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					Getting started with Word XP (2002)
Practical workbook

Aims and Learning Objectives
By the end of this course, participants will be able to:  create, open and save Word documents;  edit and format documents;  modify the page setup;  add headers and footers;  add bullets and numbering.

University of Bristol Information Services document wordxp-t8

Getting started with Word XP (2002) (wordxp-t8)

Document information
Course files
If you are working in the training room the files you need are in C:\User\Word\GS Word If you want to work through the practical tasks shown in this document on your own system, obtain the necessary files from: www.bristol.ac.uk/is/learning/documentation/docs-current.html#wordxp-t8 You will see a link to Practice files. This contains the files you need to work through the course notes. In Internet Explorer you extract the files as follows:  Click on Practice files;  Choose Save.  Browse to where you want to save the file and click on Save (the practice files are grouped together, and you need to extract them to be able to use the individual files);  Go to the file you have just saved, and Open or Run it to show the Self-extracting Archive box;  Select where to extract (save) the files on your system using the browse button (as shown opposite);  Click Start to save the files.

Related documentation
Other related documents are available from the web at: www.bristol.ac.uk/is/learning/documentation/docs-by-category.html#wp For preliminary help with computers see: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/is/learning/documentation/docs-by-category.html#win

Getting started with Word XP (2002) (February 06) www.bristol.ac.uk/is/learning/documentation/wordxp-t8/wordxp-t8.doc If you have any comments or queries about this document mail iser-docs@bristol.ac.uk. This document may be used wholly or in part by the academic community, providing suitable acknowledgment is made. It may not be used for any commercial or profit-making purpose without permission. © 2006 University of Bristol. All rights reserved.

Getting started with Word XP (2002) (wordxp-t8)

Introduction
This course continues from the skills learnt in the document Beginners guide to word processing (document number wp-t1), by introducing you to Microsoft Word XP (2002). See the Related Documentation section in the inside front cover for the location of this document. The course is based around the production of a formatted text about the old City of Bristol.

Prerequisites
Familiarity with the mouse - Know your mouse (document number mouse-t2) Familiarity with the keyboard - Know your keyboard (document number keyboard-r1) Familiarity with the contents of Beginners guide to word processing (document number wp-t1) or attendance on the Information Services course Getting started with PCs (code CC1GPC). See the Related Documentation section in the inside front cover for the location of these documents.

Getting started with Word XP (2002) (wordxp-t8)

Contents
Document information Task 1 The Word screen .................................................................................... 3 Starting Word ................................................................................... 3 Introduction to the Word screen..................................................... 3 The menu bar ................................................................................... 4 The tool bars .................................................................................... 5 Scroll bars ........................................................................................ 5 Status bar ......................................................................................... 6 Click and type .................................................................................. 6 Open, resave and navigate .................................................................... 7 Opening an existing document ...................................................... 7 Resave the file ................................................................................. 7 Navigation keys ............................................................................... 7 Selecting text .......................................................................................... 9 Selecting specific parts of a document.......................................... 9 Formatting ............................................................................................ 10 Formatting characters ................................................................... 10 Line spacing .................................................................................. 12 Copy, move and delete text ................................................................. 13 Cut, copy and paste commands ................................................... 13 Cut and paste ................................................................................. 13 Copy and paste .............................................................................. 14 Deleting a block of text ................................................................. 14 Numbered and bulleted lists................................................................ 15 Numbered lists............................................................................... 15 Bulleted lists .................................................................................. 15 Customise your numbers or bullets ............................................. 15 Headers and footers ............................................................................. 16 Insert a footer................................................................................. 16 Insert a header ............................................................................... 17 Page setup ............................................................................................ 18 Change the settings ...................................................................... 18 Set the margins and orientation ................................................... 18 Borders ................................................................................................. 19 Page borders ................................................................................. 19 Paragraph borders ........................................................................ 19

Task 2

Task 3 Task 4

Task 5

Task 6

Task 7

Task 8

Task 9

Task 10 Spelling and grammar checking.......................................................... 20 Options ........................................................................................... 20 Checking as you write ................................................................... 20 Checking the whole document ..................................................... 20

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Task 11 Find and Replace.................................................................................. 22 Find text ......................................................................................... 22 Replacing text ................................................................................ 22 Options ........................................................................................... 23 Task 12 Printing.................................................................................................. 24 Print preview and quick print icons ............................................. 24 Printing options ............................................................................. 24 Task 13 Automatic editing ................................................................................. 25 AutoComplete ................................................................................ 25 AutoCorrect ................................................................................... 25 Task 14 Word options ........................................................................................ 27 Toolbar Options ............................................................................. 27 Save options .................................................................................. 27 View options .................................................................................. 28 Task 15 Getting help .......................................................................................... 29 The Office Assistant ...................................................................... 29 What’s This command................................................................... 29 Appendix A Appendix B Unformatted Document ........................................................................ 30 Formatted Document ........................................................................... 31

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Task 1 The Word screen
Objectives Comments Introduction to the Word screen. This task is for revision purposes as you should already be familiar with Word or WordPad.

Starting Word
1.1 To start Word, click on the Start icon on the task bar (bottom of screen). Point to Programs and then click on Microsoft Office XP from the list of programs and then on MS Word. Depending on where you are using Word, you may need to skip the Microsoft Office step.

Introduction to the Word screen
2 3 4 7 6 4 1

5

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Figure 1 - the Word screen

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1

Window Boxes The title bar The menu bar The tool bars The ruler The text area The cursor Scroll bars1

control the size of the windows (minimise, maximise/restore, close) shows the document title dropdown menus showing Word commands shortcut menu commands shows margins, tabs and indents the area of the screen where the document is to be typed a flashing bar (the insertion point) appears where text is to be typed used to move around the document

More fully described on page 5

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The task pane
The right hand side of the screen is new to Word XP and is called the task pane. There are different types of task panes to use according to your needs. The initial task pane contains quick ways of opening existing documents (it lists the last 4 used) or of starting new documents from scratch or using a template. You can close this task pane by clicking on the cross on the top right corner of it and you can re-open it using View / Task pane.  Close the task pane now. We will not need it for this course.

The menu bar
1.2 Click on the main menu item with the left mouse button (eg File). You will see a dropdown list of commands/functions.

Figure 2 - menu bar showing file menu

 In Word XP (2002) if you hold the mouse pointer still for a few seconds, more choices will appear on the list. Click on the double arrow at the bottom of the list to see more menu choices.  Use the DOWN ARROW key on the keyboard or use the mouse. You will see each one in turn highlighted.  To perform one of these commands/functions while it is highlighted, click the left mouse button.  A small ► on the right, means there is a sub menu.  To close the menu click elsewhere in the Word document.

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The tool bars
1.3 The two main toolbars that you will always be using are the standard and the formatting toolbars. The toolbars display sets of icons (small symbols) that represent shortcuts for many Word functions.

 Position the mouse pointer on an icon and it will change to an arrow. Hold it over an icon and you will see a yellow help bubble describing the action of the icon. Click the left mouse button, and Word performs the function or command the icon represents. You can move off an icon without performing the action by holding down the left mouse button while you move off it.  Word 97 displays two toolbars on separate rows.  Word 2000 and Word XP (2002) displays the two main toolbars rolled into one. To see additional tools, click on the small double arrows at the end of each toolbar. Once you have used one of these icons it will remain on the main toolbar. standard toolbar

Figure 3 - standard and formatting toolbars

1.4

Above you can see: 1. the standard toolbar used for many of the editing commands also on the menu bar;

formatting toolbar

2. the formatting toolbar used for formatting commands also on the menu bar, such as:- changing font and size; emphasizing and justifying text; numbering and indenting.

Scroll bars

Figure 4 - scroll bars

1.5

The horizontal and vertical scroll bars are used to move quickly around the document. Clicking on the arrows at each end of the scroll bar moves up and down the document one line at a time vertically or across a small distance horizontally. Clicking on the space between an arrow and the scroll bar button, moves the screen vertically or horizontally one window at a time. Dragging the scroll bar itself scrolls through the document.

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Clicking on the double arrows moves the document up or down a whole page.

Status bar
1.6 The Status bar at the bottom of the screen provides information on the position of the Insertion point in the document (the page, section number, line and column numbers). It also shows whether overtype mode etc is active, that is, where typing takes the place of existing characters on the screen.

 Double-click on OVR. Note that OVR is displayed in bold on the status bar. Doubleclick OVR again to turn off overtype mode. Pressing the INSERT key on the keyboard does the same thing. This is easily done accidentally.

Click and type
1.7 The Click and type feature allows you to add text and graphics immediately on the part of the page where it is required. This is only enabled in Print Layout view.

 Click on View / Print Layout view and move the pointer to a blank area where you want to insert text (this method can also be used to insert graphics and tables).  Click to enable the Click and type pointer. Click again to insert the cursor where you want to begin typing. Item (eg, text) will be left-aligned Item will be right-aligned Item will be centred

Text will be placed to the right of the picture or table

Text will be placed to the left of the picture or table

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Task 2 Open, resave and navigate
Objectives Comments To open an existing document and experiment with the navigation keys. This task opens the file source.doc in Word. Source.doc contains a plain text document (a copy of which is included at the end of this document). During the rest of the tasks you edit this document to produce the final version (also included at the end of this document).

Opening an existing document
2.1 If you have a document on the screen, click on File / Close or on the X in the top right corner of your screen.

 Click on the Open icon (with the opening folder) (as shown opposite) or click on File / Open. If you are using the task pane, click on the file name if it is listed or on More files.

Figure 5 - open file dialogue box

Click on the dropdown box at the end of the Look in box. Click on C:\ then on the User\Word\GS Word folders to open the GS Word folder. The files in the GS Word folder are displayed in the box below. Click on source.doc to select it and click on the Open icon to open the file. Alternatively, double-click on source.doc to open it. Your file will appear on the editing screen and its name will be in the title bar at the top of the screen.

Resave the file
2.2 To save the file with a different name and keep the original:  From the File menu, choose Save As. Check the drive and folder are displayed as C:\User\Word\GS Word. Type Bristol in the File name box and click on the Save icon. This makes a copy of source.doc called Bristol.doc. The original file source.doc will remain unchanged.

Navigation keys
2.3 Spend about 5 minutes using the following keys to navigate around the document.

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 <Ctrl +  <Ctrl +  <Ctrl +  <Ctrl +  PAGE UP/PAGE DOWN CTRL + PAGE UP CTRL + PAGE DOWN HOME/END CTRL + HOME/END

one character left or right/one line up or down one word to the left one word to the right one paragraph up one paragraph down one screen up or down through the document top of next page in the document top of next page in the document beginning or end of the current line beginning or end of the document

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Task 3 Selecting text
Objectives Comments To learn to select/highlight specific text. You tell Word that you want to do something to a specific paragraph or word by selecting the text and then performing an action. You can use the mouse or the keyboard. Any area selected will have a black background with white text. When selected, you can type over, delete, move or copy, and change style, size, colour etc.

Selecting specific parts of a document
3.1 Move the mouse pointer until the I-beam is at the beginning of the text you want to select. Click and hold down the left mouse button, dragging the mouse until you reach the end of the text you want to select, and then release the mouse button, OR:  Put the cursor at the beginning, hold down the SHIFT key and place the cursor at the end.

Mouse shortcuts for selecting text
To select a word To select a sentence To select a line Double-click anywhere in the word. Hold the CTRL key and click anywhere in the sentence. Move the pointer to the left edge of the line till the pointer changes to a white arrow. This is the selection bar. Click in the selection bar to the left of the line. Move the pointer to the left edge of the line till the pointer changes to a white arrow. This is the selection bar. Double-click in the selection bar to the left of the line. Move the pointer to the left edge of the line till the pointer changes to a white arrow. This is the selection bar. Triple-click in the selection bar to the left of the line.

To select a paragraph To select the whole document

Keyboard shortcuts for selecting text
 Place the cursor at beginning of the text you want to select, and do the following: To select a character To select a word To select a paragraph To select the whole document Warning! Hold the SHIFT key and press a RIGHT or LEFT arrow key. Hold SHIFT + CTRL and press the LEFT or RIGHT arrow key. Hold SHIFT + CTRL and press the DOWN arrow key. Hold the CTRL and press the A key.

Word deletes selected text if you type new text or if you press the BACKSPACE, DELETE, or ENTER keys while the text is highlighted. If this is not what you intended, use the Undo icon to retrieve the text. To deselect all the text quickly, click anywhere else in the document. If you have selected too much, press the opposite arrow key to the one you are using while still holding Shift, to reverse the selection.

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Task 4 Formatting
Objectives Comments Change the style of your text. The following exercise takes you through various ways of formatting using both the formatting toolbar and the format/font menu.

Formatting characters
This defines what the characters look like, the font or typeface (eg, Arial, Times New Roman), point size (eg, 11), style (eg, bold, italic), and positioning (eg, superscript). At present the whole document is in a font (typeface) called Comic Sans and a font size of 10 points. In the final version of the document most of the text is in Times New Roman 11 point. Another font, Arial, is used for the headings. (See Appendix B.)

Format the body of the text
4.1 Select all the text by pressing the CTRL + A keys.  Click on the down arrow alongside the font window on the formatting toolbar (currently displaying Comic Sans) and select the font Times New Roman from the list displayed.  Click on the arrow beside the Font Size box (as shown opposite ) (which currently reads 10) and select 11.  Select the paragraph beginning 'Bristol, originally called Brigstow...' down to '….integration with Europe' (the first paragraph).  Make this paragraph bold by clicking on the Bold icon in the formatting toolbar.  Select the text 'The County of Avon' in the second paragraph.  Use the Formatting toolbar to make the text italic.

Format the heading
4.2 Select the title line - The City of Bristol.  From the Format menu, choose Font. Format the text in Arial, bold, 18 points and Small Caps.

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Figure 6 - format the font

Formatting and spacing paragraphs
Paragraph formatting defines how the paragraph is aligned (left, centred, right or justified on both margins), the indentation from the margin, spacing and tab positions. The document is divided into paragraphs. A new paragraph is started every time the ENTER key is pressed. In this section you will change the spacing and alignment of paragraphs.

Aligning and spacing paragraphs
4.3 These four buttons control the alignment. If all you need to do is to set the alignment use these buttons.

Figure 7 - left, centre, right, fully justified

 Place the Insertion point anywhere in the title The City of Bristol. To align the title in the centre (see your example printout), from the Format menu, choose Paragraph. Set alignment to Centred. Click on the up arrow beside the Spacing / After box and set it to 24 points (equivalent of 2 lines).  Select from below the heading, up to but not including Useful Contacts and Addresses and use the Format / Paragraph commands to set the spacing after the paragraphs to 12 points.  Place the Insertion point anywhere in the paragraph beginning Bristol, originally called.... From the toolbar, set the alignment to Justified (see Figure 7).  Make the second paragraph (starting, adapted from the Official...) right aligned using the Right alignment icon in the formatting toolbar.  Re-save the document - try using the save icon instead of using the menu.

Indenting paragraphs
4.4 The Format / Paragraph command allows you to set left and right indents. This is the most precise way of setting them.

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These two icons control the left indent. From left to right they are: Decrease Indent, Increase Indent. Each click of the icon moves the indent markers on the ruler. They are more limited in their use than the Format / Paragraph command because they indent only at .5" or 1.25cm increments and only set a left indent.  Use Format \ Paragraph to set a left and right indent of 2cm on the first paragraph beginning Bristol, originally called Brigstow…

Format the sub headings
4.5 Select the heading Well Provided with Education Opportunities.  Make the paragraph Arial 14 point and bold using the formatting toolbar.  From the Format menu, choose Paragraph (or click the right mouse button as a quick way to access the paragraph menu). Set Spacing Before to 12 points (equivalent to one line space). Set the Spacing After to 6 points.  Format the heading Useful Contacts and Addresses in the same way as the previous heading.

Format the addresses
4.6 Select the text Useful Contacts and Addresses and the three addresses below.  From the Format menu, choose Paragraph, click on the Line and Page Breaks tab and ensure that Keep With Next is set (so that the heading and the addresses will always be kept on the same page).  Click on the Alignment tab to make sure the text is aligned to the left.  Click in the last line of each address and set the space below it to 12 points.

Line spacing
4.7 Line spacing applies to the space between lines within the paragraph as well as to the paragraph spaces themselves. Format / Paragraph has a line spacing option, which gives more options than the quick keys below but is probably not so often used. The quick keys below are the easiest way of setting the most common line spacing options. Use these keys CTRL + 1 CTRL + 2 CTRL + 5 To set this line spacing Single Double One and a half

 Try these out using the paragraph beginning Bristol, the regional capital of the South West…., but end by selecting the whole document from Bristol, the regional capital of the South West… up to the heading Useful Contacts and Addresses and setting it all to 1.5 line spacing.  Re-save the document.

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Task 5 Copy, move and delete text
Objectives Comments To learn to move or copy selected text to another place and to delete blocks of text. Windows has an area where text can be stored temporarily. This is known as the Clipboard. Blocks of text can be copied from the text area to the clipboard and inserted elsewhere. The Office 2000 Collect & Paste clipboard offers a storage area for up to 12 clippings taken from various office applications and the Web browser. It appears in place of the task pane on the right of the screen once you have copied or cut two or more items.

Cut, copy and paste commands
cut paste copy

5.1

The following table shows 3 different methods you can use for this task. To do this To cut text To copy text To paste text Menu command Edit/Cut Edit/Copy Edit/Paste Toolbar icon Cut (Scissors) icon Copy icon Paste icon Keyboard option Ctrl+X Ctrl+C Ctrl+V

Cut and paste
5.2 This will have the effect of moving blocks of text from one place to another.  Find the paragraph beginning Bristol has preserved… Select this paragraph. From the standard toolbar click on the Cut icon (to delete the text from the document and place it on the clipboard).  Repeat this for the paragraph beginning Much of Bristol's...to add this to the clipboard. Note The Office XP clipboard pane should appear at this stage if it has not done so previously. Hover over each clipping. Clicking on any clipping will paste it into your text at the position of the cursor. Clicking the bar on the right of the clippings allows you to paste or delete them.

 Position the insertion point at the beginning of Well Provided with...  To reinsert the Much of Bristol's... text from the clipboard, click on the appropriate clipping on the clipboard toolbar.  Position the insertion point at the beginning of Ancient churches...and repeat for the Bristol has preserved...clipping.  Save your document. Versions The above exercise will not work for Word 97 as only one item of text can be kept on the clipboard at a time. You would need to copy and paste each item separately.

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Copy and paste
5.3 Make sure you have saved your document.  Experiment with using the Copy and Paste icons with various bits of your text.

Deleting a block of text
5.4 Try out the following methods:  Using the mouse, select the text and click on the Scissors icon.  Using the mouse, select the text and click on Edit / Cut.  Select the text and press the BACKSPACE or DELETE key.  Undo your deletions using the Undo icon. Provided you saved your text at the end of task 5.2, you can keep clicking the Undo icon until it won’t go any further. Warning! When you cut text using the Scissors icon CTRL + X or Edit / Cut, the original text is deleted from the document but it remains on the clipboard until you copy or cut other text, data, or a picture. When you cut using the DEL or BACKSPACE keys, the text is lost. Click on Undo immediately, to restore accidentally deleted text.

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Task 6 Numbered and bulleted lists
Objectives To create a numbered and bulleted list.

Numbered lists
6.1 Open C:\User\Word\GS Word\Numbered Lists. It contains two lists. The icons for bullets and numbering are on the formatting toolbar. . Click on an icon to turn bullets or numbering on and click on it again to turn them off.  Select the whole of the first list and click on the Numbered icon (as shown opposite) on the toolbar. This will number the list using basic numbering.  Take one of the numbers off by clicking in the chosen line and then on the Numbered icon again. (You may need to click on the increase indent icon (as shown opposite) to put the text back in line with the rest.) Note all the later numbers will be renumbered to take account of the one you have taken off. To put it back again, make sure your cursor is still in the line and click the Numbered icon back on.

Bulleted lists
6.2 Use the second list and add bullets to the list by selecting the list and then clicking on the Bulleted icon on the toolbar.

Customise your numbers or bullets

Figure 8 - bullets and numbers

You can customise the bullet or numbers using Format / Bullets and Numbering. Choose the Bulleted or Numbered tab and choose the style you like.  Try changing the type of bullet. Select the list and click on Format / Bullets and Numbering. Then choose the Bulleted tab and choose a different bullet.  Change the numbering style of the first list in the same way, but choose the Numbered tab instead of the Bulleted tab.

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Task 7 Headers and footers
Objectives To insert a header and footer that will appear on every page. Headers and footers appear at the top or bottom of a document. They are displayed in the correct position only in Page Layout view and in Print Preview. The View / Header and Footer command changes the document automatically to Page Layout view. The main text is greyed out and a header and footer toolbar is displayed (as shown in Figure 9 . A dotted box shows the position of the header or footer on the page. Headers and footers are formatted in the same way as any other text. Options include a different header/footer for the first page and different headers/footers for odd and even pages (Page Setup / Layout). Remove by deleting the text in the header and footer box.

Figure 9 - header and footer toolbar

Insert a footer
7.1 From the View menu, choose Header and Footer. The toolbar will appear on your screen.

 Click on the Switch between Header and Footer icon (as shown opposite). The footer window is displayed at the bottom of the screen. By default there are tab marks in the footer to align separate text to left, centre and right.  On the left, type your name. Press the TAB key on the keyboard to go to the centre (above the Caps Lock).  Click on the Insert Date icon on the toolbar. Press the TAB key again to go to the right.  Type the word Page and press the SPACEBAR key.  Click on the Page icon to insert the page number.  Highlight all your footer text, make it bold and choose a font size of 10 and make sure it is in Times New Roman.  Click on the arrow at the side of the Border icon on the formatting toolbar and choose the option that puts a line at the top.

Figure 10 - borders toolbar

 Click on the Close icon on the toolbar. Save the document.

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Insert a header
7.2 From the View menu, choose Header and Footer again. The toolbar will appear on your screen. and choose filename to insert the filename.

 Click on the AutoText icon (as opposite) on the toolbar   Highlight all your header text, make it bold and choose a font size of 10.  Click on the arrow at the side of the Border icon on the formatting toolbar and choose the option that puts a line at the bottom.  Close the header and footer toolbar.  Save the document.

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Task 8 Page setup
Objectives Comments To set page margins, size and orientation. Page setup defines the size of paper and margins within each section of a document.

Change the settings
8.1 This task assumes that you are using metric measurements. If you are working in inches change the units of measurement:

 From the Tools menu, select Options and click on the General tab.  Under Measurement Units select Centimetres.

Set the margins and orientation

Figure 11 - page setup dialogue box

Set margins
8.2 Click on File / Page Setup and select the Margins tab if it is not already selected.  Position the pointer in the top margins box and type 2.54 if it is not already there. Press the TAB key to move down to the next box and again type 2.54. Repeat for the Left and Right margins.  You can also click on the up or down arrow box at the side until you reach the correct number, though this will only use one decimal place. You can adjust the number more finely by typing it in.  If your settings are in cm you can use inches by typing " after the figure. Word will automatically convert it. If your settings are in inches type cm after the figure.

Set orientation
 Select Landscape or Portrait from the Orientation box (by default should be set to portrait).  Click on OK.

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Task 9 Borders
Objectives To put a border around a page and a paragraph.

Page borders
9.1 Click on Format / Borders and Shading and select the Page Border tab.

Figure 12 - page border options

 From the Setting options on the left choose any one of them except Custom.  From the Style section, choose the line style, the thickness and the colour. The Art box allows you to choose from a selection of patterned borders instead of a line style. The Preview section on the right lets you see what you have chosen and allows you to take off or change the sides of the border by clicking on the relevant side, so you can mix different styles. (You cannot mix line styles with art styles.) The Options button on the right allows you to set dimensions if your border doesn’t fit in the way you want.

Paragraph borders
9.2 Put your cursor in the first paragraph. You do not have to highlight the paragraph unless you want the border around more than one paragraph.

 Click on Format / Borders and Shading and select the Border tab at the top. This should be on top by default. This then works in exactly the same way as the page borders above, except that you do not have the choice of using art designs.  Choose a dotted style and a small width then click OK.  The Apply to box at the bottom right allows you to choose (if you have highlighted text) to apply the border just to your highlighted text or to the whole paragraph.  Experiment on a different paragraph using a mixture of styles. End with only the first paragraph bordered as above.

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Task 10 Spelling and grammar checking
Objectives Comments To correct spelling and grammar errors. You need to make sure the spelling checker is using the English dictionary by going to Tools / Language / Set Language.

Options
Select the Spelling & Grammar tab from the Tools / Options menu and make sure that Check spelling as you type and Check grammar with spelling are selected. If necessary remove the ticks from beside Hide spelling errors in this document and/or Hide grammatical errors in this document. Word has two ways of checking spelling and grammar.

Checking as you write
10.1 As you type, any spelling or grammar errors are underlined. Red underlining denotes a spelling error; green underlining denotes a grammar error.

 Point to a word that is underlined in red and click the right mouse button. From the list of alternative spellings, click the spelling that is correct, or click Ignore.  Go through the document and amend all spelling mistakes. Save the document. Ignore any grammar changes, but look at a couple (right-click) to see Word's suggestions for improvement. You can disable this option by selecting the Spelling & Grammar tab from the Tools / Options menu and clicking in the relevant box.)

Checking the whole document
10.2 Click on the ABC icon (as shown opposite):

Figure 13 - spellcheck dialogue box

Spell checker will find the words it doesn't recognise one at a time and offer you a replacement.

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 If your word is correct and you want to keep it, click on Ignore.  If you have mis-spelt it, click on the replacement you want, if it is there, OR:  Edit the word yourself, eg, insert the cursor and edit it like a normal mistake.  Click on Change or Change All. Change All will replace all occurrences of the misspelt word. Warning! The Spell Check does not correct words that may be wrong but that may also be a recognised word, eg, there; there or for; fro.

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Task 11 Find and Replace
Objectives Comments To find selected text and replace it with different text, throughout the document. When locating text within a document, Word normally searches from the current Insertion point to the end of the document and then asks if you wish to carry on searching from the beginning of the document. This practical finds and then replaces the word geographical in the document.

Find text
11.1 From the Edit menu, click on Find.  Type Bristol in the Find what box.  Click Find Next to find the next instance or close the Find dialog box by clicking on the Cancel button.

Replacing text
11.2 Move the insertion point to the top of the document.  From the Edit menu, choose Replace.

Figure 14 - find and replace dialogue box

 Click on the Find what: box. Specify Find what as geographical (lower case will also find matching upper case words).  Click in the Replace with box. Specify Replace with as socio-economic.  Click on the Find Next button to find the first instance of geographical. Click on the Replace button to replace this instance of geographical or click on the Find Next button to find the next instance of geographical without replacing the current one. (Alternatively, click on Replace All to replace all instances at once.)  Click on Close to return to the document.

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Options
11.3 Clicking the More button gives more replacement options.

Figure 15 - find and replace options

3. Match case forces Word to find only instances of the text where the case matches that typed in the Find box. 4. Find whole words only forces Word to only find complete words. This prevents replacement of words such as we for I where all instances of I could be found and replaced even in the middle of a word. 5. Sounds like will find instances of similar sounding words such as week and weak. 6. Find all word forms will find words that have a similar meaning eg, we, will find we and us.

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Getting started with Word XP (2002) (wordxp-t8)

Task 12 Printing
Objectives Comments To use print preview and printing options. Always use print preview before you print – it saves time and money!

Print preview and quick print icons
12.1 Use Print Preview (to the right of the Printer icon on the standard toolbar) to check that your work will look as you would like it when printed. This saves an enormous amount of paper.

 Look at your document in Print Preview.  Hover over the icons on this screen to see what options you have. You can either print straight from this screen or click on the printer icon on the standard toolbar – this will print one copy of the whole of your document.

Printing options
12.2 Click on File / Print.

Figure 16 - printing options

Here you have many more options including: 7. All, current page, selected pages (eg, 1,3,6,11 or 3-5), or Selection (that is, a section you have highlighted). 8. No of copies of each page to print. 9. Collate means that it will print eg, 1 - 6 and then 1 - 6 again rather than 2 copies of each page together. This saves you having to sort them manually). 10. Print just odd or just even pages.

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Task 13 Automatic editing
Objectives Comments To automate text entry. The tools/autocorrect menu has useful features to automate text entry.

AutoComplete
13.1 This feature completes a common word or phrase that you have started to type. To set it up:

 Click on the Insert menu, then on AutoText and AutoText again and on the AutoText tab. Make sure there is a tick in the box at the top to Show AutoComplete suggestions.

Figure 17 - Auto complete

 Type the words University of Bristol then click on Add and then on OK. Use CTRL + END to go to the bottom of the document and press the ENTER key to start a new paragraph.  Make sure the new text is set to Times New Roman size 11.  Type 8 Febr . Note that a suggestion to finish the word is displayed. Press the ENTER key to complete February. Press the ENTER key again to start a new line. Type Univ and press the ENTER key to complete the word. Press the ENTER key again to start a new line.

AutoCorrect
13.2 This feature automatically corrects text as you type, eg, if you type a lower case 'i' on its own, Word will turn it into a capital letter. Similarly with days or months starting with a lower case letter.

 Click on Tools / AutoCorrect Options.

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Getting started with Word XP (2002) (wordxp-t8)

Figure 18 - auto correct

 Click on the AutoCorrect tab and type UOB in the Replace box and University of Bristol in the With box. Press Add and OK.  In your document, type UOB followed by a space. (Make sure UOB is in the same case as you used in the replace box.  Press the ENTER key to make a new paragraph and try typing the days of the week with a lower case letter to start. Or try mistyping the as teh. As soon as you press the SPACEBAR key the word is corrected.  Use the Undo icon on the standard toolbar to undo all the text you have added after the first University of Bristol. Note If you have saved the document since you started this section you will not be able to undo all the text. You may have to delete it manually.

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Getting started with Word XP (2002) (wordxp-t8)

Task 14 Word options
Objectives Comments To customise the screen to your own liking. There are various methods of changing the way information is displayed on the screen. In this section you can explore some of the other changes you can make.

Toolbar Options
14.1 There are several sets of toolbars. You can see all these by right clicking on any part of a toolbar, or clicking on View / Toolbars. A tick in the box means they are on. Click on the word to put them on the screen and again to take them off. You can add your own icons to the toolbars.  Choose View / Toolbars / Customise, then the Commands tab, select a category, choose a command and drag (hold the left mouse button down and pull)the icon to your toolbar.

Save options
14.2 From the Tools menu, choose Options.

Figure 19 - save options

 From the tabs available (index cards), choose the Save tab to display a set of options for the way Word saves files.  Click on the box marked Always Create Backup Copy. This puts a cross (a check mark) in the box and sets the option on. When the option is on, Word saves the old version of the file with the extension .wbk whenever you save a file. This is useful if anything happens to your .doc file (you can open the

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Getting started with Word XP (2002) (wordxp-t8)

previous .wbk version of the file). Note that if you are working on Bristol.doc, Word will create a backup copy called Backup of Bristol.wbk when using this option.  Look at the other save options.

View options
14.3 Look at the options in the General and View tabs.  When you have finished, click on OK to confirm any option changes and return to the document.

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Getting started with Word XP (2002) (wordxp-t8)

Task 15 Getting help
Objectives Comments To learn to use the help files. In this practical you will use the Office Assistant to find out how to magnify or reduce the document on screen and learn how to search for topics in the on-line help.

The Office Assistant
15.1 Click on the Microsoft Word Help icon on the right of the standard toolbar. The Office Assistant is displayed as an animated paper clip and paper icon by default.

Figure 20 - the Office Assistant

 In the speech window alongside the Office Assistant click on the text Type your question here.  Type Zoom.  Click on the Search button.  Click the item Zoom in on or out of a document. A new help window appears, resizing the document window to allow the document and the help information to be displayed side by side. If the Office Assistant is in the way, click on the icon and drag it out of the way.  Use the information in the Microsoft Word Help window to magnify or reduce the text to the size you prefer.  Close the help window.

What’s This command
15.2 The What's This? command under Help on the menu bar, allows you to point and click at anything on the screen to find out about it's function.

 From the Help menu, choose What's This. A query (?) icon attaches itself to the mouse pointer.  Point and click on the ABC icon to find out what it does.  You can also use the What's This? command at any time by pressing SHIFT + F1. Press SHIFT + F1 again to stop using the command.

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Appendix A Unformatted Document
The City of Bristol
Bristol, originally called Brigstow, means 'the place of the bridge' presumably referring to the bridging point of the River Avon. In Norman times a large castle was built on the east side of the town within the narrow spur of land where the Avon and Frome rivers meet. By 1400 the City was the largest western seaport and by 1500 it was the second city in the country next to London. In the 19th century, failure to modernise the docks adequately, despite the efforts of Brunel and others, drove away much traffic to the booming rival of Liverpool. Fortunately, as the port began its long decline, so Bristol's importance grew as a manufacturing, trading and commercial centre. Bristol and Avon have continued to diversify; only time will tell whether the mixture will resist the new computer-based revolution, the changing patterns of leisure and the geographical effects of increasing integration with Europe. (adapted from the Official Handbook of The County of Avon, 2nd edition). Bristol, the regional capital of the South West of England and once the second city in the land, has developed in recent years as the key touring centre for the region. The city is full of historic treasures, spacious colourful parks and miles of waterway. Much of Bristol's thousand years of history is entwined with the sea and seafaring tradition. It was from Bristol that John Cabot set sail in 1497 to discover North America - centuries later William Penn and thousands of settlers followed a similar route to a new land. That spirit of adventure and exploration is at the heart of Bristol's heritage. Bristol has preserved its fine heritage. All around the City are reminders of its links with the sea. In the old City Docks at the centre of the City can be found the S.S. Great Britain, Brunel's famous iron ship, while spanning the Avon Gorge is Bristol's most famous landmark and testament to Brunel's ingenuity, the Clifton Suspension Bridge. Ancient churches are dotted around the City, while museums abound for visitors. As well as the Art City of Bristol Museum and Gallery there is an up-to-the-minute Industrial Museum on the side of the City Docks. Corn Street, the pulse of Bristol's business houses and the centre of the Old City, has magnificent buildings and the Nails - bronze trading tables where merchants used to "pay on the Nail". Nearby colourful arcades and markets offer the tourist a chance to browse and buy. Well Provided with Education Opportunities Bristol City Council maintains 166 schools and 9 day nurseries. There are nursery, infant, junior, primary, secondary and special schools, a Pupil Referral Unit and the Hospital Education Service. The University of Bristol, the University of the West of England, provides university education in the city. Useful Contacts and Addresses Bristol City Council Council House College Green Bristol BS1 5TR University of Bristol Senate House Tyndall Avenue Bristol BS8 1TH Bristol Information Office

Colston House

Colston Street Bristol BS1 5AQ

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Getting started with Word XP (2002) (wordxp-t8)

Appendix B Formatted Document

The following two pages show how your finished document should look.

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Getting started with Word XP (2002) (wordxp-t8)

The City of Bristol
Bristol, originally called Brigstow, means 'the place of the bridge' presumably referring to the bridging point of the River Avon. In Norman times a large castle was built on the east side of the town within the narrow spur of land where the Avon and Frome rivers meet. By 1400 the City was the largest western seaport and by 1500 it was the second city in the country next to London. In the 19th century, failure to modernise the docks adequately, despite the efforts of Brunel and others, drove away much traffic to the booming rival of Liverpool. Fortunately, as the port began its long decline, so Bristol's importance grew as a manufacturing, trading and commercial centre. Bristol and Avon have continued to diversify; only time will tell whether the mixture will resist the new computer-based revolution, the changing patterns of leisure and the socio-economic effects of increasing integration with Europe. (adapted from the Official Handbook of The County of Avon, 2nd edition) Bristol, the regional capital of the South West of England and once the second city in the land, has developed in recent years as the key touring centre for the region. The city is full of historic treasures, spacious colourful parks and miles of waterway. Bristol has preserved its fine heritage. All around the City are reminders of its links with the sea. In the old City Docks at the centre of the City can be found the S.S. Great Britain, Brunel's famous iron ship, while spanning the Avon Gorge is Bristol's most famous landmark and testament to Brunel's ingenuity, the Clifton Suspension Bridge. Ancient churches are dotted around the City, while museums abound for visitors. As well as the Art City of Bristol Museum and Gallery there is an up-to-the-minute Industrial Museum on the side of the City Docks. Corn Street, the pulse of Bristol's business houses and the centre of the Old City, has magnificent buildings and the Nails - bronze trading tables where merchants used to "pay on the Nail". Nearby colourful arcades and markets offer the tourist a chance to browse and buy. Much of Bristol's thousand years of history is entwined with the sea and seafaring tradition. It was from Bristol that John Cabot set sail in 1497 to discover North America - centuries later William Penn and thousands of settlers followed a similar route to a new land. That spirit of adventure and exploration is at the heart of Bristol's heritage.

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Getting started with Word XP (2002) (wordxp-t8)

Well Provided with Education Opportunities
Bristol City Council maintains 166 schools and 9 day nurseries. There are nursery, infant, junior, primary, secondary and special schools, a Pupil Referral Unit and the Hospital Education Service. The University of Bristol, the University of the West of England, provides university education in the city.

Useful Contacts and Addresses
Bristol City Council Council House College Green Bristol BS1 5TR University of Bristol Senate House Tyndall Avenue Bristol BS8 1TH Bristol Information Office Colston House Colston Street Bristol BS1 5AQ

8 February University of Bristol

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