Memo - DOC 2 by D9l9bm9t

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 7

									          College of Natural & Social Sciences
          Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry


         Memorandum
         To:     Organic instructors
         Cc:     Scott Grover, Chair
         From:   Alison McCurdy
         Date:   September 7, 2010
         Re:     Coordinating sections of 301 and 302


I am no longer the organic coordinator, but I am compiling information that should help all instructors in
Chem 301ABC and Chem 302AB maintain coordination.

The course pre/co-requisite structure for these courses is confusing. Due to class enrollment limitations,
it is important to understand what pre/co-requisites apply to what. Chem 201 is a PREREQUISITE to
Chem 302A. (Technically, it is a co-requisite to Chem 301A, but sometimes 201 fills up). I would allow
a student to enroll in Chem 301A, but NOT Chem 302A if they have not taken and passed Chem 201.
Also, students cannot enroll in chem. 302A unless they have passed Chem 301A. They cannot enroll in
Chem. 302B unless they have passed Chem 301B. Obviously, students can‟t take Chem 302B unless they
have passed Chem 302A; they can‟t take Chem 301C unless they have passed Chem 301B; they can‟t
take Chem 301B unless they have passed Chem 301A. You may think that GET will not allow students
to enroll that do not have the required courses, but you can‟t rely on that. As an instructor, you should
login to GET to make sure students in your courses satisfy the pre-requisites of the class you are teaching.

The following schedules should serve as a basis for the content of all sections of 301A, B, C. The
chapters are from Organic Chemistry (2nd Ed, J. M. Hornback). While the amount of time/depth of a
topic/order of topics may vary slightly from instructor to instructor, the content within each quarter
must be consistent for all sections of 301A and 301B so that students may easily transfer from one
instructors‟ section to another when a quarter has finished.

In addition, the partial syllabus in the front of all CHEM 302 Lab Manuals lists the point distribution for
the various student assignments. For 302A, these include pre-lab preparation; in-lab notebook entries;
formal research reports for each of the experiments; quizzes; cumulative final exam; homework;
instructor evaluation. For 302B, the same assignments are required, plus an additional Practical Exam.
While instructors have some flexibility (what homework; how often homework; content of quizzes and
final), the syllabus provides guidelines for grading standards for the notebook and the formal reports.
Note to CHEM 302 instructors: The syllabus in the supplemental lab manual along with the
schedule of classes do not add up to a complete syllabus. See Faculty Handbook
(http://www.calstatela.edu/academic/senate/handbook/).




                                                  1
Finally, there is a policy change regarding transfer credit from community colleges. Please make sure
your students are aware of this change (they may not need to take these courses!). You may want to put it
in your course syllabus. The CSULA Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry will grant upper division
unit credit as described below (But make sure students get advising – they still must take classes to satisfy
the University‟s upper division course requirements) :

           for CHEM 301A (3 units) and 302A (2 units) if a “C” grade or better is earned for
            the first semester of Community College Organic Chemistry
           for CHEM 301B (3 units) and CHEM 302B (2 units) if a “C” grade or better is earned
            for the second semester of Community College Organic Chemistry
           All community college transfer students must take CHEM 301C, as this is where
            biological molecules are introduced into the curriculum.




                                                                                                                2
                                           Class Schedule 301A
    Week          Topic
    1    Chapter 1: Introduction, Structure and Bonding, Lewis Structures, shape, polarity.
         Chapter 2: Bond energies – overview, Structural Isomers, bond line notation
    2    Chapter 2: Degree of unsaturation, physical properties of molecules, functional groups
         Chapter 3: Atomic and molecular orbitals; hybridization, resonance.
    3    Chapter 3: Resonance
         Chapter 4: Acid-base chemistry: rate versus equilibrium, pKa„s
    4    Exam 1
         Chapter 4: Acid-base chemistry: Inductive and resonance effects
    5    Chapter 5: Functional groups and nomenclature
         Chapter 5, 12: Nomenclature
    6    Chapter 6: Stereochemistry: Intro; Geometric isomers
         Chapter 6: Conformational isomers (acyclic molecules, cyclic molecules)
    7    Chapter 7: Stereoisomers: molecules with one chiral center
         Chapter 7: Stereoisomers: molecules with more than one chiral center
    8    Chapter 7: Stereoisomers: molecules with more than one chiral center
         Exam 2
    9    Chapter 7: Stereoisomers -reactions
         Chapter 14: NMR Spectroscopy
    10   Chapter 14: NMR Spectroscopy
         Chapter 14: NMR Spectroscopy
         FINAL EXAM,


   Topics to be included for the NMR portion of the class: (Focus on 1H and 13CNMR)
        Intro to spectroscopy as a tool for organic chemistry (structure determination from available data;
             index of hydrogen deficiency)
        Theory (Absorption spectroscopy; E vs applied magnetic field, etc)
        Chemical shift (local and applied field effects; shielding/deshielding; magnetic anisotropy)
        Number of signals (homotopic, enantiotopic, diastereotopic protons)
        Integrals
        Multiplicity (n+1 rule only; splitting trees where Ja≠Jb will be covered in 302B lab)
        Predict the NMR and Solve the structure problems




                                                                                                              3
                                          Class Schedule 301B
    Week   Topic
    1    Beyond acid-base chemistry: reactivity; nucleophiles, electrophiles
         Chapter 18: Carbonyl group intro, Hydride addition to carbonyl, Carbon addition to carbonyl
    2    Chapter 18: Oxygen addition to carbonyl
         Chapter 18: Oxygen addition to carbonyl
    3    Chapter 18: Nitrogen addition to carbonyl
         Chapter 18: Wittig, conjugate addition, synthesis
    4    Chapter 7: Nucleophilic substitution, SN2, SN1
         Exam 1
    5    Chapter 8: Leaving groups, nucleophiles
         Chapter 8: Solvent, SN1/SN2
    6    Chapter 9: Elimination E2, E1
         Chapter 9: Elimination vs. substitution
    7    Chapter 19: Carboxylic acid derivatives – substitutions
         Chapter 19: Carboxylic acid derivatives – substitutions
    8    Chapter 20: enols, enolates, enolate (and related) alkylation
         Exam 2
    9    Chapter 20: enolate (and related) alkylation
          Chapter 20: Aldol condensation
    10    Chapter 20: Claisen condensation, related chemistry
          Chapter 20: Conjugate additions
          FINAL EXAM


   In addition to reaction mechanisms, it is also important to incorporate retrosynthetic analysis.
   The concept of kinetic product vs. thermodynamic product must be illustrated (enolates are a good
    example)




                                                                                                        4
                                                 Topics 301C
        Week Topic
        1    Chapter 11: Electrophilic addition
             Chapter 11: Electrophilic addition
        2    Chapter 11: Electrophilic addition, conjugated systems
             Ch. 22: Pericyclic reactions; electrocyclic reactions
        3    Ch. 22: Cycloaddition reactions
             Exam 1
        4    Ch. 16: Benzene and Aromatic Compounds, 17: Electrophilic aromatic substitution
             Ch. 17: Electrophilic and Nucleophilic aromatic substitution
        5    Ch. 17: Aromatic synthesis
             Heterocyclic aromatic chemistry (handout supplement)
        6    Ch. 21: The Chemistry of Radicals
             Ch. 23: The Synthesis of organic compounds
        7    Exam 2
             Ch. 24: Synthetic polymers
        8    Ch. 25: Carbohydrates
             Ch. 25: Carbohydrates
        9    Ch. 26: Amino acids; Proteins
             Ch. 26: Amino acids; Proteins
        10   Ch. 27: Nucleotides and Nucleic acids
             Ch. 27: Nucleotides and Nucleic acids
             FINAL EXAM

   In addition to reaction mechanisms, it is also important to incorporate retrosynthetic analysis.
   This quarter must include the chemistry of all the major classes of biomolecules.
   I suggest incorporating some aspects of the chemistry of glucose metabolism (aldol cleavage; hydride
    reduction by NADH of metabolites) to reinforce mechanisms of 301B and to highlight the concept that
    biochemistry is organic chemistry that happens to be in a cell and that happens to be catalyzed by enzymes.




                                                                                                                  5
Sample 302A Schedule (may change depending on holiday schedule, etc). This course is
currently a co-requisite of Chem 301B; students must have passed Chem 301A and Chem 201
(quantitative analysis) to take this course.

Week                  Topic/Experiment
1                     Introduction to Laboratory Safety;
                      Introduction to melting point; Locker check in
                      Continue melting point (maybe start IR/NMR?)
2                     No lab; university closed 3/31
                      Introduction to IR and NMR Spectroscopy
3                     Spectroscopy; NMR and IR unknowns
                      Continue spectroscopy and unknowns
4                     Simple Distillation of Hexane/Toluene
                      Fractional Distillation of Hexane/Toluene
                       GC/NMR Analyses of simple distillation fraction
5                     GC/NMR Analyses of fractional distillation samples
                      Separation of unknown mixture of 4-chlorobenzoic
                      Acid/4-bromoaniline by extraction
6                     Complete extraction, melting points of compounds
                      Reduction of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and
                      Thin Layer Chromatography
7                     Recrystallization and Analysis of reduction product (IR,
                      melting point)
                      Aldol reaction
8                     Aldol reaction: Chromatography and NMR
                      Synthesis of Benzoic acid via a Grignard Reaction
9                     Work-up of Benzoic Acid Synthesis
                      Complete all experiments/review
10                    No lab; University closed 5/26
                      checkout
                      FINAL EXAM




                                                                                          6
Sample 302B Schedule (may change depending on holiday schedule, etc). This course is
currently a co-requisite of Chem 301C; students must have passed Chem 301B to take this.

Week                 Topic/Experiment
1                    Introduction to Laboratory Safety; Locker check-in
                     IR/NMR review
                     Preparation of N,N-dimethylbenzylamine
2                    No lab; university closed 3/31
                     Preparation of N,N-dimethylbenzylamine
3                    UV-Vis spectroscopy; Mass Spectroscopy
                     Multistep synthesis. Step 1 Protection of ketone. Synthesis of
                     Ethylacetoacetate ethylene ketal
4                    Multistep synthesis. Step 1 Distillation to isolate ketal
                     NMR interpretation/analysis
                     Multistep synthesis. Analysis of ketal. Preparation for Grignard reaction
                     NMR interpretation/analysis
5                    Multistep synthesis. Step 2 Grignard reaction to form ketal-alcohol
                     Multistep synthesis. Step 2 Isolation and purification of ketal-alcohol.
                     NMR interpretation/analysis l
6                    Multistep synthesis. Step 3 Deprotection of ketal-alcohol
                     NMR interpretation/analysis (Unknown 1)
                     Multistep synthesis. Step 3 Recrystallization of keto-alcohol
                     NMR interpretation/analysis
7                    Multistep synthesis. Step 4 Elimination to form 4,4-diphenyl-3-buten-2-
                     one.
                     NMR interpretation/analysis (Unknowns 2,3)
                     Finish multistep synthesis. Step 4 purification by column chromatography
                     of 4,4-diphenyl-3-buten-2-one.
8                    NMR interpretation/analysis (Unknowns 4, 5)
                     Diels-Alder reaction.
9                    Complete all experiments/review.
                     Laboratory Practicum
10                   No lab; University closed 5/28
                     checkout
                     FINAL EXAM




                                                                                                 7

								
To top