed this trend of a greater
diversity of student ethnicity and a changing pattern in local high school students.
DSPS can expect to follow the same shift in student population.
       DSPS staff and faculty also have noted an increase in the number of older
students returning to Cuesta College to gain more or new employment skills.

District- and Department-wide Student Demographic Changes
       One interesting trend that Cuesta College has experienced for the past several
years is a greater number of Cuesta College students enrolling in courses but a fewer




DSPS Program Review 2007                       15                               July 11, 2007
percentage of those students attending full-time.# Hence, there are more students who
come to the campuses who need parking places, registration assistance, tutoring, and of
course, DSPS services.
        Perhaps correlated with this change is an increase at Cuesta
College in the number of first-time college students (with
consequent decreases in the number of continuing students) and in
the number of “high school enrichment” students (the latter
percentage rose 12.5% from 2004 to 2006).
        One unexplained demographic change in the district is a
recent, large increase in the number of students at Cuesta College
whose primary language is American Sign Language (ASL). DSPS is required to provide
ASL interpreters for these students. However, qualified ASL Interpreters are difficult to
find in San Luis Obispo County, with the effect that it has been very difficult to provide
ASL interpreters for deaf students in all of their classes.
        As noted earlier, DSPS is experiencing a rise in the number of students with
Asperger‟s Syndrome and other disabilities of the autistic spectrum. In addition (and
likewise unexplainably), the department is seeing somewhat of an increase in students
with visual impairments, mobility impairments, and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity
Disorder.
        Some DSPS student demographic changes appear to be campus-specific. For
example, students with learning disabilities and generally higher cognitive ability levels
are increasing at the San Luis Obispo campus, while the opposite is true at the North
County Campus. Additionally, it appears that the number of older students who are
newly-diagnosed with learning disabilities are decreasing at the San Luis Obispo
campus and increasing at the North County Campus; it may be that more students are
being identified as LD in SLO and south county K-12 school districts than those in the
north county.
        There are students with two types of disabilities that DSPS serves whose
percentages appear relatively stable: students with learning disabilities – by far the
largest DSPS group – and students with speech and language disorders.

Recommendations As a Result of Changing Demographics of DSPS Students
       Recommendations regarding DSPS students are enfolded in the
recommendations for DSPS staffing, programs, and services. These recommendations
have been based on the three surveys completed for this program review, as well as
internal discussions regarding program changes, services offered to students, budget
trends, etc.
       Other, more general, recommendations are made here:
          • Increase and monitor the enrollment of the number of evening and summer
            DSPS courses
          • Maintain proficiency in the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children–IV
          • Provide training in technological advances that help students gain more
            access to educational programs


#   Perhaps this is related to the decline in the number of local high school students. The bulk of local
      students might be attending part-time, while out-of-area students, fewer in number, tend to move to
      the county specifically to attend college and might be more inclined to attend full-time. Also, national
      and local economic factors could explain the trend to part-time status, as students must work more to
      make a living.


DSPS Program Review 2007                                   16                                     July 11, 2007
        • Provide DSPS orientations to new Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing students


                                    DSPS Classified Staff
        Permanent DSPS classified staff include*
        • an Administrative Assistant (shared with the Academic
                                                                                      “The DSPS staff
          Support department)
                                                                                     supports me and
        • a Secretary (who also acts as receptionist for the High                    never gives up on
          Tech Center/Classroom Building)                                            me. Thanks to the
        • two Program Assistants (one at the San Luis Obispo                            DSPS staff I
          campus and one at the North County Campus)                                  believe I can be
        • a Support Services Coordinator                                             anything in life.”
                                                                                      – DSPS Student
        • a Support Services               Assistant      who     coordinates
          alternative testing
        • an Alternate Media Facilitator
        • two Instructional Associates (one who completes part of the learning
          disabilities assessment and tutors students in English courses and the other
          who works in the Assistive Technology Center and tutors Math.)

        Temporary support staff include notetakers, sign language interpreters, text
readers, and tutors. In addition, many volunteers contribute to the success of DSPS,
including textbook readers, test proctors, and classroom notetakers.
        DSPS staff volunteer in many community organizations that help improve the
lives of people with disabilities, such as helping coordinate the local Special Olympics.


                                          DSPS Faculty
       All of the tenured faculty in DSPS are Disability Counselors or Specialists,
including a DSPS Counselor, four Learning Disability Specialists, a Speech and
Language Specialist, and an Adaptive Technology Specialist. DSPS courses are taught
by Disability Specialists and other instructors who have specialized
training and experience in teaching students with disabilities.
       The faculty of DSPS include*                                  “I am constantly
       • a permanent full-time Academic Counselor                     amazed at the
                                                                        devotion to
       • four permanent Learning Disability Specialists (three full-
                                                                      students from
          time and one part-time; one of the permanent LD
                                                                       the staff and
          Specialists is a general Specialist part-time at the North
                                                                         faculty in
          County Campus)
                                                                          DSPS.”
       • a temporary part-time Speech and Language Disability             – DSPS
          Specialist who also manages the cases of students with       Staff/Faculty
          psychological disabilities and hearing impairments

* See Appendix A for a list of all permanent classified staff members, their positions, and their workyear
    length.
* See Appendix A for a list of all permanent and temporary faculty members, their positions, and their Full-

    Time Equivalent Faculty (FTEF) workload.


DSPS Program Review 2007                                 17                                     July 11, 2007
        • a permanent full-time Assistive Technology Specialist
        • five to seven (depending on the semester) temporary part-time course
          instructors.

       The tenured Specialists teach academic courses and authorize and provide
services to students, as well.
       The DSPS faculty is involved in a number of professional development and
volunteer activities both on and off campus, including curriculum development, writing
textbooks, leading workshops on curricula and on topics in their specialty areas,
assisting as examiners in standardization studies of nationally-published assessment
instruments, advocacy of students in the K-12 system, volunteering in Special Olympics
events, and much more.


                  DSPS Contract Employees and Volunteers
       In Spring 2007, DSPS employed 9 American Sign Language interpreters, 16
notetakers, and a large number of readers and test proctors. In addition, many students
and community members volunteer their time to read texts onto tapes, proctor tests,
take notes in classrooms, and more.


                           Changes in DSPS Staffing
        While many of the DSPS staff and faculty have been in the department for many
years, there have been some changes in personnel since the previous program review.
        The largest recent impact on DSPS staffing occurred in January 2003 when the
initial draft California state budget proposed a 47% decrease in DSPS funding. The
Cuesta College administration subsequently implemented a series of personnel
transfers, retirements, and layoffs for DSPS staff, as well as restructuring budget
allocations that shifted the responsibility for paying particular DSPS faculty salaries
from the district to DSPS categorical funds. The final state budget was revised several
months later to include only a 2% decrease in funding, yet many of the budget and
personnel cuts that had been implemented in the previous months remained and are
still being felt today.
        The largest group to be cut from DSPS was classified staff, including clerical
assistance for the Learning Disabilities Specialists, some tutors for ACA SK 30, and
many staff positions cut from 12 months to 10 or 11 months.
        Some of the budget and personnel cuts have been restored to their previous
levels, while others are in progress. For example, a full-time Learning Disabilities
Specialist has been hired this (Spring 2007) semester, the Speech and Language
Specialist‟s position has increased from 50% to 60%, and a part-time support service
coordinator assistant has been hired. Likewise, many of the cuts in the number of
months that DSPS staff work (which impacts how many months DSPS is open) have
been restored.
        In addition to the loss of staff and faculty due to budget cuts, DSPS personnel are
experiencing a general increase in workload due to a rising number of students. Unlike
academic faculty whose contracted workloads are easily managed by assigning a
specified number of units to teach, “service faculty” such as DSPS faculty experience a
greater workload as more students submit documentation for review, make

DSPS Program Review 2007                        18                              July 11, 2007
appointments and/or “drop in” to offices to discuss course schedules and academic
accommodations, etc.
       District duties impact faculty workload, as well. A trend of the district (and most
other colleges) to hire part-time faculty members rather than full-time tenure-track
faculty members translate to more faculty members for the tenured faculty members to
mentor and evaluate. Likewise, there are fewer tenured faculty members to serve on
department, division, and district committees. For example, DSPS has not had a faculty
representative on the Curriculum Committee for two years, despite the need for
specialists to review new and updated curricula for accessibility issues.
       Finally (as part of this section on staffing changes), one of the most experienced
Learning Disabilities Specialists is scheduled to retire at the end of the Spring 2008
semester.


                       Recommendations for DSPS Staffing
        The following recommendations are based on DSPS program changes, budget
considerations, and student demographic changes. See the pertinent section of this
document for discussions and justifications.
        In addition, see the 2006-2007 Unit Plan (Appendix D) that outlines the specific
staff priorities for the department.

All DSPS Personnel
        • Provide cultural awareness and sensitivity trainings, especially regarding
          Latino students
        • Provide funding and release time for DSPS personnel to visit college campuses
          with high student diversity rates

Classified Staff
        • Provide for DSPS support personnel, including alternative testing and other
          services, at South County Centers
        • Provide for evening and weekend alternative testing
        • Increase the availability of alternative testing for the Cuesta College Math
          and English placement tests
        • Increase Secretary II (Front Desk) to 12 months at the SLO campus
        • Advocate for district-funded Building 3300 Front Desk receptionist (instead of
          being funded 100% by DSPS categorical funds, as is the current case)
        • Increase Alternate Media Facilitator by ten percent (11 months to 12 months)
        • Hire a .5 FTE Alternative Media Facilitator for the North County Campus
        • Hire an American Sign Language interpreter coordinator and/or support
          person
        • Provide evening alternative testing proctoring at all campuses
        • Hire a full-time American Sign Language interpreter
        • Reinstate ACA SK 30 Phonetic Foundations tutor positions
        • Reinstate Clerical Assistant (file clerk) position



DSPS Program Review 2007                         19                             July 11, 2007
Faculty
        • Restore AS/DSPS Director to 12-month position
        • Hire a full-time tenure-track Speech and Language Specialist (who would also
          work with students with hearing impairments and students with
          psychological disabilities)
        • Replace the upcoming (from retirement) tenure-track Learning Disabilities
          Specialist position
        • Hire .5 FTEF DSPS Counselors for the North County and SLO campuses
        • Provide time for a Learning Disabilities Specialist to teach Math Literacy
          course (see DSPS courses section)
        • Develop a class for DSPS notetakers on effective notetaking techniques;
          provide time for DSPS faculty to teach it
        • Provide for Specialist coverage (academic counseling, case management, and
          learning disabilities testing) for summer sessions at both campuses
        • Provide faculty for more summer session courses
        • Hire a bilingual Learning Disabilities Specialist to administer and interpret
          learning disabilities assessment instruments in Spanish (see section on
          changes to student demographics)
        • Provide for DSPS academic counseling and case management at South County
          Centers
        • Provide and/or fund professional development activities regarding new,
          emerging, and increasing disability types

Contract Workers
        • Provide formal, classroom training for DSPS classroom note takers
        • Maintain a competitive pay scale for American Sign Language interpreters

District Personnel
        • Hire Health Center, Counselors, etc., who have licenses and/or experience in
          working with students with psychological and other disabilities


                           DSPS Advisory Committee
        DSPS‟s Advisory Committee meets at least annually to “provide direction and
advice to the DSPS program. The Advisory Committee helps set the direction and
participates in the planning of Cuesta‟s DSPS program. They act as a sounding board
for initiatives and contribute their collective wisdom to the success of the program.”
        The Advisory Committee includes the Director of DSPS and representatives from
the DSPS staff, Cuesta College faculty, community non-profit agencies that serve people
with disabilities, and local and state disability-related agencies (such as the Department
of Rehabilitation, SLO County Office of Education, and SLO County Department of
Mental Health). There currently are no parents of students with disabilities, students
with disabilities, or private psychologists on the DSPS Advisory Committee.
        A list of the current DSPS Advisory Committee members is in Appendix A.



DSPS Program Review 2007                       20                               July 11, 2007
Recommendations for DSPS Advisory Committee
        • Complete a full evaluation of the effectiveness of the DSPS Advisory
          Committee, including a review the 2002 Program Review suggestions
        • Prioritize the needs of the DSPS Advisory Committee
        • Develop a plan to address the needs of the Advisory Committee




DSPS Program Review 2007                      21                          July 11, 2007
                                Where We Are


                                   Introduction
       DSPS maintains two offices, one on the San Luis Obispo campus (Building 3300)
and another on the North County Campus (Building 3000).
       The South County centers (at Nipomo High School and Arroyo Grande High
School) do not have any DSPS office space nor DSPS staff, nor do any of the other high
schools at which Cuesta College offers courses. When taking courses at the South
County centers or the local high school campuses, students must request services either
through their instructors or via a Cuesta College Student Support staff person at the
high school.
       Cuesta College is currently undergoing a “building boom.” A large
classroom/office building was completed on the North County Campus in June 2005,
and three major construction projects are underway on the San Luis Obispo campus.
Another large construction project, a Learning Resource Center, is being planned for the
North County Campus. A Cuesta College construction bond measure is slated for the
county February 2008 primary ballot, and if it passes, it will mean more construction
and building modification projects on both campuses.


                  San Luis Obispo Campus and DSPS Office
The Setting, Staffing, and Courses Offered
        The DSPS office on the SLO campus has been in the High Tech Center/
Classroom Building (Room 3301) on the San Luis Obispo campus since February 2002.
It consists of a combination of open areas that are separated by temporary carrel walls
used for office activities and phonics tutoring and of 13 enclosed office areas, a semi-
open computer classroom, an alternative testing room, a private testing room, a locked
file room and a staff break/work room shared with the Academic Support department
staff.
        Staffing at the SLO office includes a division Director (shared with the Academic
Support department), an administrative assistant (also shared with the Academic
Support department), a division secretary (recently upgraded from a clerk position), a
support services coordinator, 2 instructional associates, a support services assistant, a
clerical assistant, an alternative media technician, a DSPS Counselor, and Disability
Specialists (including Learning Disability Specialists and a Speech and Language
Specialist). See Appendix A for a complete list of DSPS staff.
        In addition, DSPS hires a number of American Sign Language interpreters,
readers for texts and tests, and notetakers. Volunteers are recruited for reading texts
and a number of other tasks.
        The DSPS area shares moveable carrel walls with the Academic Support lab (an
open computer lab) and shares a full permanent wall with classrooms used by DSPS
and other departments. Spillover noise (particularly conversations in the open computer
lab and music and film narration in the classrooms) has been noted as a problem by
Specialists in their offices, particularly when administering learning disabilities
assessments.


DSPS Program Review 2007                       22                              July 11, 2007
       The DSPS department on the San Luis Obispo campus also houses the Assistive
Technology Center for the Disabled (formerly known as the High Tech Center). This
semi-open computer lab holds 12 computer stations outfitted with state-of-the-art
accessibility technologies for students with physical and visual impairments. It includes
scanning/reading devices, closed-circuit televisions, video relay service stations, voice
recognition software, ergonomic keyboards/mice/trackballs, large screen monitors,
Braille embossers, computer accessibility software, and much more.
       Most staff and faculty in DSPS have individual office rooms, although the
building reception area is open to all students on campus who are using the Tutorial
Center, the Academic Support computer lab, the Writing Center, or who are attending
Math or English classes. The DSPS receptionist also serves as the receptionist for these
students entering the entire ground floor of the building.
       The Learning Disabilities Specialists‟ offices have been (somewhat) soundproofed
to aid in keeping the rooms distraction-free during learning disabilities assessments,
but the Specialists report that noise from activities outside the offices still can be
distracting. Also, DSPS staff report that there is a lack of private testing rooms.
       Adaptive furniture and large pieces of adaptive equipment are usually stored in
classrooms or other rooms around the campus because of very limited storage space in
the DSPS office area.

Fall and Spring Semesters and Summer Sessions at the SLO Campus
DSPS Courses
       All of the DSPS courses are offered at the San Luis Obispo campus during the
fall and spring semesters. During the summer session, courses are much more limited,
usually only one section of one course (see Appendix B for course offerings of the past 3
semesters and summer session).

Services
        Cuesta College is mandated to provide appropriate academic accommodations
(“services”) to all students with documented disabilities any time the college is open;
hence, all services are offered during the regular 18-week and 6-week summer sessions.
        Staffing is more limited in the summer, however, than during the fall and spring
semesters. Usually, a DSPS Counselor and either one Learning Disabilities Specialist or
Adaptive Technology Specialist is available for appointments and case management
during the summer sessions.
        The DSPS office is often closed for periods of time between the semesters and
summer sessions.

Recommendations for the San Luis Obispo Campus and DSPS Office
        • Reinstate district-wide committee to examine ADA compliance issues and
          make recommendations for compliance
        • Provide a push button door opener on the main door of all buildings
        • Provide a push button door opener on the door of at least one bathroom set in
          each building
        • Develop a full space/storage needs plan for the DSPS offices and rooms,
          including moving and/or soundproofing the DSPS reception and support
          service areas, the Assistive Technology Classroom/Lab, and the ACA SK 30
          Phonetic Foundations tutoring area

DSPS Program Review 2007                       23                               July 11, 2007
        • Provide adaptive equipment and furniture storage space within the DSPS
          office area.
        • Provide more individual, private, sound-proof alternative testing rooms
        • Hire a separate Building 3300 receptionist funded by the AS/DSPS, Math, and
          English departments
        • Provide for full accessibility in the DSPS file room
        • Develop a funding plan to upgrade the Assistive Technology Classroom/Lab
          computers and technologies, including the area used by the Alternative Media
          Facilitator
        • Provide more adaptive equipment, especially digital recorders
        • Develop a funding plan to upgrade staff and faculty office equipment,
          particularly computers
        • Provide rooms for video relay services
        • Provide better notification of and access around campus construction projects
        • Continue providing input and advocacy when the district is planning new
          buildings, building modifications, pathways, software systems, distance
          education and other courses, etc.




                    North County Campus and DSPS Office
The Setting, Staffing, and Courses Offered
        The DSPS office at the North County Center (NCC) in
Paso Robles (Building 3000 Room 3024) has been in operation          “The North County
since the North County Campus‟ inception. It consists of an open          campus is
office area, one enclosed office, and an adjoining alternative        especially family-
testing room. The NCC DSPS staffing includes a full-time            like and supportive.
program assistant, a part-time Disability Specialist for the fall     It has been a very
and spring semesters (shared with the San Luis Obispo campus),      nurturing academic
and a part-time alternative media technician (also shared with           experience.”
the San Luis Obispo campus).                                           – DSPS Student
        Staff and faculty report that noise both within and outside
of the office area is bothersome.
        Accessibility at the North County Campus has generally not been a problem.
Most doors on the campus have the more easily-used lever door handles and at least one
automatic door. The exception is the newest building, Building 2400 (classrooms and
offices), which does not have an automatic door, making it very difficult to enter by
anyone in a wheelchair.
         A Learning Resource Center building (which will include new space for the
library, Tutorial Center, Academic Support offices, and DSPS offices, as well as
computer labs and classrooms) is being planned for the North County Campus. DSPS
staff have been involved closely in the planning of the building and report that the
administrators and building planners have been very receptive to their suggestions to
improve accessibility.




DSPS Program Review 2007                        24                            July 11, 2007
Fall and Spring Semesters and Summer Sessions at the North County Campus
DSPS Courses
       One section each of most of the DSPS courses are offered at the North County
Campus during the fall and spring semesters. For the first time, ACA SK 30 A/B
Phonetic Foundations will be offered in the Fall 2007 semester. During the summer
session, courses are much more limited, usually only one section of one course (see
Appendix B for course offerings of the past 3 semesters and summer session).

Services
       As at the SLO campus, Cuesta College is mandated to provide appropriate
academic accommodations (“services”) to all students with documented disabilities any
time the college is open; hence, all services are offered during the regular 18-week and
6-week summer sessions at the North County Campus.
       Staffing is more limited in the summer than during the fall and spring
semesters. Usually, there is no DSPS Counselor or Disability Specialist available for
appointments or case management during the summer sessions at the North County
Campus. The Program Assistant manages the academic accommodations for students
during the summer session.
       Students who bring in new disability documentation during the summer are
asked either to make an appointment with a Specialist at the SLO campus or to wait
until the fall semester for an appointment with a Disability Specialist at the North
County Campus. If the student wants an appointment during the summer but
transportation is difficult for them, the DSPS Director has been available for a visit to
the NCC to meet with the student.
       As at the SLO campus, the DSPS office is often closed for periods of time between
the semesters and summer sessions.

Recommendations for the North County Campus and DSPS Office
        • Reinstate district-wide committee to examine ADA compliance issues and
          make recommendations for compliance
        • Provide a push button door opener on the main door of Building 2400
        • Provide a push button door opener on the door of at least one bathroom set in
          each building
        • Provide individual alternative testing rooms
        • Provide for a Disability Specialist during the summer session
        • Hire a permanent DSPS Counselor (.5 FTEF)
        • Hire a permanent Alternative Media Technician
        • Provide for specialized English and Math tutoring for DSPS students
        • Provide Adapted P.E. courses (Weight Training and Swimming)
        • Provide for an Assistive Technology Specialist to evaluate student needs,
          campus accessibility evaluations, and course accessibility
        • Increase the amount and type of adapted equipment and furniture
        • Provide dedicated equipment and furniture storage space
        • Provide an electric cart and scooter
        • Provide more efficient soundproofing in the DSPS testing rooms and offices

DSPS Program Review 2007                         25                            July 11, 2007
        • Increase the DSPS course offerings, including a new “Math Literacy” course
        • Develop a funding plan to upgrade staff and faculty office equipment,
          particularly computers
        • Ensure that campus facilities are ADA-compliant and/or meet the needs of
          students with disabilities
        • Continue providing input and advocacy when the district is planning new
          buildings, building modifications, pathways, software systems, distance
          education and other courses, etc.


               South County Centers and Local High Schools
The Setting, Staffing, and Courses Offered
        The South County Centers include Cuesta College offices maintained at Arroyo
Grande High School and Nipomo High School. These sites account for the highest
percentage growth of students in the district (17.0% from 2004 to 2006). In addition, in
2006, following a national and state-wide trend, 47.1% of the students declared
themselves “Hispanic,” “Other,” or “Decline to State”; 52.4% of the students at the South
County Centers did not declare themselves to be “White.”
        DSPS has no office or staff at any of the south county
centers or other high schools in the county in which Cuesta             “A Chemistry prof
College offers courses. Students with disabilities must request           once told me, „I
services through their instructors or a part-time Cuesta College           started to pay
(non-DSPS) staff person. Likewise, there currently is no storage         attention when
facility dedicated for DSPS furniture or equipment.                      they came after
        DSPS staff report that the Cuesta College South County          me like lawyers.‟”
Centers personnel have requested that DSPS staff visit the site(s)       – DSPS Student
at the beginning of each semester to inform students there of
DSPS programs and services, offer learning disabilities
assessments, and set up a regular monthly visiting schedule to meet with students and
problem-solve any access or compliance issues that have come up.
        In addition, the South County Center personnel would like to develop a system
for checking out adaptive equipment (such as CD players and tape players) to students,
as well as be stocked with carbon-less notetaker paper.
        Cuesta College is possibly violating accessibility laws and students‟ rights to
academic accommodations at the high school centers, including the South County
Centers. Instructors and staff do not have experienced DSPS personnel to ask questions
of or otherwise ensure that they are following correct academic accommodation
procedures. Likewise, students are subject to the decisions of their instructors and have
no DSPS advocates there with whom to discuss their situations in case they have
questions regarding the accommodations (or lack of accommodations) that they are
being offered.
        Such violations would be through no fault of the staff at those centers or high
schools, only through a lack of knowledge and experience in the field of disability rights.
However, “ignorance of the law” does not preclude the district from complying with the
law, particularly when the district has full knowledge of and experience with student
rights and accommodations at its permanent campuses.




DSPS Program Review 2007                       26                              July 11, 2007
Fall and Spring Semesters and Summer Sessions
       In past semesters, DSPS has offered one section of ACA SK 50 Writing
Fundamentals at the South County sites (Arroyo Grande High School and Nipomo High
School), but it too often has not meet the minimum required fill rate for teaching it.
More attempts might be made to offer that and other DSPS courses at the South County
Centers as the student growth there continues to occur.

Recommendations for the South County Sites and Local High Schools
        • Reinstate district-wide committee to examine ADA compliance issues and
          make recommendations for compliance
        • Provide a push button door opener on the main door of each building in which
          Cuesta College offers courses and services
        • Provide a push button door opener on the door of at least one set of bathrooms
          in each building in which Cuesta College offers courses and services
        • Provide a dedicated DSPS office at the South County Center, including staff
          and specialists for academic counseling, alternative testing rooms, a
          soundproofed learning disabilities assessment room, a fax and copy machine,
          adaptive furniture and equipment, storage space, etc.
        • Provide advertising at the centers to inform potential DSPS students of the
          DSPS services and courses.
        • Provide disability awareness and ADA compliance trainings for all Cuesta
          College staff and faculty
        • Review past enrollment issues for ACA SK 50 Writing Fundamentals, and
          offer again, if appropriate
        • Pilot ACA SK 30A/B, ACA SK 32 Reading Comprehension, ACA SK 75
          Arithmetic Fundamentals, and a new “Math Literacy” course; evaluate for
          enrollment and effectiveness
        • Provide input and advocacy when the district is planning new buildings,
          building modifications, pathways, etc.


                               Distance Education
The Setting, Staffing, and Courses Offered
       Cuesta College denotes a “region” separate from its physical sites to procure and
evaluate data regarding its distance education (on-line, web-based) course offerings and
the students taking those courses.
       Currently, DSPS does not offer any of its courses in distance education format.
As discussions regarding distance education arise, there is consensus among DSPS
faculty that the great majority of DSPS students learn best by direct, in-class
instruction. In addition, the hands-on nature of the DSPS courses do not lend
themselves to a distance education format.
       However, as technological advancement increases, including live streaming
videoconferencing, instant messaging, etc., it is possible that some existing or new
DSPS courses could be taught effectively in a distance education format.




DSPS Program Review 2007                       27                             July 11, 2007
Recommendations for Distance Education and DSPS Courses
        • Monitor distance education technology for possible use in DSPS courses
        • Evaluate current and new DSPS courses for possible structuring as distant
          education course
        • Provide college-wide support to ensure that all distance education classes are
          accessible and content is appropriately captioned




DSPS Program Review 2007                       28                             July 11, 2007
                                   What We Do


                                    Introduction
        DSPS seamlessly merges both academic accommodations (services) and an
academic program (courses). While providing mandated services to students with
disabilities, it also provides basic skills courses academic courses, computer access
courses, learning disabilities assessments, academic counseling, high school and agency
outreach, and many other ways of assisting current and future students. Very few
college disabilities programs in the country provide such a wide array of courses and
services to students with disabilities as does DSPS at Cuesta College.
                                In addition to providing services and courses, DSPS staff
                         and faculty engage in a wide variety of outreach activities,
                         including collaborating with staff and faculty in all other Cuesta
                         College departments and at universities and agencies to assist
                         students in meeting their academic goals, visiting local high
                         school Resource Specialist Program classrooms to inform
                         potential Cuesta College students of DSPS and district services,
                         hosting the annual Central Coast Learning Disabilities
                         Conference, maintaining a web site, publishing a semesterly
                         newsletter, and many other activities.

                           Learning Disabilities Program
                                By far, the largest area of DSPS is in serving students
                        with learning disabilities (“LD”; in 2006, about 41% of DSPS
                        students had a learning disability). This program includes
                        specialized courses in phonics, reading comprehension, basic
                        writing skills, arithmetic, and assistive technologies (computer
                        application, scanning, Internet, and other skills), while also
providing learning disabilities assessments, authorization of academic accommodations,
basic academic advising, campus and community referrals, study skills assistance,
advocacy for LD students, and more. L.D. students are eligible for all appropriate and
reasonable academic accommodations, as authorized by their Disability Specialist.
        All L.D. Specialists have Master‟s degrees, as well as certification from the
California Community College Chancellor‟s Office to work with students with
disabilities.
        DSPS completes an average of 45 learning disabilities assessments each
semester, the great majority of which (95 – 100%) result in the students being eligible
for academic accommodations. The LD testing procedures have been subject to a
number of changes in recent semesters in order to test students who apply for LD
testing in the middle of the semester. The current procedure, which appears to be
working well (in that nearly all students who apply for LD testing throughout the
semester are able to get tested within that semester), has an orientation at the
beginning of the semester, monthly group testings, and frequent one-on-one cognitive
processing testings and follow-up appointments with LD Specialists.
        There is no charge for LD testing except for the cost of a half-unit course for
which the student enrolls (currently, that cost is $10 for the half-unit course, not


DSPS Program Review 2007                        29                              July 11, 2007
    including other fees a Cuesta College student would pay for). A similar LD assessment
    completed by a professional in private practice would cost about $800 to $1000.

    Assistive Technology Center
            The Assistive Technology Center is another example of DSPS seamlessly and
    effectively combining courses and services. Students can learn about assistive and
    accessible hardware and software, including scanning, word processing, other computer
    applications, the Internet, and more through DSPS courses.
            In addition, a student can be evaluated by an Adaptive Technology Specialist for
    which technologies will best allow them full access in classrooms, doing homework and
    assignments, and other aspects of their academic life.


                          Academic Accommodations / Services
    Introduction
            Cuesta College, as an agency administering federal and state funds, is legally
    required to provide reasonable academic accommodations (“services”) for students with
    verified disabilities. The college assigns this responsibility to the Disabled Student
    Programs and Services department (DSPS). Although a student is not required to go
    through DSPS to receive an academic accommodation at Cuesta College, nearly every
    student does. DSPS provided services to about 850 students in the 2006-2007 academic
    year, logging in over 9860 service contacts for the year.
            Academic accommodations authorized for students are based on a student‟s
    functional and educational limitations, as determined by the student‟s documented
    disability, an interview with the student, and the expertise of the Disability Specialist
    or Counselor. Authorized accommodations are formalized through the completion of a
    Student Educational Contract with the student (see Appendix B).
            Examples of academic accommodations include providing extra times on tests,
    priority registration, alternatives to print media, specialized furniture or equipment,
    American Sign Language interpreters, and classroom notetakers.

    Alternative Testing
            A large area of activity for DSPS is alternative testing. DSPS staff gave 2260
    tests in the 2006-2007 academic year, many of them final exams. Students usually are
                                 authorized one and one-half or double test time, but the
                                 amount of extra time can be increased with evidence of
   “Even though I am
                                 need. The Alternative Testing office can provide (if
taking a few classes, the
                                 authorized by a Disability Specialist and applicable for the
 accommodations have
                                 test) electronic talking spellcheckers and calculators,
already helped to break
                                 multiplication tables, dictionaries, private testing rooms,
  down the barriers in
                                 and other equipment and resources.
  order for me to move
                                        DSPS staff, faculty, and students report that some
         forward.”
                                 instructors are resistant to providing quizzes for alternative
     – DSPS Student
                                 testing, usually because of the last-minute method of
                                 developing the quiz, the short timeframe in which it is given
    in class, and/or the relative small amount of points that quizzes are worth in the course
    final grade. DSPS Specialists are available to assist students in asserting their right to
    authorized alternative testing, no matter whether it is a test or quiz.


    DSPS Program Review 2007                        30                              July 11, 2007
Priority Registration
       Priority registration is a service used by many students to help them develop a
weekly schedule that builds in alternative testing time, tutoring, meeting with their
instructors, and the extra time that many DSPS students need to complete homework.
472 DSPS students requested priority registration in the 2006-29-007 academic year.

Alternative Media
       DSPS has invested in a full-time Alternative Media Facilitator, who is
responsible for converting printed text into accessible media for students with visual
impairments, learning disabilities, Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, speech and
language disabilities, acquired brain injuries, and other disabilities that affect a
student‟s ability to efficiently process printed matter. Such media include (and are not
limited to) audio tape, audio compact discs, Braille, embossed drawings, and MP3
format.

Other DSPS Service Areas
       Other DSPS also provides copier use for lecture notes, adaptive furniture for
classrooms (such as electronic adjustable height tables for wheelchair users, ergonomic
padded and extra large chairs, and deskside tables), adaptive equipment (such electric
scooters, wheelchairs, digital recorders, CD players for alternative media, and Phonic
Ears), and much more.

List of Academic Accommodations / Services
        Academic accommodations for all DSPS students must first be authorized by a
Disability Specialist. Depending upon the student‟s functional or educational limitation
as a consequence of having the disability, accommodations can include such things as
alternative testing; recorded, Braille, or electronic texts; use of adapted equipment; sign
language interpreters; notetakers, and scribes, and much more.
        Students can request any academic accommodation that they believe will assist
them in attaining their academic goals, whether or not DSPS regularly offers that
service or has ever offered it in the past. DSPS will facilitate the request if the college
deems the accommodation reasonable (generally defined as not being an undue financial
hardship to the district, not putting the district in a position of legal liability, or not
affecting the integrity of the course or program in which the student is enrolled). All
accommodations are provided free of charge to the student.
        A district grievance procedure is available to DSPS students if they believe that
they have been wrongly denied a request for an academic accommodation (see Appendix
B for the written complaint procedure).
        The standard services that DSPS provides or facilitates are listed below.
       Academic Counseling DSPS students are able to meet with a DSPS counselor
for academic advising, including advising for Cuesta College academic programs,
graduation requirements, transfer requirements, and academic accommodations at
other colleges and universities.
        Academic Support    (Tutoring) DSPS offers math, reading, writing, and study
skills support to DSPS students on a drop-in and appointment basis.
       Adaptive Equipment A wide variety of adaptive equipment is available for use
by students with disabilities, including an electric wheelchair, electric scooter, Phonic

DSPS Program Review 2007                        31                              July 11, 2007
Ear, 4-track tape player, CD textbook player, spellchecker, electronic stethoscope,
Perkins Brailler, Sewell Raised Line Drawing Tool, and talking 4-function, scientific, or
graphing calculators.
        Adaptive Furniture    Available adaptive furniture includes adaptive electronic
tables, padded or adjustable chairs for large students, and small desks or tables.
       Alternate Media       All college publications and instructional materials can be
made available to students with disabilities in an alternate media of their choice,
including Braille, large print, and MP3. For example, the Alternate Media Facilitator
can translate into Braille almost all of the textbooks and instructional materials that an
instructor makes available to students and can create (or contract for) captioning of
video and other instructional materials.
        Alternative Testing DSPS Support Services administers an instructor‟s course
exams and quizzes, the Cuesta College math and English placement test, and other
tests, including tests required by other Cuesta College departments and local, state, and
federal agencies (for example, the Health Occupations Basic Entrance Test and Ability
to Benefit Test). Accommodations include extra time, quiet/private settings, computers,
spellcheckers, calculators or times tables, and alternate test formats (e.g., large print or
audio).
      Architectural Barrier Removal        Evaluating architectural barriers and
recommending changes to improve campus accessibility is a top priority for DSPS.
        Assistive Listening Devices      Phonic Ear devices are available for assistive
listening.
       Assistive Technology Assistive technology, including large monitors, trackballs,
ergonomic keyboards, screen magnification, and screen reading software are made
available on district classroom and lab computers.
       Assistive Technology Center (ATC) The ATC offers adaptive computer hardware
and software technologies to students with disabilities. Assistive technology includes
voice recognition technology, voice synthesizers, screen reading software, a Braille
printer, reading machines, optical scanners, and electronic key guards. Courses are
offered in the ATC in keyboarding, word processing, scanning, and the Internet.
      Braille For students with disabilities that prevent them from accessing printed
materials, textbooks, tests, and course handouts can be converted to Braille, large print,
or computer files.
      Counseling DSPS provides academic counseling, disability-related counseling,
and educational planning.
       E-Text Text can be re-formatted for audio playback on compact disks and/or MP3
players.
        Graduation Requirement Substitutions and/or Waivers             If a student cannot
pass a required course to obtain a degree or certificate at Cuesta College because of
difficulty related to his/her disability, the student may petition for a substitution/waiver
of the requirement. DSPS will assist with this process.
      Handicapped Parking        Cuesta College has handicapped parking spaces in all
parking lots. A permit is required to park on campus.
        High School Transition to College For students with disabilities who plan to go
directly from high school to Cuesta College, information and assistance is available
through Disability Specialists.


DSPS Program Review 2007                        32                               July 11, 2007
       Interpreters For students with severe to profound hearing loss who understand
American Sign Language, DSPS employs professional American Sign Language
interpreters for classroom lectures, meetings, etc. The district employs ASL interpreters
for Cuesta College events.
       Learning Disabilities Assessment              Individualized learning disabilities
assessments are offered to all Cuesta College students to determine eligibility for
services. LD assessments are not considered a mandatory service or accommodation, but
rather are offered as a general service to all students in the district.
       Mobility Assistance  An accessible cart is available to provide short-term on-
campus transportation (a regular transportation service for an entire semester is not
provided).
       Notetakers      DSPS works with instructors to find student volunteers, who
provide copies of course notes. Sometimes DSPS employs notetakers, such as when two
or more DSPS students have requested a notetaker for the same class.
       Priority Registration    DSPS offers early, or "priority," registration to students
with verified disabilities.
       Readers Readers are available to assist students who have visual impairments,
reading disabilities, and/or certain physical disabilities during tests, quizzes, and final
exams.
       Registration Assistance      DSPS offers course advisement and WebReg (Cuesta
College‟s on-line course registration program) assistance.
       Taped and Digitized Texts DSPS provides assistance obtaining textbooks that
are recorded on audio tape and digital media for DSPS students who have disabilities
that preclude them from accessing printed materials.

Academic Accommodations / Services Rates
Methodology
        DSPS staff used its in-house DSPS database (“Marv”) to ascertain the number of
service contacts in the 2006-2007 academic year. A service contact is defined as any
direct service provided to or for a student that is needed because of a disability (or
presumed disability, in the case of students who have not provided documentation of
their disability yet).
        Examples of service contacts that can be included in the Management
Information System (MIS) report for reimbursement for funding are learning
disabilities assessments, using a copy machine for lecture notes, converting printed text
into Braille, transporting a student across campus in an electric cart, etc. An example of
a contact that is not included in the MIS report is making appointments for students to
see a Specialist.

Results
       Service contacts (reportable for funding and not reportable) are included in the
chart below to show the amount of activity in the DSPS office for the 2006-2007
academic year. 4540 appointments were scheduled, by far the largest service activity by
DSPS staff. The next largest service activity is providing alternative testing to DSPS
students. Specialist contacts (including counseling appointments, LD testing, course
advising, study skills assistance, etc.) are the next largest group of service contacts, and
then copier use (primarily for copying lecture notes) and priority registration.


DSPS Program Review 2007                        33                               July 11, 2007
       The charts below show the numbers and relative amounts of service contacts for
the 2006-2007 academic year.


                                                  Number of Service Contacts, by Type
                                                             2006–2007

   5000                                      4540

   4000

   3000
                             2260
   2000
                                                                          850                                                       787
   1000                                                                                                                472
                212                                          210                         326             221                                        190        264
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             Service Contacts, by Type and Percentage                                                                   Alternative Media
                           2006–2007
                                                                                                                        Alternative Testing
                                                 3%
                                           2%                                                                           Appointments Scheduled
                                                         2%
                                  8%
                                                                                                                        Assistive Technology
                                                                                    22%                                 Center
                    5%
                                                                                                                        Copier Use
                2%
              3%                                                                                                        Counseling


                8%                                                                                                      Notetaking

                                                                                                                        Priority Registration
                    2%

                                                                                                                        Specialist Contacts

                                                                                                                        Staff Provision of Service
                                                                   43%
                                                                                                                        Other (furn, equip,
                                                                                                                        transp)



DSPS Program Review 2007                                                                  34                                                           July 11, 2007
Changes in DSPS Accommodations / Services
        Most changes in DSPS services are either enhanced or constrained by the
specific needs of the DSPS students, by budget considerations, and/or by technological
advances. For example, when more deaf students are enrolling in Cuesta College
courses, it is necessary to hire more American Sign Language interpreters. Likewise, as
media technology advances, students are given more options in recorded media formats,
such as compact disks and MP3.
        Since 2003, DSPS has been challenged by its increase in student growth and
services provided to them without a commensurate increase in facilities or staffing,
although recent budget increases provided by the state and staffing increases approved
by the district have helped ameliorate the difficulties.
        Current changes in providing academic accommodations (“services”) to DSPS
students include the following:
        1) providing texts on compact disks or in MP3 format
        2) an increase in the need for American Sign Language interpreters
        3) an increase in the number of alternative testings that DSPS provides

Recommendations For Academic Accommodations / Services
        • Increase the number of private testing rooms
        • Provide for evening alternative testing at all campuses and centers
        • Explore the need for alternative testing for distance education courses
        • Increase the number of notetakers, both volunteer and paid
        • Provide more captioning services, such as Typewell Captioning and closed
          captioning
        • Increase the equipment loan bank, including recording equipment, MP3
          players, CD players, adaptive furniture, video cameras and recorders, audio
          digital recorders, and Phonic Ears
        • Provide alternative math and English placement testing during evenings and
          other times when needed
        • Announce in the semester course schedules the dates when DSPS will be
          giving the alternative math and English placement tests
        • Evaluate the timeliness of LD testings (time between a student applying for
          LD testing and completing the testing); make changes, as necessary


                                 Academic Courses
Introduction
        DSPS sponsors skills-oriented courses for students who have academic
difficulties and/or need specialized instruction in certain areas, including reading
(phonics and comprehension), writing skills, arithmetic, computer access and
applications, adaptive physical education, and assessment for learning disabilities.
Some of the courses can be used to fulfill requirements for the Cuesta College Basic
Skills Certificate of Proficiency and/or electives for the Associate degree.
        These courses are taught by Disability Specialists and others with specialized
training in teaching students with disabilities and in different formats from other


DSPS Program Review 2007                       35                               July 11, 2007
courses on campus. All DSPS-sponsored courses are open to all students at Cuesta
College (at the regular tuition rate).
        The DSPS courses served 255 students [20.7 full-time equivalent students
(FTES)] in the Spring 2006 semester. Class sizes range from 8 to 22 students in each
academic basic skills class and 6 – 14 students in each computer access class (where
class size is limited to the number of computer stations available).



                       DSPS Contribution of
                            Students


                                                                       6.31

                  4.52                      4.66
  5




  0
       Pecentage of DSPS         Percentage of DSPS Percentage of Credit
       Students in District      Students Enrolled in FTES Generated by
          (duplicated)            Credit Courses in     DSPS Faculty in
                                 District (duplicated)     District



List of DSPS Courses
ACA SK 30A/B Introduction to Phonetic Foundations for Reading and Spelling (3.5
units each) Phonics, rules, and word attack for reading and spelling using multi-sensory
techniques.
ACA SK 32 Reading Comprehension (2 units) Comprehension skills using imagery to
improve understanding of classroom lectures and textbooks.
ACA SK 50 Writing Fundamentals (3 units) Grammar, the mechanics of writing,
sentence structure, and writing paragraphs.
ACA SK 75 Arithmetic Fundamentals (4 units) Basic math (whole numbers, fractions,
decimals, and percentages) and math study skills, using alternative and active
approaches for concepts and skills.
ACA SK 104 Adapted Studies: Lecture (2 units) Curricula and instruction, not available
in other courses in a lecture format, to meet identified special learning needs of disabled
students. May include advanced training in comprehension, phonetics, computer-
assisted instruction, or other specialized topics.
ACA SK 110 Keyboarding for Computer Access (0.5 units, 9 weeks) Keyboarding
(typing) basics in a self-paced approach.
ACA SK 119 Introduction to Computers Using Assistive Technology (3 units) The
components of a personal computer; how to create an ideal computer system.




DSPS Program Review 2007                        36                              July 11, 2007
ACA SK 122 Introduction to the Internet Using Assistive Technology (3 units) The
Internet and how it relates to students with disabilities; exploring search engines.
ACA SK 125 Computer Access: Adapted Work Processing I (2 units) A basic word
processing course; includes the use of spell checkers. Introduces the use of assistive
technology for students with physical or learning disabilities within the context of word
processing.
ACA SK 131 Computer Access: Applications (2 units) Word processing, database, and
spreadsheet programs. Introduces the use of assistive technology for students with
physical and/or learning disabilities within the context of word processing, database,
and spreadsheet programs.
ACA SK 140 Diagnostic Testing for Learning Disability (0.5 units) Assesses eligibility
for Disabled Student Programs and Services according to California Community College
Title V regulations for students who think they might have a learning disability.
Develops a Student Educational Contract (SEC) and discusses learning strengths and
weaknesses, academic goals, course placement recommendations, and the authorization
of academic accommodations.
PE ADPT 100 Adapted Aquatics (1.0 unit) Provides an individualized aquatic exercise
program for students with a disability.
PE ADPT 105 Adapted Fitness: Weight Training (1.0 unit) Provides an individualized
fitness program for students with a disability using resistive exercises and equipment.

DSPS Course Data
          See Appendix D for supporting data and charts for each of the sections below.
Enrollment Rates Compared with District / History
       DSPS courses have averaged a total of 230 students per semester* over the five
semesters from Fall 2001 through Spring 2006 (the most recent semesters for which
data is available). The previous five semesters (Fall 2001 through Fall 2003) saw an
average of 222 students per semester, implying a rising enrollment in DSPS courses.

Course Fill Rates / History
      Fill rates for DSPS courses have ranged between 33% and 126% over the past 10
semesters, averaging 82.4% for all DSPS courses. This exceeds the college district
average of 77.6%.

DSPS Student Retention Rate Compared to District
         “Retention” is defined as the percentage of students who stay in a course past the
official deadline to drop the course.
         DSPS students consistently have a greater retention rate than most other
Cuesta College students (an average of 87.7% vs. 85.3%, respectively, over 10 recent
semesters). One could surmise any number of reasons for this, including the fact that
DSPS students are able to receive more support than many other students.




*   Spring and Fall semesters; DSPS courses were not taught in the summer until the Summer 2007 session.
      See graph of DSPS course enrollment.


DSPS Program Review 2007                                37                                  July 11, 2007
             DSPS Total Course Enrollment, by Semester
                      Fall 2001–Spring 2006

  300                                                                                       272
                       241      245                                                                  255
  250                                    228                            223        227                      230
             194                                   204        206
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Course Grade Rates Compared to the District
        A general examination of the Fall 2006 course grade rates (percentage of A‟s, B‟s,
C‟s, D‟s, F‟s, Incompletes, Credits, and No Credits) that students receive as their final
grades) shows that DSPS courses follow the district pattern very closely, i.e., DSPS
students receive nearly the same percentage of A‟s in DSPS courses as students in other
departments receive in their courses, the same percentage of B‟s, etc. (see accompanying
chart). DSPS instructors are “just as hard” on grading their students than instructors in
other departments.


                DSPS and District Course Grade Percentages,
                              by Final Grade
                                  Fall 2006
 50


 40


 30          28.2
                           23.4
           20.4                                                                                 20.7
 20                    16.8
                                        15.2
                                      11.9
                                                                      8.59.4
 10
                                                    4.14.9                                         3.0      3.4
                                                                                   0.00.3                      0.8
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             A             B             C               D              F            I            CR          NC

             DSPS Course Grade Rate                          District Course Grade Rate



DSPS Program Review 2007                                         38                                         July 11, 2007
        A more detailed examination of the data shows that DSPS students receive
somewhat fewer A‟s, B‟s, and C‟s than the district overall total (20.4%, 16.8%, and
11.9%, respectively, for DSPS students compared to 28.2%, 23.4%, and 15.2% for the
district total). This discrepancy is explained by examining the percentage of Credit
grades received by DSPS students; an explanation follows.
        In a Credit/No Credit-only course, students earn a Credit grade in lieu of an A,
B, or C grade or earn a No Credit grade in lieu of a D or F grade. A greater percentage of
DSPS courses are Credit/No Credit-only courses as compared to the overall percentage
of courses in the district. Also, many of the DSPS courses are set up so that students can
elect to receive a Credit or No Credit grade in lieu of a letter grade if they submit the
proper paperwork within the first four weeks of the semester. Overall, this means that
students who take DSPS courses will have a greater chance to earn a Credit grade than
students in non-DSPS courses. And indeed, the data shows that 20.7 % of DSPS
students received a Credit grade compared to only 3.0 % of all students in the district.


              Percent of DSPS Students Who Receive Associate
                                 Degrees,
                    by First Semester at Cuesta College

        60               50                              50
        50
        40                    31
                                   27.3
        30 22.2 25.2                          20
                                                                                          23.97
        20                                         7.7        9.5
                     6.3                                                    3.3
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       Interestingly, when comparing the percentage of A‟s, B‟s, C‟s, and Credit grades
earned by DSPS students with the percentage of the A‟s, B‟s, C‟s, and Credits received
by students overall in the district, we see that they are exactly the same (68.9%). DSPS
instructors are giving the same number of A‟s, B‟s, C‟s, and Credits as instructors all
over campus. This again lends credence to the conclusion that DSPS instructors are
“just as hard” on DSPS students as instructors in other departments are on their
students.

Drop Rates Compared to the District
       The percentage of students that drop (or are dropped from) DSPS courses
matches very closely with the district drop rate. The DSPS course drop rate for the Fall
2006 semester was 13.8%, while the district drop rate was 14.4%.




DSPS Program Review 2007                           39                                 July 11, 2007
DSPS Students Who Receive Associate Degrees, Certificates, and Transfer Status
        The accompanying chart shows the percentage of DSPS and district students in
2006 who earned Associate degrees, certificates, and transfer status; one will note that
DSPS meets or surpasses district students in all categories.
        Also, over the past 16 semesters/sessions, 16.5% of DSPS students have earned
Associate degrees from Cuesta College. If one excludes students who began their college
career within the past seven semesters (the average time one might allow for a first-
year student to earn an Associate degree), this figure goes up to 24%. This compares to
the average district rate of 33% (for students whose goal is a degree and attend their
first semester full-time).


            Percentage of DSPS and District
               Students Earning Degrees,
            C ertificates, and Transfer Status
                        2005 - 2006

  25%
  20%                                                               18%17%
                                                   13%
  15%
                                                      10%
  10%
                 5%
    5%                 3%
                                 1% 1%
    0%
               Associate       Certificate         Transfer        Transfer
                Degree                             Prepared        Directed

                            DSPS Students       District Students

        In the Spring 2007 semester, 77 of the 711 (10.8%) of the graduates were DSPS
students, although only 7.7% of Cuesta College students were DSPS students.
        It should be noted that many DSPS students do not fit into the standard degree-
oriented mold. Many DSPS students attend Cuesta College to improve their basic skills,
get job-retraining, or “test the waters” of college.
        There is a correlation between students who begin their college careers in the
Summer or Fall semesters and those who receive more Associate degrees (as opposed to
those students who begin in the Spring semesters). Anecdotally, one might assume that
Summer and Fall semester beginning students are more motivated, organized, and/or
hard-working than Spring semester-beginning students, but there is no direct evidence
to support.

FTES/FTEF for DSPS and District Courses
        Full-Time Equivalent Student per Full-Time Equivalent Faculty (FTES/FTEF) is
one measure of faculty workload. DSPS faculty consistently surpass this average
district faculty workload measure (see accompanying chart).




DSPS Program Review 2007                      40                              July 11, 2007
                             FTES/FTEF by DSPS and District
                                Fall 2001 - Spring 2006

 25.0                                                                             23.7
                                                                                              20.7
                           19.3                                         18.7
 20.0           18.2                                         17.6                                         18.3
           16.7                                       17.4
                  16.3                 16.5 16.2
                                15.8 16.4     16.3      16.2   15.9                                         15.7
         14.3                                                              14.8                 14.4
 15.0                                                                                  13.6


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                                   DSPS FTES/FTEF             District FTES/FTEF

Early Alert Rates and Use by DSPS Instructors
        “Early Alert” is a voluntary district-wide system for faculty to alert students by
email and/or by letter who are receiving less than satisfactory grades by the ninth week
of the semester (halfway through the semester). The email or letter gives them the
reason for their alert (low grades, poor attendance, and/or assignments not completed)
and offers many suggestions for improvement, such as meeting with the instructor,
receiving tutoring, etc.
        Data shows that nearly all of the DSPS faculty members use the Early Alert
system. “Poor attendance” and “Assignments not completed” are the primary reasons for
assigning an early alert to a student.
        The percentage of DSPS students who receive early alert notices is somewhat
greater than all Cuesta College students (8.3% vs. 5.6%, respectively). This could be a
reflection of the voluntary nature of the system (DSPS instructors, as a whole, are using
the early system more than other Cuesta College faculty members), or it could mean
that more DSPS students, as a group, need more early alerts due to difficulties in and
out of the classroom. If the latter is true, then when one examines the other statistics
regarding student success, drops, retention, etc., it is clear that the DSPS students are
rebounding in their classes with success. This testifies to the beneficial nature of the
early alert system and the motivation, resiliency, and hard work of the DSPS students.


Persistence of DSPS and District Students
       “Persistence” is defined at Cuesta College as those students who are enrolled in
one semester and enroll in at least one course the following semester, no matter what
their grade was in any course in that previous semester (except for a “W,” a withdrawal,
of course).
       In the 2005-2006 academic year, DSPS students showed significantly greater
persistence when compared to all students in the district (81.7% vs. 64.5%,


DSPS Program Review 2007                                 41                                           July 11, 2007
respectively). One might assume that the support the students receive through DSPS
helps them stay in college; the student comments from the survey completed for this
program review corroborate this assumption.

Curriculum Review
Course Content
        DSPS faculty continually review and revise their courses for improvement. In
addition, in the Spring and Fall 2003 semesters, all courses in the DSPS and Academic
Support departments were reviewed and updated as part of a prefix re-numbering plan.
These former “Learning Skills” (pre-fix “LRN SK”) courses were re-organized so that
both departments‟ courses were combined under the “Academic Skills” umbrella (using
the prefix “ACA SK”) and grouped according to academic discipline, such as reading,
writing, arithmetic, and computer courses. Course outline changes, including the prefix
re-numbering and changes to the class catalog and schedule, were implemented in the
Spring 2004 semester.
        Also, DSPS last year initiated and sponsored a collaboration between the basic
writing skills instructors in the Cuesta College DSPS, English, and English as a Second
Language departments. A series of meetings with the instructors in these departments
resulted in an understanding by all those involved of the content and level of each of the
courses in their respective departments. DSPS faculty have subsequently submitted a
revised curriculum course outline for ACA SK 50 Writing Fundamentals to the DSPS
Director and the Cuesta College Curriculum Committee to reflect the changes resulting
from this collaboration and new understanding. In addition, one DSPS faculty member
created a detailed (voluntary) rubric for evaluating final paragraph writing skills for the
ACA SK 50 instructors.
        The only other necessary change to DSPS curriculum found by DSPS faculty for
this program review was an update of the learning disabilities assessment course, ACA
SK 140 Diagnostic Testing for Learning Disabilities, which needed revisions to reflect
recent changes in the LD assessment process. A revised curriculum course outline for
ACA SK 140 has likewise been submitted to the DSPS Director.
        It is expected that the course outline revisions for ACA SK 50 and ACA SK 140
will be approved by the Curriculum Committee during the Fall 2007 semester.

Course Pre-requisites, Co-requisites, and Advisories
       A course pre-requisite, co-requisite, and/or advisory review was completed for
every DSPS course as part of this program review. The majority of DSPS courses are
considered “basic skill,” and hence, have no pre-requisites, co-requisites, and advisories.
All pre-requisites, co-requisites, and advisories that did appear in any DSPS course
were considered to continue to be valid and appropriate according to Cuesta College,
Chancellor Office, and legal (California Code of Regulations, Title V) guidelines.

Changes in DSPS Courses
       Some changes to the roster of DSPS courses and the scheduling of those courses
include the following:
        • ACA SK 30 A/B Phonetic Foundations will be taught for the first time at the
          North County Campus in the Fall 2007 semester.
        • One DSPS faculty member is writing a series of “Math Literacy” courses,
          integrating basic arithmetic skills with consumer/financial, measurement, and


DSPS Program Review 2007                        42                              July 11, 2007
           logic skills. This course would require a basic skill level of fractions, decimals,
           and percentages.
        • Two sections of ACA SK 50 Writing Fundamentals will be taught for the first
          time in the Summer 2007 session, and two sections of ACA SK 50 Writing
          Fundamentals will be taught for the first time as 12-week courses in the Fall
          2007 semester.
        • The developer of the nationally-recognized ACA SK 30A/B Phonetic
          Foundations course (who is a DSPS Learning Disabilities Specialist) is
          scheduled to retire from teaching the course at the end of the Spring 2008
          semester. The future of ACA SK 30A/B is unknown, although a part-time
          instructor currently is teaching both sections of the course at the SLO campus
          and will begin teaching it for the first time at the North County Campus in
          the Fall 2007 semester.

Recommendations for DSPS Courses
        • Ensure that ACA SK 50 Writing Fundamentals and ACA SK 140 Diagnostic
          Testing for Learning Disability complete the course outline change process;
          monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of the course changes.
        • Monitor and evaluate the enrollment in ACA SK 30 A/B at the North County
          Campus.
        • Complete and submit a “Math Literacy” course or group of courses for
          Curriculum Committee and Board of Trustee approval. Pilot the course,
          perhaps as summer courses.
        • Monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of a summer section and a 12-week
          section of ACA SK 50 Writing Fundamentals.
        • Develop a specific short course in notetaking for notetakers and students who
          wish to increase their notetaking skills.
        • Develop and submit for approval a Certificate of Proficiency or Associate
          degree in Adaptive Technology


                                        Outreach
Cuesta College Departments
        DSPS works closely with all other Cuesta College departments, both academic
programs and services. The Academic Support department is DSPS‟s “sister”
department; courses in both departments are taught by DSPS faculty members and
have the same prefix (ACA SK), office and work space is shared by staff and faculty of
both departments, joint staff meetings are held, and collaboration meetings are held
often to discuss common issues and concerns.
        The Cuesta College Tutorial Center (part of the Academic Support division)
offers extra tutoring time for students with disabilities when authorized by a Disability
Specialist.
        DSPS works closely with other Cuesta College academic departments, such as
the Registered Nursing program, Psych Tech, Viticulture, and other programs, to
ensure student success. Also, student service offices, such as Admissions and Records,



DSPS Program Review 2007                          43                               July 11, 2007
Financial Aid, Health Center, Public Safety, and other offices, are often in close contact
with DSPS staff and faculty as various issues arise with DSPS students.

Agencies, Community Organizations, and Private Practitioners
       DSPS staff and faculty work closely with state and local agencies, public and
private community organizations, and private practitioners in professional practice to
serve current and future DSPS students. Such agencies and organizations include all of
the K-12 schools in San Luis Obispo County, California Polytechnic State University at
San Luis Obispo, SLO County Department of Mental Health, the Department of
Rehabilitation, the Tri-Counties Regional Center, the Achievement House (a sheltered
workshop for people with severe developmental disabilities), and many more. In
addition, the Director of DSPS and the DSPS Specialists collaborate closely with
professionals in private practice to ensure DSPS students have a smooth transition into
(and out of) college and receive the services they need.

Local and Out-of-Town High Schools
        All DSPS Specialists are assigned 2 or 3 of the SLO County high schools (so that
every high school in San Luis Obispo County has a liaison with a DSPS Specialist) to
visit the Resource Specialist Program (“RSP”) students in the fall or spring at their high
schools. The purpose is to discuss with the high school students the procedures to apply
for DSPS services and to answer the students‟ questions about going to college.
        In addition, local and out-of-town high school RSP students and students with
disabilities are given opportunities to apply for DSPS alternative testing
accommodations for the Math and English Placement tests. Afterwards, the student can
meet with a DSPS Specialist to review the placement test results and receive advice
their on courses and schedules before they register for their college courses.

Catalog and Course Schedules
       The Cuesta College Catalog includes a section on Disabled Student Programs
and Services, including its mission, examples of services, disability categories, and
contact information (see Appendix B). The catalog is available on-line at the Cuesta
College web site (www.cuesta.edu) and on compact disk (CD).
       Also, DSPS usually is included in the narrative section of the Cuesta College Class
Schedules (in addition to its list of courses) in order for students and parents to be able to
readily gain information regarding DSPS services. However, this reference to DSPS was
deleted in the Summer 2007 and Fall 2007 schedules (see Appendix B).

Central Coast Learning Disabilities Conference
        The annual Central Coast Learning Disabilities (LD) Conference is sponsored by
DSPS and coordinated by a committee of the DSPS Director, some DSPS staff and/or
faculty, and community members. The LD Conference focuses on practical educational
issues dealing with people of all ages who have learning problems associated with a
disability, particularly learning disabilities and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity
Disorder.
        Now in its 19th year, the LD Conference has drawn participants from all over the
state and speakers from all over the country. Capacity for this conference is about 200,
and last year (2006), with the conference focusing on Attention Deficit Disorder, there
was an overflow crowd of 212 participants.



DSPS Program Review 2007                       44                               July 11, 2007
Newsletter
        A semesterly newsletter is published and distributed to the district faculty and
staff. It includes a variety of articles on different types of disabilities, legal information
pertaining to students with disabilities, and other pertinent information.

Web Site
        DSPS maintains an informative web site (http://academic.cuesta.edu/acasupp/dsps/).
It includes information on how to apply for services, which services are offered through
DSPS, contact information for DSPS and all of its staff and faculty (including email links),
a handbook for Cuesta College faculty members on how to work with students with
disabilities, a schedule of local disability-related events, the requisite FAQ page, and much
more.

Recommendations for Outreach to Departments, Agencies, and Community
Groups
        • Provide training to Cuesta College instructional personnel in ADA and
          curricular issues
        • Continue sponsoring and evaluating the annual Central Coast Learning
          Disabilities Conference.
        • Increase the number of collaboration meetings with personnel from county
          and state agencies that serve students with disabilities, including the staff at
          the Disability Resource Center at California Polytechnic State University (Cal
          Poly), Department of Rehabilitation, SLO County Mental Health, local high
          schools, etc.
        • Evaluate the effectiveness of the DSPS newsletter; make changes, as
          necessary.
        • Evaluate the effectiveness of the DSPS web site; make changes, as necessary.
        • Reinstate the narrative description of DSPS in the Cuesta College Class
          Schedules.
        • Ensure that on-line Cuesta College Catalogs and Class Schedules are fully
          accessible to students with disabilities




DSPS Program Review 2007                         45                                July 11, 2007
                    Satisfaction and Feedback Surveys


                   Satisfaction and Feedback Surveys Summary
Overall Summary
        Satisfaction level rates for DSPS services and courses were consistently high in all
areas and throughout the target groups (DSPS students, DSPS staff and faculty, and all
employees at Cuesta). A positive overall satisfaction level with DSPS was rated 92% by
DSPS students, 100% by DSPS faculty and staff, and 94% by all Cuesta College
employees.*
        In addition, all target groups responded very favorably to questions such, “Does
DSPS help students achieve their academic goals?” and “Do DSPS students become
better advocates for themselves because of DSPS?” Similarly, all target groups rated
accessibility and support for DSPS students very highly.
        All target groups also responded favorably to the questions, “How do you think
that students with disabilities feel about their Cuesta College experience?” and “How do
                                  you think that students without disabilities feel about
     “Cuesta is just a            students with disabilities?”, reflecting a general positive
    wonderful place to            and supportive atmosphere for students with disabilities
  better oneself. There           at Cuesta College.
  has been no place like                 DSPS students noted a need for notetakers,
  it that enabled me to           evening alternative testing times, better understanding
 truly enjoy the pursuit          of their disabilities and accommodations by Cuesta
        of learning.”             College instructors (particularly part-time, temporary
      – DSPS Student              instructors), and better access to and from parking
                                  areas, bus stops, and around on-campus construction
                                  zones.
        Understanding their disability, academic accommodations (especially extra time
on tests) and their own attitude (determination to succeed, persistence, etc.) were noted
by students most often as helping them succeed in college.
        DSPS staff and faculty noted that maintaining a large base of part-time,
temporary (in lieu of full-time, permanent) employees was not beneficial to students, the
department, or the college.
        Cuesta College employees had a number of suggestions for making DSPS more
“known,” including visiting classrooms and putting up more flyers. They also noted the
need for more LD testing times.
        Only one community survey was completed, making response analysis for this
target group impossible. An examination of the reasons for the low response rate is
being undertaken by DSPS staff and faculty.
        Data shows that DSPS courses meet or exceed the levels of other courses in the
district in nearly all areas, including fill rates, retention, persistence, Early Alert rates,
grades earned, and FTES/FTEF.
        Data also shows that DSPS students have the same demographic attributes of all
Cuesta College students, including having similar percentages of genders, ethnic and
national origins, and college and career goals. In addition, DSPS students have similar


*   Including 16% of all Cuesta College employees who responded “OK/No Opinion.”


DSPS Program Review 2007                                 46                        July 11, 2007
success rates as other Cuesta College students, as measured by degree completion,
transfer-readiness, and transfer rates.
        While DSPS staffing has declined in recent years (while the number of DSPS
students has increased), most students are being served at the legally-mandated level.
Certain areas need more attention, however, such as the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
population, in which a lack of qualified American Sign Language interpreters has
reached critical levels; not all deaf students are receiving sign language interpretation
that is legally-required.*


                                      Survey Methodology
      DSPS conducted four on-line (or otherwise accessible) surveys in February and
March 2007. One of each of the four surveys targeted
          • currently-enrolled and recently-enrolled DSPS students,
          • all DSPS faculty, staff, and contract employees (e.g., sign language interpreters
               and notetakers),
          • all Cuesta College employees (faculty, staff, managers, administrators, and
              board members), or
          • community members who might be associated with or knowledgeable of DSPS
              (DSPS Advisory Committee members, San Luis Obispo County high school
              Resource Specialist Teachers, past attendees of the Central Coast Learning
              Disabilities Conference, etc.).

       Each survey was designed to elicit feedback regarding perceptions of DSPS
courses, services, students, and satisfaction levels in a variety of areas. The four surveys
were developed individually to elicit feedback regarding aspects of DSPS with which
each group would have familiarity, as well as common questions across each survey to
compare results from the different groups.
       The surveys, a mix of forced-choice and free-response items, were made
accessible in alternative formats for those not able to access the survey on-line. See
Appendix C to view all surveys and their results, including a number of interpretive
charts not included in the body of this report.


                                     DSPS Student Survey
Summary
       Most of the respondents have a learning disability, and most receive their DSPS
services at the San Luis Obispo campus. 1/3 of the students learn about DSPS by college
counselors or teachers and 1/4 before entering college from a parent or high school
teacher.




*   Recent state-sponsored budget increases targeted to help serve the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population
      have helped alleviate this problem somewhat; however, the problem of having few qualified ASL
      interpreters in the county persists, hindering DSPS‟s ability to meet the legally-mandated ASL
      interpreter levels.


DSPS Program Review 2007                                 47                                   July 11, 2007
       Satisfaction with first visits to DSPS and with DSPS staff and services are very
high. Ratings of campus accessibility are generally high, except for accessibility in
parking areas and with walkways around construction areas.

Student Survey Methodology
        The DSPS student survey was sent via email to all DSPS students enrolled since
the Fall 2005 semester (three semesters ago), including those DSPS students currently
enrolled, for a total of 964 email survey invitations. In addition, each DSPS staff and
faculty member was given a stack of quarter-sheet paper announcements of the survey
to give to students to remind them to do the survey (and in case a particular student did
not have an email address on file with Cuesta College). Students had multiple computer
labs in which to log on to the survey website and complete the survey if they did not
have web access elsewhere.
        As an incentive to complete the survey, the survey invitation announced a free
raffle drawing for an iPod Shuffle MP3 player for all those who completed the survey. 91
respondents enrolled in the drawing, and a DSPS student enrolled in a South County
Center course was delighted to win the “Cuesta green” iPod.

Specific Student Survey Results
       Of the 964 email survey invitations, 159 students completed the survey (a 16.5%
return rate). 114 (71.7%) of those students were currently enrolled.
       55.3% of the respondents have a learning disability as their primary disability.
The next largest group have a physical disability as their primary disability (13.8%).
Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder comprises the next largest group (10%),


                       DSPS Students Rating of First Visit to DSPS

90
                                                                                     79
80

70

60

50
                                                                          43
40

30
                                                                 20
20
                                                11
10
                                     3                    2
        0          1        0
 0
        1          2        3        4          5         6      7         8          9

                                     1 = Poor   9 = Excellent


psychological disabilities the fourth largest group (7.5%) and traumatic (acquired) brain
injuries the fifth (6.9%). Other disabilities are more or less evenly distributed at 2% or
less. This roughly matches the percentage of students in various disability categories
currently enrolled in DSPS.

DSPS Program Review 2007                            48                          July 11, 2007
        Nearly one-third of the respondents first learned about DSPS from a college
instructor or counselor (15% and 17%, respectively). One-fourth learned about DSPS
before entering college, either from their parents or a high school teacher (14% and 10%
of the respondents, respectively). While being alerted to DSPS via friends and
acquaintances, college orientations, brochures, college catalogs and schedules, web sites,
etc., are important, none of them individually accounted for more than 5% of the
respondents‟ avenues to DSPS. However, all ways are important, as even one student
who learns of DSPS, through whatever means, is another student that DSPS can help
meet their goals.


                    DSPS Student Ratings of Accessibility, Part
                                       1
                               (in percentages)

 100

   80

   60

   40

   20

    0
                             Restrooms




                                                                                                                            Facilities
                                                       Elevators
                                          Restroom




                                                                                                                          Laboratory
                                                                                     Desks
           Doors




                                                                                               Computer
                     Ramps




                                                                                                          line/Distance
                                                                        Classrooms




                                                                                                              Education
                                         Cleanliness




                                                                                                                    On-
            Positive 2007                         Neutral/No Opinion 2007                          Labs
                                                                                             Negative 2007
            Positive 2002                         Neutral/ No Opinion 2002                   Negative 2002


        The great majority of the respondents receive their services at the San Luis
Obispo campus (87%). 10% are at the North County campus, and the rest split between
the two. These rates are understandable, since the majority of Cuesta College‟s and
DSPS‟s courses are on the SLO campus.
        Most students felt positive about their first visit to DSPS. On a scale of 1 to 9
(low to high), 90% of students rated their first visit to DSPS at 7 or above, including
50% at the highest, “Excellent,” rating (see accompanying chart).
        Almost half (47%) of the survey respondents felt that the process of applying for
DSPS services was straightforward and efficient, compared to 6% that thought it was
cumbersome and too much paperwork. 39% thought that applying for services was time-
consuming but necessary, and 36% actually responded that it was pleasant.
        With over half of the respondents having a learning disability, it is important to
note that 23% thought that the LD testing application process was efficient, compared
to 2% that thought it was inefficient.
        30% said that DSPS maintained their confidentiality, compared to 1% that said
it did not.


DSPS Program Review 2007                                           49                                         July 11, 2007
        The DSPS web site appears to be under-utilized by DSPS students: 72% have not
ever visited the site.
        DSPS students rated their satisfaction with DSPS staff very highly. Over half of
the respondents (58%) gave “Courtesy and friendliness of DSPS staff” its highest (“Very
Satisfied” – 9) rating, and totaled 91% for a rating of 7 or higher. A rating of 7 or higher
garnered 78% of the ratings for “Availability of DSPS Specialists and Counselors to
meet with me.” “Follow-up about my disability,” “Knowledge about my disability,”
“Knowledge about campus resources,” from DSPS staff were all rated very highly (on a
scale of 1 – 9, scores of 7 – 9), 72%, 71%, 78%, respectively.


             DSPS Student Ratings of Accessibility, Part 2
                          (in percentages)
                           2007 and 2002

          100
           80
           60
           40
           20
            0
                                       .
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                      Positive 2007                     Neutral/No Opinion 2007
                      Negative 2007                     Positive 2002
                      Neutral/ No Opinion 2002          Negative 2002


        Two-thirds of DSPS students felt very positively about “Cuesta College
instructors‟ willingness to accommodate students in the classroom” (on a scale of 1 – 9,
66% rated 7 – 9). However, a significant amount of student comments on the survey
showed that this is still and area of concern.
        Satisfaction with priority registration and alternative testing were rated very
highly, receiving 65% and 52% of the “Very Satisfied” (9 out of 9) ratings for those items.
50% of the students rated their satisfaction with learning disabilities testing of 7 or
higher (on a scale of 1 – 9).
        Services to improve include “Explanation and discussion of my disability” (10%
rated it at 3 or lower on a scale of 1 – 9), “Referral to community resources” (8% rated it
at 3 or lower), and “Notetaker in classroom” (7% rated at 3 or lower).
        Facilities and physical plant accessibility was generally rated high, except for
desks, parking areas, and walkways around construction areas.
        See Appendix C for specific data and more charts supporting the above narrative
and other areas addressed in the survey.

Recommendations from DSPS Student Survey
        • Increase disability awareness offerings for Cuesta College faculty


DSPS Program Review 2007                        50                               July 11, 2007
        • Provide training to Cuesta College instructional personnel in ADA and
          curricular issues
        • Provide classroom notetaker training
                                                                         “I was not able to
        • Evaluate classroom notetaker procurement process for
                                                                        do my school work
          effectiveness. Revise if necessary
                                                                        because I am busy
        • Evaluate learning disability assessment follow-up               fighting for my
          discussion for effectiveness of the topic related to how to         rights.”
          deal with the LD, what to do next, etc.                         – DSPS Student
        • Evaluate the effectiveness of the web site from a DSPS
          student perspective; make changes, as necessary.


                           DSPS Faculty and Staff Survey
Summary
        Respondents of this survey were primarily from the SLO campus (87%). They
included a fairly even split between DSPS classified staff, faculty, and contract workers
(e.g., sign language interpreters and notetakers). Most of the respondents were very
satisfied with the services that DSPS provides to its students and believe that DSPS
courses and services greatly benefit students and help them achieve their academic
goals.
        The majority of respondents believe that Cuesta College is supportive to students
with disabilities and to the staff and faculty that serve them.
        Job satisfaction ratings are generally high in the areas of working with students,
working with other DSPS staff and faculty, working with other Cuesta College staff and
faculty, campus location, work schedule, and workload.
        Less satisfaction was rated in the job areas of facilities and work space (including
office space), equipment, salary and benefits, and the budget with which the staff and
faculty get to work.

DSPS Faculty and Staff Survey Methodology
       The DSPS faculty and staff survey was sent via email to all currently-employed
DSPS faculty members, staff, contract workers, and volunteers. In addition, the support
services coordinator was asked to remind all DSPS contract workers and volunteers to
complete the survey, and a quarter-page reminder notice was provided to all permanent
DSPS employees in their staff mailboxes.
       55 email survey invitations were sent to DSPS employees and volunteers, and 30
surveys were completed (a 54.5% return rate).

DSPS Faculty and Staff Survey Results
       Survey respondents included a fairly even mix of job classifications: 40% were
faculty, 30% were managers or classified staff, and 27% were contract workers, such as
sign language interpreters. There was an even split between permanent and temporary
workers (50%) each, and a similar split between full-time and part-time employees (57%
and 43%, respectively). 87% of the respondents work primarily at the San Luis Obispo
campus. 40% have in DSPS for 8 years or more, increasing to 73% to include those who
have been in DSPS for 3 or more years.



DSPS Program Review 2007                         51                              July 11, 2007
         DSPS web site use among the DSPS staff and faculty is minimal: 50% of the
 respondents had visited the site only once or twice, while only 33% said they had visited
 the site a few times or more.
                                     The DSPS staff and faculty gave the highest rating of
                             any target group in the areas of DSPS students benefiting
   “I think Cuesta
                             from academic accommodations (100%), DSPS helping DSPS
   College‟s DSPS
                             students achieve their academic goals (100%), DSPS academic
services and staff is
                             courses benefiting students (100%), and DSPS students
one of the strongest
                             becoming better advocates for themselves because of DSPS
   programs in the
                             (87%). Similar to the other target groups, the DSPS staff and
 state of California.”
                             faculty believe that DSPS students become somewhat or very
- DSPS Staff/Faculty
                             dependent on DSPS for their (students‟) success at Cuesta
                             College (77%). 92% do not think DSPS students take unfair
                             advantage of DSPS services.
         Accessibility and support for DSPS students were rated very highly by the DSPS
 staff and faculty, particularly for students with learning difficulties (93.3% positive) and
 with hearing impairments (96.4%). Mobility accessibility was rated 78.6% positive.
         96.7% of the DSPS staff and faculty respondents believe that DSPS students feel
 that Cuesta College is somewhat or very supportive. This matches the 96.8% of DSPS
 students who feel the same way.
         Satisfaction with the level of service that a staff or faculty member‟s area
 provides to DSPS students is high (96%), while 74% feel that Cuesta College provides
 good or excellent support for the staff or faculty member to fulfill their responsibilities
 (20% believe support by Cuesta in this area is only adequate).
         Job satisfaction in most areas is generally high; the following shows the
 percentages of staff and faculty members who rated each area positively (from 6 – 9, on
 a scale of 1 – 9, low to high, respectively):
        • Working with students                                    100%
        • Working with DSPS staff and faculty                      100%
        • My schedule                                               94%
        • Working with Cuesta College staff and faculty             93%

        Less favorable ratings were given in these areas:
        • Facilities (including office space)                       57%
        • Salary and benefits                                       56%
        • Budget to work with                                       36%


       DSPS staff and faculty comments were strong in their dissatisfaction with
Cuesta College maintaining a large part-time, temporary workforce. Also, American
Sign Language interpreter compensation was noted as
low.
                                                             “I truly wish we could get
       Ratings of how well DSPS accomplishes its
                                                            more non-DSPS employees
mission were high: 100% positive. Finally, overall
                                                            to understand the value of
satisfaction level of DSPS by DSPS staff and faculty
                                                            our services, that we assist
members was high: 100% of the respondents gave it a
                                                            students with leveling the
positive rating of 6 – 9 (on a scale of 1 – 9, low to high,
                                                                   playing field.”
respectively).
                                                                - DSPS Staff/Faculty
       See Appendix C for additional data and charts
from the satisfaction and feedback surveys.

DSPS Program Review 2007                         52                               July 11, 2007
Recommendations from DSPS Staff and Faculty Survey
        • Increase disability awareness offerings for Cuesta College faculty
        • Provide training to Cuesta College instructional personnel in ADA and
          curricular issues
        • Hire more staff and faculty on a full-time, permanent basis.
        • Evaluate the effectiveness of the web site from a DSPS staff or faculty
          member perspective; make changes, as necessary.


                            Cuesta Employee Survey
Summary of Survey and Data Analyses
       The majority of survey respondents were members of the faculty, permanent full-
time employees, work on the SLO campus, and/or have been employed by Cuesta
College for over eight years.
       Cuesta College survey respondents were very supportive
of DSPS. The great majority believe that DSPS helps students
                                                                       “I am extremely
achieve their academic goals, are satisfied with the services that
                                                                        grateful for the
DSPS provides to its students, and believe that DSPS is fulfilling
                                                                     support that DSPS
its mission.
                                                                         has given [my
                                                                      visually-impaired
Employee Survey Methodology
                                                                    student] and through
       The Cuesta College employee survey was sent via email to      this student I have
all employees of Cuesta College at all campuses and centers,          truly learned just
including all faculty members, staff members, confidential           how dedicated this
employees, managers, administrators, and trustees (although the     staff is to serving the
latter are technically not employed by the college). DSPS           Cuesta community. ”
employees were asked to not complete the all-Cuesta College             - DSPS Faculty
employee survey since they had an opportunity to complete the               Member
DSPS Staff/Faculty Survey.
       858 email survey invitations were sent to the Cuesta
College employees and trustees. 79 employees or trustees completed the survey (a 9.2%
return rate).

Employee Survey Results
       Respondents from the all-Cuesta College employee survey were in the following
job classifications: faculty (71%), classified staff (23%), managers or administrators
(5%), and confidential employees (1%). 81% of the respondents were permanent
employees, and 73% were full-time. 87% of the respondents work primarily at the San
Luis Obispo campus. 56% of the respondents have been employed at Cuesta College for
over 8 years, and 70% have been at Cuesta College over 3 years.
       The DSPS web site is rarely used (or perhaps even known of) by those outside of
DSPS: 57% of the respondents said they have never visited the site, and 27% said they
had visited the site only once or twice.
       Most of the Cuesta College employees were somewhat familiar (62%) or very
familiar (33%) with DSPS services; less are familiar with the courses that DSPS offers
(42% are not very familiar and 44% somewhat familiar).


DSPS Program Review 2007                       53                              July 11, 2007
       Referrals to DSPS by Cuesta College employees are numerous: 70% have made
referrals 3 or more times.
       Cuesta College employee survey respondents rated positively (as did DSPS
students and DSPS staff and faculty) the benefit that DSPS students receive from DSPS
academic accommodations (89%) and DSPS helping DSPS students achieve their
academic goals (83%). Of those familiar with DSPS courses, 94.9% thought the courses
benefit DSPS students.
       Interestingly, only 54% of the employees at Cuesta College believe that DSPS
students become somewhat or very dependent on DSPS, compared to 65% of DSPS
students and 77% of DSPS staff and faculty. Conversely, 20% of the Cuesta College
employees believe that DSPS students take unfair advantage of DSPS services,
compared to 7% each of DSPS students and DSPS staff and faculty.
       61% of the Cuesta College employee respondents thought that students become
better advocates for themselves because of DSPS, while only 5% thought they become
worse advocates for themselves because of DSPS.
       Many Cuesta College employees offered suggestions for how to better “advertise”
DSPS services and programs. These included DSPS personnel visiting classes, offering
presentations at all-employee and community events, using email to inform faculty of
services or events, presenting information at division meetings, and putting up fliers
around campus.
       Other suggestions for improvement included offering alternative testing during
the evening and providing shorter LD testing wait times.

Recommendations from Cuesta College Employee Survey
        • Increase disability awareness offerings for Cuesta College faculty
        • Provide training to Cuesta College instructional personnel in ADA and
          curricular issues
        • Explore suggestions for more “advertising” of DSPS services and programs,
          particularly visiting classrooms and putting fliers around campus
        • Evaluate the effectiveness of the web site from a Cuesta employee perspective;
          make changes, as necessary.
        • Evaluate the learning disabilities assessment process for promptness in
          testing students; make changes, as necessary


                                Community Survey
Summary
       Only one person responded to the community survey, most likely due to a
technological error that resulted in the email announcement of the survey not leaving the
Cuesta College email server. One response was not enough to validate any survey results.
A further examination of the reasons for the low response rate is currently being
undertaken by members of the department.

Community Survey Methodology and Results
     The community survey was (intended to be) sent via email announcement to the
DSPS Advisory Committee members, the local (San Luis Obispo County) high school
DSPS liaisons (most often a high school counselor), all SLO County high school


DSPS Program Review 2007                       54                              July 11, 2007
Resource Specialist Teachers, and past attendees of the Central Coast Learning
Disabilities Conference (comprised of many community members, professionals in
private practice, parents of students with disabilities, adults with learning disabilities,
and interested community members).
       However, only one person responded to the email survey announcement. This is
an unlikely (too low) number of responses if all of the emails had been sent, so DSPS
staff believe that the emails most likely encountered a Cuesta College email
system/server error so that the survey email announcement did not get through the
Cuesta College email system.

Recommendations from Community Survey
        • Explore the reasons for the low response rate to the community survey, such
          as an email system error.
        • In the future, consider hosting focused discussion groups with agencies,
          community groups, private practitioners, etc., to elicit feedback regarding
          DSPS.
        • Evaluate the effectiveness of the web site from a community member‟s
          perspective; make changes, as necessary.




DSPS Program Review 2007                        55                              July 11, 2007
                     Review of ADA Compliance Issues


                                            Introduction
        As an agency that receives federal funding and serves people with disabilities,
Cuesta College must be reasonably accessible to employees and students with
disabilities. What are usually labeled as “ADA compliance issues” are possible violations
of legal and court-ordered rights for accessibility.* DSPS is charged with assisting the
district in keeping its programs and services accessible and finding and resolving
possible ADA violations.


     2002 Galvin Group Compliance Issues, Recommendations, and
                         District Follow-up
        The Galvin Group‟s March 2002 DSPS Program Review Report commended the
district and DSPS staff and faculty for its compassion and commitment to accessibility
for students and staff. However, it also noted a number of possible ADA/504/Title V
compliance issues (violations) that the district needed to address in the areas of
Leadership/Administration and Facilities/Physical Plant. (There were no compliance
issues in the areas of Services/Programs.)
        In addition, recommendations were made by the group to improve student and
staff access in the district in a variety of other areas, as well as “a list of suggestions
that DSPS might want to consider in better utilizing their Advisory Committee.”
        The district responded to the Galvin Group‟s compliance issues and
recommendations shortly thereafter by stating its plan for resolving each compliance
issue and how it would address the recommendations.
        A district-wide accessibility committee (named the Barrier Removal Committee),
which included DSPS personnel, had been formed shortly before an accreditation
process (and coincidentally, the 2002 program review) was to begin to examine possible
district compliance violations and make recommendations for compliance. That
committee was dissolved shortly after the accreditation and program reviews were
completed and has not been reinstated since then.
        In May 2007, members of the Cuesta College DSPS staff and faculty who were on
the original (2002) Barrier Removal Committee reviewed the district‟s 2002
plan/response to the Galvin Group‟s report. Theses staff members also completed a
district-wide examination of possible current compliance violations. The DSPS staff
found that Cuesta College had implemented much of the plan outlined in the 2002
report, particularly those that could be addressed within DSPS and those that included
planning and building new construction.
        Some of the solutions that addressed the 2002 program review concerns include
          • Providing quick turnaround times when requesting alternate media, such as
            using a Kurzweil reader, hiring a full-time permanent Alternate Media
            Facilitator, and increasing Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic subscriptions

*   The enabling legislation and legal basis for serving people with disabilities (including employees and
      students) in an accessible manner are The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, Section 504
      of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1976, and Title V of the California Code of Regulations.


DSPS Program Review 2007                                 56                                   July 11, 2007
        • Installing Brailled room number signage on new buildings
        • Leveling door jams
        • Replacing an open doorway with a glass partition in the High Tech Center
          Lab/Classroom
        • Changing learning disabilities assessments procedures to provide shorter wait
          times after applying for testing
        • Changing procedures to ensure confidentiality and non-bias in alternate
          testing
        • Posting signs at the alternative testing rooms regarding chemical and
          fragrance sensitivities of students



                             2007 Compliance Issues
Facilities / Physical Plant Compliance Issues
        In addition to the compliance issues that were noted in the 2002 Galvin Group
Program Review that have not been addressed, DSPS staff also have noted the following
current physical plant compliance violations: lack of bathroom access, steep slopes
without appropriate ramps, inadequate signage on old buildings, parking inaccessibility
issues, and heavy weight of certain doors. In addition, not having an active accessibility
committee on campus has been one of the greatest barriers to improving accessibility for
students and Cuesta College employees.

Recommendations for Facilities / Physical Plant Compliance Issues
        • Disaster plan – This project has been partially addressed but needs to be
          formalized, as stated in the 2002 DSPS Program Review Response to the
          Chancellor‟s Office. Public Safety and DSPS has initiated a response plan for
          Building 3300 and have developed a pamphlet that describes guidelines for
          disabled students‟ safe evacuation from all buildings on campus. However, the
          campus needs to implement the evacuation plan and drills. Each classroom
          needs posting of the evacuation plan. (Braille maps of campus are available by
          request.)
        • Appropriate and accessible interior and exterior signage – The campus is in the
          process of remodeling existing and building new buildings (a Physical Science
          Lab, a Library Expansion, and a Performing Arts Theater) which, when
          completed, will be compliant to ADA signage requirements. The other older
          buildings still need to address this issue. The campus does not have adequate
          directional signs for campus grounds.
        • Restroom access – Many of the older building men and women‟s bathrooms are
          not accessible from the outside (double doors) and do not have handicapped
          accessible stalls in them. The newer 7100, 3300, and 3400 Buildings have
          automatic door openers and have ADA compliant stalls. This issue needs to be
          address so that all students have access to all bathrooms on campus.
        • Inaccessible bus stops and walkways – Wheelchair students have complained
          the Parking Lot 3/Romauldo Road bus stop is inaccessible for many manual
          wheelchair users due to not having appropriate ramps. Other bus stops
          (Parking Lot 4/Cuesta College Road and Parking Lot 5/Chorro Valley Road)

DSPS Program Review 2007                       57                               July 11, 2007
           has access for all students with disabilities, although they are a long distance
           from many campus classrooms and activities. Also, the Administration
           Building (Building 8100) has ramp walkways that are too steep for most
           manual wheelchair users.
        • Handicapped parking – More handicapped parking spaces are needed in all
          parking lots.
        • Door Pulls – Many door pulls on campus are not adjusted to appropriate
          weight requirements. One such door is located at the back of the cafeteria
          towards the courtyard. DSPS has asked many times to have this door adjusted
          and as of today, no adjustment has occurred. All main doors of every building
          should be equipped with electric push button door openers to provide access to
          all students.
        • Accessibility committee – Reinstate this committee to “keep on top of hot
          issues for specific students and staff that need to be addressed immediately,”
          as well as to address long-term accessibility planning issues.

Programs and Services Compliance Issues
        “Compliance” also includes accessibility to academic programs and support
services. It is probable that legal requirements for accommodations for students with
disabilities are being violated at places in which Cuesta College courses are being
taught but do not have dedicated DSPS offices, such as the South County centers and
local high schools. (Through no fault of their own, staff and instructors at these
locations do not have the background knowledge or experience in disability rights,
academic accommodations, and access issues for students with disabilities. This,
however, does not relieve the district of its responsibility to provide access to its
academic courses, student services, and other activities at these sites.)
        Such compliance issues include
        • the lack of notification of legal rights of students with disabilities
        • the lack of notification of available academic accommodations
        • the lack of DSPS staff available to facilitate procurement of academic
          accommodations
        • the lack of availability of adaptive equipment and alternative testing rooms
        • the lack of commensurate availability of services that are available at other
          district campuses

Recommendations for Programs and Services Compliance Issues
        • Provide a dedicated DSPS office area and staff for the South County centers
        • Provide services at the South County centers and local high school sites
          appropriately commensurate with services at the SLO and North County
          Campus
        • Provide training to Cuesta College instructional personnel in ADA and
          curricular issues
        • Provide disability awareness training, including the topic of legal compliance,
          for district South County Center staff




DSPS Program Review 2007                          58                               July 11, 2007
                    Conclusions / Recommendations


       Cuesta College‟s Disabled Student Programs and Services department offers to
students with disabilities a wide range of effective academic accommodations and
academic courses. DSPS receives very high marks from students in the department,
DSPS staff and faculty, and Cuesta College employees. In addition, DSPS is providing
excellent outreach to other departments on campus, local and state agencies, and
community groups.
       All is not perfect, of course, and there is always room for improvement. Each of
DSPS‟s constituent groups have made recommendations for improvement in a variety of
areas. These recommendations have been discussed in previous, pertinent sections of
this document.
       In order to facilitate the reading of the recommendations, all of the
recommendations listed in previous sections of this document have been duplicated and
re-organized below into (non-prioritized) different sets, as organized by
        • Staffing (DSPS Director and classified, faculty, contract workers and
          volunteers, Advisory Committee, and district personnel)
        • DSPS academic accommodations
        • DSPS academic courses
        • Outreach to Cuesta College departments, local and state agencies, and
          community groups
        • Location (SLO campus, North County campus, South County Centers and
          local high schools, and distance education).

        Note that duplications within the different sets are intentional.


             Recommendations for DSPS and District Staffing
DSPS Director and Classified Staff
        • Ensure that DSPS MIS data is comprehensive, complete, and accurate (for
          reporting and budget purposes)
        • Provide DSPS database (“Marv”) accessibility to all DSPS personnel
        • Explore the reasons for the low response rate to the community survey.
          Consider hosting focused discussion groups with agencies, community groups,
          private practitioners, etc., to elicit feedback regarding DSPS.
        • Explore suggestions for more “advertising” of DSPS services and programs,
          particularly visiting classrooms and putting fliers around campus
        • When employing DSPS staff and faculty, provide for full-time, permanent
          positions
        • Increase disability awareness offerings for Cuesta College faculty
        • Evaluate the effectiveness of the DSPS web site from a DSPS student, Cuesta
          College employee, and community member perspectives; make changes, as
          necessary


DSPS Program Review 2007                        59                             July 11, 2007
        • Evaluate classroom notetaker procurement process for effectiveness; revise, if
          necessary
        • Provide classroom notetaker training
        • Provide cultural awareness and sensitivity trainings, especially regarding
          Latino students
        • Provide DSPS orientations to new Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing students
        • Provide funding and release time for DSPS personnel to visit college campuses
          with high student diversity rates
        • Provide for DSPS support personnel, including alternative testing and other
          services, at South County Centers
        • Provide for evening and weekend alternative testing
        • Increase the availability of alternative testing for the Cuesta College Math
          and English placement tests
        • Increase Secretary II (Front Desk) to 12 months at the SLO campus
        • Advocate for Building 3300 Front Desk receptionist
        • Increase Alternate Media Facilitator by ten percent (11 months to 12 months)
        • Hire a .5 FTE Alternative Media Facilitator for the North County Campus
        • Hire an American Sign Language interpreter coordinator and/or support
          person
        • Hire or otherwise provide for evening alternative testing proctoring at all
          campuses
        • Hire a full-time American Sign Language interpreter
        • Reinstate ACA SK 30 Phonetic Foundations tutor positions
        • Reinstate Clerical Assistant (file clerk) position

DSPS Faculty
        • Provide DSPS database (“Marv”) accessibility to all DSPS personnel
        • Explore the reasons for the low response rate to the community survey.
          Consider hosting focused discussion groups with agencies, community groups,
          private practitioners, etc., to elicit feedback regarding DSPS.
        • Evaluate the learning disabilities assessment process for promptness in
          testing students; make changes, as necessary
        • Explore suggestions for more “advertising” of DSPS services and programs,
          particularly visiting classrooms and putting fliers around campus
        • When employing DSPS staff and faculty, provide for full-time, permanent
          positions
        • Evaluate the effectiveness of the DSPS web site from a DSPS student, Cuesta
          College employee, and community member perspectives; make changes, as
          necessary
        • Evaluate learning disability assessment follow-up discussion for effectiveness
          of the topic related to how to deal with the LD, what to do next, etc.
        • Increase disability awareness offerings for Cuesta College faculty


DSPS Program Review 2007                         60                            July 11, 2007
        • Provide cultural awareness and sensitivity trainings, especially regarding
          Latino students
        • Provide training in technological advances that help students gain more
          access to educational programs
        • Provide funding and release time for DSPS personnel to visit college campuses
          with high student diversity rates
        • Hire a full-time tenure-track Speech and Language Specialist (who would also
          work with students with hearing impairments and students with
          psychological disabilities)
        • Replace the upcoming (from retirement) tenure-track Learning Disabilities
          Specialist position with a full-time tenure-track LD Specialist position
        • Provide for a Disability Specialist during the North County Campus summer
          session
        • Hire .5 FTEF DSPS Counselors for the North County and SLO campuses
        • Provide time for a Learning Disabilities Specialist to teach Math Literacy
          course(s) (see DSPS courses section)
        • Provide time for a DSPS instructor to teach a note taking class
        • Provide for Specialist coverage (academic counseling, case management, and
          learning disabilities testing) for summer sessions at both campuses
        • Provide faculty for more summer session courses
        • Hire a bilingual Learning Disabilities Specialist to administer and interpret
          learning disabilities assessment instruments in Spanish (see section on
          changes to student demographics)
        • Maintain proficiency in the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children–IV
        • Provide for DSPS academic counseling and case management at South County
          Centers
        • Provide and/or fund professional development activities regarding new,
          emerging, and increasing disability types

DSPS Contract Workers and Volunteers
        • Provide cultural awareness and sensitivity trainings, especially regarding
          Latino students
        • Provide formal, classroom training for DSPS classroom note takers
        • Maintain a competitive pay scale for American Sign Language interpreters

DSPS Advisory Committee
        • Complete a full evaluation of the effectiveness of the DSPS Advisory
          Committee, including a review the 2002 Program Review suggestions
        • Prioritize the needs of the DSPS Advisory Committee
        • Develop a plan to address the needs of the Advisory Committee
        • Evaluate the effectiveness of the web site from a DSPS student, Cuesta
          College employee, and community member perspectives; make changes, as
          necessary


DSPS Program Review 2007                       61                             July 11, 2007
District Personnel
        • Increase disability awareness offerings for Cuesta College faculty
        • Provide training to Cuesta College instructional personnel in Americans with
          Disabilities Act compliance and curricular issues
        • Provide cultural awareness and sensitivity trainings, especially regarding
          Latino students
        • Hire Health Center, Counselors, etc., who have licenses and/or experience in
          working with students with psychological and other disabilities
        • Implement the evacuation plan drills
        • Post the evacuation plan in each classroom


        Recommendations for DSPS Academic Accommodations
        • Provide a push button door opener on the main door of Building 2400
        • Provide a push button door opener on the door of at least one bathroom in
          each building
        • Evaluate learning disability assessment follow-up discussion for effectiveness
          of the topic related to how to deal with the LD, what to do next, etc.
        • Evaluate the timeliness of LD testings (time between a student applying for
          LD testing and completing the testing); make changes, as necessary
        • Evaluate classroom notetaker procurement process for effectiveness; revise, if
          necessary
        • Provide classroom notetaker training
        • Provide cultural awareness and sensitivity trainings, especially regarding
          Latino students
        • Provide DSPS orientations to new Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing students
        • Provide training in technological advances that help students gain more
          access to educational programs
        • Maintain proficiency in the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children–IV
        • Increase the number of private testing rooms
        • Provide for evening alternative testing at all campuses and centers
        • Explore the need for alternative testing for distance education courses
        • Increase the number of notetakers, both volunteer and paid
        • Provide more captioning services, such as Typewell Captioning and closed
          captioning
        • Increase the equipment loan bank, including recording equipment, MP3
          players, CD players, adaptive furniture, video cameras and recorders, audio
          digital recorders, and Phonic Ears
        • Provide alternative math and English placement testing during evenings and
          other times when needed
        • Announce in the semester schedules the dates when DSPS will be giving the
          alternative math and English placement tests


DSPS Program Review 2007                       62                               July 11, 2007
     Recommendations for DSPS and District Academic Courses
        • Increase and monitor the enrollment of the number of evening and summer
          DSPS courses
        • Ensure that ACA SK 50 Writing Fundamentals and ACA SK 140 Diagnostic
          Testing for Learning Disability complete the course outline change process;
          monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of the course changes
        • Monitor and evaluate the enrollment in ACA SK 30 A/B at the North County
          Campus
        • Complete and submit a “Math Literacy” course or group of courses for
          Curriculum Committee and Board of Trustee approval. Pilot the course,
          perhaps as summer courses.
        • Monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of a summer section and a 12-week
          section of ACA SK 50 Writing Fundamentals
        • Develop a specific short course in notetaking for notetakers and students who
          wish to increase their notetaking skills
        • Develop and submit for approval a Certificate of Proficiency or Associate
          degree in Adaptive Technology
        • Provide college-wide support to ensure that all distance education classes are
          accessible and content is appropriately captioned




  Recommendations for Outreach to Departments, Agencies, and
                     Community Groups
        • Explore the reasons for the low response rate to the community survey.
          Consider hosting focused discussion groups with agencies, community groups,
          private practitioners, etc., to elicit feedback regarding DSPS.
        • Explore suggestions for more “advertising” of DSPS services and programs,
          particularly visiting classrooms and putting fliers around campus
        • Increase disability awareness offerings for Cuesta College faculty
        • Provide training to Cuesta College instructional personnel in Americans with
          Disabilities Act and curricular issues
        • Continue sponsoring and evaluating the annual Central Coast Learning
          Disabilities Conference
        • Increase the number of collaboration meetings with personnel from county
          and state agencies that serve students with disabilities, including the staff at
          the Disability Resource Center at California Polytechnic State University (Cal
          Poly), Department of Rehabilitation, SLO County Mental Health, local high
          schools, etc.
        • Evaluate the effectiveness of the DSPS newsletter; make changes, as
          necessary



DSPS Program Review 2007                        63                              July 11, 2007
        • Evaluate the effectiveness of the DSPS web site from a DSPS student, Cuesta
          College employee, and community member perspectives; make changes, as
          necessary
        • Reinstate the narrative description of DSPS in the Cuesta College Class
          Schedules
        • Ensure that on-line Cuesta College Catalogs and Class Schedules are fully
          accessible to students with disabilities




   Recommendations For Cuesta College Campuses and Centers
Recommendations for the San Luis Obispo Campus and DSPS Office
        • Reinstate district-wide committee to examine ADA compliance issues and
          make recommendations for compliance
        • Provide training to Cuesta College instructional personnel in ADA and
          curricular issues
        • Provide a push button door opener on the main door of each building
        • Provide a push button door opener on the door of at least one bathroom set in
          each building
        • Develop a full space/storage needs plan for the DSPS offices and rooms,
          including moving and/or soundproofing the DSPS reception and support
          service areas, the Assistive Technology Classroom/Lab, and the ACA SK 30
          Phonetic Foundations tutoring area
        • Provide adaptive equipment and furniture storage space within the DSPS
          office area.
        • Provide for evening alternative testing
        • Provide more individual alternative testing rooms
        • Hire a separate Academic Skills/DSPS (Building 3300) receptionist
        • Provide for full accessibility in the DSPS file room
        • Evaluate the need for upgrading the Assistive Technology Classroom/Lab
          computers and technologies, including the area used by the Alternative Media
          Facilitator
        • Provide more adaptive equipment, especially digital recorders
        • Evaluate the need for upgrading staff and faculty office equipment,
          particularly computers
        • Provide rooms for video relay services
        • Provide better notification of and access around campus construction projects
        • Continue providing input and advocacy when the district is planning new
          buildings, building modifications, pathways, etc.
        • Implement the evacuation plan drills.
        • Post the evacuation plan in each classroom




DSPS Program Review 2007                        64                              July 11, 2007
        • Provide a wheelchair accessible switchback ramp for the Parking Lot 3 /
          Romauldo Road bus stop and Building 8100
        • Provide more handicapped parking places, where needed

Recommendations for the North County Campus and DSPS Office
        • Reinstate district-wide committee to examine ADA compliance issues and
          make recommendations for compliance
        • Provide training to Cuesta College instructional personnel in ADA and
          curricular issues
        • Provide a push button door opener on the main door of Building 2400 and on
          the parking lot side of Building 3000
        • Provide a push button door opener on the door of at least one bathroom set in
          each building
        • Provide for evening alternative testing
        • Provide individual alternative testing rooms
        • Provide for a Disability Specialist during the summer session
        • Hire a permanent DSPS Counselor
        • Hire a permanent Alternative Media Technician
        • Provide for specialized English and Math tutoring for DSPS students
        • Provide Adapted P.E. courses (Weight Training and Swimming)
        • Provide for an Assistive Technology Specialist to evaluate student needs,
          campus accessibility evaluations, and course accessibility
        • Increase the amount and type of adapted equipment and furniture, including
          CD players for alternative media and ergonomic padded chairs
        • Provide dedicated equipment and furniture storage space
        • Provide an electric cart and scooter
        • Provide more efficient soundproofing in the DSPS testing rooms and offices
        • Increase the DSPS course offerings, including a new “Math Literacy” course;
          monitor for enrollment and effectiveness
        • Evaluate the need for upgrading staff and faculty office equipment,
          particularly computers
        • Ensure that campus facilities are ADA-compliant
        • Continue providing input and advocacy when the district is planning new
          buildings, building modifications, pathways, etc.
        • Implement the evacuation plan drills
        • Post the evacuation plan in each classroom
        • Provide more handicapped parking places, where needed

Recommendations for the South County Sites and Local High Schools
        • Reinstate district-wide committee to examine ADA compliance issues and
          make recommendations for compliance



DSPS Program Review 2007                         65                           July 11, 2007
        • Provide training to Cuesta College instructional personnel in ADA and
          curricular issues
        • Provide a push button door opener on the main door of each building in which
          Cuesta College offers courses and services
        • Provide a push button door opener on the door of at least one bathroom set in
          each building in which Cuesta College offers courses and services
        • Provide a dedicated DSPS office at the South County Center, including staff
          and specialists for academic counseling, alternative testing rooms, a
          soundproofed learning disabilities assessment room, a fax and copy machine,
          adaptive furniture and equipment, storage space, etc.
        • Provide advertising at the centers to inform potential DSPS students of the
          DSPS services and courses
        • Provide disability awareness and Americans with Disabilities Act compliance
          trainings for all Cuesta College staff and faculty
        • Review past enrollment issues for ACA SK 50 Writing Fundamentals, and
          offer again, if appropriate
        • Pilot ACA SK 30A/B, ACA SK 32 Reading Comprehension, ACA SK 75
          Arithmetic Fundamentals, and a new “Math Literacy” course; evaluate for
          enrollment and effectiveness
        • Provide input and advocacy when the district is planning new buildings,
          building modifications, pathways, etc.
        • Provide more handicapped parking places, where needed

Distance Education
        • Monitor distance education technology for possible use in DSPS courses
        • Evaluate current and new DSPS courses for possible structuring as distant
          education courses
        • Implement the Emergency Procedures/Evacuation plan and drills.
        • Post the evacuation plan in each classroom


                           DSPS Program Review Follow-up
       The DSPS staff and faculty are known for their forward-thinking, advocacy-
based work ethic. They are continually discussing and implementing needed
improvements in courses, services, office management, procedures and policies, etc.; in
essence, the DSPS staff and faculty continually are completing informal “program
                          reviews” as a normal part of their work.
                                 This 2007 program review process, however, has
                          given the DSPS staff and faculty the opportunity to formally
                          examine “hard data” regarding DSPS courses and services,
                          changes in student demographics, campus plans, and other
                          aspects of its mission.
                                 Continuing this cycle of examination, evaluation,
                          planning, and implementation, during the Fall 2007
                          semester, the DSPS staff and faculty will review the


DSPS Program Review 2007                      66                             July 11, 2007
recommendations made in this program review. They will prioritize the
recommendations and then develop a plan to address the priority list. Where feasible,
DSPS staff and faculty will implement portions of the plan immediately. Other portions
of the plan will be incorporated into the department, division, cluster, and college plans
for the subsequent years until the next department program review (in 2012 C.E.).




DSPS Program Review 2007                       67                               July 11, 2007
                           Appendices




DSPS Program Review 2007         A      July 11, 2007
   Appendix A Staff, Faculty, and Advisory Committee Members

Contents:

List of DSPS Staff and Faculty

List of DSPS Advisory Committee Members

Organizational Chart: Academic Support / DSPS

Organizational Chart: Student Support Staff and Directors

Organizational Chart: San Luis Obispo County Community College District
(Cuesta College)




DSPS Program Review 2007                A                   December 6, 2011
      Appendix B Policies, Procedures, Brochures, Newsletters, Etc.
Contents:
Cuesta College Board Policy 6520 “Programs and Services for Students with Disabilities”
DSPS Application and Verification Forms
    Application for Services
    Verification of Disability
    Eligibility Letter
    Disability Categories Defined
    Documentation Required for Verification of Disability
    Psychologist Referral List
Student Educational Contract
DSPS Academic Accommodations Policies and Procedures
    Academic Accommodations for Students with Disabilities (General)
    Alternative Testing
    DSPS Testing Room Rules
    Adaptive Equipment Loan/Use
    Adapted Physical Education
    Alternate Media/Taped Texts
    Taped Texts
    Counseling Services
    Course Substitution/Waiver Process
    Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing Student Responsibilities
    Learning Disabilities Eligibility Testing Procedure
    Notetaking Services
    Priority Registration
    Petition for Substitution/Waiver of Associate Degree or Certificate Requirements
    Suspension of DSPS Services
Grievance Procedures
    Student Complaints of Discrimination (Summary and Procedures) (blue)
     Cuesta College Board Policy on Unlawful Discrimination and Complaint Form (BP 1565) (green)
        (Also available at http://academic.cuesta.org/president/BP/BP1000/1565.pdf)
Brochures and Handouts
     Disabled Student Programs and Services
     Programas y Servicios para Estudiantes Minusvalidos DSPS
     A Parent‟s Guide to College (Transition from High School with a Disability)
     Guidelines for Students and Staff with Disabilities for a Safe Evacuation from the College Campus
     Access to Success: A Guide for Students Entering the LD Program
2006-2007 Cuesta College Catalog (DSPS References and Courses) (tan)
Fall 06 through Fall 07 Course Schedule Pages (DSPS References and Courses) (tan)
DSPS Newsletters
     March 27, 2006 (Volume 1, Issue 1)
     September 25, 2006 (Volume 2, Issue 1)
     March 15, 2007 (Volume 2, Issue 2)
DSPS Web Site Home Page




DSPS Program Review 2007                           B                             December 6, 2011
                  Appendix C Program Review Satisfaction
                      and Feedback Surveys and Data

Contents:


2007 Program Review Surveys, Data, and Charts
     DSPS Student Survey, Data, Written Comments, and Charts (yellow)
     DSPS Staff and Faculty Survey, Data, Written Comments, and Charts (green)
     Cuesta College Employee Survey, Data, Written Comments, and Charts (blue)
     Community Survey (lavender)

2002 Galvin Group Program Review
     March 2002 Galvin Group Program Review Narrative (ivory)
     March 2002 Galvin Group Program Review Data, Charts, and Tables (ivory)
     District Response to March 2002 Galvin Group Program Review (ivory)




DSPS Program Review 2007                     C                          December 6, 2011
             Appendix D Program Review Student Demographic
                     and DSPS Course Data and Charts

Contents:

Cuesta College Student Demographic Data
       “Student Characteristics and Enrollment Trends, Fall 2006”
       “Student Services Program Review Technical Assistance Site Visit – Data
           Elements” (pink)
       DSPS Students Who Received an AA/AS Degree, by Semester (pink)
       Student Demographic Charts

DSPS Course Data*
       Final Course Grades, by Instructor – Data and Chart (gray)
       Enrollments, Fill Rates, Retention Rates, Success Rates, Early Alerts, and
           FTES/FTEF by Course and Semester – Data and Charts (buff)
       Comparison of Courses (Success Rates in Cuesta Courses Subsequent to DSPS
          Courses) (tan)




*   Data gathered and assembled by the Cuesta College Institutional Research Department.


DSPS Program Review 2007                                 D                                 December 6, 2011
                     Appendix E DSPS 2006-2007 Unit Plan

Contents:

DSPS 2006-2007 Unit Plan




DSPS Program Review 2007                E                  December 6, 2011
           Appendix F Executive Summary, Conclusions, and
                         Recommendations

An Executive Summary and the conclusions and recommendations of this program
review are located in the front pocket of this binder.




DSPS Program Review 2007         Front Pocket of Binder         December 6, 2011
  Appendix G Compact Disc (CD) of Program Review Document,
                  Data Files, Charts, Etc.

A compact disk (CD) containing this program review document and related data files is
located in the back pocket of this binder.




DSPS Program Review 2007              Back Pocket of Binder             December 6, 2011

								
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