SOCIAL STUDIES VOCABULARY STRATEGIES

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					                       SOCIAL STUDIES VOCABULARY STRATEGIES
              COL                              Social Studies Main       C-FB Portal
           Elementary                              Secondary         C-FB Content Literacy



Elementary Vocabulary Strategies
Adapted from ECS Learning Systems, Inc. by the Learning Team


        Content Literacy Strategies - C-FB
        Semantic Feature Analysis
        What’s My Line?
        Missing Words
        Clues and Questions
        How Many of These Words Do You Recognize?
        Mix, Match, Freeze


Semantic Feature Analysis
Procedure:
      a.   Select a passage or topic of study. (done by teacher)
      b.   List keywords for vocabulary study from the topic. (done by teacher)
      c.   Brainstorm key features of the words being studied. (done with class)
      d.   Develop a chart listing the key features across the top. Across the side list
           of the words. (done by the student individually or in groups)
      e.   Identify which words have the key features. (done by individual or groups)
      f.   Discuss the results of the analysis on the charts. (done with the class)
      g.   Have the students read the passage and verify their analysis of the key words
      h.   Extend the process with questions or writing assignments such as having the
           students write a classificatory composition that compares the words. Students
           could also write a creative piece using the words correctly in context.

What’s My Line?
Procedure:
      a.    From the selected topic of study, create the main topics and place each on an
            index card.
      b.    Have each student select a card and from the list of vocabulary words select
            which ones go with the topic on their card.
      c.    Students then should research and read to verify their selections discarding
            words that don’t fit the topic.
      d.    Pair the students up and have each read his list of vocabulary words defining
            the ones necessary and see if his partner can guess his topic. Repeat the
             process until the student has been exposed to all topics and vocabulary terms.

Missing Words
Procedure:
      a.   Select reading passage for students.
      b.   Remove a key vocabulary word from the passage. Make sure there are
           enough clues in the passage that students can determine the missing word.
      c.   Distribute the passage to each student or group of students. Have the students
           read the passage and determine the missing words.
      d.   Discuss with students how they were able to determine the missing words.
           Point out that they used context clues. List the context clues that the students
           used.
      e.   Have the students read the passage verifying their choices.
      f.   Students then could define the vocabulary terms if necessary.

      Example:
      Last week Sarah received a ____from her grandfather. She ran to the house after she
      found it in the mailbox. She read the ____five times before she would let anyone else
      see it.

Clues and Questions
Procedure:
      a.   Type or print the vocabulary words on note cards.
      b.   Distribute several note cards to each student.
      c.   Have the students write questions that their words could answer. Teach the
           students to write higher level thinking questions.
      d.   Check the students’ questions for accuracy.
      e.   Have the students print the questions on the other side of the note card.
      f.   Have student use the completed note cards to quiz one another. They read the
           clues (questions) and have other students determine the word on the card.

Example:
     Word-treaty
     Questions (Clues)
           What is a formal agreement between two or more nations called?
                  What type of formal document between the U.S. and foreign countries
           must be approved by two-thirds vote in the Senate?

How Many of These Words Do You Recognize?
Procedure:
      a.   Make a list of the words from a particular topic or passage.
      b.   Have students respond if they “Know It,”“Heard It,” or “Have No Idea”
      c.   Process the words in each column verifying their level of knowledge.
      d.   A modification of this can be “What” (which has the students write what they
           think the word is), “So What,” (which has the students write about the
           relationship of the word to the topic), and “Now What,” (which has the students
              use the word in a newly created sentence.

Mix, Match, Freeze
Procedure:
      a.     Write the selected vocabulary terms on index cards and the definitions on other
             index cards
      b.     Depending on the number of students in the class, pass out a card with a term
             or the definition to each class member. This is the “mix” part of the activity.
      c.     On a given signal, have the students mingle and find their “match.”
      d.     When they have a “match,” they should link arm and arm and “freeze.”
      e.     The pairs should then each give their word and definition with the class
             verifying the match. Students who have a word or definition that they think best
             fits with the pair being discussed can challenge the match. Dictionaries or the
             text should be provided at that point to verify the correct answer.


Secondary Vocabulary Strategies

             Content Literacy Strategies - C-FB
             What’s My Line?
             Missing Words
             How Many of These Words Do You Recognize?
             Mix, Match, Freeze
             Clues and Questions
             Definition Word Maps
             Concept definition map
             Frayer Model
             Analogies
             Capsule Vocabulary
             The Visual-Verbal Word Association


What’s My Line?
Procedure:
      a.     From the selected topic of study, create the main topics and place each on an
            index card.
      b.     Have each student select a card and from the list of vocabulary words select
            which ones go with the topic on their card.
      c.     Students then should research and read to verify their selections discarding
            words that don’t fit the topic.
      d.     Pair the students up and have each read his list of vocabulary words defining
            the ones necessary and see if his partner can guess his topic. Repeat the
            process until the student has been exposed to all topics and vocabulary terms.
Missing Words
Procedure:
      a.    Select reading passage for students.
      b.    Remove a key vocabulary word from the passage. Make sure there are
           enough clues in the passage that students can determine the missing word.
      c.    Distribute the passage to each student or group of students. Have the
           students read the passage and determine the missing words.
      d.    Discuss with students how they were able to determine the missing words.
           Point out that they used context clues. List the context clues that the students
           used.
      e.    Have the students read the passage verifying their choices.
      f.    Students then could define the vocabulary terms if necessary.

      Example:
      Last week Sarah received a ____from her grandfather. She ran to the house after she
      found it in the mailbox. She read the ____five times before she would let anyone else
      see it.

Clues and Questions
Procedure:
      a.    Type or print the vocabulary words on note cards.
      b.    Distribute several note cards to each student.
      c.    Have the students write questions that their words could answer. Teach the
           students to write higher level thinking questions.
      d.    Check the students’ questions for accuracy.
      e.    Have the students print the questions on the other side of the note card.
      f.    Have student use the completed note cards to quiz one another. They read
           the clues (questions) and have other students determine the word on the card.

Example:
     Word-treaty
      Questions (Clues)
             What is a formal agreement between two or more nations called?
                    What type of formal document between the U.S. and foreign countries
           must be approved by two-thirds vote in the Senate?



How Many of These Words Do You Recognize?
Procedure:
      a.    Make a list of the words from a particular topic or passage.
      b.    Have students respond if they “Know It,”“Heard It,” or “Have No Idea”
      c.    Process the words in each column verifying their level of knowledge.
      d.     A modification of this can be “What” (which has the students write what they
           think the word is), “So What,” (which has the students write about the
           relationship of the word to the topic), and “Now What,” (which has the students
             use the word in a newly created sentence.




Mix, Match, Freeze
Procedure:
      a.       Write the selected vocabulary terms on index cards and the definitions on
             other index cards
      b.       Depending on the number of students in the class, pass out a card with a term
             or the definition to each class member. This is the “mix” part of the activity.
      c.       On a given signal, have the students mingle and find their “match.”
      d.       When they have a “match,” they should link arm and arm and “freeze.”
      e.        The pairs should then each give their word and definition with the class
             verifying the match. Students who have a word or definition that they think best
             fits with the pair being discussed can challenge the match. Dictionaries or the
             text should be provided at that point to verify the correct answer.


Definition Word Maps
         Word maps are graphic representations that help students visualize the components
of a definition. The map includes three relationship essential to a rich definition.
     What is it?
     What is it like?
     What are some examples?
        Word maps teach students the qualities of a definition. Too often, students have a
narrow concept of what the meaning of a word encompasses. Many students think of
definitions as simple, dictionary-like statements characterized by little elaboration and
personal comment. Word maps encourage students to personally integrate their background
knowledge with a concept. Once students understand the qualities of a definition, they apply
this knowledge to expand their own vocabularies and to master unfamiliar concepts.
    Step 1: Explain to students that in order to understand new vocabulary, they need to
know what makes up a definition of a word. Go over the three questions that make up a
definition.
    Step 2: Introduce students to the word map, and describe its parts. Begin with a familiar
concept.
    Step 3: Ask, “What is it?” Write these descriptors on the map. (Tell students that their
answers should be general.) Next, ask students, “What is it like?” Record their responses
on the map. Explain that these qualities are properties that make the term different.
    Step 4: Ask for examples. Encourage students to use information from their background
experiences as they complete their maps.
    Step 5: Model the process and guide the students through several other examples.
    Step 6: Encourage students to use maps independently as they study. Tell them that
word maps and charts help them to learn new, difficult concepts and that they can use them
to study for exams. Definition Word Map Template
Capsule vocabulary is a strategy that enables English language learners to acquire
vocabulary in a naturalistic way by engaging them in reading, writing, listening, and
speaking.

   1. Choose words or phrases related to the topic being learned or use a word wall or
      any other collection of vocabulary words.
   2. Have the students work with a partner to talk as much as they can using the
      words.
   3. Ask the students to work in groups or pairs to write any number of sentences
      using the words.
   4. You may change the word choice configurations, such as requiring the students
      to use three words from the list in each sentence, and so on.


Analogies
       Students create original analogies using information that they have been
studying. This skill is used in making such relationships as:
       A                B             =                C               D
George Washington is to one       as       Abraham Lincoln is to _____.
                                              (five, ten, fifteen, twenty)?

				
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