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					               Dimension 6
          Instructional Systems
                  Design
           Application Process




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18              D6T-1
Terrorism Liaison
    Officers:
     Role in
School/Community
   Partnership




                  Inv. Shawn Dyball
          Orange County Sheriff’s Department
                       MIDP 18


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                           D6T-2
        DIMENSION 6: Instructional Systems Design-TTP Application Process


    Need                                           Page      D6T-4

    Priorities, Constraints                        Page      D6T-17

    Goal                                           Page      D6T-19

    Learner Characteristics                        Page      D6T-20

    SME In Progress Review                         Page      D6T-21

    Tasks                                          Page      D6T-28

    Learning Objectives                            Page      D6T-30

    Course Content (CDWS)                          Page      D6T-30

    Testing (CDWS)                                 Page      D6T-30

    Learning Methods (CDWS)                        Page      D6T-30

    Instructional Resources                        Page      D6T-105

    Logistical Support                             Page      D6T-107

    Post Course Evaluation Process                 Page      D6T-108

    Marketing                                      Page      D6T-115

    Revision Plan                                  Page      D6T-116

    POST Certification Package                     Page      Appendix




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                        D6T-3
                              POST Master Instructor Development Program
                            Instructional System Design Application Process:
                                            Needs Assessment
                    Dimension 6 – Instructional Systems Design/Total Training Package


Name: Shawn Dyball
Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
Mentor: Jeff Cope
Dimension: D-6, ISD/TTP

                                           Needs Assessment
My TTP is an expansion of the Terrorism Liaison Officer (TLO) Training Program developed by Dr. Anthony
Lukin for POST. Dr. Lukin recognized the need for fostering an information and training network between
schools, community stakeholders and first responders with respect to the potential for terrorist attacks in
our state as well as the country. In light of the tragic terrorist attack at Middle School No.1 in Belsan, North
Ossetia, Russia, and the discovery of computer discs in Iraq with information about U.S. schools, there is a
growing need for schools to understand that they continue to be “soft targets” to both international and
domestic extremists and extremist groups. This program will involve training TLO’s and School Resource
Officers (SRO’s) working in that capacity to network with schools in their assigned areas on counter-
terrorism and pre-incident planning issues. This will include training school personnel in security issues,
recognition and handling of potential recruitment activity or indications of involvement in extremist groups,
and response to threats and acts of terrorism that directly or indirectly affect them. Training will include
establishing or reviewing response plans for hostage and other potentially devastating scenarios that could
affect the schools. TLO’s and school personnel will learn to work within a network to disseminate
information as quickly and efficiently as possible to the agencies that can analyze and act on that
information as quickly as possible.

In researching training of this type available in California, I found that most training related to law
enforcement and school partnerships focus mainly on SRO’s and interventions in criminal activity and
routine school violence issues. Terrorism is included as a small portion of that training, but there is no
extensive training that focuses specifically on the need for partnerships that include schools staff, parent
groups, the surrounding community, and the students. One of the most enlightening conversations I had
while preparing for this project was with an administrator in the Capistrano Valley Unified School District in
Orange County. Ed Kovak, who has both a law enforcement and educator background, has been
instrumental in fostering a great working relationship with law enforcement by working closely with the
Orange County Sheriff’s Department’s School Mobile Assessment Resource Team (SMART). Ed has also
helped to re-establish SRO’s in all of the middle and high schools in that district. Because of his efforts, the
CUSD is far ahead of many other school districts in the county in establishing and maintaining this type of
relationship with law enforcement agencies. Mr. Kovak praised my proposed training, and commented that
it has long been a necessity throughout the state. He applauded the inclusion of parent groups in the
networking and outreach effort included in the proposal, and informed me that those groups can be
instrumental in getting buy-in from the school districts for important projects such as this one. His
comments and recommendations after reviewing my course outline were very positive, and he praised the


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                     D6T-4
fact that I had identified the need to emphasize training on domestic extremist groups rather than
international groups. He has seen first hand the recruitment tactics these and other groups use on school
campuses to attract impressionable young students into that lifestyle. He also told me that since the
program is designed to promote TLO and SRO initiation and follow-through in establishing the network and
delivering the training, it would relieve any pressure on the already over taxed school district personnel to
take on this responsibility.

                            Training Needs Assessment Survey (TNA)
I spent quite a bit of time talking to members of the education community, from junior high and high school
assistant principals, to the head of the National School Safety Center, to those who headed major traumatic
incident recovery projects. Everyone I interviewed or consulted with was enthusiastic about my proposed
project, and they were glad to see that law enforcement was taking an interest in establishing a network
with the schools. I received offers from many levels to provide any assistance with this project I may need.
With this initial positive feedback, I decided to send my Training Needs Assessment Survey out to both the
school community and the law enforcement community, especially those working with schools in some
capacity.

To begin this process, I designed a survey outlining the proposed training, and asking for feedback on
items included in the proposed objective areas for the course. While I received a good deal of initial
feedback, I was not happy with the wording of the objectives or the amount of feedback I received. Very
late in the process I decided to revise my survey and use the internet based site “Survey Monkey” as the
means for collecting data. I restructured the objectives into definitive statements about the importance of a
relationship between TLO’s and schools, as well as the importance of training and planning meetings that
include first responders from all arenas. I sent the survey and the response link to many of my original
respondents, and added a wider variety of individuals in a wider geographical area, including Northern
California. I obtained positive feedback in all areas, with all respondents agreeing to some degree that this
training is necessary and would be beneficial to them in some way. Those who chose to respond to the
comments section at the end of the survey recommended a wide range of additional items to consider,
including focusing on Domestic rather than International Terrorist groups, and ensuring that the fire service
was an active part of the TLO process. I included multiple representatives from the following agencies in
my survey:
                 Orange County Sheriff’s Department
                 Orange County Fire Authority
                 Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department
                 San Diego County Sheriff’s Department
                 San Jose Police Department
                 Huntington Beach Police Department
                 National School Safety Center
                 Capistrano Valley Unified School District
                 Saddleback Unified School District
                 Tustin Unified School District
                 Brea/Olinda Unified School District

I received responses from at least one representative from each of these agencies. I have compiled the
results into a graph of the overall survey results, and pie charts of individual question results.


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                  D6T-5
                           TNA Survey


               25


               20


               15
 Response
               10


                 5


                 0
                       Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Q7 Q8
                                 Question
                          Disagree
                          Somewhat agree
                          Agree
                          Strongly Agree




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                             D6T-6
Q1: A functional network between schools and trained Terrorism Liaison Officers is
important.




                             0%     0%
                                                      31%



                       69%




                                  Disagree
                                  Somewhat agree
                                  Agree
                                  Strongly Agree




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                           D6T-7
Q2: Training school personnel and Terrorism Liaison Officers to recognize and
report potential pre-incident indicators of violence or extremist activity is important.




                                  3%
                       0%
                                                   21%




                            76%




                             Disagree

                             Somewhat Agree

                             Agree

                             Strongly Agree




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                D6T-8
Q3: Training school personnel and Terrorism Liaison Officers to recognize
recruitment activity or indications of extremist group affiliations on school campuses
is important.




                                       7%
                             0%

                                                        25%


                       68%




                             Disagree
                             Somewhat Agree
                             Agree
                             Strongly Agree




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                            D6T-9
Q4: Training school personnel and Terrorism Liaison Officers to recognize and
assist students with peer or family issues related to potential extremist activity
involvement is important.




                                       10%
                          0%




             55%                                          34%




                          Disagree
                          Somewhat Agree
                          Agree
                          Strongly Agree




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                             D6T-10
Q5: School personnel and Terrorism Liaison Officers training together in problem
solving strategies, crisis response issues and resource availability with respect to
school violence and terrorism is important.




                                          17%
                          0%


                                                               21%
                  62%




                           Disagree
                           Somewhat Agree
                           Agree
                           Strongly Agree




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                            D6T-11
Q6: Establishing a beneficial partnership between Terrorism Liaison Officers,
schools, parent groups and community stakeholders is important.




                                         14%
                          0%



               45%
                                                   41%




                           Disagree
                           Somewhat Agree
                           Agree
                           Strongly Agree




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                            D6T-12
Q7: Having contact with a trained Terrorism Liaison Officer would benefit me or my
agency/school.




                                     10%
                        0%



                                                       31%
               59%




                         Disagree
                         Somewhat Agree
                         Agree
                         Strongly Agree




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                         D6T-13
Q8: This type of training would be beneficial to me or my agency/school.




                                   7%
                        0%



                                                       38%
                55%




                         Disagree
                         Somewhat Agree
                         Agree
                         Strongly Agree




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                       D6T-14
Q9. Please add any additional comments, suggestions or contact information.
1. A terrorism liaison officer offers not only the department, but the citizens they serve, perhaps one of the
first lines of defense against extremist activity. Integrating this specialist into the community school
environment will enhance the participants’ ability to identify, interdict and respond to terrorism. The ability to
reach out and involve the school resource officers as an integral part of the team is an important concept.

2. CUSD formed a partnership with the OCSD five years ago that has proven to be beneficial to both.
Schools have been designated as soft targets by international terrorists and domestic terrorist activity has
claimed the lives of numerous school age children. I recently attended a DHS sponsored anti-terrorist
workshop specifically designed to deal with terrorism directed at schools. Your TLO concept has great
merit. The best of luck and be assured of our continued cooperation in matters of mutual concern.

3. Many schools have existing school resource officers. The SRO and TLO for schools in my area are two
different people. This may cause some confusion. All/both must work with school administration/EM staff to
make the system work and decrease redundancy.

4. Make sure the fire department is INVOLVED!! Get those guys off their recliners!!

5. A strong relationship between school, Law enforcement and supporting agencies is VITAL to the
success of any program. Training is important, however, it must be part of a larger picture of collaboration
and an ongoing working relationship.

6. San Diego TEW

7. Feel free to contact me for follow-up. Sergeant Don Barnes (949) 425-1902

8. Thinking of the teachers and staff at the schools my children attend, I don't see where they will find time
to become involved in crisis strategies, response issues, or the pre-incident indicators of extremist groups.
Perhaps this should be focused for SRO’s, TLO’s, and those assigned to school security. I think teachers
and other support staff would have difficulty with the relevance beyond emergency evacuation or holding
cover until help arrives.

9. Let me know if you would like to pilot something in CUSD. Mike Beekman Director, Child Welfare
Capistrano Unified School District (949)489-7436

10. Teaching this course must involve domestic terrorism issues over international terrorism. The age and
mentality of high school and college kids offer a great resource for groups like ALF and ELF.




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                     D6T-15
In reviewing the answers to the individual questions, I looked to each result to validate or provide a reason
to alter the tasks for my training package. As I had hoped, 100% of respondents to question one either
agreed or strongly agreed that a functional network between schools and trained TLO’s was important,
validating the overall need for this course.

With respect to my second question, the importance of training school personnel and TLO’s to
recognize and report potential pre-incident indicators of violence or extremist activity, 3% answered
that they somewhat agreed, while 76% strongly agreed and 21% agreed. I received a written comment in
this area that indicated the respondent felt that teachers have enough to do with teaching and other school
related duties to take on any responsibilities in this area. “Thinking of the teachers and staff at the schools
my children attend, I don't see where they will find time to become involved in crisis strategies, response
issues, or the pre-incident indicators of extremist groups. Perhaps this should be focused for SRO’s, TLO’s,
and those assigned to school security. I think teachers and other support staff would have difficulty with the
relevance beyond emergency evacuation or holding cover until help arrives.” While I appreciate this
answer, enough respondents felt this was an important issue to address, and validated the fact that I
should include this as a task in this training. Due to the fact that 76% of my respondents strongly agreed
that this was an important area to cover, I decided to make this a T4T session in my course. This will be a
take away tool that TLO’s can use to begin interaction with school personnel, and will open the door for
continued information exchange. Similarly, in response to my third question regarding training TLO’s and
school personnel to recognize indications of extremist group affiliation and recruitment on school
campuses, 93% agreed (25%) or strongly agreed (68%) that this was an important area to include in the
training goal. This additional question, although it appears to repeat the preceding question, again
validates the need to include this area in the T4T component of the course.

Responses to question four, the need to recognize and assist students with peer or family issues
related to potential extremist activity or involvement, caused me to change my task list by removing a
task covering that area. I received only 55% in the “strongly agree” category. As a result, I have included
this task to a lesser degree in the curriculum providing the T4T component on pre-incident indicators.

While I pleased to see that 83% of respondents either agreed (21%) or strongly agreed (62%) that school
personnel and Terrorism Liaison Officers training together in problem solving strategies, crisis
response issues and resource availability with respect to school violence and terrorism was an
important issue. The fact that 17% somewhat agree with the importance of this issue suggests that many
of those surveyed in both the first responder and school communities don’t understand how important it is
that both sides of the response coin participate in planning, training, and exercising response strategies.
The importance of this aspect of the partnership will be covered as a critical task in this course, and should
reverse any negative belief that this is not an important issue.

I was surprised to find that only 45% of those surveyed strongly agreed that a partnership between
Terrorism Liaison Officers, schools, parents and the community was important. I was equally
surprised to see that only 59% strongly agreed that having contact with a trained TLO would benefit
their agency or school. I truly expected that these responses would be higher. My interpretation of these
two responses suggests that many people, law enforcement and school personnel alike, still do not know or
understand the function of a TLO, and do not realize the full benefit of having that individual in place for
networking purposes. One comment in this area read, “Many schools have existing school resource
officers. The SRO and TLO for schools in my area are two different people. This may cause some
confusion. All/both must work with school administration/EM staff to make the system work and decrease


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                   D6T-16
redundancy.” Many consider the SRO as their primary law enforcement contact, and do not see the need
for an additional contact person, however, many do not realize the additional training and expertise a TLO
brings to the relationship. SRO’s are not always trained in terrorism related areas to make them the “go to”
person for information exchange. They may not always understand what they see or hear, and that it is
important enough to pass on to an appropriate agency for follow-up. Enough respondents recognize the
need for this type of resource within the school districts to warrant the additional training in this area. This
area will be included in the information networking and elicitation training of my course, so that TLO’s will
possess the extra tools they need to obtain information within communities that might unknowingly have an
effect on school environments.

On my final question, 93% of the respondents agreed (38%) or strongly agreed (55%) that this type of
training would be beneficial to the individual, agency or school, which once again reinforced the
necessity of my training. I have also taken into consideration all of the written comments received. One in
particular has reinforced my belief that concentrating on domestic extremist groups should be the focus of
the terrorism overview and the pre-incident and recruitment indicator modules. “Teaching this course must
involve domestic terrorism issues over international terrorism. The age and mentality of high school and
college kids offer a great resource for groups like ALF and ELF.” As a result, the terrorism overview
module will cover several international groups, mostly related to the al-Qaeda network. The majority of the
groups covered will be domestic groups, emphasizing the militia and separatist groups that recruit from
high school campuses.

Overall I am pleased with my survey results, and I am glad that I chose to recreate it in the format I did.
The results were much easier to interpret, and I was able to create an easily understood visual
representation of each component of the survey.




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                    D6T-17
                             POST Master Instructor Development Program
                           Instructional System Design Application Process:
                                       Priorities and Constraints
                   Dimension 6 – Instructional Systems Design/Total Training Package



Name: Shawn Dyball
Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
Mentor: Jeff Cope
Dimension: D-6, ISD/TTP

                                       Priorities and Constraints

For this course, the target audience will include Terrorism Liaison Officers (TLO’s), School Resource
Officers (SRO’s), Fire Safety personnel, and selected school personnel involved with security and crisis
response planning. Since the TLO program is still under construction in many areas, the idea to require
them to attend the POST Basic TLO program already in place is unrealistic at this time, but that course can
and will be recommended during the School Partnership course. The course will also be recommended to
School Resource Officers (SRO’s,) and it will be suggested that they request to be appointed as adhoc
TLO’s for their cities. Although the training is not mandated, I will suggest that designated TLO’s
throughout California attend this training to begin the networking process within their communities and
school districts.

The curriculum itself will focus on several specific tasks that will be tied together by the end of the training.
Students will learn to create profiles of terrorist groups and recognize their recruitment and operational
activities. Some of the emphasis in instruction will focus on domestic groups operating locally in California.
Students will also learn to develop and deliver short training sessions, as well as to plan and create
meeting agendas taking several aspects of that planning into consideration. Students must be familiar with
the components of a school crisis response plan, and will create components of a plan as part of a training
exercise to assist with that familiarization. This will help them to interact with school personnel on planning
training and exercises using existing response plans. As a result of this familiarization, TLO’s will be in a
position to make recommendations for the inclusion of specific strategies with respect to assessments and
other security issues if they recognize a deficiency in an existing plan.

The constraints for delivering this course so far are few. My agency has a training division which handles
all aspects of delivering training through the Advanced Officer Training Program, including POST
certification, materials reproduction, audio/visual set up, and classroom supplies. Our training division has
a mechanism for statewide course announcement to advertise and draw students in from a wide
geographical area. In addition, I have access to grant funding that will cover the cost of consultants and
training materials that might strain the training division budget. I have already been in contact with the
grant administrator for the Terrorism Early Warning Group and the Emergency Operations Center, and she



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                     D6T-18
has located all of the necessary information for grant reimbursement for the major support costs of this
training.

I have been fortunate enough to have located instructors for every aspect of this course. During the
dimensions portion of MIDP I met with and interviewed instructors that were willing to help me in my
endeavor. One of the instructors that was originally scheduled to teach for me, Mr. Jarado Blue, is the
former chief of the Pasadena Unified School District Police Department, and an instructor for the National
School Safety Center. I was fortunate to have interviewed him about his curriculum on Safe Schools, and
felt he would be a great asset to the instruction of this course. Unfortunately Mr. Blue signed a contract as
a consultant and curriculum designer with a group that would pose a conflict of interest if he were to remain
an instructor in my course outside of that contract. He has subsequently connected me with an instructor
that is equally, if not more qualified and dynamic in instruction, Mr. Curt Lavarello, who is associated with
the COPS in Schools training program. Curt has a background in both law enforcement and education in
Florida, and has been instrumental in establishing terrorism training focusing on schools in that state and
nationally.

Another instructor I have secured, Suzanne Frew, has developed and taught an interactive curriculum on
Community Demographics and Networking that was taught in the POST Terrorism Liaison Officer Course I
attended in November of 2004. She has agreed to modify and teach her curriculum in a 2-hour block of
instruction for my course. The most important part of my curriculum, Networking and Passive Interviewing
Techniques, will be taught by a former Marine Corps intelligence officer, Lt. Col. Hal Kempfer. This will be
the meat of the course and most likely require the longest block of time to accommodate an activity to
facilitate the appropriate level of learning.

My greatest concern with respect to this course lies with instructor salaries. I consulting fees can run very
high, as I have learned, and I know the POST budget is very limited. Fortunately I learned that Hal
Kempfer is already under contract with POST, which will eliminate that potential constraint. I have also
learned, as I mentioned above, that the Law Enforcement Terrorism Prevention Program grant will
reimburse for consultant fees, eliminating my biggest constraint. One other constraint I will have to take
into consideration is travel costs and logistics for students attending from out of the area. These issues will
have to be worked out through my training division, as they have mechanisms in place to handle these
issues. Some agencies will be able to recoup travel costs through grant reimbursement if those
mechanisms are in place, but many will not. It is my understanding that information is posted on the course
information package advising potential students of nearby hotels offering the lowest government rates, and
they or their agencies are responsible for the initial travel arrangements. Subsequent reimbursement from
POST will be handled through POST TRR forms.




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                  D6T-19
                               POST Master Instructor Development Program
                             Instructional System Design Application Process:
                                                Course Goal
                     Dimension 6 – Instructional Systems Design/Total Training Package



Name: Shawn Dyball
Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
Mentor: Jeff Cope
Dimension: D-6, ISD/TTP

                                               Course Goal:

To train Terrorism Liaison Officers (TLO’s) to develop and utilize a communication
and information exchange network within schools and communities in their assigned
areas.

The overall goal of this course is to train TLO’s to create and maintain a functioning network with the school
districts and community stakeholders in their assigned areas. The purpose of the network is to keep
schools and communities informed in the recognition of potential terrorism related activity or pre-incident
indicators, and to establish a two-way communication with designated contacts for information reporting
and dissemination. It will also serve to inform school district personnel of the importance of including the
local first responder community (law, fire, public health, public works, utilities, etc.) in crisis response
planning and recovery issues. The training is designed to help TLO’s understand the concept of Safe
School strategies, and to train them to create effective training in various areas for delivery at well planned
meetings. This goal is based on the need described during the assessment phase of this project. This
overall course goal has helped to focus each training module so that combined they serve to equip
students with everything they will need to disseminate the information and foster the networks this training
was designed for.




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                   D6T-20
                            POST Master Instructor Development Program
                          Instructional System Design Application Process:
                                        Learner Characteristics
                  Dimension 6 – Instructional Systems Design/Total Training Package


Name: Shawn Dyball
Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
Mentor: Jeff Cope
Dimension: D-6, ISD/TTP

                                        Learner Characteristics

Although my audience has been identified as TLO’s, SRO’s, selected Fire Safety personnel acting in TLO
capacities, and school district personnel involved in safety and planning, the characteristics may be
different because of their working backgrounds. Existing TLO’s may or may not have attended training in
networking, and will have little or no background in Safe School strategies and related problem solving. On
the other hand, SRO’s attending the course may have some experience and training in this area. Those
areas may balance each other out during learning activities in those areas. There may also be some
personnel from school districts in attendance, and they may have extensive training in crisis planning,
which will be a benefit to the other learners who do not. Their input will be a valuable resource, and will
add some relevance to the training on Safe School strategies and planning. This group may not have
experience with first responder input during the response phases of a crisis, and will benefit from the
expertise in that area provided by the law and fire personnel in the class. The inclusion of Fire Safety
personnel will bring some reality to the expectations of fire response to specific incidents, and shed a great
deal of light on their capabilities and resources. This group may also have little or no training in terrorism
groups, ideologies, recruitment tactics, and the recognition of pre-incident indicators. Those TLO’s and
SRO’s who have had the benefit of that training will be an invaluable resource during that portion of the
instructional activity involving profiling terrorist groups.

Knowing the potential knowledge base of the learners who may be in attendance at this course, I have tried
to design the depth and duration of each module to highlight and use as many of these available resources
as possible. Small groups for activities will be divided to include members from each discipline so that
each learner with a different knowledge base will have input and be able to impart some of their expertise in
the completion of the activities. In this way, the proposed networking goal will be initiated during the
course, and will hopefully continue once the training is completed.




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                  D6T-21
                                      POST Master Instructor Development Program
                                    Instructional System Design Application Process:
                                                  Subject Matter Experts
                            Dimension 6 – Instructional Systems Design/Total Training Package


         Name: Shawn Dyball
         Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
         Mentor: Jeff Cope
         Dimension: D-6, ISD/TTP


                                  SME External Network Roster
               Name                           BioSketch                                   Area Used
Dr. Anthony Lukin, Ph.D. POST    POST coordinator for training related to   Dr. Lukin has agreed to be the advisor
1601 Alhambra Boulevard          terrorism and homeland security issues.    for my overall project and course
Sacramento, Ca. 95816-7083       A recognized authority on terrorism and    content. He has also contributed
(916) 227-5562                   terrorism related issues, and has over     information on terrorist organizations and
Anthony.Lukin@post.ca.gov        thirty years of law enforcement and        4th Generation Warfare, which have been
                                 intelligence experience.                   used as the foundation of the Terrorism
                                                                            Overview module for this course
Sgt. Walt Bouman                 Retired from Los Angeles Sheriff’s         Walt has been instrumental in providing
LASD (Ret.)                      Department. Graduate of MIDP 14. Has       me with contacts on the school safety
909-944-0726                     been actively teaching courses including   side of the curriculum. Walt has also
Basbll8@earthlink.net            an “Investigator's Response to             agreed to be an instructor for the
                                 Terrorism" and “Hate/Bias Crimes           terrorism overview module of this course.
                                 Investigation Training Program” for the    He has vast resources and expertise in
                                 Federal Law Enforcement Training           this area and has provided valuable
                                 Center.                                    feedback for this module.

Jarado Blue                      Former Chief of Police of the Pasadena     Mr. Blue has provided me with additional
LiveScan USA                     Unified School District Police             resources for school safety planning
National School Safety Center    Department, and a teacher in both the      information, and the PowerPoint he has
402 Milliken Ave., Ste. E-3      K-12 and community college education       taught from for this section of my course.
Ontario, Ca. 91761               arenas and has 13 years experience         He has provided feedback on my outline
(909) 390-6677                   with the Pasadena Police Department.       for this module, and a contact with a
Blue@livescanusa.com             Consultant to the Los Angeles Unified      qualified instructor for the module when
                                 School District, the National School       he was unable to teach for me.
                                 Safety Center, and the Federal
                                 Emergency Management Agency. He is
                                 a national instructor and presenter for
                                 the Department of Justice Community
                                 Oriented Policing Service (COPS) in
                                 school safety and planning issues, and a


         Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                              D6T-22
                                participant/instructor in Homeland
                                Security for the Department of Justice.
                                Consultant during the aftermath of the
                                Alfred P. Murrah bombing in Oklahoma
                                City, and is an instructor for National
                                Association for School Resource
                                Officers. Recognized consultant to
                                school and police communities in 26
                                states and Washington, D.C.

Sgt. Wayne Windman              MIDP graduate, Class 15. Background           Wayne agreed to provide feedback on
Redondo Beach PD                in ALC and terrorism training;                my task list, and helped give me direction
401 Diamond Street              specifically with respect to Terrorism        for the T4T component of the TTP. He
PO Box 639                      Liaison Officer Training and the POST         also agreed to teach the module on
Redondo Beach, Ca. 90277        Law Enforcement Response to                   conducting meetings and ALC along with
(310)379-2477                   Terrorism course. Based on his                Lt. Andy Borello.
Wayne.Windman@redondo.org       development and delivery of this course
                                Wayne received the Individual
                                Achievement Award of the 2003
                                Governor's Award for Excellence in
                                Peace Officer Training.

Dr. Ronald Stephens             Executive director of the National School     Dr. Stephens provided invaluable
National School Safety Center   Safety Center and has served as               information on school safety with respect
141 Duesenberg Dr., Ste. 11     consultant and frequent speaker for           to terrorism planning, and allowed me to
Westlake Village, Ca. 91362     school districts, law enforcement             view training materials that the NSSC
(805) 373-9977                  agencies and professional organizations       has completed for a national program the
rstephens@nssc1.org             worldwide. Serves as executive editor of      center teaches. Dr. Stephens was
                                the School Safety News Service,               instrumental in obtaining permission for
                                America's leading school crime                me to observe this training first hand,
                                prevention newsletter. Holds a                and to collect more information for my
                                California teaching credential,               TTP.
                                administrative credential and a
                                certificate in school business
                                management. Has served as a teacher,
                                assistant superintendent and school
                                board member and as chief school
                                business officer and as vice president of
                                Pepperdine University in Malibu,
                                California.

Lt. Col. Hal Kempfer USMC       President of Knowledge & Intelligence         Hal agreed to assist me with the module
(Ret.)                          Program Professionals (KIPP).                 on networking and information elicitation,
KIPP                            Experience in the intelligence field          which is his specialty. Hal has taught
4401 Atlantic Ave., Ste. 200    including law enforcement, investigative,     these techniques to military, law
Long Beach, Ca. 90807           military and national security intelligence   enforcement and school personnel in the
(562) 984-2050                  working in the US and abroad. USMC            past, and has worked with me to modify


         Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                               D6T-23
HalKempfer@KIPP-                Lieutenant Colonel and veteran of           the training for my TTP needs. Hal also
Intelligence.com                Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation          provided me with his original PowerPoint
                                Enduring Freedom, the Cuba/Haiti Crisis     presentations, and provided feedback on
                                of ’94, Desert Storm, the Cold War and      modifications I made to them.
                                the international “War on Drugs.” Stood
                                up a major joint intelligence production
                                facility for the DoD in Southern
                                California; worked several years with the
                                FBI, DEA, US Customs and multi-
                                jurisdictional law enforcement
                                intelligence centers as a Senior Analyst
                                and Intelligence Program Manager
                                under the LA High Intensity Drug
                                Trafficking Area. Director of the
                                Intelligence (J-2) for the Combined Joint
                                Task Force for Consequence
                                Management for U.S. Central
                                Command, deployed overseas, and the
                                Director of Intelligence (G-2) for 1st
                                Marine Expeditionary Brigade at Camp
                                Pendleton, California.

Lt. Andy Borello                Watch Commander with the San Gabriel        Andy has agreed to guide me in
San Gabriel Police Department   PD and career advancement consultant;       preparing the outline and PowerPoint for
ab042@sgpd.com                  graduate, MIDP 15, specializing in Adult    the module on Adult Learning Concepts
                                Learning Concepts, facilitation, and        for my TTP, which he will also teach.
                                writing for publication; co-author of a
                                book on writing for law enforcement
                                officers, and teaches Adult Learning and
                                Facilitation modules for POST courses.
Dr. Robert McGlenn, Ph.D.       Holds licenses as a Clinical                Dr. McGlenn provided me with a wealth
Clinical Psychologist           Psychologist, Marriage/Family/              of invaluable resources on recovery
3030 Children’s Way, Ste. 101   Counseling, and is currently employed       issues related to school violence, and the
San Diego, Ca. 92123            as a School Psychologist; has               importance of including this aspect in
(858) 966-6751                  maintained private practice for over 24     school crisis planning. He has offered
rmcglenn@grossmont.k12.ca.us    years and has worked in psychiatric         any assistance in the preparation of my
                                hospitals, mental health clinics, and       training package, including case studies
                                residential treatment facilities as a       and recovery project information.
                                consultant, associate director and
                                supervisor & trainer of interns; has
                                worked for the Grossmont School
                                District as a school psychologist for 8
                                years, specifically heading the Santana
                                High School Recovery Project.




        Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                              D6T-24
Suzanne Frew, M.F.A. 3221         International consultant in cross-cultural   Suzanne has agreed to teach a module
Sylvan Ave                        risk communications, socio-economic          on the importance of community
Oakland, CA 94602 USA             assessment and disaster management;          networking, and understanding cultural
Tel/fax: 510-482-1448             9 years with the US Federal Emergency        diversity. She has provided several
suzanne@thefrewgroup.com          Management Agency (FEMA) working             outlines and PowerPoint presentations to
                                  on disaster operations throughout the        me and has provided feedback on
                                  U.S. and US                                  modifications to those presentations to fit
                                  Pacific Island Jurisdictions; private        my curriculum needs.
                                  consultant since 1999 focusing on
                                  disaster risk communications and
                                  impacts in Southeast Asia and U.S.,
                                  social cultural communications issues,
                                  public sector outreach to vulnerable
                                  populations, partnership development,
                                  and socio-economic assessment and
                                  analysis; instructor for FEMA, CA OES,
                                  Asian Disaster Preparedness Center
                                  and Sonoma State University; has
                                  taught to law enforcement in the areas
                                  of cultural diversity, networking, and
                                  understanding community demographics
                                  through POST, CSTI and on a
                                  consulting basis to the FBI.
Curtis S. Lavarello, Exec. Dir.   The School Safety Advocacy Council           Curt was able to step in and assume the
School Safety Advocacy Council    focuses in part on the potential terrorist   role of instructor for my school planning
4114 Central Sarasota Pkwy.       threats to schools in the US. He spent       and response module. He has helped
Sarasota, Florida 34238           23 years in law enforcement with             me to revise my outline and curriculum
RESOURCER@AOL.COM                 Broward County, Florida. 17 years as a       slides for the module, and has provided
                                  School Resource Officer, and sat on the      me with valuable resources for the
                                  committee that developed the first SRO       training course.
                                  program in the county. Developed the
                                  first youth/teen court program for Palm
                                  Beach County, Florida, and was a
                                  founding board member and executive
                                  director of the National Association of
                                  School Resource Officers (1991-2005).
                                  He has published numerous articles and
                                  has been featured on many radio and
                                  TV programs addressing school safety
                                  issues. He was on national committees
                                  to develop training programs throughout
                                  the country developing school police
                                  oriented curriculum, including the DOJ
                                  Community Oriented Policing in Schools
                                  project, through the National School
                                  Safety Center in California. Currently
                                  working to develop a homeland security


        Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                  D6T-25
                       curriculum for school based police
                       officers whit USDOJ.




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                        D6T-26
                            POST Master Instructor Development Program
                          Instructional System Design Application Process:
                                          In Progress Review
                  Dimension 6 – Instructional Systems Design/Total Training Package


Name: Shawn Dyball
Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
Mentor: Jeff Cope
Dimension: D-6, ISD/TTP

                                           In Progress Review
When I first began gathering the ideas and components for this training course, I had many thoughts about
how it should flow. As I continued to research case studies, read about incidents, and talk to SME’s about
what was already in place, I learned that some of my ideas were either covered, or did not really flow in the
direction I wanted the overall course to go in.

While making the first attempts at my task list, I met with Sgt. Wayne Windman, who relayed the
importance of having an ALC component in a course that would train officers to develop and conduct even
short training sessions in briefings or other types of meetings. As a result of this conversation, I worked
with Wayne and Lt. Andy Borello on mapping out a plan to include this in my TTP. After further discussion
and thought, and attending a T4T course facilitated by both Wayne and Andy later in the year, I also
decided to change one of my tasks to include a module on recognizing the pre-incident indicators of
terrorism. They agreed with my suggestion to make this the T4T portion of my TTP, and gave me a great
deal of help and resources to include as handout and take-away material for the students in the course.

Dr. Robert McGlenn, who headed the Santana High School Recovery Project in San Diego, made the
original recommendation to include a recovery component in the crisis planning module of the course. Bob
introduced me to the concept of “the new normal” and felt that first responders needed to be included in
that recovery process. As a result, even though most schools have begun including terrorism components
to their crisis planning, I have included this module in my TTP. I feel that in order to train and exercise on
these plans with school personnel, first responders need to be familiar with the planning process and the
components of those plans. It is also important that school personnel understand how vital it is to include
first responders in the development and creation of these plans, so that everyone responds as predicted.

 Throughout this process, I spoke with Dr. Tony Lukin several times to make sure I was actually headed in
the right direction, and he always assured me that I was. I sent him a preliminary outline for the course
after several changes mentioned above, and he responded that it was exactly what he was looking for.
Tony has contributed a great deal of information on terrorism and terrorist groups for me to use in the
course, and agreed with my recommendations to include recovery planning components in the course.

During the design of this course I have been in touch with SME’s in each area of planned instruction.
Throughout the development I have revised and rearranged items on my task list, removed and/or re-
invented instructional modules, and added or deleted instructional activities several times prior to finalizing
the course content.


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                    D6T-27
                                      POST Master Instructor Development Program
                                    Instructional System Design Application Process:
                                                          Tasks
                            Dimension 6 – Instructional Systems Design/Total Training Package


       Name: Shawn Dyball
       Facilitator: Jim Fraser
       Mentor: Jeff Cope
       Dimension: D-6, ISD/TTP


                                                  Validated Task List

       This task list was submitted to all SME’s who will be involved in the instruction of this course, and to Dr.
       Anthony Lukin, my project advisor. The tasks were evaluated, and after minor changes of order and
       criticality, the list was validated. Changes were based on both SME input and TNA survey results
       mentioned during the discussion of those results.


                  Critical Task                                               Non-critical task
                                                               Students will understand the need for TLO
                                                               networking with school personnel and the community
1
                                                               in recognition, reporting, and planning issues related
                                                               to terrorism
    Students will demonstrate a specific understanding of
2   terrorist groups, ideologies and tactics using profiling
    techniques
    Students will apply Adult Learning Concepts to
3
    training presentations
    Students will apply proper strategies to create an
4
    agenda for planning and training meetings
    Students will outline a plan to network with
5
    community stakeholders and school district personnel
                                                               Students will understand the importance of
                                                               maintaining network contacts and disseminating
6
                                                               information through an established network with
                                                               schools or community group
    Students will demonstrate the ability to utilize Passive
7
    Interviewing Techniques to gather information
                                                               Students will understand the difference between
8
                                                               information and intelligence
    Students will recognize potential pre-incident
9
    indicators and select the appropriate course of action


       Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                    D6T-28
     in response
     Students will develop and apply a comprehensive
     prevention and response plan to include a variety of
10   potential threats and incidents including based on
     safe school strategies, including a comprehensive
     recovery plan for a variety of traumatic incidents




       Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                 D6T-29
                           POST Master Instructor Development Program
                         Instructional System Design Application Process:
                                     Course Design Worksheets
                 Dimension 6 – Instructional Systems Design/Total Training Package

Name: Shawn Dyball
Facilitator: Jim Fraser
Mentor: Jeff Cope
Dimension: D-6, ISD/TTP

MIDP COURSE DESIGN WORKSHEET (NON-CRITICAL TASK)

 GOAL:
 To train Terrorism Liaison Officers to develop and utilize a communication and information
 exchange network within schools and communities in their assigned areas.

 SUBGOAL:


 TASK (# 1):
 Understand the need for TLO networking with schools and the community in recognition,
 reporting and preparation planning issues related to terrorism.

 Learning Domain(s)
 Cognitive domain-
 Students will develop an understanding of the need for training and networking with schools,
 and their roles in creating and maintaining open lines of communication for information
 sharing.

 Subject Content that supports learning the task to third level of detail
 I. Introduction
    A. Why are we here?
        1. Understanding the importance of networking and training with schools
           a. Beslan tragedy and impact
           b. US school information in Iraq
        2. Create functioning network between TLO’s and school districts
           a. Self introductions and experience
        3. Ensure first responder involvement in terrorism prevention and response
           planning
        4. Maintain safe school environments through training and communication
        5. Establish a two-way communication network between TLO’s, schools, and the
           community
        6. Provide information and training to school personnel


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                          D6T-30
             a. Recognizing potential indicators
                  1) Recruitment
                  2) Involvement
                  3) Planning
             b. The importance of prevention and planning for terrorism incidents
                  1) TLO roles
                  2) Training
                  3) Exercising
         7. Course learning objectives
             a. Demonstrate an understanding of terrorist groups, ideologies and tactics
             b. Apply adult learning concepts to training presentations
             c. Apply proper strategies for planning effective meetings
             d. Outline plans to network with community stakeholders and school personnel
             e. Demonstrate the ability to use community information networking and passive
                  interviewing techniques to gather information
             f. Recognize potential pre-incident indicators and select appropriate reporting
                  and response actions (T4T)
             g. Develop comprehensive prevention and response plans to a variety of
                  potential threats and violent incidents at schools, including recovery planning
 Learning method selected
 PowerPoint and video presentations-
 Students will view videos and PowerPoint presentations demonstrating past incidents and
 their impacts. Students will participate in discussion of current knowledge and experience
 levels in the learning objective areas, and begin the networking process.

 Resources required to support the selected learning method(s)
               Computer with PowerPoint, projector and screen
               Presentation handouts
               Instructor provided audience information and overall goal
               4 Tables and chairs to accommodate small groups of 6 to 7 students per table




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                           D6T-31
MIDP COURSE DESIGN WORKSHEET

 GOAL:
 To train Terrorism Liaison Officers to develop and utilize a communication and information
 exchange network within schools and communities in their assigned areas.

 SUB-GOAL:


 TASK (#2) :
 Demonstrate a specific understanding of terrorist groups, ideologies and tactics using
 profiling techniques


 Learning objective:
 A=     Students

 B=      Create

 C=      In small groups, provided:
                a terrorist group profile template
                a profile job aid
                available resources on a specific terrorist group

 D=      Accurately complete all areas of the terrorist group profile template.

 Expected learner outcomes:
 Present a complete profile of a given terrorist group to include:
    1. Name and origin of name
    2. Identified leader(s)
    3. Ideology
    4. Goal(s)
    5. Geographical, Cultural, Political, or Religious target(s)
    6. Sponsor(s), (if any) and affiliates
    7. Tactics and techniques
    8. Preferred weapons
    9. Area of operation
    10. Significant past operations (minimum of three)
    11. Prognosis

 Learning objective in sentence form:



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                          D6T-32
 Provided resource material, a profile template, instructor provided information packet, and a
 specific terrorist group, students, working in small groups, will create a profile on the group
 to include accurate information available in each category of the profile template.

 Learning Domain(s):
 Cognitive domain-This module will measure the knowledge and understanding of the
 students through an oral presentation of that knowledge.

 Subject Content that supports learning the task to third level of detail:
 I Terrorism Overview
    A International Terrorism
        1 Definition
        2 Motivations
           a Political
           b Religious
        3 Group identifications
           a al Qaeda
               i Origin of name
               ii Identified leader(s)
               iii Ideology
               iv Goal(s)
               v Target(s)
               vi Sponsors/affiliates
               vii Tactics and techniques
               viii Preferred weapons
               ix Area of operation
               x Significant incidents
               xi Prognosis
           b al Queda associated groups
               i Name and origin of name
               ii Identified leader(s)
               iii Ideology
               iv Goal(s)
               v Target(s)
               vi Sponsors/affiliates
               vii Tactics and techniques
               viii Preferred weapons
               ix Area of operation
               x Significant incidents
               xi Prognosis
           c Palestinian Groups
               i Name and origin of name
               ii Identified leader(s)
               iii Ideology
               iv Goal(s)
               v Target(s)


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                           D6T-33
            vi Sponsors/affiliates
            vii Tactics and techniques
            viii Preferred weapons
            ix Area of operation
            x Significant incidents
            xi Prognosis
         d Other International Groups
            i Name and origin of name
            ii Identified leader(s)
            iii Ideology
            iv Goal(s)
            v Target(s)
            vi Sponsors/affiliates
            vii Tactics and techniques
            viii Preferred weapons
            ix Area of operation
            x Significant incidents
            xi Prognosis
    B Domestic Terrorism
      1 Definition
      2 Right wing
         a Political/religious motivations
         b Right wing groups
            i Posse Comitatus
                  Origin of name
                  Identified leader(s)
                  Ideology
                  Goal(s)
                  Target(s)
                  Sponsors/affiliates
                  Tactics and techniques
                  Preferred weapons
                  Area of operation
                  Significant incidents
                  Prognosis
            ii The New Black Panther Party for Self Defense
                  Origin of name
                  Identified leader(s)
                  Ideology
                  Goal(s)
                  Target(s)
                  Sponsors/affiliates
                  Tactics and techniques
                  Preferred weapons
                  Area of operation
                  Significant incidents
                  Prognosis


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                          D6T-34
               iii Aryan groups
                    Name and origin of name
                    Identified leader(s)
                    Ideology
                    Goal(s)
                    Target(s)
                    Sponsors/affiliates
                    Tactics and techniques
                    Preferred weapons
                    Area of operation
                    Significant incidents
                    Prognosis
               iv Phineas Priests
                    Origin of name
                    Identified leader(s)
                    Ideology
                    Goal(s)
                    Target(s)
                    Sponsors/affiliates
                    Tactics and techniques
                    Preferred weapons
                    Area of operation
                    Significant incidents
                    Prognosis
       3   Left wing
           a Political/religious motivations
           b Left wing groups
               i Anarchist groups
                    Name and origin of name
                    Identified leader(s)
                    Ideology
                    Goal(s)
                    Target(s)
                    Sponsors/affiliates
                    Tactics and techniques
                    Preferred weapons
                    Area of operation
                    Significant incidents
                    Prognosis
               ii Revolutionary groups
                    Origin of name
                    Identified leader(s)
                    Ideology
                    Goal(s)
                    Target(s)
                    Sponsors/affiliates
                    Tactics and techniques


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                           D6T-35
                      Preferred weapons
                      Area of operation
                      Significant incidents
                      Prognosis
         4   Single issue
             a Anti-abortion
             b Environmental extremists
                i Name and origin of name
                ii Identified leader(s)
                iii Ideology
                iv Goal(s)
                v Target(s)
                vi Sponsors/affiliates
                vii Tactics and techniques
                viii Preferred weapons
                ix Area of operation
                x Significant incidents
                xi Prognosis
             c Animal rights extremists
                i Name and origin of name
                ii Identified leader(s)
                iii Ideology
                iv Goal(s)
                v Target(s)
                vi Sponsors/affiliates
                vii Tactics and techniques
                viii Preferred weapons
                ix Area of operation
                x Significant incidents
                xi Prognosis


 Learning method selected:
 PowerPoint presentation and small group activity:
 Each group will be given a packet of information on a specific domestic or international
 terrorist group. From this information, students will work together to complete the profile of
 the group.
 Testing strategy:
 Each group will present a comprehensive profile summary of their group to the class. The
 final outcome of the exercise will be that the class as a whole will have an understanding of
 several different terrorist groups, and be able to recognize potential recruitment tactics, pre-
 incident indicators and actual incidents indicative of those or similar groups. Profile
 templates will be matched to instructor master templates of the given groups.

 Resources required to support the selected learning method(s):



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                           D6T-36
             Computer with PowerPoint, projector and screen
             Presentation handouts
             Flip charts with paper, masking tape, markers
             Instructor provided information packets
             4 Tables and chairs to accommodate small groups of 6 to 7 per table




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                D6T-37
                                    TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: Abu Sayyaf Group AKA al-Harakat al-Islamiyya (“Bearer of the Sword”
or “Father of the Swordsman”)
Named for 1980’s mujahedin fighter in Afghanistan
Split from Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF), 1990’s
Basilan Island, southern Philippines

Type/Ideology:
Religious (Islamic, fundamental Sunni Muslim)

Size of group:
Close to 500 in mid 1990’s, comprised of young Islamic radicals most recruited from universities and high
schools.
Size now believed near 4,000

Area of operation:
Southern Philippine islands-
Basilan Province
Sulu Province
Tawi-Tawi Province
Zamboanga peninsula
Manila (occasionally)
Cotobato, Mindanao
Malaysia

Organizational structure:
Organizational head
Several autonomous cells on different islands

Leaders:
Abdurajak Abubakar Janjalani (deceased)
Khadaffy Janjalani (current) AKA: Abu Muktar

Alliances with other groups/Known aid:
Al Qaeda
Jemaah Islamiya
Ramzi Yousef (provided training)
Multiple international Muslim terrorist organizations

Strategy and Stated Goals:
Fighting for independent Muslim nation for Fifipino muslims under Iranian-style Shari’a law or “reach
martyrdom in Allah’s way.”
Strike mainly at Christians and/or foreign visitors. They want to fight Americans to dispel beliefs that they
are afraid to engage them in fighting.

Targeting:


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                   D6T-38
Christians
Foreign nationals
Americans
Some Filipino Businessmen

Tactics:
Kidnapping for ransom
Beheadings
Bombings
Assassinations
Extortions


Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
       April 1995-raided Ipil, Mindanao (first large scale action) and razed town center t the ground
          (53 civilians and soldiers murdered)
       1995-plot uncovered to assassinate the Pope and bomb 12 US airliners on trans-Pacific flights,
          and to crash an airplane into CIA headquarters in Langley, Va.
       March 2000-Kidnapped 58 adults and children from local school
       -April 23, 2000-kidnapping of 21 persons (10 Western tourists) from Malaysia resort
       -May 26, 2001-kidnapping of 18 persons (1 US citizen murdered) from Palawan resort
       -August 5, 2001-kidnapped 30 people from Christian village (10 beheaded)
       -April 21, 2002-multiple bombings in General Santos, Philippines (15 killed, over 70 injured)
          Test messages sent to reporters and some officials warning of 18 bombs
       October 12, 2002-believed to have worked with Jemaah Islamiya in carrying out the night club
          bombings in Bali, Indonesia (over 200 Australians and Americans killed)
       -October 2002-bombing near Philippine military base in Zamboanga (1 US serviceman killed)
       -February 2004-bombing of SuperFerry 14, Manila Bay (approx. 132 killed)

Prognosis:
At this time Abu Sayyaf does not appear to pose any direct threat to the Continental US, however they
have vowed to increase level of violence against US interests as well as the surrounding Philippines if a
peace treaty is signed between the Philippine government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MNLF.)
The group is returning to its Islamic roots and is using the familiar weapons of terror—bombing and
assassination, and has formed a new assassination squad called “Fisabillilah”, or “The Path of God”.
Members of this squad were arrested in possession of explosives just prior to the inauguration of President
Arroyo in June of 2004.

References (web sites and profile resources)
Kushner, Harvey W. (2003) Encyclopedia of Terrorism
Petersen, Marilyn, (2002) NJ Office of Counter Terrorism report on Abu Sayyaf
US DOJ, (2004), Patterns of Global Terrorism 2003
NPS Terrorist Group Profiles (2004) http://web.nps.navy.mil/~library/tgp/asc.htm
FAS Intelligence Resource Program (2005) www.fas.org/irp/world/para/asg.htm



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                               D6T-39
Time/Asia Online (2004) http://www.time.com/time/asia/magazine/article/0,13673,501040830-
686107,00.html




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                        D6T-40
TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: al-Qaeda (The Base)
AKA: Qa’idat al-Jihad
Established 1988 from Arabs who fought in Afghanistan against the Soviet Invasion

Type/Ideology:
Religious/Fundamental Islamic

Size of group:
Several thousand extremists and associates worldwide

Area of operation:
Based in Afghanistan until 2001; has dispersed in small groups across South Asia, Southeast Asia, the
Middle East, and Africa.
Cells located worldwide, concentrating in Europe, Canada and the U.S.
Bin-Laden and some top aids my be residing in the northern Afghanistan-Pakistan border region.

Organizational structure:
Loose military type organizational structure, with single leader of a council that oversees and approves all
activities.
Some autonomous cells exist in over 100 countries

Leaders:
Osama bin-Laden (Usama bin-Laden)
Ayman al-Zawahiri (EIJ)
Muammad Atef (killed)
Abu Zubaydah (arrested)
Khalid Shaidh Muhammad (arrested)
Mustafa Ahmed al-Hawsawi (arrested)

Alliances with other groups/Known aid:
Egyptian Islamic Jihad
Jamaat Islamiyya
The Libyan Islamic Fighting Group
Islamic Army of Aden (Yemen)
Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Muhammad (Kashmir)
Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan
Salafist Group for Call and Combat and the Armed Islamic Group (Algeria)
Abu Sayyaf Grouup (Philippines, Malaysia)

Most of al-Qaeda’s funding is provided by bin-Laden’s inheritance from his family construction company
fortune. He has also set up other companies to provide income, charities to act as fronts, protection
schemes, credit card frauds, diamond and drug smuggling, sympathetic donors, and possibly from
disaffected members of the Saudi royal family.

Strategy and Stated Goals:


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                  D6T-41
According to a statement found in an al-Qaeda house in Afghanistan, the following three “Goals and
Objectives of Jihad” have been identified:

1. Establishing the rule of God on earth
2. Attaining martyrdom in the cause of God
3. Purification of the ranks of Islam from the elements of depravity

Their overall goal is to unite Muslims to fight to expel Westerners and non-Muslims from Muslim countries.
Long range goal is to establish pan-Islamic Caliphate throughout the world. Statement released in 1998
makes it the duty of all Muslims to kill US citizen, civilian and military and their allies everywhere.

Targeting:
All non-Muslim persons in what are considered Muslim or Islamic countries/regions, particularly U.S. and
Israeli interests in the Middle East, Europe, Africa, Saudi Arabia, the continental U.S., and the U.K.

Tactics:
Bombings, suicide bombings, assassinations

Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
     Aug. 1998 – U.S. Embassy suicide bombings in Nairobi, Kenya and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
     Oct. 2000 – suicide bombings of the U.S.S. Cole in Aden, Yemen
     Sept. 2001 – hijackings and suicide attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon in New
      York and Virginia
     Apr. 2002 – fuel truck explosion outside a synagogue in Tunisia
     Nov. 2002 – bombing of Israeli resort and missile attack on Israeli airliner, Mombassa, Kenya
     May 2003 – vehicle bombing of residential compounds in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Suspected of directing sympathetic or allied groups in the following:
        1993 World Trade Center Bombing
        2002 Bali nightclub bombings
        2003 suicide attacks on Western interests in Casablanca, Morocco
The following disrupted plots are linked to al-Qaeda or its allies:
        1994 plot to kill Pope John Paul II
        1995 plot to down 12 American airliners in flight over the Pacific
        1995 plot to assassinate President Clinton during a visit to the Philippines
        1999 plot to detonate an explosive at LAX
        2001 plot to blow up a trans-Atlantic flight (Richard Reid)

Prognosis:
Al-Qaeda claims to have acquired nuclear weapons, but as of yet no evidence of that have been found. It
is possible that bin Laden may have planned many attacks to be carried out long after his death, making
the group a continuing threat to any U.S. or Israeli supported interest throughout the world. Alliances with
the most violent militant factions pose an increasing danger to the continental U.S. as well as abroad.

References (web sites and profile resources)
Kushner, H. (2003) Encyclopedia of Terrorism


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                 D6T-42
Council on Foreign Affairs, Terrorism: Q&A http://cfrterrorism.org/groups/alqaeda_print.html
SecurityInfo Watch (2004) http://www.securityinfowatch.com/article/article.jsp?siteSection=306&id=2603




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                             D6T-43
                                      TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: al-Fuqra (from “al-fuqara”, meaning “The Impoverished”)
Secretive Black Muslim sect in the US and Canada

Type/Ideology:
Religious/Black Muslim, Offshoot of the Orthodox African-American Muslims

Size of group:
1,000-3,000 members

Area of operation:
US, Canada, Pacific Northwest, Kashmir Province, Cote d’lvoire, Pakistan
Headquarters believed to be in Hancock, New York, with major compounds near Deposit, New York near the Catskill
Mountains, South Carolina, Buena Vista, Colorado and the California desert area.

Organizational structure:
Loose cell structure, calling themselves “Soldiers of Allah” or “Mohammed Commandos”, each assigned a
geographical location in which to operate. Cells never communicate with each other directly to preserve overall
structure. No cell knows the physical description of anyone in another cell. Cells communicate via pay phones at
pre-determined times. Members reside in commune type set-ups that are also paramilitary training camps.

Leaders:
Pakistani Sheikh Mubarak Ali Jilani Hashemi (Arrested in connection with the kidnapping of Daniel Pearl)

Alliances with other groups/Known aid:
Currently under investigation for ties to Al-Qaeda

Strategy and Stated Goals:
Counter the excessive Western influence on Islam, and to purify Islam by waging “Jihad” on all opressors of Muslims.

Targeting:
US government, Hindus, Israel, Hare Krishnas, JDO and Nation of Islam

Tactics:
Bombings, assassinations,

Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
1983 – Murder of Muslim religious leaders in Canton Michigan
1984 – Bombing of Hindu temples in Denver, Philadelphia and Seattle
1990 – Murder of Muslim religious leader Imam Rashid Khalifa in Tucson, Arizona
1991 – Bombing of Hindu owned properties in Toronto, Canada
Disrupted plots to bomb the UN, FBI offices at 26 Federal Plaza, and the Holland and Lincoln Tunnels in 2000 and
2001.
2001 – Assassination of Fresno Co. Deputy Sheriff
2002 – Jilani arrested in connection with the kidnapping and murder of journalist Daniel Pearl
2002 - Under investigation for a Charter School scam in California providing funds for arms to Pakistan
Prognosis:
Information located in raids on al-Fuqra compounds indicates the group had developed a list of targets and victims in
LA , Arizona and Colorado which included oil and gas installations, electrical facilities. Air Force Academy and other
military sites, and individuals in 12 US states and Canada of Jewish or Hindu origin. This group has studied and


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                          D6T-44
trained in guerrilla tactics, radio operations, flying, and blueprint reading and sketching, indicating the potential for
planning and deploying any type of attack at any given time. They are fast becoming a major concern to the
continental US, and are under close federal scrutiny.

References (web sites and profile resources)
http://www.tkb.org/Group.jsp?grouupID=3426
Kushner, H. (2003) Encyclopedia of Terrorism

Southeast Asia Intelligence Review http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pakistan/terroristoutfits/jamaat-
ul-fuqra.htm




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                               D6T-45
                                     TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: Aryan Nations/Church of Jesus Christ Christian
Founded in the 1970’s by Richard Butler as an umbrella group for factions of the Ku Klux Klan, with its
headquarters in Hayden Lake, Idaho.

Type/Ideology:
Right-wing anti-semitic White supremacist anti-government/Christian Identity
Neo-Nazism
Survivalist
Paramilitary

Size of group:
Unknown, believed less than 100 active members, and a few hundred supporters worldwide

Area of operation:
Mostly Southern California, scattered members in Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Oklahoma, Illinois, and Florida

Organizational structure:
Leadership has been passed to a 'High Council,' of Kreis along with Charles Juba and one other.
The group has currently splintered into two factions: one located in Pennsylvania and led by August Kreis
and Charles Juba, and a group calling itself The Church of the Sons of YHVH/Legion of Saints (Church of
the Sons of Yahweh), led by Ray Redfeairn Morris Gulett. (Tabernacle of the Phineas Priesthood)

Leaders:
Franklin, Carl
Furrow, Buford Oneal
Gulett, Morris
Juba, Charles
Kreiss, August B. III (national director)
Redfeairn, Ray
Wickstrom, James P (national pastor)

Alliances with other groups/Known aid:
KKK
The Order
White Patriot Party
National Alliance

Strategy and Stated Goals:
Its goal is to form "a national racial state. We shall have it at whatever price is necessary. Just as our
forefathers purchased their freedom in blood so must we". We will have to kill the bastards." –Butler

”We believe that the Aryan folk deserve the right to a sovereign existence and racial self-determination
within a territorial area characterized by our own laws, culture and customs. This is in line with the ’Blood
and Soil’ concept of Third Reich-era National Socialists and follows the logic that for a people to survive (as



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                    D6T-46
a distinct racial and cultural group) they must have their own land so that their own ways can be furthered
amongst their own folk - to the exclusion of alternate ways of life within that specific geographic territory.
It is our intention to see Judaic-influenced society and governmental infrastructures to be pushed into a
state of perpetual revolution: as is understood, no infrastructure can survive a state of perpetual revolution -
and that is entirely the point in regards to the future of the current System…
Where we differ from our predecessors is that we realize that it takes a cold-blooded, pragmatic and realist
viewpoint to enact the changes which will be necessary to achieve our goals. As such we see - for the
immediate future - a period where the spread of subversion and the aid of all forms which are a liability and
are inimical in nature to the current Judaic-tyrannical state of affairs should be our principal aim. We have
encapsulated the quintessence of this work in two words: Aryan Jihad…” –AN Website


Targeting:
Jewish Americans/other non-whites
Government

Tactics:
Assaults
Protests
Leaflets
Bank robberies and murders, as well as, abortion clinic attacks - bombings and assassinations (Phineas
Priesthood)

Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
July 1998 – shooting attack of Victoria and Jason Keenan outside Idaho compound (Following lawsuit
bankrupted the group and they lost the property and the name)
Aug. 1999 – Shooting at a Jewish Community Center in LA, Ca. (Phineas Priest)

Prognosis:
AN is still committed to ridding the nation of Jewish influence and creating an Aryan homeland. They have
stated that if radical means are required, they are willing to follow that path to achieve their goal. The sub-
group Phineas Priesthood are the more violent faction of the group and have and most likely will continue
to be the perpetrators of violence of Jewish interests in the US.

References (web sites and profile resources)

Kushner, H. (2003) Encyclopedia of Terrorism
Anti-Defamation League
http://www.adl.org/learn/ext_us/Aryan_Nations.asp?&MSHiC=1252&L=10&W=NATIOND+NATIONA+NATI
ON+NATIONAL+NATIONALLY+Nations+NATIONWAY+Aryan+ARYANS+&Pre=%3CFONT+STYLE%3D%
22color%3A+%23000000%3B+background%2Dcolor%3A+%23FFFF00%22%3E&Post=%3C%2FFONT%
3E&LEARN_Cat=Extremism&LEARN_SubCat=Extremism_in_America&xpicked=3&item=an

Wikpedia Online Encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aryan_Nations
Terrorism Knowledge Base http://www.tkb.org/Group.jsp?groupID=29
Aryan Nations Website http://www.aryan-nations.org/about.htm


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                   D6T-47
Shawn Dyball MIDP 18   D6T-48
                                   TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: Egyptian Islamic Jihad (al-Jihad)
AKA: Jihad Group; Egyptian al-Jihad; New Jihad; Islamic Jihad

Split from the Muslim Brotherhood in the 1970’s (Student oriented rebellion)

Type/Ideology:
Religious/fundamental Sunni Islamic

Size of group:
Unknown; several hundred hard core members

Area of operation:
Egypt (Cairo, until 1993)
Pakistan
Africa
Bases in Lebanon, Yemen, Sudan, Afghanistan and U.K.
Operative and financial cells in the U.S.

Organizational structure:
Actions believed to be governed at one time by Muslim Brotherhood.
Allied with al-Qaeda group, and acting as foot soldiers to Osama Bin Laden
Small militant faction led by Abbud al-Aumar (AKA: al-Zumar)

Leaders:
Ayman al-Zawahiri
Abbud al-Aumar (AKA: al-Zumar)
Sheikh Omar Abd al-Rahman (AKA: Omar Ahmad Ali Abdel Rahman)
Possibly Osama Bin Laden

Alliances with other groups/Known aid:
Gama’a al-Islamiyah (AKA: Jamaat Islmaniyya)
Al-Qaeda
Financial cells in U.S.; possible funding from Iran and al-Qaeda
Charity fund re-direction
Commercial networks
Criminal activity

Strategy and Stated Goals:
 Overthrow the secular Egyptian government
 Establish fundamental Islamic government
 World jihad against Jews and crusaders
The group sees war with the Israeli’s as a necessary first step toward those goals
Egyptian Islamic Jihad is known to have engaged in actions that are:
• aimed at advancing the EIJ’s political and religious causes;
• done with the intention of coercing or influencing by intimidation the governments and people of numerous


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                               D6T-49
countries (including Australia);
• intended to, or do, cause serious damage to property, the death of persons or endanger life; and
• intended to cause, or have caused, serious risk to the safety of sections of the public in Egypt and other
persons visiting areas in which it operates.

Targeting:
Egyptian government and high level officials
Egyptian embassies in Pakistan
U.S. embassies
U.S. and Israeli interests abroad and in the continental U.S.
Israeli, U.S., Austrailian and Egyptian Christians

Tactics:
Assassinations
Bombings

Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
October 1981- assassination of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat;
November 1990 – assassination of Rabbi Meir Kahane in New Yok
August 1993 - attempted assassination of Egyptian Interior Minister Al-Alfi;
November 1993 - attempted assassination of Egyptian Prime Minister Ated Sedky;
June 1995 - attempted assassination of Egyptian President Mubarak in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia;
November 1995 - assassination of an Egyptian diplomat in Geneva;
19 November 1995 - suicide truck-bomb attack against the Egyptian embassy in Pakistan, killing 17
people;
As a member of the al-Qa’ida coalition, the EIJ have been implicated in a number of significant terrorist
attacks, including:
7 August 1998 - bombings of the US embassies in Tanzania and Kenya killing over 200 people;
12 October 2000 - suicide bomb attack against the USS Cole, Aden, Yemen; and
11 September 2001 - attacks against the World Trade Center and the Pentagon

Prognosis:
EIJ continues to plan terrorist attacks along with al-Qaeda against Egypt, Israel, Austrailia and the U.S.
both abroad and domestically. EIJ maintains operatives and financial cells in the U.S. and the U.K., and
will continue to pose a threat in an effort to accomplish its goals.

References (web sites and profile resources)
Kushner, H. (2003); Encyclopedia of Terrorism
Atkins, S. (2004); Encyclopedia of Modern Worldwide Extremists and Extremist Groups
Terrorism 101 http://www.terrorism101.org/organizations/Egyption_Islamic_Jihad.html
Monterey Institute of International Studies http://cns.miis.edu/research/wtc01/aljihad.htm
Australian National Security (2003, 2005)
http://www.nationalsecurity.gov.au/agd/WWW/nationalsecurityHome.nsf/Page/Listing_of_Terrorist_Organis
ations_terrorist_listing_Egyptian_Islamic_Jihad_-_Listed_11_April_2003



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                  D6T-50
Council on Foreign Relations, Terrorism: Q&A http://www.terrorismanswers.org/groups/jamaat.html




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                              D6T-51
                                  TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: Earth Liberation Front (ELF)
Established 1992 in Brighton, England by more radical members of “Earth First!”
1996 – American branch formed

Type/Ideology:
Environmental activists
Biocentrism and deep ecology
Anti-authoritarian orientation

Size of group:
Unknown

Area of operation:
Bases in US, UK, Canada, Europe, & So. America

Organizational structure:
Leaderless Resistance: ELF’s web site describes the organization as an “international underground
movement consisting of autonomous groups of people who carry out direct action according to the E.L.F.
guidelines.”i
No centralized authority or chain-of-command. The various cells are linked by shared ideology but
otherwise are autonomous, for the most part unconnected and unknown to each other.

Leaders:
Spokesperson-Craig Rosebraugh

Alliances with other groups/Known aid:
ALF
PETA
SHAC
Sympathizers

Strategy and Stated Goals:
Believe in direct action and revolutionary violence to further cause-
 To inflict economic damage on those profiting from the destruction and exploitation of the natural
    environment.
 To reveal and educate the public on the atrocities committed against the earth and all species that
    populate it.
 To take all necessary precautions against harming any animal, human and nonhuman.

Targeting:
Facilities and companies involved in logging, genetic engineering, home building, automobile sales, energy
production and distribution, and a wide variety of other activities, all charged by ELF with exploiting the
environment.
WTO, G8 Summits



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                D6T-52
Tactics:
Arson
Sabotage (“monkey-wrenching”)
Vandalism
Organized Protest

Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
     Oct. 1998 – Arson attack on Vail, Co. ski resord ($12-24 million in damages)
     Aug. 2003 – Arson and Vandalism at 3 Hummer dealerships in LA area ($1 million in damages)
     Sept. 2003 – Arson and graffiti of 4 homes under construction in San Diego, Ca. ($1 million in
      damages)
     Sept. 2003 – Arson and graffiti at a condominium complex under construction in San Diego, Ca.
      ($50 million in damages)
     Apr. 2004 – Over 100 metal spikes found in trees at Cattermole Timber’s Elk Creek jobsite, east of
      Vancouver, BC.
     Dec. 2004 – Incendiaries and graffiti found in construction site, Lincoln, Ca.
      Feb. 2005 – Seven arson fires set and graffiti left at new apartment complex, Amador County, Ca.
      ($50,000.00 in damage)
      Feb. 2005 – Vandalism (window smash and graffiti) at McDonald’s, Torrance, Ca.

Prognosis:
ELF poses a threat to research facilities involved in, or perceived to be involved in, virtually any form of
biotech research. Given ELF’s preference for attacking facilities with little or no security, university labs
are most clearly at risk.

ELF also poses an insider threat to research laboratories and other similar facilities. The Brookhaven case
cited above suggests the possibility that ELF could place a sympathizer inside a research facility.

Finally, ELF could pose a threat to nuclear facilities; especially those involved in the storage of nuclear
waste, by organizing violent demonstrations designed to disrupt waste shipments. Given the decentralized
nature of the organization and its loose control over the tactics used by activists, the possibility that such
individuals could turn to violent tactics not consistent with ELF’s general guidelines cannot be ignored.

References (web sites and profile resources)
Kushner, H. (2003) Encyclopedia of Terrorism
Earth Liberation Front Website http://www.earthliberationfront.com/main.shtml
Probst, P., Leader, S. Earth Liberation Front and Environmental Terrorism (2002)
http://www1.umn.edu/dcs/earthliberationfront3pub.htm

Wikpedia Online Encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Liberation_Front
Terroris Knowledge Base http://www.tkb.org/Group.jsp?groupID=41
Anti-Defamation League
http://www.adl.org/learn/ext_us/Ecoterrorism.asp?LEARN_Cat=Extremism&LEARN_SubCat=Extremism_in
_America&xpicked=4&item=eco



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                    D6T-53
Animal/Eco Terrorism Attacks www.furcomission.com/atack/




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                       D6T-54
                                     TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: Animal Liberation Front (ALF)
Formed by Ronnie Lee in 1975 from the original Band of Mercy, a militant offshoot of the Hunt Saboteurs
Association in England established in the 1960’s and 1970’s.

Type/Ideology:
Underground animal rights activist group

Size of group:
Unknown, but believed to have over 300 hard core members with thousands of supporters that attend
rallies and protests

Area of operation:
U.K., USA, Canada, Europe, South America, and the Netherlands

Organizational structure:
No formal leadership structure. Leadership comes from collective decision making. Membership is
automatic after the perpetration of an attack on an identified person or organization engaged in animal
cruelty.

Leaders:
20 to 30 hard core founding group members

Alliances with other groups/Known aid:
ELF
PETA
Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty (SHAC)

Funding comes from PETA and the thousands of supporters who donate via websites and when attending
rallies and protests.

Strategy and Stated Goals:
The ALF's stated aims or policies are:
     to liberate animals from places of abuse, i.e. laboratories, factory farms, and fur farms, and place
       them in good homes where they may live out their natural lives free from suffering;
     to inflict economic damage on those who profit from the misery and exploitation of animals;
     to reveal the horror and atrocities committed against animals behind locked doors, by performing
       non-violent direct actions and liberations;
     to take all necessary precautions against harming any human or non-human animal.

Targeting:
Research laboratories, breeding farms, related businesses, (subsidiaries and product distributors,
suppliers, billing firms, etc.), animal shelters, corporations relying on meat for profits, (restaurants,
conglomerates, etc.), fur manufacturers and retailers

Tactics:


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                        D6T-55
Animal liberation from laboratories and breeding facilities
Arsons
Bombings
Vandalism
Individual stalking of employees
Protests and rallies
Published threats of food contamination

Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
2000
January 3
Arson at Rancho Veal
USA: Five incendiary devices placed in offices, storage facilities and trucks at Rancho Veal Corp. in
Petaluma, California, cause $250,000 in damage. Guilt is claimed by ALF, which also hit Rancho Veal in
1997.

February 25
Trucks destroyed at animal breeder
USA: Four incendiary devices destroy trucks belonging to B&K Universal in Fremont, California. B&K
breeds animals for research. Guilt is claimed by ALF.

December 7
McDonald's offices vandalized
USA: Windows are smashed and anti-meat slogans are spraypainted at McDonald's offices in Long Island,
New York. Guilt is claimed by ALF and the Earth Liberation Front.

2001
March 17
Chickens stolen from California egg farm
USA: More than 450 chickens are stolen from Sunny-Cal Eggs in Beaumont. This is the second raid on the
farm. In June 2000, 200 chicks were stolen. ALF claims guilt.

April 20
Washington mink farm raided
USA: Burglars release and abandon about 300 mink from a farm in Snohomish County, mostly females
which are heavily pregnant. 200 are later recovered. Breeding cards are also destroyed. Damage is
estimated by the owner at $35,000

June 11
Furnishing store trashed in Utah
USA: 45 windows are smashed and other acts of vandalism committed at Bed Bath & Beyond store in Salt
Lake City. ALF claims guilt, saying the store was targeted because it had financial dealings with investment
company Stephens, Inc., which in turn had financial dealings with a research company that uses animals,
Huntingdon Life Sciences.

June 12
Bank of New York attacked


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                 D6T-56
USA: Five branches of the Bank of New York, in Nassau and Suffolk Counties, New York, are attacked by
vandals. One branch has 13 windows smashed, two others have their ATMs smeared with glue. ALF and
ELF claim joint guilt, saying the attacks were prompted by the bank's support of Huntingdon Life Sciences,
a research company that uses animals.

September 8
McDonald's torched in Arizona
USA: A McDonald's franchise in Tucson is set ablaze, causing an estimated $500,000 in damage. Guilt is
claimed by ALF and ELF.

May 3 2002
Truck firebombing at Indiana poultry company
USA: A bomb destroys a truck belonging to Sims Poultry in Bloomington. Undetonated incendiary devices
are recovered from under two other trucks. ALF claims guilt.

July 10
Smoke bombs in Washington
USA: Two smoke grenades cause mass evacuation from two buildings in downtown Seattle. The buildings
house insurance companies doing business with the medical research company Huntingdon Life Sciences.
Animal rightists are suspected.

2003
March 22
California slaughterhouse torched again
USA: The Rancho Veal slaughterhouse in Petaluma is torched. The building survives but $10,000 in
damage is done to the roof. Spray-painted at the scene is the message "stop the killing". In January 2000,
three buildings were set ablaze, causing $250,000 in damage. Guilt for that attack, and another in 1997,
was claimed by ALF.

July – August
French-style chef victimized in CA
USA: Multiple attacks are directed at the homes of two owners of a new foie gras specialty store in
Sonoma, including spray-painting, cars splashed with acid, and threatening letters and videotapes. On Aug.
12, vandals also break into the store, Sonoma Saveurs, in an historic adobe building. Drains are plugged
with concrete and water valves are opened to flood the restaurant, causing extensive damage. Combined
damage from all the attacks: over $60,000.

August 25
Mink farm raided in Washington
USA: More than 10,000 mink are released and abandoned at a farm in Snohomish County. Most are
recovered, but many die. ALF claims guilt. (See related article.)

2004
November 14
Iowa University lab ransacked, animals released




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                D6T-57
USA: More than 400 animals, including rats, mice and pigeons are relased in the psychology department,
more than 30 computers and three offices damaged, hazardous chemicals deliberately spilled. Damage
and losses: $450,000. ALF claims guilt.

2005
January 12
Another California construction site targeted
USA: Five incendiary devices with timers are found inside an Auburn, Placer County office building under
construction. The devices could have destroyed the entire complex. FBI connects incident to December 27
attempted arson. ELF claims guilt.

February 6
McDonald's vandalized in California
USA: Windows are smashed and slogans - McMurder Killers" and "ALF" - are painted at McDonald's in
Crenshaw Boulevard, Torrance.

Prognosis:
Terrorism in the name of animal and environmental protection has steadily increased during the past
decade in the United States. Automobile dealerships, forestry companies, corporate and university-based
medical research laboratories, restaurants, medical-supply firms, fur farms and other industries continue to
be targeted. Although no one has yet been injured in a domestic ecoterror attack, the increasingly violent
nature of attacks suggests that someone will be hurt before long.

In a statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee in May 2004, John E. Lewis of the FBI's
Counterterrorism Division noted the "upswing in violent rhetoric and tactics" among ecoterrorists and said
that in recent years ALF and ELF "have become the most active criminal extremist elements in the United
States."

Despite a few successes by law enforcement in capturing those responsible for ecoterror-related crimes,
most acts remain unsolved. Ecoterror cells remain extremely difficult to identify and infiltrate, and it is
unlikely that this rapidly growing movement will disappear soon.

In September 2001, ALF co-founder Ronnie Lee told Jane's Intelligence Review, "So far no one on the
other side has ever been seriously harmed or killed. But that may now change."

References (web sites and profile resources)
Kushner, H. (2003) Encyclopedia of Terrorism
Atkins, S. (2003) Encyclopedia of Modern Extremists and Extremist Groups
Wikpedia Online Encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animal_Liberation_Front
Southern Poverty Law Center http://www.splcenter.org/intel/intelreport/article.jsp?aid=42&printable=1
Animal Extremist/Ecoterrorist Crimes http://www.furcommission.com/attack/
Anti-Defamation League Website
http://www.adl.org/learn/ext_us/Ecoterrorism.asp?LEARN_Cat=Extremism&LEARN_SubCat=Extremism_in
_America&xpicked=4&item=eco



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                  D6T-58
Animal Liberation Front Website www.animalliberationpressoffice.org/communiques/2004-11-
18_comm_UofIowa.htm




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                       D6T-59
                                        TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: Hamas (Harakat al-Muqawamah al-Islamiyyah)
Founded 1987 – Outgrowth of the Palestinian branch of the Muslim Brotherhood
AKA: “Islamic Resistance Movement”
Abbreviation of Harakat al-Muqawamah al-Islamiyyah (Arabic: Islamic Resistance Movement), Colloquial Arabic for
"enthusiasm" or "zeal."
Military wing is known as the Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades (also known as the Ezzedeen-al-qassam brigades)
Armed Hamas cells also sometimes refer to themselves as "Students of Ayyash," "Students of the Engineer," or
"Yahya Ayyash Units," to commemorate Yahya Ayash, an early Hamas bomb-maker who was assassinated by Israel
in 1996 for designing explosive devices used in operations that killed more than 50 Israelis.


Type/Ideology:
Fundamental Islamic
Hamas ideology states that the Palestinian problem is religious and therefore can never be solved by political
compromise, and that the land of Palestine, “from the river to the sea,” is consecrated to Islam ( wakf ). It cannot be
given up, not even a part of it, especially not Jerusalem .
Thus

Size of group:
Hamas has an unknown number of hard-line members and tens of thousands of supporters and sympathizers.

Area of operation:
Today Syria is Hamas' main political, propaganda and operational arena. The leaders – especially members of the
Political Office – both live there and direct the organization's activities.
The Syrian régime supports the Palestinian terrorist organizations and allows the Hamas leadership and its
operational headquarters to conduct their activities from Syrian soil. Such activities include deciding operational
policy, the active direction of terrorist attacks against Israel, training terrorists, financing the organizing of terrorist
elements in the PA-administered territories and providing assistance in purchasing weapons. Reacting to American
pressure, Syria occasionally takes steps to make its support less visible, but in effect nothing has changed in the way
Hamas (and other terrorist organizations) conduct their affairs in Syria , and they continue their activities without
intervention or disturbance.
Hamas is active in Iran, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and Jordan , which also provide financial support and training camps.
Saudi Arabia is the source of much of the radical religious Islamic material distributed by Hamas in the PA-
administered territories, which serves its “educational” and indoctrinational needs.
It is worthwhile noting that Hamas is also active in European countries, where activities are oriented toward
indoctrination and propaganda (its organ Filisteen Al-Muslima is distributed from London ) and raising money to
finance its civilian infrastructures in the PA-administered territories.


Organizational structure:
Hamas has operational-terrorist infrastructures (the Izzedine al-Qassam Battalions) in the Gaza Strip and
the West Bank, and logistic support infrastructures outside of the PA-administered territories. Most of its
operatives in the West Bank are directed by the “external” leadership and have been responsible for most
of the suicide bombing attacks within Israel since the beginning of the current on-going violent insurrection .
However, the focus and leadership of Hamas' operational-terrorist infrastructures are in the Gaza Strip ,
where it has even founded a militia called the Popular Army.
For a list of the more deadly terrorist attacks perpetrated by Hamas against the Israeli civilian population,
see the Appendix . Prominent among them were the suicide bombing attack at the Park Hotel in Netanya


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                               D6T-60
(March 2002), which led to Operation Defensive Shield (April 2002) and the suicide bombing attack on the
No. 2 bus in Jerusalem (August 2003), which ended the temporary cease fire ( hudna ).

The Hamas civilian infrastructures
In addition to its operational-terrorist infrastructures, Hamas has a broad range of civilian infrastructures
called the da'wah . They complement and support the former: its mosques and university student
movements are hothouses for future suicide bombers; a portion of the funds collected by its “charitable
societies” for the needy are channeled to the families of shaheeds , prisoners and those wanted by Israel;
some of the funds trickle down to the operational-terrorist wing; and it provides employment for high-
ranking Hamas operatives in its “charitable societies” and other institutions.

Hamas also supports a wide range of “educational” activities in the PA-administered territories
(kindergartens, schools, summer camps, clubhouses) which are in de facto competition with those of the
PA . In its alternative educational system, the younger generations are indoctrinated with the tenets of
extreme religious Islam and are incited to perpetrate terrorist attacks against Israel. The inspiration
sometimes comes from extremist Islamic preachers in Saudi Arabia, Egypt and other Arab countries.

Hamas has vast financial resources (estimated at tens of millions of dollars annually ). The money is
supplied mostly by various funds and institutions in Saudi Arabia, the Gulf States and Western Europe, and
from other, secondary sources. That enables Hamas to invest some of the money in Palestinian welfare
(which is harmed by its terrorist attacks) and to purchase sympathy from some of the population (which
suffers from the attacks but enjoys the payments).

Hamas is the Palestinian Authority's chief source of opposition and systematically undermines its authority,
prestige and political influence. The Palestinian Authority takes no effective steps against it and certainly
does nothing to dismantle its terrorist infrastructures. During the current ongoing violent confrontation the
PA has acted against Hamas a number of times, but its attempts were ineffective and short lived because
Arafat does not want a showdown with Hamas and is interested in the continuation of the violent
confrontation with Israel

It is impossible to separate the operational-terrorist and political-propaganda wings of
Hamas or to make any distinction between them

One of the claims providing a kind of immunity for Hamas leadership is that its military and political wings
are “separate.” The claim is false , however, since no clear line can be drawn between the two. The senior
“political” leaders are deeply involved in directing all Hamas' activities:

Leaders:
       Gaza Strip
           o Shaikh Ahmed Yassin - spiritual leader and founder of Hamas (assassinated by Israel,
               2004)
           o Dr. Abdel Aziz al-Rantissi - leader in
               Gaza (assassinated by Israel, 2004)
           o Ibrahim al-Makadmeh - co founder of
               Hamas (assassinated by Israel, 2003)
           o Mahmoud al-Zahar - "political wing"
           o Ismail Haniya - "political wing"



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                   D6T-61
          o   Sa'id A-Siyam - "political wing"
          o   Salah Shahade - leader of "military wing" (assassinated by Israel, 2002)
          o   Mohammed Deif - leader of "military wing"
          o   Adnan al-Ghoul - chief explosives expert in Gaza and "father of the Qassam
              rocket[13](assassinated by Israel, 2004)

      West Bank
          o Mohammad Taha - co founder of Hamas (arrested by Israel, March 2003)

                                                         Left: IKhaled Mash’al, head of Hamas Political Office
                                                         Right: Hassan Nasrallah, Hesbollah leader

          o   Qawasameh clan in Hebron - provided local leaders and suicide bombers to Hamas (many
              members assassinated by Israel, one arrested, 2002-2003)
          o   Yahya Ayyash - the "Muhandees", a senior bomb-maker (assassinated by Israel, 1996)

      Arab and Muslim countries
          o Khaled Mashal - leader of Hamas, based in Damascus, believed to have fled to Iran in
              September 2004.
          o Mousa Abu Marzuk - Hamas senior, Damascus, believed to have fled Syria in September
              2004.
          o Izz El-Deen Sheikh Khalil - Hamas mid-level, "military wing" (according to Israel)
              Damascus (assassinated by Israel, 2004)




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                          D6T-62
The Hamas founder and leader was Sheikh Ahmad Yassin, who was eliminated by Israel in a targeted killing on
March 22, 2004. Its current leader is the chairman of its Political Office, Khaled Mash'al , who has held that position
since 1996 and resides and is active in Damascus . His second-in-command, also residing in Damascus, is Mousa
Muhammad Muhammad Abu Marzouk , for whose arrest the United States issued a warrant (August 20, 2004) for
financing and supporting terrorism.


Alliances with other groups/Known aid:
Al- Qaeda
Hizbollah
Other Palestinian groups

Strategy and Stated Goals:
Their stated goal is to conquer all of the State of Israel, the West Bank and Gaza, including any secular Palestinian
state that may come into formal existence, and replace it with an Islamic theocracy.
The organization's goal is to "raise the banner of God over every inch of Palestine," i.e. to eliminate the State of
Israel (and any secular Palestinian state which may be established), and to replace it with an Islamic republic.
Hamas is utterly opposed to a political settlement with Israel. It has opposed any agreements the Palestinian
Authority (PA)/PLO reached with Israel, particularly the Oslo accords. That is also the reason it refuses to recognize
the authority of the PA. Hamas rejects the idea of joining it, and will do so only when the PA has cancelled all its
political obligations and agreed to a new orientation and source of authority.
The perpetration of terrorist acts against Israel is central to its ideology : as long as Palestinians live under the
“occupation” ( including within Israel ) they must “resist” through jihad (holy war, by which they mean an armed
insurrection against the State of Israel) . However, Hamas also realizes the necessity (with religious rationale as well)
of reaching temporary tactical cease fires ( hudnas ) to avoid coming into open conflict with the PA (and international
and regional elements), which might hurt its standing with the Palestinian public.

Targeting:
US and Israeli civilian population

Tactics:
Suicide bombings
Hamas also fights a guerrilla war against the Israeli military and security forces in its effort to drive them
from the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and ultimately eliminate the state of Israel and replace it with an
Islamic state. As well as suicide bombings (mostly targeting civilians and occasionally against the military)
Hamas guerrillas also carry out non-suicidal attacks, such as planting bombs and carrying out shooting
attacks in Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The organization's goal to destroy Israel in its entirety has
made its leaders prime targets for assassinations.

Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
              1989 -Kidnap/murder of Israeli soldiers Avi Sasportas and Ilan Sa'adon
              1992 – Kidnap/murder of Israwli soldier Nissim Toledano
              1994 - Kidnapping of Israeli soldier Nahshon Wachsman (Wachsman and another soldier, Nir
               Poraz, were killed.)
              1994 - Suicide bombing attack on the No. 5 bus in Tel Aviv (22 killed.)
              1996 - Two suicide bombing attacks on No. 18 buses in Jerusalem (47 killed.)
              2001 - Suicide bombing attack at the Dolphinarium in Tel Aviv (21 killed.)
              2001 - Suicide bombing attack at the Sbarro Restaurant in Jerusalem (15 killed.)
              2002 - Suicide bombing attack at the Park Hotel in Netanya during the Passover Seder (30 killed.)
               (The attack led to Operation Defensive Shield, April 2002).



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                            D6T-63
                 2002 - Suicide bombing attack in Rishon Letzion (16 killed.)
                 2002 - Suicide bombing attack at the Pat intersection in Jerusalem (19 killed.)
                 2003 - Suicide bombing attack on a No. 2 bus in Jerusalem (23 killed.) (The attack ended the
                  temporary cease fire hudna ).

Prognosis:
Hamas poses a continued threat to US and Israeli interests in the Middle East, and maintains cells that conduct
fundraising efforts worldwide.

References (web sites and profile resources)
Global Security: Military Web Site http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/para/hamas.htm

Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center
http://www.intelligence.org.il/eng/sib/9_04/hamas.htm

Wikpedia Online Encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamas




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                        D6T-64
                                   TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: Hezbollah (Party of God)
AKA: al-Muqawamah al-Is.amiyyah (Islamic Resistance)
Founded in 1982 as a political and military organization in Lebanon by Lebanese clerics and Iranian
Revolutionary Guardsmen to oppose the Israeli invasion and occupation of 1982
Became a guerilla group in 1983

Type/Ideology:
Militant Shi’a political party
Islamic fundamentalist organization

Size of group:
Several hundred to 1,500 military operatives, plus several thousand active supporters

Area of operation:
Israel
Southern Lebanon
Beirut
Europe
North America
South America
Africa
Asia

Organizational structure:
Leadership council of decision-making clerics, the Majlis al-Shura, and field leadership is broken into three
regions – Bekaa Valley, Beirut and Southern Lebanon

Leaders:
Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah (Main leader)
Bakaa Valley
Sheikh Subni al-Tufayli
Sheikh Hussein al-Musawi (Killed 1992)
Sheikh Husayn al-Khalil
Mustafa Mahmud Madhi (Arms coordinator)
Beirut
Sheikh Muhammad Hussein Fadlallah
Sheikh Ibrahim al-Amin
Sheikh Hassan Nasserallah
Sheikh Muhammad Ismail al-Khaliq
Southern Lebanon
Sheikh Abd al-Karim Obeid
Sheikh ‘Afif al-Nabulsi
Sheikh Muhammad Fannish

Alliances with other groups/Known aid:


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                  D6T-65
Hamas
Islamic Jihad
Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades
Financed by Iran and Syria
Raises additional funds through charities and commercial activities

Strategy and Stated Goals:
Wants an Islamic republic modeled after Iran, achieved by peaceful democratic means, requiring the
removal of all non-Islamic influences. They also support the complete destruction of Israel

Targeting:
US and Israeli interests within Israel and throughout the world

Tactics:
Kidnappings
Assassinations
Suicide bombings
Car bombings
Hijackings

Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
1982-1992 Kidnapping/torture of approximately 30 individuals including:
       Col. William R. Higgins
       CIA Station Chief William Buckley
       American journalist Terry Anderson
       British journalist John McCarthy
       Archbishop of Canterbury special envoy Terry Waite
       Irish citizen Brian Keenan

1983 – Suicide truck bombing of US Marine barracks in Beirut (241 killed)
1984 – Truck bombing of the US Embassy in Beirut (24 killed)
1985 – Hijacking of TWA flight 847 from Athens to Rome
1992 – Bombing of the Israeli Embassy in Argentina (29 killed)
1994 – Bombing of the Jewish Community center in Argentina (95 killed)
1996 – Truck bombing of the Khobar Towers in Dahrahn, Saudi Arabia (19 US servicemen killed, 370
American and Saudi citizens injured)
2002 – Hezbollah cell discovered in Charlotte, North Carolina raising funds and procuring dual-use
technology (including night vision goggles, GPS, stun guns, naval equipment, nitrogen cutters and laser
range finders)

Prognosis:
Hezbollah continues to pose a threat to Israeli interests, and has turned its focus to interests outside of
Israel, including South America and Europe. Hezbollah has also concucted surveillance in Iraq of US
targets in attempts to destabilize Iraq. They and other Iranian sponsored groups continue to pose a major
threat to US as well as Isreali interests throughout the world. Hezbollah maintains a network of fundraising
“sleeper cells” throughout the US



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                D6T-66
References (web sites and profile resources)

Kushner, H. (2003) Encyclopedia of Terrorism

Wikpedia Online Encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hezbollah

Ranstorp, M. (1994) Hizbollah’s Command Leadership: Its Structure, Decision-Making and Relationship
with Iranian Clergy and Institutions. Terrorism and Political Violence, Vol. 6, No. 3 (Autum 1994)

Washington Policy Watch #964 http://www.washingtoninstitute.org/templateC05.php?CID=2263

Patterns of Global Terrorism http://www.state.gov/s/ct/rls/pgtrpt/2003/31711.htm

ADL Terrorism Symbol Database http://www.adl.org/terrorism/symbols/hezbollah.asp




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                           D6T-67
                                      TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: Militia of Montana (MOM)
Founded in 1994 in Noxon, Montana by brothers John and David Trochmann, and David’s son, Randy.
Evolved from the group United Citizens for Justice, in response to the Ruby Ridge, Idaho incident.

Type/Ideology:
Paramilitary patriot militia/survivalist
White supremacist
Weapons rights

Size of group:
Unknown


Area of operation:
Montana
Washington
Militia movement has groups scattered across many US states


Organizational structure:
The three founding group leaders continue to run the main group.


Leaders:
John Trochmann
David Trochmann
Randy Trochman
Robert Fletcher (until 1996)


Alliances with other groups/Known aid:
Montana Freeman
Republic of Texas
Most other militia groups across the US

Strategy and Stated Goals:
In their initial period of activism, the Trochmann brothers considered themselves sovereign citizens; they
believed that individuals were not subject to the authority of either state or federal government unless they
formally chose to enter into a "contract" with the government -- for example, by having a driver's license or
Social Security number or by paying property or income taxes. John went so far as to declare his
"sovereignty" in a series of documents he filed with a Montana court in January 1992. By 1995 the group
had distanced themselves from that initial ideology. Fighting the “New World Order” became their ideology,
as they perceived a vast conspiracy by unseen global powers to use the United Nations to overturn the
constitution and invoke martial law.



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                 D6T-68
Targeting:
Government agencies

Tactics:
Perpetuating conspiracy theories, distribution of literature, intimidation of officials

Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
MOM has had no significant violent actions attributed directly to the group, although several militia groups
have had confrontations with government agencies over the years. Most of their activities have consisted
of spreading propaganda literature, selling survivalist supplies, and speaking at gun shows and other militia
gatherings. The group has a reputation of all talk and no action.

Prognosis:
Both Trochmann brothers insist that the group remains vital; clearly, however, its significance in anti-
government circles has diminished. Nonetheless, the group is not dead yet, and the bombings of the
Pentagon and the World Trade Center have certainly provided an opportunity to inflame the same sorts of
fears and anxieties that fueled the group's rise during the hysteria surrounding Y2K. Indeed, current public
concerns regarding security differ in a very important respect from those of the late 1990s: today, the threat
is no longer theoretical. Fear of terrorist attacks, expanded domestic surveillance and conspiracy theories
generated by major social change could all impart new credibility to the group. The new climate could re-
ignite interest among those who have fallen away as well as attracting newcomers concerned about both
safety and individual liberties. For these reasons, it would be premature to discount MOM's potential future
influence. The group has sparked other militias to act rather than talk, leading officials to believe that militia
groups across the US still pose a threat in many areas.


References (web sites and profile resources)
Anti-Defamation League Website Anti-Defamation League Website
http://www.adl.org/learn/ext_us/mom.asp?xpicked=3&item=mom

Southern Poverty Law Center http://www.splcenter.org/intel/intelreport/article.jsp?aid=269
Anti-Defamation League Website
http://www.adl.org/learn/extremism_in_america_updates/groups/militia_of_montana/MOM_up_2.htm




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                     D6T-69
                                    TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: New Black Panther Party for Self Defense
Founded in Dallas, Texas in 1990 by Aaron Michaels and patterned after the Black Panther Militia started
by Milwaukee Alderman Michael McGee, a former member of the original Black Panther Party. Both
organizations are modeled after the original Black Panther Party of the 1960’s. Members are former
members of the Nation of Islam.

Type/Ideology:
Militant black nationalists, Pan-Africanism, racist, anti-Semetic

Size of group:
There are known to be as many as 35 chapters or more of the group, but the national group size is
unknown. The Texas chapter reports over 100 members.

Area of operation:
Chapters are scattered throughout the East, Midwest and a few in the south, but members will travel to
locations of controversy to bring media attention to an incident.

Organizational structure:
Spokesperson and national leader at Washington, D.C. Headquarters
Regional chapters with organizational heads

Leaders:
Malik Zulu Shabazz

Alliances with other groups/Known aid:
Black Panther Militia

Strategy and Stated Goals:
Since the mid-1990s and right up to the present, the new Panthers have specialized in confrontational,
armed demonstrations — protests guaranteed to win attention from the media.

Targeting:
Jews
Whites

Tactics:
Protest
Arson
Propaganda

Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
Though no specific events have been directly connected to the group, incidents have occurred shortly after
speeches by NBPP leaders-
       1994 – Wedowee, Alabama high school burned to the ground after a speech by Indiana leader
       Mmoja Ajabu (School principal refused to allow inter-racial couples attend the prom)


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                D6T-70
        1996 – Ajabu made death threats to a prosecutor seeking the death penalty in the murder trial of
        Ajabu’s son
        1996 – Dallas, Texas school board meeting cancelled after NBPP members threatened to come
        armed and disrupt the meeting
        1998 – Armed NBPP members confronted the KKK in Jasper, Texas after the dragging death of
        James Byrd
        1998 – Million Youth March in NYC resulted in violent confrontation with police that ended the
        march (March continued to be held annually)

Prognosis:
AT this time the New Black Panther Party poses a minimal threat to white supremacist groups, and Jewish
organizations. They have not threatened any government agencies with violence, and appear to want as
much publicity as possible at this time through demonstration, protest, and other means.

References (web sites and profile resources)
 Anti-Defamation League Website
http://www.adl.org/learn/ext_us/Black_Panther.asp?LEARN_Cat=Extremism&LEARN_SubCat=Extremism_
in_America&xpicked=3&item=Black_Panther

Southern Poverty Law Center http://www.splcenter.org/intel/intelreport/article.jsp?aid=214




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                              D6T-71
                                   TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: Nazi Low Riders (NLR)
Formed in the late 1970’s in the California Youth Authority after being recruited to form an Aryan
organizaton by John Stinson and the Aryan Brotherhood. Stinson wanted to use this youth as a strong-arm
of the Brotherhood.
“Nazi” was chosen to display their racist philosophy, and “Low Riders” was chosen to make fun of their
Hispanic counterparts in the Hispanic gangs.

Type/Ideology:
Racist, although a small number of Hispanics were allowed to join to do much of the dirty work (trafficking
drugs in and our of prison).
Latino last names and wives are allowed, but members must be more than half Caucasian and committed
to the white race against blacks and “race traitors”.

Size of group:
Close to 3,000 hard core members estimated

Area of operation:
Mostly Southern California, scattered members in Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Oklahoma, Illinois, and Florida

Organizational structure:
NLR membership in prison is based on a three-tier hierarchy consisting of "seniors," "juniors" and "kids."
The typical NLR unit is led by seniors, some of whom have been connected to the gang since its early days
in the California Youth Authority. To attain senior status, NLR members must have been active for at least
five years and must be elected by three other senior members. In the NLR hierarchy, juniors, who are just
below seniors, cannot induct new members (only a senior can confer membership), but they recruit
potential members. The senior who inducts a kid becomes his mentor and disciplinarian. Kids usually come
from smaller white power gangs like the PENIskins and Insane White Boys.
NLR's street leadership structure is unclear. Members organize locally only with the approval of established
leaders -- those who try to set up independently risk retribution. Recruits are usually culled from smaller
white gangs like Insane White Boys, La Mirada Punks, Independent Skins and Orange County Skins, all of
whom acknowledge and submit to NLR's authority on the street.

Leaders:
Unknown

Alliances with other groups/Known aid:
Aryan Brotherhood
Public Enemy Number 1 (PEN1 or PENI)
Other Skinhead groups

Currently, various white gangs maintain a frail alliance known as the Southern California Skinhead Alliance
or SoCal Skins. Public Enemy Number One (PEN1) Skins leads the coalition, in alliance with NLR.

Strategy and Stated Goals:



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                D6T-72
Depending on which members of the group you talk to, the goal is either to “protect the incarcerated whites”
or to “rid the streets of blacks”.

According to the NLR oath:
“We hereby invoke the blood covenant and declare that we are in a full state of war and will not lay down
our weapons until we have driven the enemy into the sea and reclaimed that which is rightfully ours.
Through our blood and gods will, the land will be that of our children.”
 “UNTIL DEATH”

Targeting:
African Americans, mixed race couples, homosexuals

Tactics:
Narcotics trafficking, murder, assault

Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
1996 – beating death of an African-American teen with a baseball bat in Lancaster, Ca.
1998 – attack and stabbing of two African-American men in Lancaster, Ca.
1999 – attack of an African-American man in prison cell
1999 – attack of an African-American Wal-Mart employee with a hammer in Lancaster, Ca.
1999 – stabbing death of an African-American homeless man in Lancaster, Ca.
2001 – stabbing death of an African-American male in Merced, Ca. (stabbed 23 times)
2002 – Kidnap and murder of a bisexual man in Salinas, Ca.

Prognosis:
New gang members have been identified in Reno and Las Vegas, Nevada, and Lake Havasu City, Arizona,
and, should they continue their eastward migration, could evolve into a national problem over the next few
years.

References (web sites and profile resources)
Anti Defamation League http://www.adl.org/learn/ext_us/nlr.asp?xpicked=3&item=nlr
Arizona Department of Corrections http://www.azcorrections.gov/STG/Nazi_Low_Riders.html
Know Gangs Website www.knowgangs.com
Southern Poverty Law Center Article http://www.splcenter.org/intel/intelreport/article.jsp?aid=469

Southern Poverty Law CenterIntelligence Report
http://www.splcenter.org/intel/intelreport/article.jsp?aid=474




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                 D6T-73
                                      TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: Palestinian Islamic Jihad (Haraiat al-Jihad al-Islami al-Filastini) AKA – Islamic
Jihad of Palestine; PIJ Shaqaqi Faction; PIJ Shalla Faction,;Al-Quds Brigades
Founded in 1979 in the Gaza Strip area by Palestinian students in Egypt
Originally with the Muslim Brotherhood, influenced by the Iranian Revolution and militant Egyptian students

Type/Ideology:
Religious-desire one Islamic State
Oppose moderate Arab governments “tainted by Western secularism”
Liberation of all Palestine

Size of group:
Unknown

Area of operation:
Istael, West Bank, Gaza Strip (mainly in the University)
Maintains offices in Beiruit, Damascus, Tenhran, and Khartoum
Israeli soldiers in Lebanon
Samaria

Organizational structure:
Has leadership in Syria and Lebanon
                 Al-Aqsa Batallions formed in 1982 - carry out terrorist attacks from Jordan
                 The Temple (al-Jihad al-Islami-Bait al-Maqdas) founded in 1980’s; called the “Western Sector” and
                  comprised of former “Students Committee” activists turned religious and led by Bassem Sultan,
                  Marwan al-Kayali and Muhammad Bkheis (killed by car bomb in 1988)
                 Islamic Jihad Squad (Tanzim al-Jihad al-Islami), a small group led by Ahmad Muhanna and active
                  from the Sudan area into Israel, and Israeli interests in Egypt

Leaders:
Founders –
        Fathi Shaqaqi (killed 1995)
        Abd al-Aziz Odah
        Bashir Musa
1995 – Abdallah Shalah (had been living in Florida teaching Middle Eastern Courses at So. Florida Univ. in Tampa)

Alliances with other groups/Known aid:
Hizbollah
Iranian Revolutionary Guard
Hamas (1994)
Support from Iran and Syria

Strategy and Stated Goals:
Committed to the creation of a Palestinian tate and the destruction of Israel through Holy War.
“Jihad for the liberation of Palestine by Islamic movements will bring upon the expected Jihad for the reconstruction
of the greater and one Islamic State”

Targeting:
Israeli civilians
Israeli interests


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                          D6T-74
US citizens via in Israeli attacks

Tactics:
Shotings, suicide bombings, bombings

Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
Oct. 1981 – Participated in the assassination of President Anwar Sadat
Feb. 1990 – Gunman opened fire on tour bus in Cairo,Egypt (11 killed, 17 injured)
Jan. 1995 – 2 suicide bombers detonated themselves at a bus stop (18 killed, 69 injured)
Mar. 1996 – Suicide bomber detonated an explosive outside Dizengoff Shopping Center, Tel Aviv (20 killed, 70
injured)
May 2001 – Car bomb exploded outside Israeli school where students were studying for matriculation exams (8
injured)
Nov. 2001 – Gunman fired on bus, killing a 14-year-old boy and 16-year-old girl returning home from school (2
killed, 45 injured)
Mar 2002 – Suicide bomber detonated explosives on bus from Tel Aviv to Nazareth ( 7 killed, 42 wounded)
Jun 2002 – Suicide bombers detonated explosives packed in vehicle next to a bus near Megiddo Junchion in Nothern
Israel (17 killed, 50 injured)
Oct. 2002 – Car bomb detonated near bus in Northern Israel (14 killed, 45 injured)
Dec. 2002 – Gunmen infiltrated dining room of Jewish Religious School (4 killed, 9 wounded)
Mar. 2003 – Suicide bomber detonated explosive in London Café, Netanya (54 wounded)
Oct. 2003 – Female suicide bomber detonated explosive inside Maxim Reataurant (21 killed, 60 wounded)
Feb. 2005 – Suicide bomber detonated explosive in Stage Club in Tel Aviv (5 killed, 50 wounded)

Prognosis:
Aside from Israel, PIJ also considers the United States an enemy because of its support for Israel. The PIJ
also opposes moderate Arab governments that it believes have been tainted by Western secularism and
has carried out attacks in Jordan, Lebanon and Egypt. The PIJ has targeted US interests Israel since the
invasion of Iraq, and its ideology remains hostile to the United States and the values it stands for.

References (web sites and profile resources)
Patterns of Global Terrorism http://www.state.gov/s/ct/rls/pgtrpt/2003/31711.htm
Kushner, H. (2003) Encyclopedia of Terrorism
Naval Post Graduate School Library http://library.nps.navy.mil/home/tgp/pij.htm
IntelCenter http://www.ict.org.il/organizations/org_frame.cfm?orgid=28
Jewish Virtual Library http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Terrorism/PIJ.html
Wikpedia Online Encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palestinian_Islamic_Jihad
Internet Haganah http://haganah.org.il/harchives/003975.html




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                    D6T-75
                                   TERRORIST GROUP PROFILE
Name of group and origin: Sheriff’s Posse Comitatus (“Power of the County”)
Formed in the late 1960’s by Henry L. Beach in Oregon, and William Potter Gale in California

Type/Ideology:
White supremacist/Christian Identity
Anti-semetic
Anti-abortionist
Right-wing

Size of group:
Unknown

Area of operation:
Most states in the U.S.

Organizational structure:
There is no single national group, and local units are autonomous.

Leaders:
Beach, Henry L. (Died)
Gale, William Potter (Died)
Humphries, Larry
Kahl, Gordon (Killed)
Kirk, Arthur

Alliances with other groups/Known aid:
Montana Freemen
Most Militia Grooups
KKK

Strategy and Stated Goals:
The Posse Comitatus (from the Latin phrase meaning "power of the county") is a loosely-organized right-
wing social movement that opposes the United States federal government and believes in radical localism.
Posse members believe that there is no legitimate form of government above that of the county level and
no higher law authority than the county sheriff and that if the sheriff refuses to carry out the will of the
county's citizens:

Targeting:
Government officials (Believed Jewish)
Abortion doctors
Non-whites


Tactics:
Assaults


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                D6T-76
Vigilantism
Tax evasion
Counterfeiting
Murder
Death threats to judges and IRS officials
Clogging the Judicial system with lawsuits

Chronology of major operations/Significant events:
1974 – Plot to assassinate Vice President Nelson Rockefeller
1980’s – Violent opposition to repossession of farms forclosed for default on payment
1983 – Murder of two Federal Marshals in North Dakota (Kahl); Murder of Arkansas Sheriff during shootout
(Kahl killed in fire)

Prognosis:
This group is no longer a strong threat to the US government, as most of its leadership is deceased. Small
groups still remain throughout the US, but most violent activity has ceased.

References (web sites and profile resources)
Kushner, H. (2003) Encyclopedia of Terrorism
Posse Comitatus Website http://www.anti-government.com/posse-comitatus.htm
Terrorism Knowledge Base http://www.tkb.org/Group.jsp?groupID=110
Anti Defamation League http://www.adl.org/poisoning_web/posse.asp
Wikpedia Online Encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posse_Comitatus_%28U.S._movement%29




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                              D6T-77
MIDP COURSE DESIGN WORKSHEET

 GOAL:
 To train Terrorism Liaison Officers to develop and utilize a communication and information
 exchange network within schools and communities in their assigned areas.
 SUB-GOAL:

 TASK (#3) :
 Students will apply basic ALC techniques to specific training needs
 Learning objective:
 A= Students
 B= Create
 C= Working in small groups, provided:
                available resources
                training tasks
                learning objectives
 D= Create a lesson plan to include all appropriate ALC strategies and RIDEM which earns a
 score of 3 or better on the evaluation rubric.
 Expected learner outcomes:
    12. Create a lesson plan for a brief training session containing the following:
             a. Training goal
             b. Learning objective
             c. Experience-based learning
             d. Competency-based learning
             e. Single concept/theory training
             f. Feedback and recognition
             g. RIDEM
             h. Learning domains
 Learning objective in sentence form:
 Students, provided resources, specific tasks and learning objectives, will create a lesson
 plan for a specified training need, incorporating all appropriate ALC strategies and RIDEM,
 earning a score of 3 or better on the evaluation rubric.
 Learning Domain(s):
 Cognitive domain-This module will measure the ability of the students to apply planning and
 implementation of training strategies by developing a short training session.
 Subject Content that supports learning the task to third level of detail:



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                           D6T-78
 I.  Strategies for planning and delivering effective training sessions
         A. Incorporating ALC for effective training
              1. Understanding ALC basics
                  a. Experience-based learning
                      1) Discussion
                      2) Problem solving
                  b. Competency-based learning
                      1) Real life applications
                      2) Apply learning to immediate circumstances
                  c. Motivation for learning
                      1) Problem centered
                      2) Personal growth
                      3) Monetary or other type of gain
                      4) Curiosity
                      5) Immediate benefit
              2. Single concept/theory training
                  a. Relevant to learner goals
                  b. Promote information integration
              3. Plan feedback and recognition
              4. Account for learning style differences
         B. Applying RIDEM to learning concepts
              1. R-relevance
              2. I-involvement
              3. D-discovery
              4. E-experience
              5. M-modeling
         C. Learning domains
              1. Psychomotor
              2. Cognitive
              3. Affective
         D. Communication skills
         E. Learning activities
              1. Small and large group activities
              2. Case studies
              3. Role playing
         F. Questioning
              1. Direct
              2. Discovery
              3. Overhead
 Learning method selected:
 PowerPoint presentation and small group activity:
 Each group will create a lesson plan and 10 minute training segment on their originally
 profiled terrorist group. The training must incorporate ALC strategies and RIDEM. (To be
 incorporated with the activity for Task #4 - Meetings)
 Testing strategy:




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                        D6T-79
 Each group will present a their lesson plan and strategy for teaching a short training session
 to the class that will be evaluated based on the incorporation of appropriate ALC techniques
 and learning strategies.
 Resources required to support the selected learning method(s):
               Computer with PowerPoint, projector and screen
               Presentation handouts
               Flip charts with paper, masking tape, markers
               4 Tables and chairs to accommodate small groups of 6 to 7 per table




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                         D6T-80
Evaluation Form: ALC Techniques
Name: Shawn Dyball
Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
Learning Objective: Students will apply specific techniques to create a lesson plan and
deliver a short training session on a given subject.
           Terrorism Liaison Officers: Role in School/Community Partnership
              Application of Adult Learning Concepts Evaluation Form
 Training Topic:
 1. Did the instruction consist of more than just lecture?                Yes _______ No ______
 2. Were students/attendees involved in instruction?                      Yes _______ No ______
 3. Did the lesson plan contain the minimu elements required?
 (Topic, description, goals, content, allotted time)                      Yes _______ No ______
 4. Were at least two instructional techniques/aids planned for
 use during instruction? (Flip chart, props, handouts, PPT)               Yes _______ No ______
 5. What were the strong points of the training?




 6. How could the instructor improve?




 7. General Comments:




 Evaluator:




     Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                         D6T-81
MIDP COURSE DESIGN WORKSHEET

 GOAL:
 To train Terrorism Liaison Officers to develop and utilize a communication and information
 exchange network within schools and communities in their assigned areas.

 SUB-GOAL:


 TASK (#4) :
 Students will apply proper strategies to create an agenda for planning and training meetings

 Learning objective:
 A=Students

 B= Create

 C= Working in small groups, provided:
               available resources
               a specific target group
               meeting objective
 D= Students will develop a complete strategy and create an agenda for conducting a meeting
 earning a score of 3 or higher on an evaluation rubric
 Expected learner outcomes:
    13. Create and implement a complete plan for conducting an effective meeting to include
        the following:
             a. Purpose
             b. Specific objectives
             c. Agenda
             d. Place
             e. Atmosphere
             f. Documentation
             g. Evaluation
             h. Post meeting strategy

 Learning objective in sentence form:
 Students, provided available resources, a specific target group and meeting objective, will
 apply specific techniques to create an agenda to conduct effective and productive meetings,
 which include evaluation and follow-up strategies.




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                          D6T-82
 Learning Domain(s):
 Cognitive Domain-This module will measure the ability of the students to apply learned
 planning and implementation strategies by producing an agenda for a training meeting.

 Subject Content that supports learning the task to third level of detail:
 I. Strategies for conducting effective meetings
    A. Planning and conducting effective meetings
        1. Purpose of meetings
        2. What are you trying to achieve?
        3. Is a meeting necessary to achieve goal?
    B. Setting meeting objectives
            a. Length
            b. Location
            c. Participants
            d. Preparation
    C. Planning strategies for success
        1. Create an agenda
            a. Precise
            b. Time limits
            c. Location identification
            d. Roles and objectives
            e. Advance delivery
            f. Planning and preparation
        2. Select Location
            a. Size
            b. Comfort
            c. Serves the purpose
            d. Appropriate audio/visual aids
            e. Accessibility
            f. Atmosphere
                1) Conducive to task
                2) Conducive to interaction
                3) Refreshments
                4) Make participants happy to return
    D. Conducting the meeting
        1. Role of the facilitator
            a. Clearly state objectives
            b. Start on time
            c. Stay on target
            d. Keep discussions moving
            e. Insure participation
            f. Make everyone feel comfortable and values
            g. Be neutral
            h. Resolve conflict
            i. Close on time
        2. Starting meetings



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                      D6T-83
          a. Self introductions
          b. Welcoming statement
          c. Pre-designate or assign a meeting secretary
              1) Takes minutes
              2) Records attendance
              3) Records discussions/decisions
              4) Records assignment
              5) Lists future agenda items
          d. State objectives and goals
       3. Conducting the meeting
          a. Remember roles
          b. Clarify and paraphrase
          c. Use brainstorming techniques
          d. Guide participants
          e. Limit “private conversation”
          f. Appropriate breaks
          g. Periodic summaries of key points – seek consensus
       4. Concluding the meeting
          a. Seek agreement/reach conclusions
          b. Assist group in selecting next steps
          c. Make appropriate assignments
          d. Clarify understanding of future expectations
          e. Summarize accomplishments
          f. Thank participants for contributions
    E. Post meeting documentation and evaluation
       1. Prepare minutes documentation of meeting
       2. Evaluate effectiveness of meeting
          a. What worked?
          b. What did not work?
          c. What needs improvement?
          d. Was the meeting effective?
          e. Was the meeting successful?
       3. Plan post-meeting strategy
       4. Monitor progress

 Learning method selected:
 PowerPoint presentation and small group activity:
 Each group will be given a target audience with whom to plan a meeting, and an overall
 meeting goal for that audience. Each group will develop a meeting plan and agenda for their
 target audience based on their goal.
 Testing strategy:
 Each group will present a comprehensive agenda and appropriate method for conducting a
 meeting for planning or training objectives, and will present this strategy to the class. Each
 strategy will be evaluated via rubric for content based on the guidelines provided during
 instruction.



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                              D6T-84
 Resources required to support the selected learning method(s):

              Computer with PowerPoint, projector and screen
              Presentation handouts
              Flip charts with paper, masking tape, markers
              Instructor provided audience information and overall goal
              4 Tables and chairs to accommodate small groups of 6 to 7 per table




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                 D6T-85
  Evaluation Rubric: Meeting Agenda Planning
  Name: Shawn Dyball
  Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
  Learning Objective: Students will apply specific techniques to plan, lead and conduct effective and productive meetings, which include
  evaluation and follow-up strategies.
                                                         Meeting Agenda Planning
Purpose/Objectives:
                  1                                      2                                 3                                   4                   Score
The purpose or objective was not     The purpose or objective, while      The purpose and objectives were    The purpose and objectives were
clearly stated and were very         stated, used poorly chosen           generally well written although    clearly outlined and easily
difficult to understand. Times       words, making under standing the     they could have been clearer.      understood. The approximate
were inconsistent with the items.    intent difficult. Times were not     The approximate times were         times were consistent and within
Numerous errors in the spelling or   consistent with the material being   times generally acceptable. Very   expected parameters. All
format of individual’s titles,       presented. Some errors in the        few errors in the spelling or      participants, agencies and titles
agencies and names. Poorly           spelling or format of individual’s   format of individual’s titles,     were properly listed. Guest
formatted document.                  titles, agencies and names.          agencies and names. Document       speakers were properly listed.
                                     Document format less than            format satisfactory.               The document was neat and
                                     satisfactory.                                                           properly formatted.
Location/Atmosphere:
            1                                        2                                   3                                   4                     Score
                                                                                                             Location chosen was ideal for the
Location was inappropriate for       Location chosen was convenient       Location chosen was appropriate
                                                                                                             meeting, easily accessible to
type of meeting and did not          to host, but not necessarily         and convenient to most
                                                                                                             most attendees, and the start
accommodate the number of            conducive to the type of meeting     attendees. Time of meeting and
                                                                                                             time is included. The exact
attendees. Time provided was         and number of attendees.             address were included along with
                                                                                                             address and room designation
inappropriate for duration of        Address was provided as well as      directions and room location for
                                                                                                             are included along with driving
meeting. No other information or     time of meeting. No directions or    meeting. Most information about
                                                                                                             directions and parking
amenities provided to attendees.     information about other amenities    amenities was included.
                                                                                                             information. Notations about
                                     provided. Parking not adequate       Information provided to a
                                                                                                             available refreshments or other
                                     or difficult to find.                satisfactory level.
                                                                                                             amenities are included.




  Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                                                           D6T-86
Documentation:
               1                                    2                                    3                                     4                      Score
No one assigned to take minutes     Minutes were assigned to one of     Specific person assigned to take        Qualified person (clerical staff)
at meeting. No plan in place to     the attendees at the start of the   minutes in appropriate amount of        was designated to take detailed
follow-up on any assignments        meeting. Assigned person was        detail for distribution to attendees.   minutes of the meeting for the
given during meeting.               not necessarily knowledgeable in    Minutes to be used by host to           purpose of distribution to
Completion of assignments left up   taking specific minutes at a        track progress of assignments           attendees and tracking progress
to attendees with no mechanism      meeting.                            given during meeting.                   of assignments given during
in for reporting progress.                                                                                      meeting. Names of the attendees
                                                                                                                were provided as well as agency
                                                                                                                affiliation and any assignment
                                                                                                                given.


Post Meeting Documentation/Evaluation Strategy:
               1                                    2                                    3                                     4                      Score
                                                                        Assignments (if any) given and          Minutes formatted to include
Assignments given but no interim
                                                                        expectations for reporting              method of tracking progress of
follow-up plan established. No      Assignments (if any) given and
                                                                        progress clearly stated to              assignments given (if any).
documentation of progress           deadlines for completion
                                                                        attendees. Method for                   Expectations clearly stated for
planned, and no specific            established. No follow-up plan
                                                                        documenting follow-up clearly           attendees receiving assignments
deadlines set. Subsequent           established for interim progress
                                                                        established during meeting.             and deadlines established.
meeting date not clearly            but date for subsequent meeting
                                                                        Assignment deadlines clearly            Follow-up contact outlined and
established-stated in vague terms   set.
                                                                        established and date for follow-up      date for subsequent meeting
(3 weeks, 2 months, etc.)
                                                                        meeting determined.                     determined.




  Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                                                              D6T-87
MIDP COURSE DESIGN WORKSHEET

 GOAL:
 To train Terrorism Liaison Officers to develop and utilize a communication and information
 exchange network within schools and communities in their assigned areas.

 SUB-GOAL:


 TASK (#5) :
 Students will create a plan to establish and sustain an information exchange network within
 their community.

 Learning objective:
 A=Students

 B= Create

 C= Working in small groups, provided:
               Available resources
               Specific area demographic

 D= Create a strategic plan for networking within their specific community earning a score of 3
 or better on an evaluation rubric.

 Expected learner outcomes:
 Develop a strategy to establish a network within a given community and school district to
 include the following principles:
                Determine area demographics
                Identify community stakeholders
                Involve community leaders
                Involve the community
                Customize outreach for community
                Create ownership within the community
                Create two-way communications
                Evaluation plan for success

 Learning objective in sentence form:
 Students, working in small groups, provided resources and a specific community
 demographic, will create a plan to establish and sustain a working network within that
 community.


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                              D6T-88
 Learning Domain(s):
 Cognitive Domain-This module will measure the ability of the students to apply learned
 demographic profiling and implementation strategies by producing a plan to implement a
 networking strategy based on that knowledge.

 Subject Content that supports learning the task to third level of detail:
 I Socio-cultural differences in community engagement
    A Changing face of America
        1 Shifting demographics
        2 Reasons for immigration
        3 Geographical distribution
    B Iceberg of culture
        1 Cultural context
            a High and low cultures
        2 Contrasting cultural views
            a Collectivist vs. individualistic cultures
    C Community stakeholders
        1 Who are they?
    D Knowing the community
        1 Marginalized populations
        2 What might be considered?
        3 Connections
    E Socio-cultural indicators
        1 Demographics profile
            a Getting beyond baseline demographics
            b Collecting information
        2 Criticality of indicators
    F Building a three-way street
        1 Thoughts for a networking approach
 II Principles for effective community outreach campaigns
    A Principles for success
        1 Involve community
        2 Customize
        3 Be creative-take risks
        4 Create ownership
        5 Incorporate local community perspectives
        6 Create two-way communications
        7 Aggressively involve community leaders
        8 Speak with one voice on message issues
        9 Evaluate and measure performance
    B Strategies and tactics
        1 Turn data into intelligence
        2 Social marketing
        3 Sustained outreach and engagement



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                      D6T-89
      4 Trust and credibility
    C Partnerships
      1 Keys to success
      2 Benefits
    D Campaign implementation
      1 Strategy
          a Assessment
          b Development
          c Implementation
      2 Message development
          a Targeting and balancing content
          b Traditional vs. non-traditional distribution
      3 Approaches, tools and products
      4 Performance measurements

 Learning method selected:
 PowerPoint presentation and small group activity:
 Matrix exercise

 Testing strategy:
 Each group will present their strategy to the class for discussion. Each strategy will be
 evaluated via rubric for content based on the guidelines provided during instruction. Each
 strategy must achieve a score of 3 or better on the evaluation rubric.

 Resources required to support the selected learning method(s):
           Computer with PowerPoint, projector and screen
           Presentation handouts
           Flip charts with paper, masking tape, markers
           Instructor provided audience information and overall goal
           4 Tables and chairs to accommodate small groups of 6 to 7 per table




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                          D6T-90
MIDP COURSE DESIGN WORKSHEET (NON-CRITICAL TASK)

 GOAL
 To train Terrorism Liaison Officers to develop and utilize a communication and information
 exchange network within schools and communities in their assigned areas.

 SUBGOAL


 TASK (# 6 )
 Students will understand the importance of maintaining network contacts for information
 exchange

 Learning Domain(s)
 Cognitive domain-
 Through lecture and PowerPoint presentation students will understand the importance of
 community demographics and interaction, and its role in establishing networks within those
 communities.

 Subject Content that supports learning the task to third level of detail
 I Socio-cultural differences in community engagement
    A Changing face of America
        1 Shifting demographics
        2 Reasons for immigration
        3 Geographical distribution
    B Iceberg of culture
        1 Cultural context
           a High and low cultures
        2 Contrasting cultural views
           a Collectivist vs. individualistic cultures
    C Community stakeholders
        1 Who are they?
    D Knowing the community
        1 Marginalized populations
        2 What might be considered?
        3 Connections
    E Socio-cultural indicators
        1 Demographics profile
           a Getting beyond baseline demographics
           b Collecting information
        2 Criticality of indicators
    F Building a three-way street
        1 Thoughts for a networking approach



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                          D6T-91
 Learning method selected
 Students will view a PowerPoint and lecture presentation which will lay the ground work for
 understanding community demographics and its relationship to networking strategies.

 Resources required to support the selected learning method(s)
           Computer with PowerPoint, projector and screen
           Presentation handouts
           Flip charts with paper, masking tape, markers
           Instructor provided audience information and overall goal
           4 Tables and chairs to accommodate small groups of 6 to 7 per table




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                           D6T-92
MIDP COURSE DESIGN WORKSHEET (NON-CRITICAL TASK)


 GOAL
 To train Terrorism Liaison Officers to develop and utilize a communication and information
 exchange network within schools and communities in their assigned areas.

 SUBGOAL


 TASK (#7)
 Students will understand the difference between information and intelligence.

 Learning Domain(s)
 Cognitive domain-
 Through lecture, discussion and PowerPoint presentation students will understand the
 definitions of information and intelligence, and the process used to transform one into the
 other.

 Subject Content that supports learning the task to third level of detail
 I Citizen information Networking
    A Traditional intelligence cycle
        1 Planning & direction
        2 Collection
        3 Processing & exploration
        4 Production
        5 Dissemination
        6 Utilization
    B Re-thinking information and intelligence
        1 Boyd’s OODA loop
        2 Intelligence levels
        3 Boyd’s “I” to the fourth
        4 Terrorism liaison and intelligence
           a TLO function
           b Internal and external intelligence
    C Community information networking
        1 Knowing the community
           a Who’s who
           b Support segments
        2 Collection
           a Harvesting relationships
           b Harvesting information
           c Networking




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                           D6T-93
 Learning method selected
 Students will view a PowerPoint and lecture presentation which will lay the ground work for
 understanding community demographics and its relationship to networking strategies.


 Resources required to support the selected learning method(s)
               Computer with PowerPoint, projector and screen
               Presentation handouts
               Flip charts with paper, masking tape, markers
               Instructor provided audience information and overall goal
               4 Tables and chairs to accommodate small groups of 6 to 7 per table




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                           D6T-94
MIDP COURSE DESIGN WORKSHEET

 GOAL:
 To train Terrorism Liaison Officers to develop and utilize a communication and information
 exchange network within schools and communities in their assigned areas.

 SUB-GOAL:


 TASK (#8) :
 Demonstrate the ability to apply community information networking and elicitation
 techniques to gather information.
 Learning objective:
 A= Students

 B=    Demonstrate

 C=    Provided:
              Specific information requested
              The ability to choose an individual from whom to elicit information

 D=    Gather a minimum of four out of five items of information requested by instructor

 Expected learner outcomes:
 Gather specific information from individuals in their community
               Name
               Occupation
               Religious preference
               Family situation (married, single, divorced, children, etc.)
               Hobbies (if any)

 Learning objective in sentence form:
 TLO’s and other students will demonstrate the ability to gather a minimum of 4 out of 5
 pieces of specific from members of the community they have selected using passive
 interviewing skills.

 Learning Domain(s):
 Cognitive domain-
 Students will use knowledge learned from lecture and PowerPoint presentation and
 demonstrate the ability to use that knowledge by gathering specific information



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                          D6T-95
 Subject Content that supports learning the task to third level of detail:
 I Community Information Networking
    A Introduction and Intelligence Concepts
        1 Human Source Intelligence Networking
           a Inner ring sources
           b Middle ring sources
           c Outer ring sources
        2 The cell or Network
           a Leadership
           b Active cadre (shooters)
           c Active cadre (supporters)
           d Active supporters
    B 4th Generation Warfare (4GW) and Boyd Concepts
        1 Pre-4GW History
           a 1GW – Agricultural/Industrial
           b 2GW – Heavy industrial (American)
           c 3GW – Maneuver (Information age)
        2 4GW
           a Definition
           b dangers
    C Traditional intelligence cycle
        1 Planning & direction
        2 Collection
        3 Processing & exploration
        4 Production
        5 Dissemination
        6 utilization
    D Re-thinking information and intelligence
        1 Boyd’s OODA loop
        2 Intelligence levels
        3 Boyd’s “I” to the fourth
        4 Terrorism liaison and intelligence
           a TLO function
           b Internal and external intelligence
    E Community information networking
        1 Knowing the community
           a Who’s who
           b Support segments
        2 Collection
           a Harvesting relationships
           b Harvesting information
           c Networking
 II Passive Interviewing (Information elicitation)
    A Collection planning
        1 Ascendancy approach
           a Preparation and planning
    B Why and how elicitation works


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                         D6T-96
       1 Definition of elicitation
       2 Maslow’s hierarchy of needs
       3 Conduct
       4 Rapport
     C Elicitation skills and techniques
       1 Too many questions
       2 Sincerity
       3 Conversational layering
       4 Loaded questions
       5 Asking permission
       6 “Quid Pro Quo”
       7 False/provocative statements
       8 Naiveté
       9 Disbelief
       10 Controlling emotions and reactions
     D Record and review
       1 Record results
       2 Review results
       3 Plan next collection

 Learning method selected:
 Lecture, discussion and PowerPoint presentation and large group activity. Students will be
 asked, in the course of their evening activity (dinner, drinks, etc.) within the community of
 their choice or at the training facility, to use the elicitation techniques learned during
 instruction to obtain at least 4 out of 5 specific pieces of information from an individual of
 their choosing. This individual may be someone unknown to the student, or an acquaintance
 about who the student knows minimal information (neighbor, classmate, etc.).

 Testing strategy:
 Students will present their information to the class and the instructor will determine if three
 out of five items of information were successfully gathered.

 Resources required to support the selected learning method(s):

                Computer with PowerPoint, projector and screen
                Presentation handouts
                4 Flip charts with paper, masking tape, markers
                Instructor provided audience information and overall goal
                4 Tables and chairs to accommodate small groups of 6 to 7 per table




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                               D6T-97
MIDP COURSE DESIGN WORKSHEET

 GOAL:
 To train Terrorism Liaison Officers to develop and utilize a communication and information
 exchange network within schools and communities in their assigned areas.

 SUB-GOAL:


 TASK (#9) :
 Students will recognize potential pre-incident indicators and select the appropriate course of
 action in response.
 Learning objective:
 A=Students

 B= Identify

 C= Given a specific scenario, working in small groups

 D= Identify a minimum of 80% of the pre-incident indicators present

 Expected learner outcomes:
 Recognize pre-incident indicators and identify proper reporting procedures to include the
 following:
              Fliers/postings of meetings or support groups
              Increased public demonstrations/rallies
              Recognition of websites
              Calls/notes/mailings/other notifications or threats
              Increased criminal activity including but not limited to:
            o ID theft
            o Forged checks
            o Business scams
            o Specific specialty item theft (uniforms, chemicals, explosives, firearms,
               weapons)
            o Robberies
              Increased inquiries of specific information including but not limited to:
            o Physical aspects of location
            o Security features
            o Operational environment/schedules
              Attempts to gain access to restricted areas (testing security)
              Suspicious persons loitering in area



Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                              D6T-98
                Abnormal photography/videography
                Anonymous response calls with no activity upon arrival (testing response)
                Increased enrollment in specialized training (flight schools, diving schools,
                 mechanical engineering, truck driving)
                Possession of suspicious materials including but not limited to:
             o   False ID
             o   Disguises
             o   Communication equipment
             o   Protective equipment
             o   Dissemination devices (sprayers, backpacks, briefcases)
             o   Laboratory components
             o   Surveillance equipment
             o   Publications
             o   Random phone numbers
             o   Drawings

 Learning objective in sentence form:
 Students, given specific scenario information, will identify 80% of the potential pre-incident
 indicators present, and select the appropriate course of action in response and reporting the
 information.
 Learning Domain(s):
 Cognitive- Students will be provided with information with which to complete the stated
 objective

 Subject Content that supports learning the task to third level of detail:
 I Building blocks of terrorist activity: Pre-incident Indicators
    A Components of an attack
        1 Group membership
        2 Fundraising
        3 Weapon selection
        4 Date selection
        5 Reconnaissance
        6 Logistics
        7 Move weapon to target
        8 Activate weapon
        9 Terrorist egress
        10 Media attention
    B Recognition of potential terrorist targets
        1 Group ideology
           a Attractiveness of target
               i Symbolic
               ii Potential for mass casualty
               iii Potential for media attention
               iv Economic impact
           b Potential for success
               i Vulnerabilities


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                              D6T-99
          c Potential for avoiding capture
    C Pre-incident indicators
      1 Group strengthening/membership increase
          a Recruitment flyers
          b Rallies/meetings
          c Web site activity
          d Documents/statements
      2 Fundraising activities
          a ID theft
          b Forged checks
          c Business scams
          d Robberies
          e Burglaries
              i Specific/unusual items/locations
          f Drug sales
          g Extortion
      3 Weapons selection
          a Firearms
          b Explosives
          c CBRN
      4 Activity at potential sources for weapons
          a Gun shops
          b Police departments/personnel residences
          c Military bases
          d Manufacturers/suppliers
          e Construction companies
          f Mines
          g Black market
      5 Target selection
          a Critical infrastructure
          b Symbolic sites
          c Gathering places
          d Schools
      6 Date selection
          a Anniversary dates
          b Significant birthdays
          c Historical dates
          d Religious holidays
      7 Indications of reconnaissance
          a Human intelligence and research
              i Books
              ii Brochures
              iii Technical manuals
              iv Photography
              v Videography
              vi Requests for operational information
          b Indicators of reconnaissance


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                    D6T-100
              i Frequent extended visits to location
              ii Notes
              iii Cameras
              iv Maps
              v Drawings
              vi Unusual interest
              vii Hackers
              viii Theft of specific ID/uniforms
              ix False alarms/calls for service to test response
      8 Indicators of weapon moved to target
          a Suicide bomber
              i Nervous stagnant individual
              ii Fixed stare
              iii Unusual clothing for environment
              iv Forceful action to reach target
          b Vehicle borne device
              i Large containers in vehicle
              ii Timer and power unit
              iii Unusually large or excessive wiring
              iv Overloaded vehicle
              v Burning fuse/smoke
      9 Terrorist egress indicators
          a False/multiple passports or ID’s
          b No current fixed address
          c Materials in possession
          d Rental vehicles
          e Multiple hotel receipts
          f Cash transactions
          g One-way travel tickets
          h Disguises
      10 Additional indicators
          a Equipment
              i Tactical
              ii Surveillance
              iii Props
              iv Communication equipment
              v Laboratory components
              vi Spraying equipment
              vii Protective equipment
              viii Publications/manuals
          b Training indicators
              i Camps in remote areas
              ii Commercial schools/ranges
              iii Equipment operations training
    D Notification protocols
      1 Local Terrorism Liaison Officer (TLO)
      2 Local Terrorism Early Warning Group (TEWG)


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                               D6T-101
        3   State Terrorism Threat Assessment Center (STTAC)
        4   Federal Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF)

 Learning method selected:
 Lecture, PowerPoint presentation, and small group activity:
 Students will be given a scenario in either written or video format. After obtaining all of the
 information from the scenario, students will break into small groups and list all potential pre-
 incident indicators of terrorist activity from the scenario. Once indicators are identified,
 students will identify reporting procedures for the information they have gathered.
 Testing strategy:
 The list of indicators will be compared to the complete list from the instructor, and each
 group should have 80% of the indicators present in the scenario.



 Resources required to support the selected learning method(s):

           Computer with PowerPoint, projector and screen
           Presentation handouts
           4 Flip charts with paper, masking tape, markers
           Instructor provided handout or video segment
           4 Tables and chairs to accommodate small groups of 6 to 7 per table




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                D6T-102
MIDP COURSE DESIGN WORKSHEET

 GOAL:
 To train Terrorism Liaison Officers to develop and utilize a communication and information
 exchange network within schools and communities in their assigned areas.

 SUB-GOAL:


 TASK (#10) :
 Students will incorporate networking strategies to develop a comprehensive crisis plan to
 include prevention strategies and response procedures to a variety of potential threats.
 Learning objective:
 A= Students
 B= Create
 C= Working in small groups, provided available resources on specific event case studies
 involving traditional and non-traditional threat information
 D=     a comprehensive crisis response plan that receives a score of 3 or better on the
 evaluation rubric.
 Expected learner outcomes:
 Produce complete components of a comprehensive plan that when assembled constitutes a
 complete crisis prevention and response plan including:
    1. Identify necessary members of planning committee (Networking strategies)
    2. Identify potential threats (Traditional and non-traditional)
    3. Prevention strategy
    4. Mitigation strategy
    5. Response planning
    6. Recovery planning
 Learning objective in sentence form:
 Students working in small groups, provided with specific resources, will create a plan for a
 comprehensive crisis response and recovery to traditional and non-traditional threats in
 accordance with the Safe Schools strategy.
 Learning Domain(s):
 Cognitive domain: Students will be provided with materials and information with which to
 complete the stated objective.
 Subject Content that supports learning the task to third level of detail:
 I. Safe School strategies, planning and response
    A. Applying networking strategies with school personnel
        1. TLO and first responder involvement in planning, training and exercising
        2. Prevention strategy


Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                            D6T-103
             a. Site assessment
             b. Student assessment (cultural climate, risk behavior)
             c. Searches
             d. Training
             e. Reporting procedures
             f. Visitor control
             g. Site entry information
         3. Mitigation strategy
             a. Reduce risks
             b. Evaluate building design
             c. Physical safety upgrades
             d. Coordinate emergency plan with community and first responders
             e. Training
             f. Design features
         4. Response planning
             a. Traditional and non-traditional threats
             b. ICS
             c. Functional protocols
             d. Practice
             e. General response procedures
             f. Crime scene security
             g. Death notifications
             h. Mass casualty incidents
             i. Public health emergencies
         5. Recovery planning-Understanding the “New Normal”
             a. Immediate post-crisis
             b. Crisis intervention teams
             c. Intervention protocols
 Learning method selected:
 Small group activity:
 Groups will be assigned one of four specific event case studies and response planning
 resource material for developing safe school plans. Each group will be assigned specific
 components of a complete plan and will develop those portions of an overall response plan.
 The collective parts will combine to complete an overall crisis response plan.
 Testing strategy:
 Each component will be evaluated as to content against a comprehensive list from Jane’s
 Safe Schools Planning Guide for all Hazards.
 Resources required to support the selected learning method(s):

               Computer with PowerPoint, projector and screen
               Presentation handouts
               Flip charts with paper, masking tape, markers
               Instructor provided audience information and overall goal
               4 Tables and chairs to accommodate small groups of 6 to 7 per table




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                          D6T-104
    Evaluation Rubric: Crisis Response Plan
    Name: Shawn Dyball
    Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
    Learning Objective:
    Students working in small groups, provided with specific resources, will be able to create a strategy for a comprehensive crisis response and recovery
    plan for traditional and non-traditional threats in accordance with the Safe Schools strategy.
                                                   Crisis Response Planning
Networking strategies (Committee Members):
               1                                    2                                      3                                       4                     Score
Most of the key committee           Some critical committee members        Most of the key committee               All of the key committee members
members were excluded from the      were not included in the planning      members were included in the            were included in the planning
planning process                    process                                planning process                        process


Prevention Strategy:
               1                                     2                                      3                                       4                    Score

                                                                           Complete site security assessment        Complete site security assessment
                                    Exterior site assessment done with     completed including                      completed, plan to include
Did not do a site assessment and
                                    recommendation for visitor control     recommendations for security             weapons searches implemented,
there was no obvious visitor
                                    and security upgrades included.        upgrades and visitor control             cultural climate and student
control. No plan for training on
                                    Did not complete a plan for training   implementation, plan developed           behavior assessment procedures
recognition or reporting
                                    on other security measures or          for training on indicator recognition    developed, training on recognition
procedures or other security
                                    recognition and reporting              and reporting procedures, but            and reporting procedures
measures.
                                    procedures.                            minimal additional security              developed, all aspects of physical
                                                                           measures taken into consideration        security taken into consideration
                                                                           for training.                            and upgrade plan implemented




    Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                                                              D6T-105
                                        POST Master Instructor Development Program
                                                    Instructional Resources
                               Dimension 6 – Instructional Systems Design/Total Training Package



Name: Shawn Dyball
Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
Mentor: Jeff Cope
Dimension: D-6, ISD/TTP

The instructional resources necessary for the successful delivery of training must be anticipated, budgeted and
requested well in advance of presenting the course. I have found that the instructional resources for this course
will be many, and the majority of the items will be supplied by my presenter. Much of the course will involve
creating plans and profiles, developing training and meeting agendas, and demonstrating learned techniques
for information elicitation. My resources will include the following general items:

               Computer, LCD projector with screen and audio, remote controls
               DVD player
               4 Flip charts and markers (4 extra pads of paper)
               National School Safety Center DVD “What If…”
            o   Phone order from NSSC – $50.00 each
               Unsolved Mysteries DVD “Miracles” Collection – “Lucky School” (Online order, Amazon.com
                $20.00)
               Instructor provided resource materials (4 sets, 1 per table; updated periodically by instructor
                from available resource sites)
               Instructor provided terrorist group profile templates (4 sets, 1 per table; updated periodically by
                instructor from available resource sites)
               Instructor provided planning manuals (1 per table)
            o   Jane’s Safe Schools Planning Guide for All Hazards
            o   Online order from The Jane’s Group at http://www.janes.com - $99.00 each
               Instructor provided reference books (1 per table)
            o   Encyclopedia of Terrorism, Harvey Kushner (2003)
            o   Online order from http://www.amazon.com - $140.00 each
               Instructor provided handouts and reference material for each student (25-30; instructor or
                presenter re-produced)
            o   RIDEM job aid
            o   Pre-Incident Indicator quick reference card
               Instructor provided reference articles for each student (25-30; updated and printed periodically
                by instructor or presenter from available sources)
               Instructor provided templates for each student (25-30 of each template)
               CD-ROM’s with Pre-Incident Indicator training materials for each student (take away items,
                instructor or presenter reproduced)
               5 Round tables to accommodate groups of 6-7
               Tent cards for student names

Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                     D6T-106
               Student notebooks with note taking materials for each student (25-30; presenter reproduced)
               Copies of instructor manuals, PowerPoint presentations on CD ROM, and evaluation tools (1
                per instructor, instructor or presenter reproduced)
               Break-out tables for groups
               Instructor table

I have met with my presenter and have learned that most of these items will be covered under general
budgeting protocols already in place, and reproduction of instructor provided items will be handled by training
division staff. Higher cost reference books will be reimbursed by the LETPP grant.




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                    D6T-107
                                     POST Master Instructor Development Program
                                                    Logistical Support
                            Dimension 6 – Instructional Systems Design/Total Training Package



Name: Shawn Dyball
Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
Mentor: Jeff Cope
Dimension: D-6, ISD/TTP

My course will be presented by the Orange County Sheriff’s Department Training Division, and will be held on
site at the Advanced Officer Training Facility. The dates are set for September 12-14, 2005, and I have been
working with Sgt. Toni Bland on the support aspects. She has provided me with all the necessary information I
need to obtain POST certification for my course, and will submit that paperwork for me. She will also send out
a course announcement and handle student registration for the course. The training division staff member
assigned to handle all of the logistics for my course is Maria Whittaker. I have worked with Maria on a number
of occasions, and have every confidence in her abilities to handle every aspect of this project. Maria will handle
the details of accepting student reservations, completing registration forms, and handling POST and grant
funding reimbursement issues. Hotel and travel arrangements are left up to the individual student or their
agency’s travel department, but the course announcement will contain information about available government
lodging rates at the nearby Ayers Hotel. Since this course is terrorism related, and has a T4T component
included, Sgt. Bland is requesting a POST Plan IV approval for this course, and students will be required to
complete POST TRR forms prior to arrival.

My budget will include 3 instructors who are under existing contracts with POST, and 2 who will require
separate contracts:

               Suzanne Frew, The Frew Group (Oakland, Ca.) - $700.00 plus travel
               Curt Lavarello, Safe Schools Advocacy Council (Sarasota, Fl.) - $1200.00 plus travel

Sgt. Bland has informed me that the Orange County Sheriff’s Department’s travel bureau will arrange travel for
instructors traveling from outside the Southern California. Both instructors will be initially paid from existing
training division funds, and all expenses will be reimbursed from the LETPP grant funds.

The training division has designated a classroom that has both round and rectangular tables to accommodate
group break-out activities and an instructor resource table. Maria will take on the responsibility of coffee and
morning pastries for each day of class.




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                    D6T-108
                                     POST Master Instructor Development Program
                                               Post-Course Evaluation Plan
                            Dimension 6 – Instructional Systems Design/Total Training Package


Name: Shawn Dyball
Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
Mentor: Jeff Cope
Dimension: D-6, ISD/TTP

My strategy for evaluating the effectiveness of this course will involve several methods. I will collect immediate
feedback from learners at the end of the course using an evaluation sheet that will rate both the course and the
individual instructor presentations. The Student Evaluation form will be distributed with the course materials
during registration. From this feedback I can work with instructors and POST advisors to remedy any
substandard issues that appear consistently. I will also request that my instructors provide written feedback
and recommendations for improvements of course layout and timelines. This feedback will allow all instructors
to have input into the shape of the class, and to determine if some areas should be given more or less time
than others.

My long term strategy involves subsequent contact with students after the training, to determine if any action
has been taken toward implementing the networking strategy recommended in the course. During initial
registration, I will obtain contact information from all students to include in a contact roster for them to take
away as a networking resource. I plan to follow up with those students after approximately 6 months with a
survey to find out if any of the students have begun to implement any of the resources or strategies provided
during the course. Each student will be asked to provide contact information on a prepared form during the
introduction module. The contact list, which will also serve as a networking roster, will be available at the end
of day three of class. (Samples of each form follow.)




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                     D6T-109
                                        Student Evaluation Form
 Please rate the course in both categories, content and instructor presentation by circling the appropriate
 score.
                      1=Very Poor 2=Poor 3=Average 4=Good 5=Excellent

                                                                          Content             Presentation
                 Module                           Instructor
                                                                        (circle one)           (circle one)
 Introduction                                 Inv. Dyball               1   2   3   4   5      1   2   3   4   5
 Terrorism Overview                           Inv. Dyball               1   2   3   4   5      1   2   3   4   5
 Terrorism Overview                           Sgt. Bouman               1   2   3   4   5      1   2   3   4   5
 Adult Learning Concept                       Lt. Borello               1   2   3   4   5      1   2   3   4   5
 Conducting Meetings                          Sgt. Windman              1   2   3   4   5      1   2   3   4   5
 Socio-Cultural Differences                   Ms. Frew                  1   2   3   4   5      1   2   3   4   5
 Community Information Networking             Col. Kempfer              1   2   3   4   5      1   2   3   4   5
 Elicitation Techniques                       Col. Kempfer              1   2   3   4   5      1   2   3   4   5
 Pre-Incident Indicators                      Inv. Dyball               1   2   3   4   5      1   2   3   4   5
 Pre-Incident Indicators                      Dep. Ellis                1   2   3   4   5      1   2   3   4   5
 Crisis Response Planning
                                              Mr. Lavarello             1 2 3 4 5              1 2 3 4 5
 Safe School Strategies


 Additional Comments:




 Name:                                                         Agency:




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                       D6T-110
                           Student Networking Roster
                  TLO/School Partnership and Community Networking
Name:                                     Name:
Address:                                  Address:


Phone:                                    Phone:
E-mail:                                   E-mail:
Name:                                     Name:
Address:                                  Address:


Phone:                                    Phone:
E-mail:                                   E-mail:
Name:                                     Name:
Address:                                  Address:


Phone:                                    Phone:
E-mail:                                   E-mail:
Name:                                     Name:
Address:                                  Address:


Phone:                                    Phone:
E-mail:                                   E-mail:




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                D6T-111
                            Instructor Evaluation Form
  Please provide comments, observations, and recommendations for each module and
                                the course overall.

 Introduction:




 Terrorism Overview:




 Adult Learning Concept :




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                       D6T-112
 Conducting Meetings:




 Socio-Cultural Differences:




 Community Information Networking:




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                 D6T-113
 Elicitation Techniques:




 Pre-Incident Indicators:




 Crisis Response Planning/Safe School Strategies:




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                D6T-114
 Additional Comments:




 Name:




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18    D6T-115
                                    POST Master Instructor Development Program
                                                        Marketing
                           Dimension 6 – Instructional Systems Design/Total Training Package


Name: Shawn Dyball
Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
Mentor: Jeff Cope
Dimension: D-6, ISD/TTP

I began marketing my course by word of mouth shortly after I took on the project. In my position on the Orange
County Terrorism Early Warning Group I have access to many agencies in and out of the county. Our group
hosts a bi-monthly multi-agency meeting, and I have had the opportunity to discuss my TTP with many
representatives of those agencies. I was asked by several of our ad hoc members to include them in the
distribution of the course announcement when the time comes so that they can try to attend. I also attend
several other multi agency partnership meetings in Orange, LA, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. I
have constantly requested feedback from other members of these groups, and made many contacts with
experts in the field who could provide feedback on the project or provide me with contacts that could.

In the last 8 months I have attended numerous training courses and conferences that have given me access to
terrorism experts in different states. These afforded me many opportunities to network and tell others about my
project. The feedback I received was usually very positive, and most agreed the there were still many areas
that needed to incorporate schools into the fold of terrorism preparedness on a local level. In seeking out
SME’s for this project, meeting one would invariably lead to the introduction of another. Through this chain of
events, I have been able to spread the word about my project to those in the school districts who would benefit
from working with first responders having this training.

My final marketing strategies prior to the pilot will include distribution of the course announcement, posting on
the POST website, and forwarding the announcement to training associations for posting on their websites as
well. My target audience for this course will include Terrorism Liaison Officers, School Resource Officers,
School Police and Security Officers, and crisis planning personnel from local school districts. From the
feedback I have gotten so far, I should have no trouble signing up 25 to 30 students for this course.




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                     D6T-116
                                       POST Master Instructor Development Program
                                                           Revision
                              Dimension 6 – Instructional Systems Design/Total Training Package



Name: Shawn Dyball
Team Facilitator: Jim Fraser
Mentor: Jeff Cope
Dimension: D-6, ISD/TTP

                                            Revision Process/Plan
My revision process plan involves the careful interpretation of SME observer, instructor and student evaluation
forms collected post instruction. Constructive and feasible recommendations will be taken into consideration for
revision. I plan to send copies of all evaluations to all instructors so that they may have input into those
revisions, especially those involving modules they teach. I think it is important to take into consideration
instructor comfort during presentation, and likes or dislikes with respect to every aspect of the course. Those
aspects can include everything from classroom setup to available resources and staff support at the facility. I
will also look at the flow of each module and how it feeds into the next. Instructor feedback will be important in
this area as well, because each instructor will build off of the learning in prior modules.

Another important aspect of the course involves support materials such as videos, handouts, training tools, and
delivery methods. Much of the feedback in this area will most likely come from the students, but I am hoping to
get suggestions and resources from instructors as well.

My original SME’s for this project will be invited to attend any day of the course as observers, either the pilot or
one of the first two subsequent classes. If they choose to attend, I will request that they provide feedback on
the portion of the class they attended or the entire class if they choose to remain for it. I plan to carefully weigh
any and all suggestions provided, work with my POST consultants, and adjust the course accordingly.




Shawn Dyball MIDP 18                                                                                        D6T-117

				
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