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Report on the Hawai_i 2050 Youth Sustainability Project

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					      THE OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR
           STATE OF HAWAI`I


                  ******


HAWAI`I 2050 SUSTAINABILTY TASK FORCE


                  ******


             Report on the
Hawai`i 2050 Youth Sustainability Project




             November 2007
         Report on the Hawai`i 2050 Youth Sustainability Project
                              EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

In support of its mandate to develop a Hawai`i 2050 Sustainability Plan (herein, Plan)
that reflects the collective values, priorities, and aspirations of residents throughout the
State, the Hawai`i 2050 Task Force’s (herein, Task Force) created the Hawai`i 2050
Youth Sustainability Project. The project was to not only provide a platform for the
youth to speak, but also to identify concrete ways that help them build capacity,
motivate them to become involved, and create opportunities for them to work in tandem
with adults to direct, shape, and realize a sustainable future for Hawai`i.

To accomplish these ambitious goals, the Task Force created four channels of
communication through which youth could participate: 1) 2050 Youth Sustainability
Summit; 2) 2050-HI Youth Blog; 3) Kids Voting Hawaii Survey; and 4) Community
Engagement Meetings. The reporting of these activities, as well as others, is the
subject of this report entitled, “Report on the Hawai`i 2050 Youth Sustainability Project”
(herein, Report). The Report attempts to convey what youth in Hawai`i, who have
participated in these channels of communication, are saying about the issues that
impact their preferred futures by first offering observations and then recommendations.

The Report makes five general observations regarding: 1) Triple bottom line approach;
2) Societal behavior: 3) Quality of life issues; 4) Vision statement; and 5) Youth
perspective on sustainability. Not surprisingly, the youth attribute the myriad of
challenges facing Hawai`i to earlier decisions made by adults. Although they vacillate
between being pessimistic and optimistic, they want to get involved and be part of the
solution.

The recommendations incorporate the concepts and ideas that best reflect not only the
voices of the youth, but also support the Plan’s proposed goals and strategies. They
are organized around the three core elements essential to youth participation and
leadership development: 1) Building Capacity; 2) Deepening Motivation; and 3) Creating
Opportunities. Inherent to all three elements is continued support and encouragement
of the youth to not only express their ideas, opinions, and concerns, but also to find
creative and constructive ways to advocate for and effectuate change.

Although the challenge of making Hawai`i sustainable is a daunting task, the youth say
they are up for the challenge. They want to be at the table with the adults and be
involved in not only creating a plan, but also, more importantly, in its execution. And
while they believe in their own abilities, they also understand they need the help and
cooperation of those who currently hold leadership positions and power, to best begin
effecting change today. In other words, they do not want to inherit a situation in which
they are rendered helpless because they are left without credible and doable solutions.
They want the option of building upon the successes of their predecessors. The Report
affirms the Task Force’s belief in Hawai`i’s youth.


                                             1
                             REPORT ON THE
               HAWAI`I 2050 YOUTH SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT


In support of its mandate to develop a Hawai`i 2050 Sustainability Plan (herein, Plan)
that reflects the collective values, priorities, and aspirations of residents throughout the
State, the Hawai`i 2050 Task Force (herein, Task Force)1 created the Hawai`i 2050
Youth Sustainability Project (herein, Project). The Project’s purpose was threefold:

        To develop an understanding of where today’s youth are on issues related to
        Hawai`i’s sustainable future;
        To give voice to a segment of the population who must search for ways to
        shape and determine their own future; and
        To find appropriate ways to capture and convey their sentiments so they are
        not lost or ignored by those who hold leadership positions that can affect
        change.


To accomplish this purpose, the Task Force set up four channels of communication.
The first three are specifically geared toward youth. The fourth has a broader focus -
the community, which includes the youth. Aspects of the four channels were activated
at various times during the months of September through November of 2007. The four
channels are as follows:

        2050 Youth Sustainability Summit
        2050-HI Youth Blog
        Kids Voting Hawaii Survey
        Community Engagement Meetings


The reporting of this activity is the subject of this document, entitled, “Report on the
Hawai`i 2050 Youth Sustainability Project” (herein, Report). The Report attempts to
convey to the reader what youth in Hawai`i are generally saying about the issues that
impact their preferred futures. It incorporates data captured through the four channels
of communications. It also tries to provide contextual information about the many
informal conversations that are occurring within these channels and outside of them.


1
 The Hawai`i 2050 Task Force was established in 2005, by the Hawai`i State Legislature through Act 8
(SB1592 CD1). It is working with the Office of the Auditor to prepare a Hawai`i 2050 Sustainability Plan.
(www.hawaii2050.org)


                                                     2
Such information is integrated into the Observation and Recommendations sections of
the Report.

While this Report attempts to give an accurate portrayal of what the youth are saying, it
should not be viewed as the definitive voice of the youth on sustainability. In part, this is
because the survey instruments and protocols utilized were purposefully designed to be
less rigorous so any student interested in voicing his or her thoughts and opinions would
feel welcomed. Furthermore, the Task Force knows that the efforts to date only scratch
the surface of what it hopes will eventually emerge from the youth. In fact, the Task
Force considers the Report as the first of many benchmarks that will indicate progress
towards meaningful youth involvement. The Task Force ultimately wants Hawai`i’s
youth to be fully engaged in the development and successful implementation of the
Plan.


APPROACH
As noted, the Project came into existence because of the Task Force’s desire to involve
the youth in the formation, formulation, and execution of the Plan. Additionally, the
Youth Summit organizers’2 aspiration were predicated on the notion of giving “voice” to
the youth, in a manner consistent with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of
the Children (herein, CRC). The appropriate CRC provisions are stated below, along
with the corresponding child friendly language provided by the United Nations Children’s
Fund (UNICEF). 3

        State Parties shall assure to the child who is capable of forming his or her
        own views the right to express those views freely in all matters affecting the
        child, the views of the child being given due weight in accordance with the
        age and maturity of the child. 4


                             “You have the right to give your opinion,
                         and for adults to listen and take it seriously.” 5



2
  Youth Summit organizers refer to the Girl Scouts of Hawai`i and Hawai`i Institute of Public Affairs, who
collaboratively organized the Youth Sustainability Summit on behalf of the Hawai`i 2050 Task Force.
3
   UNICEF is mandated by the United Nations General Assembly to advocate for the protection of
children's rights, to help meet their basic needs and to expand their opportunities to reach their full
potential. (www.unicef.org)
4
  “Article 12 of Convention on the Rights of the Child”; Adopted and opened for signature, ratification and
accession by General Assembly resolution 44/25 of 20 November 1989 – entry into force 2 September
1990, in accordance with article 49; United Nation; New York.
5
  “Article 12 of UNICEF – CRC at 18 – The convention in child-friendly language”; United Nations; New
York (www.unicef.org/knowyourrights/convetion_pictures.html).


                                                    3
        The child shall have the right to freedom of expression; this right shall include
        freedom to seek, receive and impart information and ideas of all kinds,
        regardless of frontiers, either orally, in writing or in print, in the form of art, or
        through any other media of the child’s choice.

        The exercise of this right may be subject to certain restrictions, but these shall
        only be such as are provided by law and are necessary: (a) For respect of
        the rights or reputations of others; or (b) For the protection of national security
        or of public order (ordre public), or of public health or morals. 6


                                 “You have the right to find out things
                                 and share what you think with others,
                           by talking, drawing, writing or in any other way
                              unless it harms or offends other people.” 7



The Youth Summit organizers also wanted to reinforce the message that youth
leadership matters when it comes to finding the right pathways to Hawai`i’s sustainable
future. It supports what other youth leadership experts advocate - “a more participatory
and inclusive approach with a focus on a commitment to changing communities,
neighborhoods and the world at large.” 8 It also agrees with the view that “[t]his more
empowering approach encourages youth to take on increasing responsibility, treats
them as involved participants in designing and implementing activities; and explores
how they can have an impact today, not just as adults tomorrow.” 9

The Youth Summit organizers further concur that important to the success of achieving
positive youth participation and leadership, and the ultimate engagement of youth in
policy making, are three core elements: 10

        Building Capacity – Help the youth develop skills, and knowledge related to
        systems and strategies.

        Deepening Motivation – Build awareness of the root causes of issues and a
        deepening commitment to, and sense of responsibility for solving them.

6
  “Article 13 of Convention on the Rights of the Child”; Adopted and opened for signature, ratification and
accession by General Assembly resolution 44/25 of 20 November 1989 – entry into force 2 September
1990, in accordance with article 49; United Nation; New York.
7
  “Article 13 of UNICEF – CRC at 18 – The convention in child-friendly language”; United Nations; New
York (www.unicef.org/knowyourrights/convetion_pictures.html).
8
  “Exploring Girls’ Leadership”; Girl Scout Research Institute; New York, New York; October 2007
9
  “Exploring Girls’ Leadership”; Girl Scout Research Institute; New York, New York; October 2007
10
   “Building Effective Youth Councils”; Forum for Youth Investment; Washington, D.C.; July 2007


                                                     4
          Creating Opportunity – Provide a range of opportunities to work on skills and
          act on passions in a way that generates demonstrable outcomes.


Moreover, the Youth Summit organizers’ work is rooted in the principle of youth-adult
partnerships - “intergenerational relationships that are transformative in nature, promote
knowledge, competency, and initiative.” 11 Such an approach is not only supported by
experts in the youth development field, but also consistent with the Kanaka Maoli and
Island Values of Hawai`i.



INFORMATION GATHERING
As part of its statewide, community-based planning efforts, the Task Force wanted to
send a strong signal to the youth that the adults do care about what they are thinking,
feeling, and dreaming about with regards to their futures. Thus, it made resources
available to ensure that youth voices were heard. The youth reciprocated in-kind by
providing valuable feedback in a variety of ways.

While the information gathered is informative and helpful, one must be cautious about
aggregating data as well as extrapolating greater meaning to a particular response. For
example, care must be given when making comparisons between the youth and adults
because the youth were not asked the full compliment of survey questions as the adults.
Even with these limitations, the Task Force believes it has been well-worth the effort.


Four Communication Channels

Because the Task Force is specifically interested in knowing and understanding the
views, concerns, and hopes of today’s youth, it supported the development of four
channels of communication that utilized various methodologies to capture their voices.


2050 Youth Sustainability Summit

On September 21, 2007, the Task Force convened its 2050 Youth Sustainability
Summit (herein, Youth Summit) at the City and County of Honolulu facility, Neal
Blaisdell Center. (See Appendices A and B)

Throughout the day-long event, 217 students and 43 adults participated in several small
and large group activities designed to encourage them to share their feelings, insights,
and understanding of issues relative to sustainability. The participants came from all

11
     “Exploring Girls’ Leadership”; Girl Scout Research Institute; New York, New York; October 2007


                                                    5
four counties and from public, private, and charter schools. Nearly all students were
high-school age. (See Appendices C and D for demographic breakdown)

The participants also took the time to interact with a touch screen that was programmed
to record their range of responses to questions similarly asked of adults during earlier
community meetings and on the Hawai`i 2050 Sustainability Task Force website.
However, while the adult survey contained 46 questions, the youth survey was
narrowed down to 14. The rationale for doing so was to make it feasible for students to
respond during the summit day. Thus, the questions most relevant to the youth were
asked. The response to each question was rated by the participant on a sliding scale of
green to red, indicating highly agree to highly disagree, respectively. The responses
were later reported out on a ten-point scale. Of the 255 in attendance, 203 responded to
the survey. (See Table 1)


2050-HI Youth Blog

In many ways, the youth of today have already demonstrated the impact they can have
on the world. They rule in cyberspace. Since it is often their preferred choice of venue
to communicate, the Youth Summit organizers provided a virtual meeting place – a blog
– for Hawai`i’s teens to share their thoughts, exchange ideas, and impart information
about what it will take to achieve a sustainable future for Hawai`i. Those who went to
the blog had more than one way to express themselves. They could blog by uploading
visual or written material, respond to a survey written specifically for the site, download
information and pictures on sustainability related topics around the world, and/or be
linked to the Hawai`i 2050 website to answer the survey on that site. Not surprisingly,
the expressions captured through the blog site were similar to those from other venues.
(See www.2050-HI.com)


Kids Voting Hawaii

In a fashion similar to what occurs during election year, Kids Voting Hawaii made
available on its website age appropriate surveys for students 11-13 and 14-18 years
old. At this site, students had an opportunity to participate in a survey similar to the one
available at the Youth Summit. Like the other venues, the responses collected were
similar in nature. (See www.kidsvotinghawaii.org)


Community Engagement

In 2050, the students currently enrolled in elementary school through college will be the
adults-in-charge. Engaging tomorrow’s adults in discussions with today’s adults sets
the stage for dynamic and rich conversations that can shift paradigms and create new
possibilities. Thus, on the day of the Youth Summit and in subsequent e-mails,


                                             6
students were encouraged to participate in the October Task Force community
engagement meetings. (See Appendix B for community meeting schedule)


Additional Tools

Independent Surveys

In addition to the four channels of communication formally established by the Task
Force, additional surveys were distributed by high school students who were interested
in engaging their classmates who were not able to attend the Youth Summit. In total,
578 independent surveys, asking the same 14 questions with a rating scale of yes or
no, were collected by these students. (See Table 2)


Focus Group

Prior to making the decision whether or not to convene a summit for the youth, Rebecca
Ward of Ward Research, Inc. generously agreed to conduct a focus group with students
from six public and private high schools to access their sentiments about issues related
to the work of the Task Force. The group affirmed the importance of engaging the
youth in this effort because they clearly understood the potential impact on their futures.
They also shared that the youth need to be engaged at their level and through avenues
that attract and compel them to participate.

Other informal group discussions conducted by the Youth Summit organizers yielded
remarkably similar results.



OBSERVATIONS
After reviewing and analyzing the information gathered through the four communication
channels and other less formal means, it is clear the youth are genuinely interested in
issues related to sustainability. The following can be said about the youth who offered
their voice:


   Although the youth were not asked specifically whether they agreed with the triple
   bottom line approach incorporated into the Task Force’s proposed definition of
   sustainability, their answers to other questions indicate they do agree and that they
   understand that the approach often requires making difficult choices.




                                            7
   They place great importance on preserving sites of cultural importance and the
   environment because these factors help make Hawai`i a special place. Yet,
   there was less clarity when asked whether Hawai`i should limit the number of
   tourist in order to protect Hawai`i’s natural resources.
   Even though affordable housing was considered a priority, the youth strongly
   disagreed with the idea of using more agriculture or conservation land, or other
   open spaces to address this need. Yet, they were tentative about whether
   people should pay more for houses if there was a limit on building new structures
   in order to protect the environment.


The youth clearly appreciated the fact that people would have to change their
societal behaviors in order to achieve a sustainable future.
   There was strong agreement that there needs to be a major emphasis on
   developing all possible and affordable means for recycling.
   The youth were in agreement that Hawai`i should become energy independent,
   using renewable energy sources, even if it cost more.


Issues that impact a community’s quality of life - such as education, affordable
housing, and health care – are important considerations for the youth.
  There was general agreement that Hawai`i needs to improve its educational
  system, no matter the cost.
  `The youth also recognized the importance of having access to health care, no
  matter the cost.
  They are worried about whether they can actually afford to live in Hawai`i. The
  youth are concerned about the types of jobs they might have to settle for if they
  remain in Hawai`i. They are generally skeptical of their abilities to make a living,
  being able to buy a home, and raise a family in Hawai`i in a manner consistent
  with the quality of life they hope to have.


The youth generally agree with the concepts found in the Task Force’s proposed
definition of sustainability and the corresponding vision, with possibly one exception,
the – the last paragraph that reads, “Hawai‘i is where our hopes and aspirations as
individuals, families and as a community are realized now and in the future.” (See
Appendix G)
   Through the surveys, many respondents, indicated that while they plan to live in
   Hawai`i when they are 35 years old, they do not believe that Hawai`i will be a
   better place 10 or even 50 years from now.


                                         8
       Many off-the-record conversations, especially among college-bound students,
       indicate they do not see themselves living in Hawai`i as adults because of a
       disconnect between their dreams and aspirations, and the perceived lack of
       future opportunities in Hawai`i.


    Overall, the vast majority of the responses from the youth mirrored those of the
    adults. However, the youth attribute the myriad of challenges facing Hawai`i to
    earlier decisions made by adults. Thus, they believe they must get involved now if
    their preferred futures have any chance of being realized.
       Most youth do not think the government will be effective in solving Hawai`i’s
       problems in the future.
       While many youth have been “energerized” by the work of the Task Force, they
       are under no illusion that the efforts to realize the Plan’s stated vision will be
       easy, effortless, and precise. In fact, given the current state of affairs, they are
       not yet convinced that it is attainable, albeit desirable.
.
       Nearly every participant at the Youth Summit was motivated to “Be a Voice and
       Get Involved” in the sustainability effort. This sentiment is also being echoed by
       their peers.


The following is the presentation of data from the Youth Summit Survey and the
Independent Sustainability Survey. (See Tables 1 and 2, respectively). As noted, care
must be taken when making comparisons between the two sets of data. Although the
same fourteen questions were asked, the Youth Summit Survey responses were
reported on a ten point sale, whereas the Independent Sustainability Survey responses
were reported in a yes or no format.

Additionally, while both surveys provided the underpinnings of these observations, the
observations were also shaped by anecdotal comments from and conversations
amongst the youth.




                                            9
                                                                                        TABLE 1
                                                      2050 Youth Sustainability Summit Survey Results
                                                                                September 21, 2007)



                                                10

                                                 9

                                                 8

                                                 7

Responses - Students were                        6
                                    Responses



asked to rate, on a scale of 0-10
(0 - disagree and 10 - agree),                   5
their response to 14 questions
                                                 4
taken from a Hawai`i 2050 Task
Force survey.                                    3

                                                 2

                                                 1

                                                 0
                                                 1        2          3          4         5          6         7        8          9     10         11        12        13        14
 Survey Questions
 1. I plan to stay in Hawai`i to go to college.                                                                Questions
 2. I plan to be living in Hawai`i when I am 35 years old.
 3. Hawai`i's youth live a better life now than their grandparents did when they were young.
 4. Hawai`i will be a better place to live in 10 years.
 5. To protect Hawai`i's natural resources, (ocean, air quality, trees, plants, etc.) Hawai`i needs to limit the number of tourists.
 6. There should be a major emphasis on developing all possible and affordable means for recycling.
 7. Hawai`i needs to limit new building to protect the environment, even if it means people have to pay more for houses.
 8. Hawai`i should become energy independent using renewable energy sources, even if it means I have to pay more for that energy.
 9. If the only way to keep housing affordable is to build more houses on agricultural or conservation land (forest reserves, parks, open spaces, etc.) then Hawai`i should do this.
 10. Hawai`i should preserve sites of cultural importance because they are important to what makes Hawai`i such a special place to live.
 11. Hawai`i should take big steps to fix our traffic problems, even if it means paying a fee for driving on some roads or higher gas taxes.
 12. Hawai`i needs to improve its education system, no matter how much it costs.
 13. All Hawai`i residents should have access to health care in the future, no matter what it costs.
 14. I think our government will be effective in solving Hawai`i's problems in the future.




                                                                                             10
                                                                                            TABLE 2
                                                                Independent Sustainability Survey Results
                                                                                     (578 Participants)




                                              600
                                                                                                                                                                 86%

                                                                                                                                                                 500
                                              500
Responses - (572) Students                                                                                                 67%
                                                                        63%                 63%
and (6)teachers answered yes                              58%                                                              389                     58%                              57%
                                              400                       369
or no to a series of 14                                                                     365
                                                          335                                                                                      335                              332
questions taken from a
                                  Responses




Hawai`i 2050 Task Force                       300
                                                    35%                                                                                                                                   36%
survey.                                                                                            32%
                                                                                                                                             35%
                                                    205                       27%                                  27%                       205                                          211
                                              200                                                  186
                                                                              159                                  156

                                                                7%                  9%                                               6%                                8%   6%
                                              100                                                          5%                                            7%                                     7%
                                                                                     54                                                                                49
                                                                 42                                         31                        37                  42                 33                  39

                                                0
                                                    Yes   No     No     Yes    No    No     Yes    No       No     Yes      No        No     Yes   No     No     Yes   No    No     Yes   No     No
                                                                reply               reply                  reply                     reply               reply              reply               reply

                                                           1                   2                       3                    *4                      5                  6                   7
                                                                                                                         Questions


     Survey Questions
     1. I plan to stay in Hawai`i to go to college.
     2. I plan to be living in Hawai`i when I am 35 years old.
     3. Hawai`i's youth live a better life now than their grandparents did when they were young.
     4. Hawai`i will be a better place to live in *50 years. (* Youth Summit Survey used 10 years)
     5. To protect Hawai`i's natural resources, (ocean, air quality, trees, plants, etc.) Hawai`i needs to limit the number of tourists.
     6. There should be a major emphasis on developing all possible and affordable means for recycling.
     7. Hawai`i needs to limit new building to protect the environment, even if it means people have to pay more for houses.

                                                                                                  11
                                                                              TABLE 2 – Continued
                                                          Independent Sustainability Survey Results
                                                                                (578 Participants)



                                              600


                                                                                                                                                             78%
                                              500
                                                                                             70%                                                             455
Responses - (572) Students                                                     68%                                                       67%
                                                                                              406
and (6)teachers answered yes                  400
                                                    58%                        396                                                       388
or no to a series of 14                             339                                                                   51%                                                           47%
                                  Responses



questions taken from a                                                                                            42%      299                                                   44%
                                              300                                                                                                                                         275
Hawai`i 2050 Task Force                                   35%                                                      242
                                                                                                                                                                                  253
survey.                                                   201           27%
                                                                                                                                               28%
                                              200
                                                                                                    23%
                                                                        155                                                                    164
                                                                                                    135                                                            15%
                                                                                                                                                                                                9%
                                                                7%                                        7%                     7%                                 85   7%
                                              100                                    5%                                                              5%
                                                                                                                                                                                                 54
                                                                 42                                        41                       41                                    42
                                                                                      31                                                              30

                                                0
                                                    Yes   No     No     Yes     No    No      Yes   No     No      Yes     No     No     Yes   No     No     Yes    No    No      Yes     No     No
                                                                reply                reply                reply                  reply               reply               reply                  reply

                                                           8                    9                   10                     11                  12                   13                    14

                                                                                                                        Questions


       Survey Questions
       8. Hawai`i should become energy independent using renewable energy sources, even if it means I have to pay more for that energy.
       9. If the only way to keep housing affordable is to build more houses on agricultural or conservation land (forest reserves, parks, open
       spaces, etc.) then Hawai`i should do this.
       10. Hawai`i should preserve sites of cultural importance because they are important to what maks Hawai`i such a special place to live.
       11. Hawai`i should take big steps to fix our traffic problems, even if it means paying a fee for driving on some roads or higher gas taxes.
       12. Hawai`i needs to improve its education system, no matter how much it costs.
       13. All Hawai`i residents should have access to health care in the future, no matter what it costs.
       14. I think our government will be effective in solving Hawai`i's problems in the future
                                                                                             12
RECOMMENDATIONS
The Report’s recommendations build on the observations previously noted. They
incorporate the concepts and ideas that best reflect not only the voices of the youth, but
also support the Plan’s proposed goals and strategies. Moreover, they are designed to
add perspective to on-going sustainability discussion and, hopefully, result in a way of
work that includes innovative thinking and collaborative problem solving.

The recommendations are organized around the three core elements essential to youth
participation and leadership development: 1) Building Capacity; 2) Deepening
Motivation; and 3) Creating Opportunity. Inherent to all three elements is continued
support and encouragement of the youth to not only express their ideas, opinions, and
concerns, but also to find creative and constructive ways to advocate for and effectual
change.


   Building Capacity
   Help the youth develop skills and knowledge related to systems and strategies.
      Create a Youth Sustainability Day at the Hawai`i State Capitol on a day most
      youth can participate. It is important to provide opportunities for the youth to
      speak to legislators about issues that matter to them. Also set up opportunities
      for students to meet with each other and work on addressing and responding to
      issues together. Suggested Date: President’s Day – Feb. 18, 2008.
      Appoint youth to be active members of the proposed Sustainability Council
      and/or other entities that monitor and report on the progress of sustainable efforts
      in Hawai`i.
      Encourage students to develop an understanding of the workings of each level of
      government, and their areas of responsibility and influence on issues related to
      sustainability. For example, students can visit government operations that
      manage solid waste, water quality control, and land and natural resources.


   Deepening Motivation
   Build awareness among the youth of the root causes of issues and a deepening
   commitment to, and sense of responsibility for solving them.
      Encourage students to develop habits that are environmental friendly. For
      example, arrange for students to visit county solid waste sites so they can see
      what happens to their trash in hopes of understanding the importance of
      recycling.




                                           13
       Work with school administrators and educators to ensure that issues related to
       sustainability are an integral part of the school’s curricula and that their student
       government forums are encouraging, advocating, and monitoring sustainable
       practices and behaviors by adults and students.
       Work in tandem with non-profit organizations that focus on positive youth
       development and/or content experts on sustainability issues to augment
       classroom learning experiences by strengthening their understanding of the triple
       bottom line approach to sustainability. For example, incorporate into the Kids
       Voting Hawaii election year educational efforts, issues related to sustainability.
       Encourage the academic and scientific communities to provide opportunities for
       the youth to meet and interact with researchers and scientists who are committed
       to discovering and/or promoting break-through projects that fundamentally
       change the economical, social, and political landscape of society in ways that
       bring great benefit to sustainable communities.


    Creating Opportunities
    Provide a range of opportunities for the youth to work on their skills and act on their
    passions in a way that generates demonstrable outcomes.
.
       During the 2008 Hawai`i State Legislative Session, encourage the youth to track
       and actively be engaged in the passage of legislation that supports the
       recommendations of the Task Force. The youth can follow the legislative
       process by going on-line, testifying on bills, speaking with legislators, and writing
       letters or sending e-mails in support of or opposition to relevant issues or
       legislation.
       Encourage non-profits, institutions, business establishments, cultural and social
       clubs, and other group entities to create youth councils that embrace sustainable
       practices and behaviors so the youth can align their personal interests or abilities
       with organizations that help the State achieve its sustainability goals.
       Have the youth work with business and community leaders to make the students’
       learning relevant and tangible. For example, students can work with property
       managers and vendors to ensure that recycling receptacles are readily
       accessible for patrons and business operators to utilize.
       Have the youth engage in service learning projects that help them understand
       the complexities of the triple bottom line approach. For example, high school
       students can help to clean-up watershed areas.
       Have the youth exercise their influence on their parents’ spending habits to
       purchase environmentally friendly products, equipment, and household goods.




                                            14
CONCLUSION
Although some might argue that it is the prerogative of the youth to vacillate between
being pessimistic and optimistic about their futures, it is difficult to ignore the pessimism
that exists among the youth about their future opportunities in Hawai`i. Without a
doubt, the youth appreciate that the home they are growing up in is special. They
recognize the importance of preserving the elements of what makes Hawai`i a unique
place to live, play, and work. They inherently understand how difficult it will be to
succeed in doing so, especially in this rapidly changing world.

The youth are also acutely aware of the impact mankind’s decisions and behaviors are
having on earth and in space. They are regularly bombarded with images and stories
about global warming and the affect it is having on the environment in ways that directly
impact Hawai`i. They know about wars being fought and habitats being destroyed
because of energy consumption and consumer demands. They see and hear about
world-wide pandemic epidemics that know no geographical boundaries.

At the same time, they believe they are in a better position to change the world in ways
previous generations could not. They intuitively understand what author Thomas L.
Friedman argues. He states, “[c]learly, it is now possible for more people than ever to
collaborate and compete in real time with more other people on more different kinds of
work from more different corners of the planet and on a more equal footing than at any
previous time in the history of the world.”12

The good news is that the youth are a motivated generation. Partly because of their
youthful optimism and mostly because they believe they have no choice. They
understand that there are costs involved and that many of the choices facing them will
be difficult to make and problematic to live by. It will require them to change their own
thinking, behaviors, and practices, regardless of what the adults say or do.

However, they want to be at the table with the adults and be involved in not only
creating a plan, but also, more importantly, in its execution. And while they believe in
their own abilities, they also understand they need the help and cooperation of those
who currently hold the leadership positions and power, to best begin effecting change
today. In other words, they do not want to inherit a situation in which they are rendered
helpless because they are left without credible and doable solutions. They want the
option of building upon the successes of their predecessors.

Thus, the Report’s recommendations not only reflect these sentiments but also that of
the Task Force. The Task Force believes the youth must be involved in significant and
substantial ways. It hopes its efforts to engage the youth will start a chain of events that
will positively and permanently change the current trajectory of Hawai`i’s future.

12
  “The World is Flat – A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century”; Thomas L. Friedman; Picador; New
York; 2007.


                                                  15
Achieving a preferable future is a long-term proposition that will require from the people
of Hawai`i commitment, dedication, discipline, patience, and creative leadership.
Fortunately, for Hawai`i, the youth say they are up for the challenge. The Report affirms
the Task Force’s belief in Hawai`i’s youth.




                                           16
                                    APPENDIX A
                   Synopsis of 2050 Youth Sustainability Summit


The Day

On September 21, 2007, 255 participants from primarily high schools across the State
gathered to attend the 2050 Youth Sustainability Summit (herein, Youth Summit) at the
Neal Blaisdell Center in Honolulu, Hawai`i. The summit was organized by the 2050
Sustainability Task Force (herein, Task Force) for the purpose of bringing together
students to discuss issues related to creating a sustainable future for Hawai`i. The one-
day summit was designed to realize three outcomes:

     Creating Voice – To provide opportunities for students to express their ideas,
     opinions, and concerns about Hawai`i’s future.

     Creating Understanding – To participate in interactive group activities designed
     to help them understand the complexities of the issues facing Hawai`i.

     Creating a Preferred Future – To engage in discussions that challenge them to
     think about what roles and responsibilities they might assume to help shape
     the State’s future course of action and to foster sustainable behaviors.

Mr. Ramsay R.M. Taum was invited by the Youth Summit organizers to engage the
students in a learning process that advances the notion that for Hawai`i to be
sustainable by the year 2050, her people must implement a triple bottom line approach
that effectively balance the often competing interests of economic development,
environmental protection and social-community goals. Interwoven into Mr. Taum’s
presentation were opportunities for small and large group discussions.

In addition to Mr. Taum’s sessions, the message of creating a sustainable future for
Hawai`i was reinforced in several ways. Senator Russell Kokubun, Task Force Chair,
opened the Youth Summit by welcoming the participants and sharing with them the
hopes, aspirations, and work of the Task Force. Slack-key guitarist, Makana, during his
lunch-time musical performance, spoke about the importance of preserving the
environment. Also, the Honorable Mufi Hannemann, Mayor of the City and County of
Honolulu, challenged the students to get involved in creating their preferred future as
well as invited them to the City’s Recycling Fair that showcased the sustainable
practices of the city government and vendors.

Throughout the day, students took turns interacting with a touch screen that was
programmed to record their range of responses to questions similarly asked of adults
during earlier community meetings and survey instruments.



                                           17
The Participants

Youth Summit participants were a diverse group, comprised of 217 students and 38
adults from across the State. There were more females than males, 164 to 91
respectively. The students were largely high school-age from 20 public, 12 private, and
1 charter schools. (See Appendices C and D)


The Challenge

From the onset, the Youth Summit organizers understood the logistical and content
challenges of a one-day summit, especially on a school day. For the most part, thanks
to the cooperation of school officials and partnering organizations, the Youth Summit
organizers were able to resolve a myriad of logistical concerns. For example, due to
safety concerns, it was decided that groups of students chaperoned by adults would be
invited to participate, rather than making it a public event. Also, for those who had to
travel significant distances, the Youth Summit organizers provided and coordinated
transportation. Similarly, whenever needed, financial support was made available for
substitute teachers.

However, addressing the content issues was inherently more problematic on several
fronts. For example, the timing of the funding and the fact that the Youth Summit
occurred early in the school year meant there was little, to no, lead time for teachers to
adequately work with their students prior to Youth Summit. This factor made it difficult
to know how to structure and deliver the content that day since the students’ level of
engagement would be impacted by how knowledgeable and familiar they were about
the subject matter. Also, the students’ capacities to learn and engage in a summit-type
setting would be influenced by their age, grade, intellect, and critical thinking skills as
well as their commitment to the issue.

Furthermore, asking any person to imagine a situation 43 years into the future is an
important, but largely improbable task. This is particularly true for someone of the
younger persuasion. Many shared they already had difficulty projecting what they
would be doing the next five years let alone four decades later. Also, trying to anticipate
the rate, pace, and impact technological advances will have on the State’s social,
economic, and political landscape is a difficult exercise.

The situation was further complicated by the fact that the Task Force knew full-well
going into the event that even under the best of circumstances the day would have its
limitations. The academic disciplines related to sustainability are not only complex and
numerous, but also inter-related and inter-dependent. Although a one-day event might
pique interests, it would not provide enough time to master an understanding of the
issues. Thus, early on the Youth Summit organizers worked to develop other avenues
and resources for student learning and engagement beyond the summit day.



                                            18
Yet, even with these challenges, the Task Force felt it was important to begin the
engagement process by hosting a summit for the youth. It saw the day as a starting
point rather than a means to an end.


The Support

During the planning stages of the Youth Summit, adults throughout the State articulated
the view that the youth needed to be engage in the development and execution of the
Plan. They universally understood that the Plan was about the future of today’s youth,
not their own.

As a testament of this sentiment, the Hawai`i State Legislature, the four county Mayors;
and congressional delegation sent letters affirming the importance of the Youth Summit.
Also, Task Force members came to observe on the day of the Youth Summit.

Further support was evidenced by the Project Partnerships: Hawai`i Institute for Public
Affairs (HIPA) on behalf of the Task Force; City and County of Honolulu; and Girl
Scouts of Hawai`i, the organizers of the Youth Summit. Other key sponsors also
showed their support in significant ways: Commercial Data Systems; Hawaiian Airlines;
Kids Voting Hawaii; Makana Music; Menehune Water Company; Puna Geothermal
Venture; and 3ToadProductions.

Most importantly, significant funding from the State Legislature administered by the
Office of the Auditor made it possible for students from every county to be able to
participate and have meaningful learning experiences.

See Appendix B for Youth Summit program.




                                           19
                APPENDIX B
Hawai`i 2050 Youth Sustainability Summit Program




                       20
Hawai‘i 2050 Youth Project


“Why the youth? We don’t have PHd, Master’s, or even college diplomas…..but we will.
      We are not business leaders, CEOs, or powerful politicians…but we will be.
            We need to be prepared for when we are called upon to lead.
  We need to understand the process, the effort, and know how to affect change.”

                                - Colby, 16 years old


      “We must learn how to preserve our world for future generations, so that
      they are able to enjoy the same things we do. The role of Hawaii’s youth
       today is to be the leaders and ultimate decision makers of tomorrow.”

                                -Malia, 16 years old


       Ha w ai i 2050 Youth Sustainability Summit
       Hawai‘i          Youth
                 riday September 21 2007
                Friday, Sept ember 21 , 2007
        Pikake Room, Blaisdell Exhibition Hall
               HAWAI I 2050 TASK F ORCE
               HAWAI‘I             ORCE
                            TASK FOR
                  www.hawaii2050.org

The Hawai‘i 2050 Sustainability Task Force is charged with
helping to create a sustainability planning document that
will guide the decisions of our policymakers, our
communities, and individuals to create a sustainable Hawai‘i
in a manner that reflects the collective values, priorities,
and aspirations of residents throughout the State. The Task
Force was established in 2005, by the Hawai‘i State
Legislature through Act 8 (SB1592 CD1). It is working with
the Office of the Auditor to prepare a Hawai‘i 2050
Sustainability Plan.

The Task Force is making a concerted effort to reach out to
the youth because the plan it is working to develop concerns
their future.

We want to hear from you about the draft Hawai‘i 2050
Sustainability Plan – what you like, what you don’t like, what
makes sense, what’s missing, and what could be improved.

Please tell us what you think at one of our community meet-
ings. We ask that you download the draft Hawai‘i 2050
Sustainability Plan at www.hawaii2050.org and review it
before attending a meeting. If you can’t attend a meeting,
you can send us your ideas and opinions via the website.

Should you have questions, contact the Task Force at
808-585-7931, x104 or info@hawaii2050.org.
                            HAWAI‘I 2050 SUSTAINABILITY TASK FORCE



  Sen. Russell Kokubun,
          Chair


      Rep. Lyla Berg
     Rep. Pono Chong
Sen. Suzanne Chun Oakland
          Ian Costa
         Henry Eng
    Sen. Mike Gabbard
       David Goode
      Marion M. Higa
        Jeffrey Hunt                  MESSAGE FROM STATE SENATOR RUSSELL S. KOKUBUN
       Dr. Karl Kim
         Millie Kim
      Keith Kurahashi
      Brad Kurokawa          On behalf of the Hawaii 2050 Sustainability Task Force, greetings and warmest
    Rep. Colleen Meyer
       Keith Rollman         aloha to all who have gathered for the Hawai`i 2050 Youth Sustainability Summit.
     Dr. James Spencer
         Jane Testa
       Laura Thielen         I thank and commend all the students and the adults who are participating in today’s
     Stacie Thorlakson       summit. What you say and do is critical to the success of the Task Force’s efforts.
       Beth Tokioka
      Sen. Jill Tokuda       So we invite you to think deeply about the issues related to a sustainable Hawai`i.
      Michael Tresler           We also challenge you to be engaged and become involved. By working together,
      Pamela Tumpap
    Rep. Ryan Yamane         we can collectively influence and shape not only your future but generations to
                             come.

                             Best wishes for a successful and insightful summit. We look forward to hearing
                             your voices.


                             Aloha,




                             Senator Russell S. Kokubun
                             Hawai`i 2050 Task Force




                                                          Hawai‘i 2050 Sustainability Task Force
                                       c/o Office of the Auditor 465 S. King Street, Rm. 500 Honolulu, HI 96813
                                         Tel: (808) 587-0800 Fax: (808) 587-0830 auditors@auditor.state.hi.us
                                                                  www.hawaii2050.org
Russell S. Kokubun
Russell S. Kokubun was born and raised in Honolulu. He
graduated from Punahou School in 1966 and received his
Bachelors of Business Administration degree from Southern
Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. Russell lives with his
wife, Anne in Volcano Village on Hawai‘i Island. He has two
daughters. Older daughter Keiko lives on Hawai‘i Island with
her husband Clinton Mercado and their son Gabriel. His
younger daughter Nina lives in Tahiti on the Island of Bora
Bora with her husband Haunui Ta‘ati and their daughter
Vavea.

        After moving to the Big Island in 1974 to pursue a career in agriculture, Russell
        lived and worked in Waimea as a farm laborer. Subsequently, he purchased
        and began operating his farm in Volcano in 1978. As the President and
        Executive Director of the Volcano Community Association from 1981 through
        1984, he led the organization in its effort to prevent the destruction of pristine
        native forest, which serves as critical habitat for endangered species, by
        industrial geothermal development near Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.


Kokubun was elected to the Hawai‘i County Council in 1984. He was re-elected in 1988 and
selected by his council colleagues to serve as Chairman of the County Council. In 1992 he
sought the Mayor’s seat for the Big Island and was unsuccessful in his endeavor. In November
1992, Kokubun was hired by the Hilo Downtown Improvement Association as the Project
Manager for the Hilo Main Street Program. He led the effort to revitalize Downtown Hilo
through the preservation and enhancement of the historic and cultural elements of the
area.

Hawai‘i County Mayor Stephen Yamashiro appointed Kokubun as an Executive Assistant in
September 1995. Working as a facilitator on special projects, Kokubun was subsequently
appointed by Mayor Yamashiro to the post of Deputy Director for the Department of Planning
in June 1997 and continued in this capacity until December 2000. Fulfilling his interest in
historic, cultural and natural resource management, Kokubun was selected to serve from
1996 to 2002 as one of two advisors from the State of Hawaii to the National Board of
Advisors for the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He has also served as a Trustee for
Historic Hawai‘i Foundation from 1995 to 2002.

Kokubun was appointed by Governor Benjamin J. Cayetano to serve as the Hawai‘i Island
Member of the State Board of Land and Natural Resources beginning in 1998. When a vacancy
occurred in the State Senate District 2 in 2000, Governor Cayetano appointed Kokubun to
complete the term in the Senate until 2002, and was subsequently re-elected to the Senate
in 2004 and 2006, where he is currently the Chair of the Hawai‘i 2050 Sustainability Task
Force.
                                          Ramsey R.M. Taum

                                 Ramsay Taum is the Director of Oahu Operations at the
                                 Hawai‘i Nature Center. He also serves as the Director of
                                 External Relations and Community Partnerships at the
                                 University of Hawai‘i Travel Industry Management (TIM)
                                 School at Manoa. Born and raised in Hawai‘i, he is a
                                 graduate of the Kamehameha Schools and holds a Bachelor
                                 of Science degree in public administration from the
                                 University of Southern California.
Ramsay is a sought after keynote speaker and cultural consultant integrating Native Hawaiian
host cultural values and principles into contemporary business models through lectures,
training classes and seminars. He is a practitioner and instructor of several Native Hawaiian
practices including ho‘oponopono (stress management and conflict resolution), lomi haha
(body alignment) and Kaihewalu Lua (Hawaiian combat/battle art).

As an active community advocate, Ramsay serves on numerous local and national boards,
advisory groups and councils including


       ·   Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs, Oahu Council Policy Committee Chair
       ·   Hawai‘i 2050 Task Force: Definitions Working Group; Accountability
           Working Group
       ·   Hawaii Chamber of Commerce Tourism & Transportation Committee
       ·   Hawai‘i Maoli, Board Vice-President
       ·   Hawaii State Consortium of Integrative Heath Services
       ·   The Hawaii Tourism Authority Hawaiian Cultural Program Advisory Council
       ·   Hawaii Visitors & Convention Bureau Marketing Advisory Committee
       ·   Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences Health Policy
           Institute, Board Member
       ·   Pacific Islanders in Communication (PIC), Board Vice President
       ·   Pasifika Foundation Hawaii, Inc. (PFH), Board President
       ·   The Royal Order of Kamehameha, Hawaii Chapter
       ·   Sustain Hawai‘i, Co-facilitator (Co-executive Director)
       ·   The University of Hawai‘i (UH) at Manoa Chancellor’s Sustainability
           Council
       ·   UH Travel Industry Management School Hawaiian Advisory Council
       ·   World Business Academy, Hawaii Chapter, President


Ramsay is President and founder of LEI of the Pacific LLC and, co-founder and managing
member of E Ola Pono LLC, organizations dedicated to the promotion and perpetuation of
Native Hawai‘i cultural healing principles and practices.
Makana
Makana was born and raised on the isle of O‘ahu in Hawai‘i.
He began singing at age 7 in the Honolulu Boy Choir, then
picked up the ‘ukulele at age 9 as a student of the Roy
Sakuma ‘Ukulele School. At age 11 Makana began his
journey with Hawaiian slack key guitar under the guidance
of Bobby Moderow (protege of slack key master Ray Kane).
His first public slack key performance, age 11, was at the
Palisades Elementary cafeteria talent show. Appeared on
“SuperKids of Summer” TV show, age 12. Awarded grant
from The State Foundation on Culture and the Arts to study
under legendary slack key master Sonny Chillingworth, age
13-14.

Makana began his first professional gig at age 14 at the Pier Bar in downtown Honolulu. He
played solo, and by age 15 was gigging 4 nights a week! With a beginner’s mind and a lot of
playing and stage time, Makana soon developed the foundation for his own style of Slack
Rock, known for its “huge” sound and surprisingly dynamic range of expression.


          Makana has toured England, Japan, China, Germany, Canada, Tahiti,
          Bali, and throughout the US, has headlined at Bumbershoot (Seattle)
          and WOMAD Reading, and is regularly featured at Slack Key Festivals
          and as a headliner throughout the Hawaiian Islands. He performs solo
          and with a band, sharing Hawaiian/World music, and modern
          contemporary original rock. His music has been featured in major
          motion pictures and independent films, as well as innumerable
          environmental and educational documentaries. Makana has opened
          for talents such as Sting, Santana, Elvis Costello, No Doubt, Jack
          Johnson, Michael Franti and Spearhead and Baaba Maal and shared
          the stage with Andreas Vollenweider, Bruddah Iz, Keali‘i Reichel, Clay
          Walker, Jason Mraz and Raul Midon.



                                   Makana started his own artist label Makana Music in
                                   2002 and enjoys the freedom of creative independence
                                   and the ability to share his music with a multitude of
                                   fans as well as non-profits, educational institutions,
                                   environmental and social organizations, and
                                   communities worldwide. Makana currently lives at
                                   Diamond Head, and enjoys spending his free time at the
                                   beach, doing qi gong, yoga and the continuous process
                                   of learning new things.
Mufi Hannemann
                                                               Mufi Hannemann is the 12th mayor
                                                               of the City and County of Honolulu,
                                                               the 13th largest municipality in the
                                                               United States. Following an
                                                               illustrious career in business,
                                                               government, and politics, he took
                                                               office on January 2, 2005,
                                                               Honolulu’s first native-born mayor
                                                               in almost 40 years.

                                                              Mayor Hannemann’s goals include
                                                              restoring fiscal integrity and
                                                              accountability at City Hall, focusing
                                                              on basic public services, and
improving the quality of life for all of Honolulu’s citizens. The concentration on City services
is directed at ensuring public safety; repairing and maintaining roads, parks, and other public
facilities; improving an aging sewer system; tackling traffic and transportation issues; and
managing solid waste and recycling.

In September 2005, various City                   Mayor’s Energy & Sustainability
departments were convened by                                     Force
                                                            Task F orce
the Department of Budget and               www.honolulu.gov/mayor/ahupuaa/plan.htm
Fiscal Services to address the
rising fuel oil prices and its impact      Objectives
to the City’s operating budget and         The objective of the Mayor’s Energy and Sustainability Task
                                           Force are to:
formed the Energy Issues                   1. Examine current technology and improve upon existing
Committee (EIC). The objective of          practices to make the City more energy efficient and
the committee was to brainstorm            sustainable.
energy reducing initiatives to             2. Identify new technologies and practices that can be used
                                           to improve city operations by maximizing energy efficiency,
offset the City’s increasing energy        reducing waste and protecting the environment.
costs. The EIC established three           3. Adhere to the Mayor’s vision of the 21st Century Ahupua‘a
subcommittees: electricity; fuel           and its driving principles.
                                           4. Align with the U.S. Conference of Mayor’s Climate Control
usage; and innovative ideas (“Out-
                                           Agreement of 2004 advocating the reduction of greenhouse
of-the-Box”). An employee                  gas emissions.
awareness subcommittee was                 5. Develop a 10-year plan with goals and benchmarks in the
later added to help foster energy          areas of:
                                                    Energy Conservation
conservation at the individual
                                                    Fuel and Transportation
employee level. In early 2007, the                  Material Recovery and Recycling
EIC evolved into the Mayor’s                        Water Conservation
Energy and Sustainability Task                      Watershed Protection and Management
                                                    Sustainable Agriculture
Force to develop a 10-year plan to
                                                    Innovation Urban Forestry
make the City even more energy                      Education and Outreach
efficient and sustainable.
Hawai‘i 2050 Youth Sustainability Project

                   What should Hawai‘i be like in the year 2050?
                  What kind of economy do we want in fifty years?
        How self-sufficient do we want to become in growing our own food?
   Will we provide self-sufficient energy resources to meet our population needs?
          How do we preserve our land and water for future generations?
                  How do we care for our children and our elders?
        How do our actions today impact the future we will have tomorrow?
             Will we be leaving a better Hawai‘i for future generations?

Tough questions? Yes, but ones that many adults have been contemplating. In fact,
hundreds have weighed-in by participating in community meetings sponsored by the
Hawai‘i 2050 Sustainability Task Force (Task Force). Thousands, by responding to
surveys found on the Task Force’s website and by sending in comments via e-mail.

But what are the youth thinking? Do they even care? Are they up for the challenge of
finding solutions to the problems raised when grappling with the answers to these
questions? Understanding where the youth are on these issues is what the Hawai‘i
Youth Sustainability Project is all about. It’s about giving voice to a segment of the
population who must search for ways to shape and determine their own future. It
begins with asking the right questions, carefully listening to the responses, and then
finding appropriate ways to capture and convey their sentiments so they are not lost
or ignored by those who hold leadership positions that can affect change. To
accomplish this, the Task Force, with the help of others, has set up four channels of
communication.

                    Hawai‘i          Youth Sust
                    Ha wai i 2050 Youth Sus t ainability Summit
As the 2007-2008 school year begins, more than 250 high school students from across
the state will be invited to raise their “voices” on issues related to creating a
sustainable future for Hawai‘i. The 9th through 12th grade participants will be from
public, private, and charter schools. This one-day summit will focus on three outcomes:

 § Creating Voice - Students will have opportunities to express their ideas, opinions,
   and concerns about Hawai‘i’s future. Specifically they will be asked to discuss
   and comment on the recommendations of the State of Hawai‘i’s Sustainability
   Plan currently being drafted by the Task Force.

 § Creating Understanding - Students will participate in interactive group activities
   that are designed to help them understand the complexities of the issues facing
   Hawai‘i.

 § Creating a Preferred Future - Students will engage in discussions that will challenge
   them to think about what roles and responsibilities they might assume to help
   shape the State’s future course of action and to foster sustainable behaviors.
   Hawai‘i 2050 Youth Sustainability Project

                                          Youth
                                   2050 Youth Blog
                                  www.2050-hi.com
   In many ways, the youth of today have already demonstrated the impact they can
   have on the world. They rule in cyberspace. Since it is often their preferred choice of
   venue to communicate, it makes sense for Hawai‘i’s teens to have a virtual meeting
   place to share their thoughts, exchange ideas, and impart information about what it
   will take to achieve a sustainable future for Hawai‘i.

                                   Kids Voting Hawaii
                               www.kidsvotinghawaii.org
   Growing up, child regularly get asked, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”
   Although the answers may vary and change over time, the question reinforces a child’s
   understanding that he or she should be thinking about the future. With Kids Voting
   Hawaii, school-age children can have a say about Hawai‘i’s future. By electronically
   inputting their responses to age-appropriate questions about sustainability, they will
   have an opportunity to express their views and concerns.

                                 Community Engagement
   In 2050, the students currently in elementary schools through college will be the
   adults-in-charge in that era. Engaging tomorrow’s adults in discussions with today’s
   adults sets the stage for dynamic and rich conversations that can shift paradigms
   and create new possibilities. Several opportunities for this to occur are:


                              Hawai‘i 2050 Sustainability Summit
                                 Saturday, September 22, 2007
                            Hilton Hawaiian Village Spa and Resort
                                     7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

                                     Community Meetings
                                Throughout the State of Hawai‘i
                                  September & October 2007

                               2008 Hawai‘i State Legislature
                     During the 2008 legislative session, legislators will
                 review, discuss, and hopefully adopt the recommendations
                             and report findings on Hawai‘i 2050.
                       Students will be encouraged to become active
                        participants during the deliberative process.



If you can’t attend a meeting, you can send us your ideas and opinions via the website. Should you
have questions, contact the Task Force at 808-585-7931, x104 or info@hawaii2050.org.
                          Make Your Impact!
              Get Involved And Help Shape Hawai‘i’s Future

                             www.2050-hi.com
 Get in touch with students just like you in the global community! Share your thoughts,
 stories, videos, photos, and find out what your peers are doing to shape our collective
 future.

                       www.kidsvotinghaw
                          .kidsvotingha
                       www.kidsvotinghawaii.org
 Speak up and be heard! Just a couple minutes spent on a simple 2050 Youth
 Sustainability Survey can make a world of difference. Your voice counts!

                           Community Meetings
 Participate in the Hawai‘i 2050 Sustainability Task Force community meetings and
 let them know what you think about the draft Hawai‘i 2050 Sustainability Plan. A
 draft of the plan is available for review by logging on to www.hawaii2050.org.

O ‘ ahu                      Island of Hawai ‘i                Maui
Urban Honolulu               Hilo                              Wailuku
Saturday, Oct. 6             Wednesday, Oct. 3                 Monday, Oct. 8
9:00 to 11:30 a.m.           6:00 to 8:30 p.m.                 5:30 to 8:00 p.m.
McKinley High School         Aupuni Center Conference          Maui Economic Opportunity
cafeteria                    Room                              office
1039 S. King St.             101 Pauahi St.                    99 Mahalani St.

North Shore                  Kailua-Kona                       Kahului
Saturday, Oct. 6             Thursday, Oct. 4                  Saturday, Oct. 13
3:00 to 5:30 p.m.            6:00 to 8:30 p.m.                 8:30 to 11:00 a.m.
Hale‘iwa Elementary          Gateway Center of the Natural     Maui Arts & Cultural Center
School                       Energy Lab of Hawai`i             Haynes Meeting Room
66-505 Hale‘iwa Rd.          73-4460 Queen Ka‘ahumanu          One Cameron Way.
                             Hwy.
Windward Coast                                                 Lana‘i
Monday, Oct. 15              Kaua‘i                            Lana`i City
6:00 to 8:30 p.m.            Kapa‘a                            Thursday, October 11
Castle High School           Tuesday, October 9                5:30 to 8:00 p.m.
cafeteria                    5:30 to 8:00 p.m.                 Lana`i High & Elementary
45-386 Kane‘ohe Bay          Kapa‘a Middle School cafeteria    School cafeteria
Dr.                          4867 Olohena Rd.                  555 Frasier Ave.

Leeward Coast                Lihu‘e                            Moloka ‘ i
Tuesday, Oct. 16             Wednesday, October 10             Kaunakakai
6:00 to 8:30 p.m.            5:30 to 8:00 p.m.                 Thursday, October 11
Nana‘ikapono Elementary      War Memorial Convention           6 to 8:30 p.m.
School cafeteria             Center                            Kaunakakai Elementary School
89-153 Mano Ave.             4191 Hardy St.                    30 Ailoa St.
It Takes Everyone Working Together
       To Make A Difference
    Hawai‘i 2050 Youth Sustainability Project Partners




   Hawai‘i 2050 Youth Sustainability Project Sponsors




                       Special Thanks To
       Charter School Administrative Office, State of Hawai‘i
                      Hastings & Pleadwell LLC
             Hawai‘i Association of Independent Schools
                   Hawai‘i Department of Education
                       Hawai‘i Nature Center
                      OHANA Hotels & Resorts
                       Sam’s Club / Walmart
                            Spunge Media
                            Sustain Hawai‘i
     University of Hawai‘i School of Travel Industry Management


 And MAHALO to all of Hawai‘i’s youth who are committed
     to making the world a better place for all of us!
                                 APPENDIX C
               2050 Youth Sustainability Summit Participants


School                                        Island     Teens Adult Total

Public     Kea`au                             Hawai`i      6    1      7
           Honokaa                            Hawai`i      9    1     10
           Pahoa                              Hawai`i     10    2     12
           Konawaena                          Hawai`i      1    0      1
           Waimea                             Kaua`i      11    1     12
           Kaua`i                             Kaua`i       1    0      1
           Lana`i                             Lana`i       9    1     10
           Lahaianluna                         Maui        5    1      6
           Maui                                Maui        10   1      11
           Aiea                               O`ahu        5    1      6
           Castle                             O`ahu        1    0      1
           DOE Student Council                O`ahu        3    1      4
           Kahuku                             O`ahu       11    3     14
           Kalaheo                            O`ahu       25    2      27
           Kalani                             O`ahu        3    1      4
           Leilehua                           O`ahu        1    0      1
           McKinley                           O`ahu        1    0      1
           Roosevelt                          O`ahu        13   1      14
           Waianae                            O`ahu       25    2      27
                                                          150   19    169

PRIVATE    Kamehameha – Kea`au                Hawai`i     11    1     12
           Hawaii Preparatory Academy         Hawai`i      1    0     1
           Kula High & Intermediate           Kaua`i       3    1      4
           Kamehameha -- Pukalani              Maui        7    1      8
           Seabury Hall                        Maui        7    3     10
           St Anthony                          Maui        1    0     1
           Assets School                      O`ahu       6     1     7
           Damien Memorial                    O`ahu       1     0     1
           Hawaii Baptist Academy             O`ahu       1     0     1
           Iolani                             O`ahu        2    0      2
           Kamehameha -- Kapalama             O`ahu       10    1     11
           Mid Pacific Institute              O`ahu       7     1     8
           Punahou School                     O`ahu        3    1     4
                                                          60    10    70

CHARTER Connection Public Charter School      Hawai`i      7     3    10
                                     21
School                                   Island     Teens Adult Total



OTHERS   City and County Youth Board     O`ahu        0    1      1
         DOE State Office                O`ahu        0    2      2
         UH Manoa                         O`ahu       0    1      1
         Leeward Community College       O`ahu        0    2      2
         Task Force Members             Statewide     0    5
                                                      0    11     6

                               TOTAL PARTICIPANTS    217   43    255




                                   22
                                             APPENDIX D
                        2050 Youth Sustainability Summit Participants
                                     Demographic Breakdown (255)



 Teen and Adult Participants                                        Total Participants
  by number and percentage                                      by number and percentage
                                       Adults
                                      38, 15%                                                              Males
                                                                                                          91, 36%




 Teens
217, 85%                                                    Females
                                                            164, 64%




      School Representation                                                  Youth Grade Level
    by number and percentage                                             by number and percentage
                                                                                                      7th grade
                     CHART ER                               12th grade
                       7, 3%                                                                            6, 3%
 HAIS                                                        87, 39%
60, 28%                                                                                                8th grade
                                                                                                        12, 6%

                                         DOE
                                                                                                        9th grade
                                       150, 69%
                                                                                                         25, 12%
                                                           11th grade
                                                            59, 27%                      10th grade
                                                                                          28, 13%




                                 Island Representation
                               by number and percentage
                                                                 Hawai`i Island
                                                                   53, 21%
                          O`ahu
                         139, 54%
                                                                                Maui
                                                                               36, 14%



                                                                          Kaua`i
                                                  Lana`i
                                                                          17, 7%
                                                  10, 4%




                                                     23
                               APPENDIX E
        2050 Youth Sustainability Summit Survey
           Demographic Breakdown - (203 Participants)


                         Participant Gender
                     by number and percentage


                                                              Male
                                                               84
                                                              41%
                  Female
                   119
                   59%




                                Participant Age
                           by number and percentage

                   (19 yrs.- up),                   (11-13 yrs.),
                     20, 10%                          20, 10%




                                    (14-18 yrs.),
                                     163, 80%



                                 Participant Island
                             by number and percentage



                      Hawaii, 53, 27%
                                                               Kauai, 15, 7%
  Lanai, 13, 6%

Molokai, 3, 1%




     Maui, 27, 13%
                                                              Oahu, 92, 46%




                                         24
                                                         APPENDIX F
                                        Independent Sustainability Surveys

                                   Demographic Breakdown of (578 Participants)

                                                   High School Survey Participants
                                                      by number and percentage




                                          Male                                             Female
                                        292, 50%                                          280, 48%


                                                                       No reply
                                                                        10, 2%


                          Grade Level                                                               Participants by Island
                    by number and percentage                                                      by number and percentage
      12th grade                               Adult                                 Oahu
       180, 31%                                6, 1%                                318, 55%                                  No reply
                                                                                                                               32, 5%
                                                       No reply
                                                        7, 1%
       11th grade                                                           Maui, 1, 0%
        114, 20%                                                                                                               Hawai`i
                           10th grade                9th grade
                                                                                        Kaua`i                               Island, 228,
                            127, 22%                 148, 25%
                                                                                        3, 1%                                    39%


                                                                                  Top 3 most important issues facing Hawai`i

High School participants from:                                            450
                                                                                                             387
                                                                          400
                                                                                                                                     336
                                                                          350
 Hawaii Baptist Academy - O`ahu                                           300             276

 240 students (41.2%)                                                     250
                                                                                                 185
                                                                          200
                                                                                  152
                                                                                                                    128
 Castle High School - O`ahu                                               150
                                                                          100
                                                                                                        90
                                                                                                                              114


 53 students (9.1%)                                                        50
                                                                             0

 Iolani School – O`ahu
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 239 students (41.1%)




                                                                  25
                                          APPENDIX G

                                Hawai`i 2050 Task Force
                            Common Framework for Discussion



Definition of Sustainability in Hawai`i

Sustainability is Hawai`i means achieving a quality of life that:

       Respects the culture, character, beauty and history of our state’s island
       communities.
       Strikes a balance between economic prosperity, social and community
       well-being, and environmental stewardship
       Meets the need of the present without compromising the ability of future
       generations to meet their own needs.


Hawai`i’s Vision for Sustainability

In 2050, Hawai`i is a sustainable community. Living responsibly and within our own
means is top-of-mind for all individuals and organizations. We learn about the virtues
and values of a sustainable Hawai`i. As a result, our goals of economic prosperity,
social and community well-being, and environmental stewardship are in balance and
achieved.

Our Native Hawaiian and island values and culture are perpetuated. We have a vibrant,
clean, locally-based and diversified economy that supports a living-wage for island
residents. Workforce development affords economic and career opportunities for our
children. Our land, water and natural resources are used responsibly, and are
replenished and preserved for future generations. We respect and live within the natural
resources and limits of our islands.

In 2050, the energy we use is clean, renewable and produced mostly in Hawai`i. Much
of the food we consume is produced locally. We minimize waste by recycling. We are a
strong and healthy community with access to affordable housing, transportation and
healthcare. Our public education system prepares our people for productive, meaningful
and fulfilling lives.

Hawai`i is where our hopes and aspirations as individuals, families and as a community
are realized now and in the future.




                                             26
Guiding Principles of Sustainability

       Our sustainability goals, actions and measurements are guided by balancing
       economic prosperity, community and social well-being and environmental
       stewardship.
       We respect and live within the natural resources and limits of our islands.
       Sustainability cannot occur without a strong, diversified and dynamic
       economy.
       Our cultural traditions, history and sense of place are honored.
       We make decisions based on meeting the present needs without
       compromising the needs of future generations.

       The traditional values and principles of the ahupua`a system guide how we
       manage our resources and behaviors.

       Everyone — individuals, families, communities, businesses and government
       — has a responsibility for achieving a sustainable Hawai‘i.


Triple Bottom Line Approach

Where economic, environmental and community goals are in balance




                                            27

				
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