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Choreography and Dance BA

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					                        PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION FOR


Title: BA (Honours) Choreography and Dance

Faculty: Arts

Author: Cathy Seago

Date (revised): July 2010



1)       PROSPECTUS INFORMATION

Awarding Institution
                                                           University of Winchester
Teaching Institution (if different)
                                                           As above
Programme also accredited by (if relevant)
                                                           N/A
Title of Final Award/s (detail all, eg Cert HE, Dip HE,
etc.)                                                      Cert HE, Dip HE, Bachelor of Arts
                                                           Single Honours
                                                           Combined Honours (Joint only)

Language of Study
                                                           English
UCAS code (or other code if relevant)
                                                           W500
QAA Subject Benchmarking Group
                                                           Dance, Drama and Performance


2)       EDUCATIONAL AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES



a) The aims of the Programme are:
        To empower students to become enquiring, critical and articulate choreographers creating
         inventive and innovative work
        To develop and integrate students’ creative, evaluative, and critical skills
        To provide a broad understanding of the theoretical and cultural contexts for and of CAD
        To enable students to analyse various forms of dance and to apply theoretical and critical
         interpretation to choreographic processes and works


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       To facilitate exploration of the relationship between individual and group creativity through a
        constructive and co-operative learning environment
       To facilitate practice, discussion and analysis of the technical construction of specific forms of
        choreography and dance
       To develop students’ understanding of the relationship between CAD as practice and as
        research
       To provide students with opportunities to apply their evolving critical and creative skills within
        the practical arenas of performance, dissemination, and employment

b) The Learning Outcomes of the Programme are:
       To employ a range of strategies for developing and producing dance
       To integrate creative and critical skills in dance practice and debate
       To critically reflect on the development of dance and its place within wider cultural contexts
       To identify and analyse creative processes and dance works from a range of critical perspectives
       To employ a range of skills for working in collaborative contexts
       To explore a range of dance forms & assimilate them within choreographic, teaching and
        performance practice
       To recognise the symbiotic relationship between dance as a professional practice and a process
        of enquiry
       To demonstrate awareness of the value and potential application of skills within wider contexts


The Learning Outcomes for Level 4 Single Honours

By the end of level 4 students will have the ability to:

        1.     Demonstrate an understanding of choreographic processes through dance forms and ideas
        2.     Develop a critical response to dance in a range of contexts
        3.     Critically reflect on the current status of contemporary dance in Britain and beyond
        4.     Critically analyse the development of creative practices with reference to cultural contexts
        5.     Identify their strengths in contributing to collaborative group work
        6.     Articulate a working knowledge of the body as a holistic moving entity
        7.     Develop appropriate skills in presenting and debating work in progress
        8.     Reflect on individual strengths and weaknesses

The Learning Outcomes for Level 5 Single Honours

By the end of level 5 students will have the ability to:

        1. Embody an understanding of choreography through experimental interdisciplinary work
        2.  Develop, with reflexivity, new practices, processes and ideas from established methods
        3.  Contextualise and differentiate work within contemporary contexts and practices
        4.  Demonstrate a reflexive understanding of critical frameworks for the analysis of dance
        5.  Design and implement group projects and present research outcomes in a variety of media
        6.  Demonstrate enhanced awareness and skills in embodying dance
        7.  Assimilate and employ a range of contextual and physical research methodologies
        8.  Evaluate developing critical, contextual and physical skills within the wider context of
            dance

The Learning Outcomes for Level 6 Single Honours

By the end of level 6 students will have the ability to:


                                                     2
        1. Demonstrate a sophisticated engagement with contemporary choreographic practice in
           process and performance
        2. Articulate verbally and physically a critical understanding of dance performance and
           choreography drawing on contemporary critical theories
        3. Debate how both the production and reception of performance work is informed by context
             and negotiate their own position within contemporary contexts
        4. Apply a range of critical perspectives and theoretical frameworks to articulate dance
        5. Appropriate skills to coordinate, direct and produce dance for different contexts, as a
             critical member or leader of a group
        6. Demonstrate a sophisticated embodiment of a range of dance forms
        7. Implement an original research project, developing appropriate research methodologies for
             choreography as a research process and outcome
        8. Demonstrate an awareness of the potential value and impact of their own work and skills
             within a wider context

The Learning Outcomes for Level 4 Combined Honours

By the end of level 4 students will have the ability to:

        1.    Demonstrate an understanding of choreographic processes through dance forms and ideas
        2.    Develop a critical response to dance in a range of contexts
        3.    Critically reflect on the current status of contemporary dance in Britain and beyond
        4.    Critically analyse the development of creative practices with reference to cultural contexts
        5.    Identify their strengths in contributing to collaborative group work
        6.    Articulate an awareness of the body as a holistic moving entity
        7.    Develop appropriate skills in presenting and debating work in progress
        8.    Reflect on individual strengths and weaknesses

The Learning Outcomes for Level 5 Combined Honours

By the end of level 5 students will have the ability to:

        1. Express an understanding of choreography through experimental interdisciplinary work
        2. Develop, with reflexivity, new practices, processes and ideas from established methods
        3.  Contextualise and differentiate work within contemporary contexts and practices
        4.  Demonstrate a reflexive understanding of critical frameworks for the analysis of dance
        5.  Design and implement group projects and present research outcomes in a variety of media
        6.  Demonstrate an awareness of embodied practices
        7.  Assimilate and employ a range of contextual and physical research methodologies
        8.  Evaluate developing critical, contextual and physical skills within the wider context of
            dance

The Learning Outcomes for Level 6 Combined Honours

By the end of level 6 students will have the ability to:

        1.     Demonstrate a sophisticated engagement with contemporary choreographic practice in
             process and performance
        2.     Articulate verbally and physically a critical understanding of dance performance and
             choreography drawing on contemporary critical theories
        3.     Debate how both the production and reception of performance work is informed by
               context and negotiate their own position within contemporary contexts
        4.     Apply a range of critical perspectives and theoretical frameworks to articulate dance
        5.     Appropriate skills to coordinate, direct and produce dance for different contexts, as a

                                                     3
              critical member or leader of a group
        6.    Engage with a range of embodied practices
        7.    Implement an original research project, developing appropriate research methodologies
              for choreography as a research process and outcome
        8.    Demonstrate an awareness of the potential value and impact of their own work and skills
              within a wider context


c) On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to demonstrate:

       knowledge and understanding of the following

   The process of creating and producing dance performance
   Research methodologies in theoretical and practical contexts
   The techniques and practices of the reflective practitioner in embodied performance
   Current developments and debates in contemporary dance
   Critical practices in dance

       intellectual and cognitive skills
   The ability to critically engage with different models of dance production
   The ability to synthesise and critically evaluate the relationship between theory and practice
   The ability to critically reflect on their own practice and that of others
   The ability to critically evaluate choreography within historical and current contexts
   The ability to analyse and utilise research skills drawing on traditional and practice-based
    methodologies

       skills and other attributes
    The ability to creatively develop and produce sustained original dance works
    The ability to work individually and collaboratively to create and present work
    The ability to understand the body as an holistic instrument and explore a range of physical skills
    The ability to synthesise material from a variety of disciplines
    Skills in structuring and developing argument and debate
    Skills in a range of forms for documentation and presentation
   The ability to plan, organise & implement projects
   The ability to negotiate and communicate ideas with precision and sensitivity
   IT skills


d) Learning for the Workplace: the programme addresses the graduate employability skills of students
Students who successfully complete the programme will possess the following employability skills:
       Creativity and imagination
       The ability to give and receive criticism
       The ability to express ideas verbally, physically and through the written word
       The ability to work independently in a self disciplined manner and to take responsibility for
        personal development
       The ability to work effectively in collaborative situations
       The ability to debate, negotiate and communicate
       The ability to plan, organise & implement projects
       The ability to organise and analyse information and data
       Problem solving and decision making skills

                                                   4
        Time Management skills
        IT skills


3)       LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT

a) Learning and Teaching:

In accord with the University Teaching, Learning and Assessment Strategy 2009-11, the programme
assessments are all designed to establish the extent to which the skills, abilities, self awareness and
confidence of the students have been developed over the course of individual modules and the
programme as a whole.

The BA (Hons) Choreography and Dance is focussed by an integration of practice, theory and
criticality. At all three levels of study there is focus on a reflexive relationship between these elements.
Theoretical enquiry is linked to practice, enabling the examination and evaluation of theory and its
appropriateness in extending and re-informing practice and the subsequent creation or extension of
theoretical enquiry. The programme is designed so that the key areas of practice and theory are re-
visited at ever increasing levels of complexity. The programme is a cycle of re-visiting what is known
and achieved in changing and increasingly demanding contexts. Evaluation and assessment are
themselves both formative and summative to support this pedagogy.

The learning outcomes are largely vocational in character, directed towards ensuring that graduates
from the programme are able to take up posts in the field of choreography and dance. The assessment
strategies are designed to affirm confidence in the nature of the subject area while remaining sensitive to
developing skills that are relevant and valued within the wider spheres of employment, such as oral and
written presentation, IT literacy, criticality and self discipline.


b) Means of delivery:


BA (Hons) Choreography and Dance is delivered via a wide range of means:

        Tutor led practical workshops and labs are developed throughout the programme and include
         individual and group work in exploring and generating as well as accurately recreating
         activities, methods and tasks
        Critical and reflective analysis of works in progress, both own and that of others
        Video viewings, live viewings, performance, observation and discussion
        Theoretical enquiry is facilitated through lecture, lecture-demonstration, seminar, debate and
         tutorials
        Student led and experiential learning is a feature of the programme through seminar,
         presentations, collaborative workshop and rehearsals
        Self directed study
        Performance and facilitation skills are increasingly delivered with an outward facing
         perspective, to encourage confidence within the wider context of Dance
        Work based learning features at levels 5 and 6


c) Specifics of assessment:


The bulk of assessed work on the programme is performance work, critical essays and presentations.


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Practical work is assessed through embodied practice, in keeping with nature of the subject. In order to
measure the learning outcomes regarding contextualising and theorising dance, the critical and
analytical work underpinning and reflecting on practical work is submitted within a portfolio for the
writing modules at levels 4 and 5.
Assessment strategies regularly include group work, to more accurately reflect models of practice
within the field.
                     Group          Individual     Performance   Essays,      Group          Solo           Workshop
                     Choreography   Choreography                 Critique,    Presentation   presentation   or Lect
                                                                 Critical                    or VIVA        Dem
                                                                 Evaluation

 Level 4

 Learning to         A number of
 make and            short works
 making to learn
 Physical Skills                                   Two
 1
 Critical Studies                                                5000 word
                                                                 portfolio
 The Thinking                                                    750 word                                   20 min (4
 Body                                                            self                                       persons)
                                                                 evaluation
 Music For                                                                                                  Two
 Dancers


 Level 5

 Screendance         12-15 min
 Interdisciplinary   20 min
 Studies
 Moving Music        A number of
                     short works
 Physical Skills                                   Two
 2
 Dance Analysis                                                  6000 word
 and Criticism                                                   portfolio
 Performance                                       Continuous    1500
 Skills 1
 Popular Forms       10-12 min
 Choreographer                      a)5 min                                                                 b)10-15
 Specialism                                                                                                 min (2-3
                                                                                                            persons)
 Student                                                         1000                        10min
 Placement
 Somatic                                                                      a) 10-15                      b) 10-15
 Practices                                                                    min (2-3                      min (2-3
                                                                              persons)                      persons)
 Techniques of       10-12 min
 Physical
 Theatre
 Student                                                         a) 3000                                    b) & c)
 Proposal                                                        b)1500                                     practical
                                                                 c)750                                      demo


 Level 6

 Final Year                         a) 10-12 min                 a) 1500                     a) 30 min
 Project                            b) 6-8 min                   word
                                                                 précis
                                                                 b) 1500


                                                         6
                                                          word
                                                          precis
                                                          b) 4000
                                                          c) 10000
 Physical Skills                             Two
 3
 Dance                                                    2000                               30 min (2
 Facilitation                                                                                persons)
 Performance                                 Continuous   1500
 Skills 2
 Current Debates                                                                10-15 min
 Dance                                                               20 min
 Management                                                          +Q&A (2
                                                                     persons)


d) Types of assessment employed:
        Group and individual choreography
        Performance
        Dance film
        Workshop
        Performative presentation
        Lecture-demonstration
        Critical Essay
        Reflection and self critique
        Written analysis
        Group Seminar Presentations
        Proposal
        Paper+ Debate
        Precis
        Viva
        Dissertation



4) ENGAGEMENT WITH THE ACADEMIC INFRASTRUCTURE AND OTHER
   ACCREDITATION REQUIREMENTS


The BA (Hons) Choreography and Dance programme accords with the subject benchmark statement for
Dance, Drama and Performance, produced by the QAA in 2007.
In addition, a variety of employers and professionals within the field of Choreography and Dance have
been consulted as part of the evolution of the programme over the last few years.
The programme conforms to the University’s Work-based and Placement learning policy through
modules at level 5 and 6.
Agreement with the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications and the QAA Code of Practice is
assured by the validation process and by annual monitoring.

Other reference points applied to the design of the Programme:
Past and present students have been fundamental to the development of the programme, offering
perceptive stakeholder comments on all aspects of the BA (Hons) Choreography and Dance




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   5) PROGRAMME STRUCTURE, LEVELS, MODULES, CREDIT AND AWARDS


Fulltime programme of Undergraduate study

                 SEMESTER 1                               SEMESTER 2
 LEVEL 4                                    LEVEL 4
 Learning to make and making to learn       -------
 Credits: 30 CATS/ 15 ECTS
 Mandatory SH
 Mandatory CH
 Critical Studies                           -------
 Credits: 30 CATS/ 15 ECTS
 Mandatory SH
 Mandatory CH
 Physical Skills 1                          -------
 Credits: 30 CATS/ 15 ECTS
 Mandatory SH
 The Thinking Body                          Music For Dancers
 Credits: 15 CATS/ 7.5 ECTS                 Credits: 15 CATS/ 7.5
 Mandatory SH                               Mandatory SH

 EXIT AWARD:                                Cert HE

 LEVEL 5                                    LEVEL 5
 Choose 1:                                   -------
 Screendance
 Interdisciplinary Studies
 Moving Music
 Credits: 30 CATS/ 15 ECTS
 Mandatory SH
 Mandatory CH
 Dance Analysis and Criticism               -------
 Credits: 30 CATS/ 15 ECTS
 Mandatory SH
 Mandatory CH
 Physical Skills 2                          -------
 Credits: 30 CATS/ 15 ECTS
 Mandatory SH
 Performance Skills 1                       -------
 Credits: 30 CATS/ 15 ECTS
 Optional SH
 Popular Forms                              Techniques of Physical Theatre
 Credits: 15 CATS/ 7.5 ECTS                 Credits: 15 CATS/ 7.5 ECTS
 Optional SH                                Optional SH
 Somatic Practices                          Choreographer Specialism
 Credits: 15 CATS/ 7.5 ECTS                 Credits: 15 CATS/ 7.5 ECTS
 Optional SH                                Optional
 Student Placement                          Student Proposal
 Credits: 15 CATS/ 7.5 ECTS                 Credits: 15 CATS/ 7.5 ECTS
 Optional SH                                Optional SH
 Activity Based learning                    Enterprise
 Credits: 15 CATS/ 7.5 ECTS                 Credits: 15 CATS/ 7.5 ECTS


                                             8
 Optional SH                                      Optional SH

 EXIT AWARD:                                      Dip HE

 LEVEL 6                                          LEVEL 6
 Final Year Project                                ---------
 Credits: 30 CATS/ 15 ECTS
 Mandatory SH
 Optional CH
 Current Debates In Dance                         Dance Management
 Mandatory SH                                     Mandatory SH
 Mandatory CH                                     Mandatory CH
 Credits: 15 CATS/ 7.5 ECTS                       Credits: 15 CATS/ 7.5 ECTS
 Physical Skills 3                                 ---------
 Credits: 30 CATS/ 15 ECTS
 Mandatory SH Except if 100% written
 pathway for FYP is undertaken
 Performance Skills 2                             ----------
 Credits: 30 CATS/ 15 ECTS
 Optional SH
 Optional CH
 Dance Facilitation                               . ---------
 Credits: 30 CATS/ 15 ECTS
 Optional SH
 Optional CH

 EXIT AWARD                                       BA HONOURS




6)      SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS


The University provides the following support:
University Student Handbook; Personal Tutor system; Counsellors; Chaplaincy; Careers Service; Job
Shop; Equal Opportunities Officer; Disabled student support; Induction and Pre-Entry Study Skills
Programme; general Study Skills Programme; Library Skills and Study Skills Programmes; Child Care
Nursery; Welfare Advice; Bursaries; Financial Advice; the Learning Network, IT support; Student
Exchanges.
The Faculty, Department and Programme provides the following support:
Personal Tutoring; PDP; Module Handbooks and Guides; Tutorials; Assignment Feedback; Programme
Leadership.
In addition to this, the BA (Hons) Choreography and Dance supports its students through a range of
external speakers, writers, performers and practitioners all intended to assist the students in their
development.




                                                   9
7)      CRITERIA FOR ADMISSION


The present UCAS banding for the programme is 260, increasing in 2011 to 280. However, in some
cases where this entry level is not met then relevant experience and an interview/ audition may be
accepted as a partial fulfilment of the entry requirements.

The programme will interview/audition all short-listed Single Honours Dance applicants for their
suitability for the course and contribution to the learning environment. We identify enquiring creators
and thinking bodies as appropriate qualities for the Single Honours Student. The audition involves:
          Participation in a technique class
          Participation in an improvisation/creative task
          Presentation of a self – choreographed solo

This Admission Policy operates in addition to the entry requirements as stated in the College
prospectus.




8)      QUALITY ASSURANCE AND ENHANCEMENT


a) Mechanisms for review and evaluation:

Quality assurance and enhancement at Module Level
Students provide feedback to module tutors through Module Evaluation Forms, reviews and other
responses. The tutor collates the evaluation forms and produces a response for discussion at Programme
Committee. The response identifies good practice and proposes remedies for any points of concern. The
response is made available to students at the next running of the module.

Quality assurance and enhancement at Programme Level
The Programme Committee evaluates the success of the programme, paying particular attention to
student feedback and student representatives. Minutes from the Programme Committee and the External
Examiners report will inform the Programme’s annual Action Plan and Evaluation which is submitted
for approval to the Faculty Quality Committee. Issues for attention are identified and included in the
plan for the following year.

Quality assurance and enhancement at Department Level
The Action Plan and Evaluation is submitted to the Department for discussion and inclusion in the
Department Report.

Quality assurance and enhancement at Faculty Level
The Action Plan and Evaluation are submitted to the Faculty Quality Committee; the Faculty Learning
and Teaching Committee has oversight of learning development in the Faculty, including via the
Collaborative Enhancement of Teaching and Peer Observation of Teaching.

Quality assurance and enhancement at University Level
The quality of the programme is monitored by an External Examiner appointed by the University’s
Senate. The External Examiner’s Report is distributed to the Vice-Chancellor, Pro Vice Chancellor,
Director of Quality Management, and to the Faculty Dean, Chair of Quality Committee. A summary of
all external examiner reports is received at Senate Academic Standards Committee. Academic Standards
Committee audits a selection of Departments regularly.


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Quality assurance and enhancement for Staff
The quality of learning and teaching is supported by the Collaborative Enhancement of Teaching and
Staff Development, by Staff Development and Review, by attendance at conferences and curriculum
focused staff development, by external involvement such as external examining and by involvement in
research and knowledge exchange activities.

b) Indicators of Quality and Standards
External Examiner Report
Annual Monitoring process
Student feedback including the University Student Satisfaction Survey and the National Student Survey
Programme Re-approval
QAA Institutional Audit


Quality arrangements for Collaborative Provision if relevant
N/A




9)        THE REGULATORY & POLICY FRAMEWORK

The University’s Academic Regulations apply to all undergraduate and postgraduate taught
programmes. In this section indicate that:


(a) The programme conforms fully with the University’s Academic Regulations for (delete as
applicable):
Academic Regulations for Undergraduate Programmes

(b) Exemptions
N/A
c) External PSRB Accreditation
N/A
d) University Strategies and Policies

          Widening Participation
     In addition to the UCAS point score required for admission, the programme also allows for a more
     flexible entry for students returning to study or students who may not quite meet the tariff, in the
     form of an interview/ audition, which is considered in lieu of some qualifications. Furthermore, tutors
     within the CAD team are frequently involved in outreach work (workshops and performances) in
     partnership with local colleges and arts organisations. The Performance skills module at levels 2 and
     3 works in conjunction with AimHigher, who facilitate engagements and provide financial support.

         Employability
     Whilst not a strictly-vocational programme, the BA (Hons) Choreography and Dance includes within

                                                    11
  it a variety of employment-related opportunities, including a number of work-based learning
  modules. There are numerous opportunities for students to meet with a range of potential employers,
  such as artists, venue managers, producers, and local authority providers of cultural services. The
  programme is structured around the development of key skills and abilities that are very desirable
  within the wider employment market. In particular, the practice based modules in choreography,
  facilitation and performance have an outward facing perspective, enabling students to identify and
  respond to opportunities within the wider dance community.

       Disability Awareness
  The programme is committed to ensuring that all students are treated equitably and has a
  commitment to supporting students with a wide range of impairments. For instance, there are no
  programme admissions restrictions related to a potential student’s disability. When students with
  disabilities do enrol appropriate teaching spaces are chosen that are sensitive to their particular needs.
  The key to the support of students with disabilities is the creation of a positive, mutually-supporting
  working environment, within which all students feel equal.

        Equal Opportunities
  All students are treated equitably regardless of their age, colour, disability, family responsibilities,
  gender identity, marital status, national origins, race/ethnicity, religious or political beliefs and
  affiliations, sex, sexual orientation, socio-economic background or other inappropriate distinction.
  There is a high level of sensitivity towards cultural difference within the teaching of the programme,
  for instance in overcoming barriers to participation in practical workshops. The programme
  promotes cultural awareness by studying a range of artists from across the world, representing a
  variety of positions and viewpoints.

       Ethics
  By its very nature Choreography and Dance often involves the use of research and the creation of
  work that requires participation with a diverse range of individuals. The research processes and
  performances are planned and delivered so as to fully comply with ethical standards in terms of (for
  instance) discretion and confidentiality.

        Foundation
  Choreography and Dance is an inclusive, diverse programme, which engages with a range of
  intellectual and spiritual concerns.

        Internationalisation
  The University of Winchester has a number of well-established exchange programmes with
  institutions in the USA: the University of Wisconsin Eau-Claire, the University of Southern Maine,
  and Southern Oregon University. The programme offers a range of modules to visiting exchange
  students from abroad, including from US universities. The curriculum of the programme is
  configured in a way that encourages students to engage with writing from around the world, and to
  see their own developing creative practice in relation to that wider context.

    Sustainable Development
  Across all years and modules there is a commitment to analyse and interrogate the relationship
  between bodies, sites and spaces. Environmentalism offers concepts and contexts for creative
  practice. The programme contains a specific Current Debates module at Level 6 that engages with
  environmental/sustainability issues both in theory and practice.




10)    RESOURCES FOR THE PROGRAMME


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The BA (Hons) Choreography and Dance requires high quality teaching spaces with sprung floors and
performance spaces, fully equipped with the latest AV and IT equipment, designed for practical
performance classes, rehearsals and performance events.
The New Performing Arts Studios have significantly benefited the programme in offering 6 new studios
for rehearsals but, specifically, raising the number of well appointed dance studios to two. The
Performance Gymnasium provides an important and well equipped venue for the presentation of staff
and student work.

The programme utilises the support of specifically dedicated technical and administrative staff.

The Library has a well-stocked provision in the subject area, of books, video and audio materials,
consistently updated.

IT
The University’s IT services and provision have expanded considerably in recent years, with over 400
fully networked PCs available for student use. Over 100 PCs housed in the Kenneth Kettle Building are
available to students on a 24 hour basis. All University owned student accommodation has broadband
internet connectivity. Networked software includes:
        Microsoft Word
        Microsoft Excel
        Photoshop
        PaintShop Pro
        Macromedia Extreme 3D
        Microsoft Powerpoint
        Microsoft Paintbrush
        Microsoft PhotoEdit
        Microsoft Access
        Stats for the Terrified
        Microsoft Project
        Java Development Kit
        Visual Basic
        Outlook
        First Class
        Frontpage
        Dreamweaver
        Microsoft Internet Explorer
        Sound Forge
        Director
        Aftershock
        Fireworks

        On-line software training packages are also available.

A general induction to IT and subject-specific introductions to the Internet are available for all students.
It is clear, however, that a high proportion of students now arrive at Higher Education with a fair degree
of computer literacy. A good level of computer literacy will be expected of all students and those who
are struggling in this area will be strongly encouraged to seek assistance from the University IT trainer.
All written work for assessment, excepting examinations, will be expected to be word-processed.

The Multi-media Centre
The Multi-media centre is operated by the Media Services section of the Information Technology and
Communications Services department (ITCS). An area which has undergone rapid expansion over the
past few years, it is now at the cutting edge offering students professional facilities in television, video,

                                                   13
radio, music, image manipulation and web content creation.

Video
        23 Sony VX2000/PD150/PD170 MiniDV digital camcorders
        (10 of which are in ‘shooting kits’ including boom mics)
        7 MiniDV palmcorders
        30 twin monitor editing suites running Premiere Pro and Avid Composer. Also included are
        Adobe PhotoShop, Audition. All suites are capable of DVD authoring and are equipped with
        DSR-11 DVCam player/recorders.
        10 twin monitor multi media suites including Flash, Fireworks, Director, Poser, Audition,
        Photoshop and Cubase, with keyboards.
        Audio workstation with sound proof booth
        Graphics workstation
        Video duplication (including DVD)
        All PCs are fitted with removable hard drives which enable multiple users to use each machine.
        (60+ hard drives in stock)
        12 Digital stills cameras

Newsroom
The Newsroom is equipped with 24 Intel Apple Mac computers, all of which run Microsoft Office and
Apple iLife. In addition, 15 of the computers are installed with Final Cut Studio and 8 with Quark
Xpress. It is planned that these computers will be fed from a specific server in the near future. At that
time AP’s Electronic News Production software will be installed. The Newsroom is also equipped with
audio interfaces for voice over work and Sony DSR-11s for recording and playback of mini DVCam. It
is planned in the near future to directly interface the Newsroom with both the TV studio and the Radio
studio.

Web Content
      Software as above – much of which is available on all networked PCs.
      Digital still cameras.
      CD and DVD writers.

The Multi-media Centre is subject to a rolling plan of equipment improvement an enhancement. All the
facilities within the Multi-media Centre are centrally owned and controlled and, therefore not specific to
any subject. A committee exists with representatives from all relevant subjects to co-ordinate usage over
the Academic Year.

Students also have access to other items of equipment available on loan from the Multi-media Centre.
These include musical instruments, laptop computers, AV projectors, audio and video and DVD
recorders.




11)     STAFF DEVELOPMENT, RESEARCH AND THE PROGRAMME


Staff development is maintained by the Staff Development and Review Process and by policies which
support the quality of teaching, including the Collaborative Enhancement of Teaching, which includes
the Peer Observation of Teaching.


Paul Jackson is the Programme Leader. He holds a BA Hons Performing Arts from Middlesex
University and a MMus from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and is an elected Fellow of the Royal

                                                  14
Society of Arts and a past Chair of the Standing Conference of Dance in Higher Education. His
teachers in dance have included Viola Farber, Erick Hawkins, Kazuko Hirabayashi and Bertram Ross,
and in music John Cage and Sir Malcolm Arnold.
He has performed with the companies Gravity, Nonesuch and Artlink and has created roles in dances by
artists as varied as Rudy Perez, Gus Solomons jr. and Walter Nicks. As a pianist he has worked as an
accompanist to most of the major figures in dance including; Martha Graham, Robert Cohan, Merce
Cunningham, Viola Farber, Richard Alston. He has worked in dance education for over 25 years and
was a member of the education groups of London Contemporary Dance Theatre, Extemporary Dance
and Ballet Rambert.

He has written extensively on dance and music and in 1997 was awarded the Chris de Marigny Dance
Writers Award, part of the Bonnie Bird Fund. He is the leading authority on the music of Sir Malcolm
Arnold and is the author of ‘The Life and Music of Sir Malcolm Arnold: The Brilliant and the Dark’
published by Ashgate in 2003. This formed the basis for Tony Palmer's film commissioned by The
South Bank Show; Towards the unknown region: Sir Malcolm Arnold a story of survival. He writes
extensively on music /dance collaborations and a collection of his writings will be published by Dance
Books in 2012. He is currently working on the authorised biography of Robert Cohan, founder of The
Place, which will be published by Dance Books in 2011

His research underpins the Dance programme through modules such as: Critical Studies, Physical Skills,
Music for Dancers, Learning to make and making to learn, Moving Music, Dance Analysis and
Criticism.


Debbie Lee-Anthony, MA trained at the London Contemporary Dance School graduating in 1982.
Debbie has extensive experience as an independent dancer performing in project-based work with
various choreographers. She was a founder member of Theatre of Motion and Tacit Dance Theatre with
whom she performed for several years. Since completing her training Debbie has taught in a wide range
of education and community contexts in the UK and abroad, including Swindon Dance, Laban Centre
and Malta’s Contact Dance Company. As a choreographer she has created many pieces for students,
community and youth groups.
Debbie creates her own work for performance and runs her own company Soma/Numa, which has
received Arts Council funding for several collaborative projects. In 2006, Debbie performed in and
directed ‘Body of Experience’ an evening of multicultural dance works which toured nationally to
critical acclaim. She has also published on the subject of ageing and performance. Debbie is a member
of the Board of Hampshire Dance and sat on the Swindon Dance Advisory Board for many years. She
was an assessor for Southern Arts for 10 years, reporting on small-scale dance/theatre touring.
Debbie’s area of research engages with the nature of collaboration and the relationship between
innovation and accessibility. Debbie has been lecturing at the University of Winchester since 1999. She
specializes in teaching Limon influenced technique and her practice-based research underpins the
Choreography & Dance programme through modules such as Dance Management, Choreographer
Specialism, Performance Skills1 &2, Dance Facilitation and Final Year Project.


Cathy Seago received a Ba (Hons) from University of Surrey Roehampton. As a Fulbright Scholar, she
received an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College and the professional certification at the Merce
Cunningham Studio.

Her practice based research addresses knowledges of the body, cross disciplinary/ cross cultural
collaborative methodologies and composition as a generative and thematic process in choreography. At
the World Dance Alliance 2008 Global Summit she presented, and has subsequently published, a
performative paper addressing the topic of the body as an intercultural phenomenon in compositional &
choreographic practices.


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She is the director of Evolving Motion and has received awards in support of choreographic research
and performance since 1998 in Europe, the USA and Southeast Asia. The Artists work in collaboration
across a range of disciplines, developing work through deconstructing traditional practices and forms to
create original languages which spiral organically to carve cross disciplinary tensions into dialogues.
Most recent Artist residencies have been supported by KLPAC Malaysia (09), The Blue Elephant
Theatre London (08), Odyssey Dance Theatre in Singapore (07). In the UK, support from Arts Council
England, the Artist Development Initiative at the Royal Opera House, DerbyDance/ Dance4, Swindon
Dance and commissioning awards from Jacksons Lane and Hertsdance, as Associate Artists, have
enabled the creation of 8 major works as well as numerous smaller projects. Recent works have toured
in the South East of England and London and to Edinburgh, Paris, Singapore, Taiwan and Thailand.

In 2008 Cathy was a choreographer for Pointe to Point China Dance Forum, an artist exchange initiative
of the Asia Europe Foundation. In 2009 she was project leader for a cross cultural exchange residency
with artists in Thailand. She has developed multimedia collaborative projects, linking with researchers
at both Bournemouth and Portsmouth Universities. Cathy Seago guest teaches, creates new work for
dancers internationally and leads workshops through regional dance agencies and colleges in the UK.
She has been a faculty member at Laban and at Roehampton University and a Guest Artist at the Taipei
National University of the Arts (2005) and at the Duncan Centre Conservatoire, Prague (2006-08).

Her research and professional practice support the dance program through modules such as Final Year
Project, Current Debates, Dance Facilitation, Interdisciplinary studies, Learning to Make and Making
to Learn, Physical Skills, Performance skills 1 & 2 and Critical studies.


Suna Imre has a background in dance improvisation and has collaborated with a diverse range of artists
in the U.K and Europe to create interdisciplinary works, most often in site specific locations. Suna is
currently working on a series of interviews with key somatic (movement) practitioners in the UK and
USA. The first of these conversations was published in the journal for ‘Somatic and Dance Practices’
May 2009. ‘Listen, Closer’ premiered April 2009 was commissioned by the ‘Cornershop’, Winchester;
an improvised duet utilising aspects of contact improvisation and authentic movement, touring the U.K
in 2010/2011.
Suna has been collaborating with senior lecturer Belinda Mitchell from Portsmouth University for three
years on a project entitled ‘The Sensory Experience of Space’, which investigates the interplay between
bodies and buildings and how a more sensory experience of space can inform and develop the
architectural process. The first public output of this research was at the launch of The Laundry
exhibition December 2009 in Winchester. Further exhibitions/seminars/performances are anticipated
for late 2010/2011.
Her research underpins the dance programme through modules such as Making to Learn and Learning
to Make, Physical Skills, Somatic Practices and The Thinking Body.


David McCormick is a Senior Lecturer. He trained in Dramatic Arts at Bretton Hall and went on to
complete a professional Diploma in dance at Laban achieving a distinction.
He was a founder member of Air dance Company and went on to dance professionally for 10 years with
leading companies including DV8 Physical Theatre Company, Richard Alston Dance Company,
Siobhan Davies, Imlata Dance Company, Random Dance Company and Ted Stoffer amongst a number
of other independent choreographers. During this time he co-created and toured internationally
acclaimed and multi-award winning works.
David is a regular teacher of technique and choreography on the Laban International Summer School
and has created numerous choreographies for significant youth and community dance events. He has
taught professional level company and open technique classes in the UK, Japan, America and across
Europe.
Since 2001 he has been working on a range of multi media art projects from live-event video
installations, commissioned by the likes of MTV and Siemens to collaborations with dance and theatre
makers including Yorke Dance Project, Scarabeus, Punchdrunk, Snag Dance Project, Graeae Theatre

                                                 16
Company, The Petrovski Ensemble and the Gala re-opening of the South Banks’ Royal Festival Hall in
2007. These projects have resulted in performance and film outcomes shown in the UK and abroad. His
film Cut Out and Keep was short-listed for The Place Dance on Screen Production Award and screened
at Tate Modern, Videodanza Film Festival, Italy and the I.C.A. Recently David was the video director
for Boy Blue Entertainment’s Olivier Award winning production of Pied Piper at the Barbican Theatre.
He spent two years as Associate Artist at The Place Dance Theatre researching dance and video as
performative and screen-based partners. At the end of this he received The Wallace Potts Bursary from
the Nureyev Foundation in support of his work as a dance and video artist.
He has conducted research projects for METAL culture on collaborative approaches for artists and art
forms, and presented his findings and outcomes to Arts Council England Annual Conference and The
British Council National Executive.
He is currently working with Dance Partners for Creativity at Exeter University. DPC is a collaborative
research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council exploring the how and what of
creative partnerships in Key Stage 3 dance education. The project’s wider aim is also to disseminate the
research in new settings within and beyond UK dance education to contribute to debate about
partnership within educational futures.
His research and professional work outside the University underpins the Dance programme through
modules such as: Screendance, Techniques of Physical Theatre, Learning to Make and Making to
Learn , FYP and Physical Skills.




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