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					Olympic Delivery Authority Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games Summary First edition October 2007

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Olympic Games sport icons Archery Athletics Badminton Basketball Beach Volleyball Boxing Canoe/Kayak (Flatwater) Canoe/Kayak (Slalom) Cycling (BMX) Cycling (Mountain Bike) Cycling (Road) Cycling (Track) Diving Equestrian Fencing Football Gymnastics (Artistic) Gymnastics (Rhythmic) Gymnastics (Trampoline) Handball Hockey Judo Modern Pentathlon (Riding/Running) Modern Pentathlon (Shooting/Fencing) Modern Pentathlon (Swimming) Rowing Sailing Shooting Swimming Synchronised Swimming Taekwondo Table Tennis Tennis Triathlon Volleyball Water Polo Weightlifting Wrestling

Paralympic Games sport icons Archery
 Athletics
 Boccia
 Cycling (Road/Track Equestrian Football Goalball Judo Powerlifting Sailing Shooting Swimming Table Tennis Volleyball (Sitting) Wheelchair Basketball Wheelchair Fencing Wheelchair Rugby Wheelchair Tennis

Foreword
 .

Delivering the transport needed for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games is a challenge and an opportunity. We need to ensure safe, reliable and accessible transport for 500,000 spectators daily from across the UK and overseas, as well as the 50,000 athletes, officials and media we will host in the summer of 2012. We want to do this at the same time as leaving lasting transport improvements for generations to come. The publication of the Transport Plan marks a year of significant achievement, during which important progress has been made by our transport partners on key 2012 schemes. This partnership will be crucial to our future success. Thanks to the strong teamwork that is in place right across the industry we are on track to deliver. Together with our partners, we have hit all of our milestones in the last 12 months. Work to treble capacity at Stratford Regional Station is underway; the tunnels needed to extend the Docklands Light Railway have broken through; the first new trains to be used on the Javelin® shuttle service in 2012 have arrived in the UK for testing and the high speed rail link they will travel on, HS1, is ready. With a number of other transport improvements underway and more to follow before the Beijing Games in 2008 there are important targets ahead to ensure we maintain this momentum. We are on track to meet these challenges and are confident of delivering a ‘public transport Games’ for spectators and a legacy of world­class transport links for London and beyond. Vitally important will be the transport for the athletes. We want the athletes who will grace the Olympic and Paralympic stage in 2012 to have high­quality services between accommodation, competition and training venues.

The key to delivering world­class transport throughout the Games is partnership. The first version of the Transport Plan has been shaped and developed through extensive consultation with industry stakeholders after we published the draft plan one year ago. We will continue to listen carefully to the views of our transport partners as we review and develop our plans on the road to 2012. The transport plans for the Games will create a positive legacy, helping transform the Lower Lea Valley into one of the best connected areas in the capital and bringing economic and social benefits that go far beyond 2012, and far beyond sport. It is an ambitious vision but one that we can deliver together. The construction of the venues and infrastructure for the London 2012 Games is funded by the National Lottery through the Olympic Lottery Distributor, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, the Greater London Authority and the London Development Agency.

John Armitt Chairman Olympic Delivery Authority

Sebastian Coe Chair London 2012 Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games

Foreword

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Summary Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – first edition

Contents

Page London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games The transport strategy for the Games Getting spectators to the Games Games venues The Paralympic Games Ensuring a sound transport system 4
 7
 13
 18
 22
 25


London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games

.

The Olympic and Paralympic Games are two of the world’s greatest sporting events. In the summer of 2012, the Games of the XXX Olympiad will be held in London. Around 10,700 world­class athletes from more than 200 nations will compete in the Olympic Games. Over 16 days of competition, approximately 7.7 million tickets will be available for sale for the Olympic Games to watch the athletes compete in 26 sports. On the busiest days of competition, around 800,000 tickets are expected to be sold. Eighteen days after the Olympic Games Closing Ceremony, the sporting action at the Paralympic Games will begin. The Paralympic Games provide an arena for competition between the world’s top 4,200 athletes with a disability. In 2012, athletes from 162 countries will compete in 20 sports. During the 11 days of competition, approximately 1.5 million tickets will be available for sale for the Paralympic Games. The Olympic and Paralympic Games have been described as a country’s largest peacetime logistical operation. They present the UK and London with a huge transport challenge. However, they also provide an opportunity to showcase London and the UK and create a valuable legacy of real and lasting improvements. Olympic Games – 28 July to 12 August 2012 – 10,700 athletes from 205 countries – 26 sports and 300 events – 7.7 million tickets available for sale Paralympic Games – 30 August to 9 September 2012 – 4,200 athletes from 162 countries – 20 sports and 471 events – 1.5 million tickets available for sale

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Summary Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – first edition

Key dates for Games transport

June 2012 July 2012 August 2012 September 2012

27 June Venues open Media venues open

28 July to 12 August Olympic Games

30 August to 9 September Paralympic Games Opening Ceremony 13 – 16 August Departures 14 September Olympic Park closes

13 July Official opening of Olympic Village

27 July Olympic Games Opening Ceremony

29 August Paralympic Games Opening Ceremony

The London 2012 Games will be delivered by two organisations: the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG); and the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA). LOCOG is responsible for preparing for and staging the Games. The ODA is the public body responsible for developing and building the venues and infrastructure for the Games.

Athletes and team officials for both Games will live in the Olympic Village, which will open on 13 July 2012, two weeks before the Olympic Games Opening Ceremony. It will serve as the Paralympic Village during the Paralympic Games and will close nearly two months later, after the Paralympic Games Closing Ceremony.

Section 1: London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games

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Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games
The London Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Act 2006 requires the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) to prepare and keep under review a plan to address transport matters relating to the Games. This first version of the Transport Plan has been produced by the ODA in conjunction with LOCOG.

Transport for the Games will be delivered through a partnership between the ODA’s Transport team, LOCOG and a number of transport authorities, including: – – – – – – Transport for London; Department for Transport; Highways Agency; Train Operating Companies; Network Rail; London & Continental Railways (LCR), including Union Railways (North) – BAA; and – other transport providers, including London boroughs and local authorities and transport operators across the UK.

Key client groups
As part of hosting a successful Olympic and Paralympic Games, the Host City Contract requires the safe and efficient movement of three key groups of people. The Games Family Transport for the Olympic Family and Paralympic Family, particularly the athletes, is the top priority. Some 50,000 Games Family members will require transport on any one day during the Olympic Games for training, competition or recreational purposes. Spectators An estimated 800,000 spectators will use public transport to travel to the Olympic Games on the busiest day of competition. Every person with a ticket to a London 2012 sports event will be given free public transport within Greater London for that day. Games workforce – staff, contractors and volunteers The majority of travel by the Games workforce, which is expected to grow to 100,000 by the Games, will be by public transport. The Games workforce will be able to use the public transport system within Greater London free of charge.

Working in partnership
The task of delivering a safe, reliable and inclusive transport for the Games impacts on the whole of the UK transport sector. LOCOG and the ODA are working with a wide range of partners to ensure that London 2012 is remembered as the best connected Games ever. Many stakeholder organisations were involved in the development of the transport strategy. These, and many more, will continue to be involved during the detailed planning and operational phases.

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Summary Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – first edition

The transport	 strategy for	 the Games	

The transport strategy for the Games has evolved through regular stakeholder involvement since the bid stage in 2003. This Transport Plan has also developed through the responses received during the formal consultation period, as well as through the ongoing partnership with the transport delivery partners and stakeholders. Delivering a fit­for­purpose transport system will be critical to the success of the Games. The transport strategy focuses on building on London’s existing transport system and infrastructure and driving a series of transport enhancements to meet transport demand during the Games. Just as importantly, the strategy focuses on providing a valuable legacy for London and the UK before and after the Games.

The challenge to get all ticketed spectators to the Games by public transport, walking or cycling can only be met if transport is accessible and inclusive for all. London 2012 will implement an accessible and inclusive transport network to ensure that everyone, including disabled people of all impairments and other people who may have difficulties using the transport system, can get to the Games. The five key objectives of the transport strategy are to: – provide safe, secure, inclusive, fast and reliable transport for the Olympic Family and Paralympic Family client groups; – provide frequent, reliable, friendly, inclusive, accessible, environmentally friendly and simple transport for spectators and visitors from all around the UK and overseas; – leave a positive legacy and facilitate the regeneration of east London; – keep London and the rest of the UK moving during the Games and thus make it a positive experience to host the Games; and – achieve maximum value for money for every pound spent on transport.

A ‘public transport’ Games
Underpinning London 2012’s transport strategy is its ambition to host a ‘public transport’ Games. The aim is for 100 per cent of ticketed spectators to travel to the Games by public transport, or by walking or cycling. There will be no private car parking for spectators at any venue except for some Blue Badge parking. Existing public transport services will be improved and enhanced in the years before 2012 and additional services will operate during the Games to meet the extra demand.

Section 2: The transport strategy for the Games	

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Athletes a top priority
London 2012 is required to provide safe, secure and reliable transport for all Games Family client groups (see Figure 2.1). The highest transport priority during the Games will be the transport services for the Olympic and Paralympic athletes, as it is essential the athletes can arrive in good time at their training and competition venues. Athletes, accredited media, technical officials and Marketing Partners (sponsors) will all be provided with their own bespoke transport services to meet their different transport requirements. To support further seamless Games Family transport, an Olympic Route Network (ORN) will be implemented (see Figure 2.2). This will comprise a network of roads linking all the competition and key non­competition venues. It will be used to transport the Olympic Family quickly and securely between accommodation areas, all competition venues and other venues, such as arrival airports. In

general, the roads will still be available for use by all traffic during the Games. However, some traffic lanes will be reserved for Games vehicles on the busiest sections of the ORN. Following the Olympic Games, the ORN will be scaled down to form the Paralympic Route Network and facilitate efficient transport services for the Paralympic Family.

As part of the transport strategy, an Olympic Transport Operations Centre (OTOC) will be established to manage all modes of transport for the Games Family, spectators, workforce, and for all those travelling for reasons unconnected with the Games. This will help Transport for London, other transport operators, the police, local authorities and those running the Games to keep London and the UK moving.

Keeping London and the UK moving
The implementation of the Transport Plan will ensure that increased demand for transport services during the Games has a minimal impact on existing transport networks and commuters’ regular journeys within London. It will also ensure that spectators can easily get to and from London from across the UK, and to competition venues that are located outside of London, such as the venues for the Football competition.

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Summary Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – first edition

Figure 2.1 Games Family client groups

Client group Number of people: Olympic Games 19,900 Number of people: Paralympic Games 6,600

National Olympic Committees (NOC) National Paralympic Committees (NPC) (Includes athletes and team officials) International (sports) Federations Media International Olympic Committee (IOC) International Paralympic Committee (IPC) Marketing Partners Workforce

4,150 20,000 1,650

1,100 10,000 1,125

31,400* 100,000

4, 400 62,500

* of whom around 12,000 people will be in the UK at any one time.

Creating a lasting and positive legacy
The ODA aims to implement a Transport Plan that will produce benefits which reach beyond simply delivering transport during the Games. The ODA is committed to providing a legacy of new transport infrastructure, enhanced and new public transport services, training and employment opportunities in the transport sector, and to regenerating east London. The implementation of the Transport Plan will provide benefits in two ways. The first is to enhance or accelerate existing transport schemes – for example, co­funding 22 of an additional 55 rail cars to increase capacity on the Docklands Light Railway. For other schemes, such as the upgrade of Stratford Regional Station, the ODA is funding the full scheme so that benefits can be enjoyed before, during and after 2012.

Other important benefits after the Games will include: – a network of new and upgraded walking and cycling routes, and an increased awareness about the benefits of walking and cycling as a healthy means of travel; – improvements to key stations to enable disabled people of all impairments to use public transport networks more easily; and – more people choosing public transport when travelling to or within London and the UK, and to future events.

Section 2: The transport strategy for the Games

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HARLOW
Broxbourne

Figure 2.2 Olympic and Paralympic Games route network

Weymouth and Portland

M25 A10
Weald Country Park Olympic Park Competition venue Olympic route network Olympic and Paralympic route network Athletes’ accommodation

M25 M40
Wembley Stadium Lord’s Cricket Ground Hyde Park Eton Dorney

A406 A12

IOC hotels Olympic Village Olympic Park ExCeL Airport

Regent’s Park

M25

M4

M4
Heathrow Airport

Earls Court

Horse Guards Parade

Greenwich Peninsula Maritime Greenwich Royal Artillery Barracks

STAINES
Royal Holloway College

Wimbledon
0 5km 10km

M3
To Weymouth and Portland

CROYDON M25

M25

M20

This map is based upon Ordnance Survey data with the permission of the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery. © Crown copyright. Unauthorised reproduction infringes Crown copyright and may lead to prosecution or civil proceedings. All rights reserved. Olympic Delivery Authority. 100046062 . 2007

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Summary Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – first edition

Maximum value for money
In order to meet immovable deadlines and to achieve the best value for money, the ODA will maximise the use of existing transport infrastructure and services, and will build new infrastructure only where it is essential and leaves an appropriate legacy. Wherever possible and where there is no cost­effective legacy, temporary solutions will be used to meet temporary peaks in travel demand generated by the Games. The ODA will use existing expertise and processes to deliver the new transport solutions needed. In addition to creating cost efficiencies by identifying legacy opportunities, the transport strategy seeks to bring forward where possible planned transport infrastructure or investment in services so that passengers may enjoy the benefits earlier.

Sustainable transport
London 2012 has made a commitment to be the first ‘sustainable’ Games, setting new standards for major events. Sustainability principles were incorporated into the development of the transport strategy for the Games from the start of the planning process. The following are examples of these principles: – All ticketed spectators will travel to competition venues by non­car modes. – The transport strategy makes best use of existing infrastructure. – The need for transition between the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games has been minimised. – A compact Games means that the need for travel is reduced. – The promotion of the ‘Active Spectator Programme’.

London 2012 is committed to working with stakeholders to maximise the economic, social, health, environmental and sporting benefits the Games bring to the UK and London. For example, the ‘Active Spectator Programme’ is being developed to promote active and healthy travel modes, such as walking and cycling, across London and the UK. To help minimise the amount of carbon dioxide emissions related to Games transport, the Olympic Park will be a Low­Emission Zone (LEZ) during the Games. This is an independent LOCOG initiative that requires emission levels to be even lower than the Greater London LEZ levels and extends to smaller passenger vehicles, such as cars. Only vehicles under five years old and which meet the predetermined London 2012 emissions standards will be allowed to enter the Olympic Park.

Section 2: The transport strategy for the Games

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Summary Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – first edition

Getting spectators	 to the Games	

.

A wide range of schemes are proposed to enhance transport networks across the UK and London to meet the travel demand generated by the Games. The transport strategy will build on and maximise existing transport networks, infrastructure and assets. It will also utilise future transport networks that are planned to be in place by 2012.

Currently, 37,000 passengers pass through Stratford Regional Station in the morning peak period. By 2012, this number is forecast to rise to 55,000. An additional 63,000 spectators are expected to use the station each morning during the Games, bringing the number of people passing through Stratford in the morning peak period to 118,000. The ODA­funded improvements to Stratford Regional Station are already underway. By 2012 these enhancements, which are part of a wider package of improvements, will include: – nine new lifts to make all station platforms fully accessible; – re­opening a disused subway to create additional access to platforms and make it easier to change between rail, Underground and Docklands Light Railway services; – a new westbound Central Line platform; – lengthened and wider platforms to increase capacity; and – a new station entrance at mezzanine level to improve the flow of passengers.

Major schemes for the Olympic Park
Rail, including National Rail services, London Underground and Docklands Light Railway services, will play a key part in delivering spectators and Games workforce and volunteers to competition venues and cultural events across the UK and London. Three stations – Stratford Regional Station, Stratford International Station and West Ham Station – have been identified as key access points to the Olympic Park. A total of 12 different rail services will run through these stations. Stratford Regional Station Stratford Regional Station is a major public transport interchange that allows passengers from east of London to travel to Canary Wharf without travelling into central London, as well as providing interchange opportunities for passengers using National Rail and Underground services from central London.

Section 3: Getting spectators to the Games	

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7
 15 1.5 7.7 118,000 25,000 240,000 800,000
million million Up to Up to Up to

Seven

Number of minutes it will take to travel from St. Pancras
 International to the Olympic Park using the Javelin®
 shuttle service.


Fifteen	

Frequency in seconds of trains serving the Olympic Park

1.5 million	

Number of tickets available for sale for the Paralympic Games

7.7 million	

Number of tickets available for sale for the Olympic Games

118,000	

Number of people passing through Stratford Regional Station in the morning peak period during the Games

Up to 25,000	

The hourly capacity of the Javelin® shuttle service that will transport people to and from Stratford International Station

Up to 240,000	 Hourly capacity of the rail system servicing the Olympic Park during the Games

Up to 800,000	 Number of spectators who will use public transport to travel to the Olympic Games on the busiest day of competition

Stratford International Station During the Olympic Games, a high­speed rail shuttle service – the Javelin® – will operate from St. Pancras International Station to Stratford International Station and then on to Ebbsfleet in Kent. This temporary Games­time service will be one of the transport centrepieces for the Games. It will run from St. Pancras International to Stratford International in seven minutes, with a service frequency of up to ten trains per hour. Spectators travelling on Eurostar services, which will not stop at Stratford International Station during the Games, will use the Javelin® service to complete their journey to the Olympic Park. North London Line The North London Line will undergo two significant changes before 2012. The first is that the section of the line between Stratford Regional Station and Canning Town Station will be converted from

National Rail to Docklands Light Railway operation and extended from Stratford Regional Station to Stratford International Station. The second change is that new terminating platforms will be constructed for the North London Line at Stratford Regional Station. The existing North London Line National Rail services to the north from Stratford will become part of the Transport for London, North London Railway (‘London Overground’) concession from November 2007. As a result, there will be four new stations on the Docklands Light Railway network: Star Lane, Abbey Road, Stratford High Street and Stratford International. The converted route will also serve the existing stations at Canning Town, West Ham and Stratford Regional. New Docklands Light Railway services will run between Stratford International and Woolwich Arsenal stations, and between Stratford International and Beckton stations.

Docklands Light Railway The Docklands Light Railway (DLR) currently provides a highly accessible transport service in east London. Capacity on the DLR service will be increased through a 2.6km track extension from King George V Station to Woolwich Arsenal and through the procurement of an additional 55 rail cars. Other plans include a number of enhancements that were already being developed by DLR, including infrastructure works to allow for three­car trains on most of the existing DLR network by 2009. Three­car trains will increase capacity on the Bank – Lewisham line by 50 per cent at peak times. Due to the nature and location of the DLR system, the proposed enhancements will benefit both the Olympic Park and River Zone venues, as well as contributing to the delivery of the rail strategy for the Central Zone and cultural events.

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Summary Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – first edition

Other rail enhancements A range of other temporary and permanent station enhancements are planned that will provide benefits to people using the rail network during the Games. For example, temporary and permanent lifts are being constructed at Prince Regent Station to enable the circulation of spectators between the platforms and the ExCeL venue. Permanent enhancements include the refurbishment of St. John’s Wood Station and the modernisation of Highbury & Islington station.

Local bus, coach, taxi, and river and canal services The ODA is working with Transport for London, the relevant local authorities and trade representatives to define the role that bus, coach, taxi and river and canal services will play to help deliver the transport strategy. For example, discussions will be required to determine the location of bus and coach stops and taxi drop­off/pick­up points, and service patterns during the Games. Bus and rail park and ride services Two types of park and ride services are planned; one coach­based and the other rail­based, and each one will serve different spectator demand. Park and rail services will operate from Ebbsfleet to Stratford International Station using the Javelin® service. During the bid stage, two large coach­based park and ride sites located close to the M25 and M11 were proposed. Analysis has since suggested the long­term benefits and use of these schemes would be low and so alternative arrangements are being investigated.

Dedicated, temporary, local park and ride services are proposed for spectators at the Wimbledon, Weymouth and Portland, and Eton Dorney venues. In addition, the need for temporary park and ride services to serve Broxbourne and Weald Country Park will be investigated.

Mode specific schemes
Walking and cycling Promoting sustainability is at the heart of the transport strategy, and walking and cycling play an important role in supporting this objective. The Active Spectator Programme will ensure that spectators are encouraged to walk and cycle to venues. This will also help to raise awareness about the benefits of walking and cycling as a mode of transport, and help increase the number of walking and cycling journeys across London as a whole.

Section 3: Getting spectators to the Games

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Games venues	 .

Competition venues
The 2012 Olympic Games will be staged at 33 competition venues within London and the UK, as shown in Figures 4.1 and 4.2.

Non­competition venues
A series of non­competition venues will be used during the Games. These include: – the Olympic Village; – other accommodation for athletes and team officials at Weymouth and Portland and at Royal Holloway College; – the International Broadcast Centre/Main Press Centre (IBC/MPC) in the Olympic Park, which will house an estimated 20,000 members of the media for the Olympic Games and 10,000 media for the Paralympic Games; – training venues; – hotel accommodation in central London for Games Family members, including the International Olympic Committee and International Paralympic Committee members, and the media; and – airports for arrivals and departures to and from the UK. Transport services will be provided to serve these non­competition venues. Venue transport plans that outline the specific transport arrangements for each venue will be produced.

Venue transport plans
During the bid stage, a venue transport plan was created for each competition venue. London 2012 is continuing to review and develop the detail of these plans, which may undergo significant changes before 2012. The International Olympic Committee requires a Venue Operating Plan to be produced for each venue approximately two years before the Games. The ODA and LOCOG will continue to work with venue operators and other stakeholders to develop robust venue transport plans.

Crowd movement
The Games will generate large numbers of spectators travelling to competition venues. This will create considerable volumes of pedestrian crowd movement at venues, on the transport systems and on the approaches to venues. Careful analysis is being undertaken for all competition venues in relation to key transport interchanges to ensure that the predicted levels of crowd movement can be safely accommodated and managed.

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Summary Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – first edition

Figure 4.1 Olympic Games venues

The key to the sports icons can be found by folding out the back cover.

Section 4: Games venues

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Figure 4.2 UK Olympic Games venues

The key to the sports icons can be found by folding out the back cover.

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Summary Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – first edition

The Paralympic Games

.

The Paralympic Games will be hosted at 17 competition venues, which will be mainly concentrated in the Olympic Park and River Zone, as seen in Figure 5.1. It is expected that more than 1.5 million spectators will travel to the Olympic Park and River Zone to watch the Games. The Paralympic Games will be held over 11 days and the sporting action will start 18 days after the Olympic Games Closing Ceremony. An integrated approach to transport planning for both Games has been adopted. This will minimise the need for transition works between the two Games and achieve the best value for money. As for the Olympic Games, the transport strategy for ticketed spectators to the Paralympic Games is founded on the principle that public transport, walking and cycling will be the main modes of transport for spectators. Spectators with a valid event ticket will be entitled to free public transport within Greater London on the day of the event. In many respects, the transport challenge and strategy for the Paralympic Games are similar to the Olympic Games with some important differences: – providing safe, reliable and accessible transport for more than 16,500 Paralympic Family members each day;

– ensuring that Paralympic Family transport services provide for disabled people of all impairments; – providing appropriate transport for approximately 2,500 Paralympic Family members, including athletes, who use a wheelchair for daily living; – maintaining a high level of security for the Paralympic Family and spectators, while satisfying the access requirements for all; – ensuring that transport is available for up to 160,000 spectators each day during the Games; and – providing high­capacity, accessible transport, to cater for approximately 15 –20 per cent of spectators (24,000 to 32,000) who are expected to have specific access needs. The ticketing arrangement for the Paralympic Games will be different from the Olympic Games. The majority of tickets will be sold as ‘open day’ passes, allowing entrance to any events held on that day. In addition, a significant number of spectators will be schoolchildren who are likely to arrive by coach.

Transporting equipment
Paralympic athletes use a variety of specialist equipment, both for daily living and for sporting activities. This includes wheelchairs, throwing platforms and tandem bicycles, as well as spare parts and maintenance equipment. This equipment will need to be transported to venues, and extra time and resources will be required to load equipment into vehicles.

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Summary Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – first edition

Figure 5.1 Paralympic Games venues

The key to the sports icons can be found by folding out the back cover.

Section 5: The Paralympic Games

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Summary Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – first edition

Ensuring a sound	 transport system	

.

The ability to host a memorable and inspirational Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012 will depend on the successful delivery of a sound transport plan. In addition to providing efficient, reliable and inclusive transport for the Games Family, spectators and the Games workforce, it is paramount that the transport system is safe and secure. It is essential that all passengers using all modes can travel safely, and feel that they are travelling safely, to and from the Games. Safety and security strategies, and contingency and test event plans are being developed to ensure these objectives are met.

Security
The ODA and LOCOG are working in partnership with the Olympic Security Directorate (OSD) to create an overarching transport security strategy. The OSD has developed a high­level risk assessment approach to analysing transport security issues for the Games. The police and security agencies are involved in the development of the strategy and it will continue to evolve as the finer details of the Transport Plan emerge. A Transport Security Working Group has been established to coordinate the approach to transport security.

Safety
The ODA is committed to ensuring that safety risks are properly managed and that all necessary safety controls are in place. The strategic approach to safety risk management is based on the principle that all existing transport delivery partners have mature and approved safety management arrangements in place and will use existing techniques to ensure significant hazards and risks are managed. The ODA’s Transport team is assuming a watching brief over safety assurance for the transport programme.

Section 6: Ensuring a sound transport system	

Page 25

Contingency plans
During the bid stage, London 2012 conducted extensive analysis to ensure that the core strategies adopted were robust and would deliver excellent transport during the Games. As the Games approach, it will be essential to develop and implement a series of contingency plans to enable the continued successful delivery of Games­time operations. It is likely that a family of contingency plans will be produced to cover all transport modes. The plans will be developed using an integrated approach so that cross­mode solutions can be properly designed and implemented.

The ODA’s Transport team will work closely with its delivery partners to develop these plans. Many of these organisations already have a great deal of experience in contingency planning and have tried and tested plans in operation. In addition, the Transport team will work with other functional areas across LOCOG and the ODA to make certain that the transport contingency plans are not developed in isolation, but reflect the involvement of the full range of functions.

Test events
A number of events will be held to test different competition venues and infrastructure in the build up to 2012. The schedule for test events will be determined by LOCOG in consultation with the individual International Federations. Most of these will take place in the summer of 2011. It is expected that there will be test events for Olympic and Paralympic sporting and non­sporting events, and that they will test the facilities provided for disabled people of all impairments.

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Summary Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – first edition

About this document This document is a summary of the first version of the Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The first version of the Transport Plan was produced after considering comments and feedback on the Consultation Draft, which was published in October 2006. A Consultation Report detailing the feedback to the Consultation Draft has also been published alongside the Transport Plan. The first version of the Transport Plan, the Consultation Report and this Executive Summary are all available from the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) at the address on the back cover or at www.london2012.com/transportplan The ODA will continue to consult widely on future versions of the Transport Plan.

© Olympic Delivery Authority
 The official Emblems of the London 2012 Games are © London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and
 Paralympic Games Limited (LOCOG) 2007. All rights reserved.
 The emblems of the National Lottery, the London Development Agency, the Department of Culture, Media and
 Sport, and the Mayor of London are reproduced with the permission of the Crown and the other copyright holders
 respectively. All rights reserved.
 This document can be found in the publications section of www.london2012.com
 Published October 2007
 Printed at an environmentally aware ISO14001­certified printer on recycled paper.


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Summary Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – first edition

The construction of the venues and infrastructure for the London 2012 Games is funded by the National Lottery through the Olympic Lottery Distributor, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, the Mayor of London and the London Development Agency.

This publication is available on request in other languages and formats. To obtain these please: Quote reference number ODA 2007/004 Email transportplan@london2012.com Phone +44 (0) 203 2012 000

Olympic Delivery Authority 23rd floor, One Churchill Place Canary Wharf, London E14 5LN Reception +44 (0) 20 3 2012 000 Fax +44 (0) 20 3 2012 001 www.london2012.com


				
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