SPE-G+ 642 +FALL+2010 by QJ7QC7

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									             University of Massachusetts Boston
        College of Education and Human Development
         Department of Curriculum and Instruction
                  Special Education Program
                        Vision Studies

    SPE-G 642: Assessment for Students with Visual Impairments
            including those with Additional Disabilities
                             Fall 2010
                           Course Syllabus

Course Instructor: Tammy Reisman, M.Ed., C.A.E.S.
Office Location: Wheatley Building, 2nd Floor, Institute for Community
Inclusion Office, room 2-159
Telephone: 617- 287-7595, 781-799-4745
E-mail: tammy.reisman@umb.edu
Office Hours: Wednesday 7:30-8:30 pm (online, Web based tcConference Room
http://www.conference321.com/masteradmin/room.asp?id=rsf59f269b4752 )

Catalog Descriptor
This course examines and explores the unique educational needs of children with
visual impairments and children with visual and multiple impairments and
techniques for assessment related to teaching these children in a full array of
educational settings from ages 3-22. Topics include assessment specifically
designed for students with visual impairments, and those in the expanded core
curriculum Issues related to team approaches to assessment, and evaluation are
also presented. This course requires a field-based placement/pre-practicum
requirement of a minimum of 30 hours.

 Pre-practicum-TVI Assessment: Visual Impairments
This is a field-based experience which provides the opportunity to apply
classroom knowledge and learn observational, and assessment strategies by
engaging with students and their school communities and educational teams. The
field site options will include experience with children preschool through grade
12. This course requires minimum daytime participation of three hours per week
to acquire 30 hours of instructional experience. This must be taken concurrently
with SPE-G 642 Assessment for Teaching Students with Visual Impairments
including those with Additional Disabilities.
. A pre-practicum verification form must be completed and signed by the student
and cooperating instructor at the end of the placement and can be found at
http://www.nercve.org/index.php?page=tvipreprac .


Course Conceptual Framework:
The topics and assignments of this course have been designed to prepare
thoughtful and responsive educators skilled in the educational implications
of children with visual impairments. Included are the unique assessment and
teaching strategies that are critical when working with this population. The
thoughtful and responsive educator is also committed to collaboration with other
specialists and professional staff in order to meet all the needs of his/her
students. The topics, assignments and field-based experiences within this course
have been designed to prepare the participants to acquire:

     o Understandings of content, pedagogy, assessment, and technology
     o practices of caring, collaboration, reflection and social justice
     o commitments to dedication, life-long learning, modeling and mentoring

                         Mission Statement
      UMass Boston College of Education and Human Development
                           August 25, 2008

The College of Education and Human Development (CEHD)
generates knowledge, fosters engaged learning, promotes social
justice, and empowers students, educators, other professionals, and
community members through teaching, research, evaluation, and
public service. The urban setting of the University of Massachusetts
Boston informs – and is informed by – CEHD efforts to fulfill the
academic and civic purposes of education in a diverse democracy.

This mission statement as associated core values serve as a philosophical and
operational guide for all activities of the College of Education and Human
Development. Core values include:

       Academic excellence applies theory and evidence-based practice to
    produce effective and sustainable learning and development outcomes;
       Social justice and inclusion involves equality of access and success for all
    students, especially those who historically have had limited educational
    opportunity because of education level, national origin, socio-economic status,
    gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, or ethnic, linguistic, or cultural
    background;
       Community engagement integrates academic knowledge with community-
    based knowledge to address public and policy issues, improve quality of life,
    and support a just and inclusive democracy.

The mission of the College of Education and Human Development is
accomplished in collaboration with students, professionals, and other
stakeholders through:

         offering learning environments that prepare students, educators, and
    other professionals to assume leadership roles in the design, development, and
    implementation of teaching and learning experiences that are consistent with
    our values;
         conducting research directed at improving educational policy and practice
    in school, higher education, and community settings to improve the quality of
    life for all individuals;
         disseminating materials and information to increase knowledge, improve
    practice, and facilitate the learning and development of all individuals in
    school, higher education, and community settings;
       offering technical assistance to enhance learning and skill development in
    community settings including schools, colleges and universities, and
    community-based organizations and programs at local, state, national and
    international levels.


Objectives of the Course
The students will be able to:

    1. Conduct professional activities in compliance with applicable laws and
       policies.
    2. Discuss both the potential impact of differences in values, languages, and
       customs that can exist between the home and school by demonstrating
       sensitivity for the culture, language, religion, gender, disability, socio-
       economic status, and sexual orientation of individuals and the cultural
       perspectives influencing the relationships among families, schools, and
       communities as related to assessment and instruction.
    3. Demonstrate the use of specialized terminology used and ethical
       considerations, laws and policies in assessing individuals with visual
       impairments. (CEC VI8K1 & CEC VI8K2)
   4. Understand the genetic basis of various syndromes and other etiologies
       commonly associated with visual and multiple impairments as well as the
       impact of additional exceptionalities on individuals with visual
       impairments and visual impairment on learning and experience (CEC
       VI3K1 & CEC VI10S1)
   5. Discuss the roles and responsibilities of the TVI on behalf of students with
       visual impairments and visual and multiple impairments, and
       demonstrate expertise in a transdisciplinary process approach in assessing
       students with visual and multiple impairments.
   6. Discuss and implement disability assessment instruments and alternative
       assessment techniques for individuals with visual impairments. (CEC
       VI8K5 & CEC VI8S2)
   7. Adapt and use general and disability-specific assessment instruments,
       discuss and implement alternative assessment techniques for individuals
       with visual impairments and interpret and apply the scores as well as from
       assessments of individuals with visual impairments. (CEC VI8K5, CEC
       VI8K6, CEC VI8S2, CEC VI8S3)
   8. Interpret and apply the scores from assessments of individuals with visual
       impairments. (CEC VI8K6)
   9. Adapt and use assessment procedures when evaluating individuals with
       visual impairments. (CEC VI8S3)
   10. Maintain disability-related records for individuals with visual
       impairments. (CEC VI8S4)
   11. Gather background information and family history related to the
       individual’s visual status. (CEC VI8S5)
   12. Interpret and use assessment data for instructional planning with
       individuals with visual impairments. (CEC VI8S6)
   13. Discuss and demonstrate the relationships among assessment,
       individualized education plan development and placement as they affect
       vision-related services. (CEC VI8S7)

Pre-requisites:
 SPE-G 620 Education of Students with Visual Impairments
 SPE-G 614 Visual Functioning
 SPE-G 621 Intro to Disabilities
 SPE-G 615 Braille I
 SPE-G 616 Implications of Low Vision
 SPE-G 619 Braille Communications II
 SPE-G 640 O&M and Independent Living
 SPE-G 622 Technology and Visual Impairments

Required Texts

Anderson, Sharon, et al. (2007). Oregon Project Skills Inventory (6th ed).
      Parent/University Student Set. Medford: Southern Oregon Education
      Service District. http://www.soesd.k12.or.us/Page.asp?NavID=215
Coster, Wendy, Deeney, Theresa, Haltiwanger, Jane and Haley, Stephen. (1998).
       School Function Assessment. San Antonio: The Psychological
       Corporation. Will be provided.

D’Andrea, Frances Mary and Farrenkopf, Carol. (2000). Looking to Learn:
     Promoting Literacy for Students with Low Vision. New York: AFB Press.
     Was required for 616 and will use for 642 & 643

D’Andrea, Frances Mary and Presley, Ike. (2008). Assistive Technology for
     Students Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired: A Guide to Assessment.
     New York: AFB Press. Required from SPE-G 622

Koenig, Alan J. and Farrenkopf, Carol. (1995). Assessment of Braille Literacy
      Skills. Houston: Region IV Education Center.

Koenig, Alan J. and Holbrook eds. (2000). Foundations of Education (2nd ed):
      Vol. II, Instructional Strategies for Teaching Children and Youths with
      Visual Impairments. New York: AFB Press. Will use for 642 & 643

Koenig, Alan J. and Holbrook, M. Cay. (1995). Learning Media Assessment of
      Students with Visual Impairments. Austin: Texas School for the Blind and
      Visually Impaired.

Roman-Lantzy, Christine (2007). Cortical Visual Impairment: An Approach to
     Assessment and Intervention. New York: AFB Press. Will use for 642 &
     643

Sewell, Debra, et al. (2007). Evals: Evaluating Visually Impaired Students.
       Austin: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired.

Optional Texts

American Psychological Association. (2001). Publications manual of the
      American Psychological Association. Washington, DC: APA.

Hagood, L. (1997). Communication: A guide for teaching students with visual
     and multiple impairments. Austin, TX: Texas School for the Blind and
     Visually Impaired.

Heydt, K., Allon, M., Edwards, S., Clark, M.J., & Cushman, C. (2004). Perkins
      activity and resource guide: A handbook for teachers and parents of
      students with visual and multiple disabilities. Watertown, MA: Perkins
      School for the Blind.

Johns, Jerry (2008). Basic Reading Inventory: Pre-Primer Through Grade
      Twelve and Early Literacy Assessments. Dubuque: Kendall-Hunt.
Morgan, Elizabeth and Watkins, Sue. (1989). Assessment of Developmental Skills
     for Young Multihandicapped Sensory Impaired Children: An
     Instructional Manual for the INSITE Developmental Checklist. Logan:
     SKI HI Institute. This includes instructions, assessment tool and scoring
     sheet.
     http://www.hopepubl.com/index.cfm?Action=ViewCategory&Category=2

Sacks, S.Z. & Silberman, R.K. (1998) Educating students who have visual
       impairments with other disabilities. New York: AFB Press.

Stillman, Robert et al. (1978 & 1985) The Callier-Azusa Scale: G and H
       Administration. Dallas: University of Texas.
       http://www.callier.utdallas.edu/scale.html


Required Assignments

1. FACE TO FACE CLASSES AND 3 ONLINE CLASSES
   Each student will be required to attend the 2 Saturday face to face classes on
   the UMass campus in Boston in October and November as well as
   participate in the 3 online sessions; dates to be determined.
2. MODULE ACTIVITIES AND QUIZZES
   Throughout the semester, there will be activities and quizzes associated with
   the course Modules. These activities and quizzes will serve as the evaluation of
   student knowledge of Module content. Quizzes will include a combination of
   true/false, short answer and essay. Specific due dates are listed on the Course
   Schedule.
3. IEP ASSIGNMENT: Complete an IEP form for a student whom you’ve
   completed one of the assessments, including key evaluation results
   summaries, present level of educational performance A and B, current level of
   performance, instructional profiles, goals and objectives for two domains of
   learning, and include the equal access accommodations. The MA DOE/DESE
   format will be used. Due Date:
4. CVI ASSESSMENT KIT
   Students will work with a group to develop a CVI assessment kit. Groups will
   work together to determine the materials needed for the kit that will assess
   each of the 10 characteristics of CVI and write a 1 page handout that lists and
   describes the materials in the kit. Each individual student must put together a
   kit of their own and bring it to the second Saturday face to face class. Kits will
   be shared in class. Due date:
5. PRE-PRACTICUM OBSERVATION LOG
   Students will keep a log of observations made during the Pre-Practicum
   experience. Written observations will be based on topics related to the
   coursework.
Guidelines for Pre-Practicum Observation Log

Throughout the semester you will engage in observations and submit a log based
on your observations with a licensed TVI of various students with visual
impairments in school and community environments. Each entry should be a
minimum of 3 double spaced pages. Every log must have a topic as well as the
focus questions answered. Entries should answer the questions, provide specific
anecdotes, and demonstrate a reflective quality by raising questions for further
examination. The topics may be completed in any order. The completed
Observation Log will be due on

   1. Topic: The Unique Learner
      Pick one student and create an in-depth case study of information about
      this student. Describe the student’s background (cultural, socio-economic,
      medical, family and educational history), current placement/setting and
      visual functioning. What evaluations have been implemented with the
      student? What were the results? What comprehensive assessments have
      been administered to the student? Why were they administered? Where
      and by who were they administered? What accommodations and/or
      modifications were made? What informal assessments have been
      administered? How has the data from assessments been interpreted and
      used? How often is the student assessed? Does the IEP contain testing
      information? What learning medium(s) does the student use to access
      material? What are the services the child receives, as outlined in the IEP?
      How were these determined? Where and when are the services provided?

      Note: Gather information for this observation log through a variety of
      resources, including observation with the TVI, observation in the general
      education classroom, interviews and document reviews.

   2. Topic: Assessment
      Observe 2 professionals (but not general education teachers) perform an
      assessment. You will follow up that observation with an informal interview
      with the professional. The two professionals do NOT need to be on the
      same educational team, nor do they need to serve the same student(s). You
      may observe a Teacher of the Visually Impaired, Orientation and Mobility
      specialist, Speech and Language Pathologist, Occupational Therapist,
      Physical Therapist, Psychologist, Music Therapist, Recreational Therapist,
      Vocational Specialist or Transition Specialist. Include a discussion about
      how the professional’s assessment and report relates to the large IEP team
      effort. If the student you observe is does not have a visual impairment,
      reflect on how this assessment would be impacted by a visual impairment.

      Also, In addition, focus on the other assessments performed on the
      student in the past, and answer as many of the following questions as
      possible. What comprehensive assessments have been administered to the
      student? Why were they administered? Where and by who were they
      administered? What accommodations and/or modifications were made?
      What informal assessments have been administered? How has the data
      from assessments been interpreted and used? How often is the student
      assessed? Does the IEP contain testing information?

   3. Topic: Observation
      Select a student for observation during 3 30-minute segments of
      instruction. Record narrative information and prepare a report of these
      observations. Describe the instruction you observed. What specifically did
      you observe with regards to vision? Sensory channels? What else could you
      use from the observations to complete evaluations of the student?

   4. Topic: Interviews
      Interview a teacher of students with visual impairments (TVI) about the
      interview process they use to complete evaluations. What types of
      questions do they ask? Observe the TVI performing an interview with a
      classroom teacher about their observations of their student’s use of vision
      and sensory channels in the school environment. What information did
      they gather from the interview? Finally, interview a classroom teacher
      yourself about a student you have been observing. What do they notice
      about the student’s use of vision and sensory channels? What concerns, if
      any do they have? Provide a list of questions you asked.

6. ASSESSMENT PORTFOLIO PROJECT
   Select one academic student with a visual impairment and one student with
   visual and multiple impairments and perform several evaluations that will
   include the following:

   1. Functional Vision Evaluation
      Administer two informal functional vision evaluations. One for an
      academic student with a visual impairment and one for a student with
      visual and multiple impairments. Report and interpret the results.
      Consider the implications of the results and their validity.

   2. Expanded Core Curriculum Informal Assessments
      Select two areas of the expanded core curriculum and use informal
      evaluations tools to assess each area. Perform one for an academic student
      with a visual impairment and one for a student with visual and multiple
      impairments. Report and interpret the results. Consider the implications
      of the results and their validity.

   3. Learning Media Assessments
      Administer two Learning Media Assessments using instructor guidelines.
      Perform one for an academic student with a visual impairment and one for
      a student with visual and multiple impairments. Report and interpret the
      results. Consider the implications of the results and their validity.
   4. Communication Assessment
      Administer one of the informal communication assessments discussed in
      the course for a student with multiple and visual impairments. In a formal
      write-up, report and interpret the results. Include copies of your note
      taking tools and official assessment reports for each area.

Submit the portfolio to your instructor via electronically. The portfolio should be
organized with a table of contents section for easy reference and word processed
in a professional manner. The evaluation reports that you produce as a
professional are a reflection of your personal level of professionalism. Therefore,
you will be graded for the quality of your writing abilities, including typos,
spelling errors and grammatical errors. You will also be graded on the accuracy
and appropriateness of your recommendations in each assessment report. Due
date:

Note: You will need to gain consent of the students’ parents for this portion of the
Pre-practicum time since you will be looking at confidential documents. You will
be receiving an official Student Participant Consent form from your instructor.
This must be signed and dated before any data collection can begin. Submit a
copy of the consent form to your instructor as soon as consent is gained; these
must be kept on file.

When writing up any of the above components, you may not use the student’s
real name, the school’s real name or the real names of any of the teachers and/or
related service providers. If any of real names appear on the
assessment/evaluation tools used to collect the data, black out names before
submitting as part of your portfolio. You may also need to sign any confidentiality
consent forms that the district may or may not require.

Methods of Evaluation

                                                               Relevant
Assignment                                   Points
                                                               Objectives
1. Face to Face and Online Classes           60 points         1-13
2. Module Quizzes and Activities                               1-13
                                             245 points
(8 @ 30 points each)
3. IEP Assignment                            80 points         1-13
4. Pre-Practicum Observation Log             100 points        1-13
5. Assessment Portfolio Project              170 points        1-13
6. CVI Assessment Kit                        80 points         1-13
Total Points                                 705 points
Grading

Grade Module      IEP                           Pre-                 CVI                 Assessment
      Quizzes and Assignment                    Practicum            Assessment          Portfolio
      Activities                                Observation          Kit                 Project
                                                Log
A        Participates       Thorough            Passed in on         As a group,         Completely
         within time        examination of      time. Attention      develops a          addresses each
(√+)     periods.           student             to detail for each   complete kit for    component of
90-      Demonstrates       strengths & key     topic area.          assessing           portfolio with
100%     critical or        evaluation          Demonstrates         students with       clear
         creative           summary,            exceptional          cortical vision     interpretation of
         contributions,     feedback on         insights and         impairment.         performed
         demonstrates       present levels of   reflections.         Shows high          assessments and
         reading            performance in                           creativity and      rationale for
         knowledge 90-      each goal area,                          originality.        recommendations.
         100% of the        Correctly written                        Individually        Also shows
         time. For          goals, correctly                         creates own kit     high creativity and
         quizzes,           written                                  and shares it       originality.
         answers are        objectives, goals                        with entire class
         complete and       and objectives                           during face to
         correct. All       match needs                              face session.
         parts of quiz      cited,                                   With group
         questions are      accommodations                           creates 1 page
         addressed.         make sense.                              handout that
                                                                     lists and
                                                                     describes kit
                                                                     and materials.
B (√)    Participates       Examination of      Passed in on         As a group,         Completely
         within time        student             time.                develops a kit      addresses each
80-      periods.           strengths & key     Demonstrates         for assessing       component of
89%      Demonstrates       evaluation          good insights        students with       portfolio with
         critical or        summary,            and reflections.     cortical vision     clear
         creative           feedback on                              impairment.         interpretation of
         contributions,     present levels of                        Individually        performed
         demonstrates       performance in                           creates own kit     assessments and
         reading            each goal area,                          and shares it       rationale for
         knowledge 80%      goals and                                with entire class   recommendations.
         of the time. For   objectives may                           during face to      Also shows
         quizzes, most      not be written                           face session.       good creativity
         answers are        completely                               With group          and originality.
         complete and       measurably.                              creates 1 page
         correct. Most      Goals and                                handout that
         parts of quiz      objectives do not                        lists and
         questions are      match needs,                             describes kit
         addressed.         accommodations                           and materials.
                            make some
                            sense.
C (√-)   Participates       Student             Passed in on         As a group,         Addresses each
         within time        strengths & key     time.                develops a kit      component of
70-      periods.           evaluation          Demonstrates         for assessing       portfolio with fair
79%      Demonstrates       summary is          fair insights and    students with       interpretation of
         critical or        there, but          reflections.         cortical vision     performed
         creative           minimal, no                              impairment. No      assessments and
         contributions,     present levels of                        individual kit is   rationale for
         demonstrates       performance in                           created – not       recommendations.
         reading            each goal area,                          prepared to         Also shows
         knowledge 70%      goals and                                shares it with      average creativity
         of the time. For   objectives not                           entire class        and
         quizzes, some     written                      during face to    originality.
         answers are       measurably,                  face session.
         incomplete and    goals and                    With group
         incorrect. Quiz   objectives do not            creates handout
         questions are     match needs,                 that lists
         not fully         accommodations               materials.
         addressed.        make some
                           sense.


According to UMASS- Boston standards, the following grading categories will be
used:

A     100%-94%         (705-663 points)        C+   79%-77%       (563-543 points)
A-    93%-90%          (662-635 points)        C    76%-74%       (542-522 points)
B+    89%-87%          (634-613 points)        C-   73%-70%       (521-494 points)
B     86%-84%          (612-592 points)        F    below 70%     (493-0 points)
B-    83%-80%          (591-564 points)


Course and Grading Policies
1. Assignments will either be returned to you via upload to Blackboard or postal
mail. Your grades will be posted to the electronic grade book in Blackboard.
Grades for all assignments will be posted in approximately one week.
2. No late assignments will be accepted without the prior written permission of
the instructor. Extensions on assignment due dates will only be given in the most
extreme circumstances. Any assignments submitted without prior permission
will receive a zero in the grade book.
3. Any questions regarding a grade received on an assignment must be submitted
to the instructor in writing within one week of receiving the grade.
4. Module quizzes and discussion questions must be posted by 11:59pm on the
due date. Any quizzes or responses posted after 11:59pm will be considered late,
and will thus receive a grade of a zero.
5. If you are experiencing any technical difficulties and cannot submit your
assignment, please leave a voicemail message for your instructor immediately.
Describe the problem in terms of whether it was a technical problem with your e-
mail/Internet or if there is a problem with the course website or Blackboard. If it
is a problem with Blackboard, please additionally seek out technical support via
UMass Online.
6. Students are required to maintain a B average

Submitting Assignments
When submitting an assignment via upload to Blackboard, it is very important
that you name the files using your initials, then the Module number. For
example, I would submit the Module II assignment as TRModuleII.doc


All assignments, except quizzes and discussion questions, must be submitted
using APA style in citing and paraphrasing references. Click here for online APA
style information.
Points will be deducted if APA format style is not used. Additionally, all
assignments must have an APA style cover sheet with your last name and page
number as the page header on each page. Please refer to the example in
Blackboard.
All assignments formatted as following:

• Saved as .doc files. If you do not have Microsoft Word, it is still possible to save
your assignments as .doc files when naming the file. I cannot open PC or Mac
formatted files in programs such as Lotus or Word Perfect.
• 1 inch margins
• Double spaced
• 12 point font; Please be sure to use a professional font such as Arial, Times New
Roman or Trebuchet MS. This is important especially in report writing.
• Last name and page number in the upper right hand header.
• APA Cover sheet as the first page.

These requirements are essential to help ease the file management and grading
process.

ADA Accommodations Policy

Section 504 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 offer guidelines for
curriculum modifications and adaptations for students with documented
disabilities. If you wish to request any accommodations in order to participate in
this class you must register with the Lillian Ross Center. The Center assists all
UMass - Boston faculty in providing you with accommodations. To contact the
Ross Center for Disability Services, visit their web page at
www.rosscenter.umb.edu or call 617.287.7430 TTY: 617.287.7436. Be sure to
indicate that you are in an on-line class when you register with the Center. The
student must present and discuss these recommendations with the instructor
within a reasonable period, preferably by the end of the Drop/Add period.

Academic Honesty Policy

Students are required to adhere to the Code of Student Conduct, including
requirements for academic honesty, delineated in the University of
Massachusetts-Boston Graduate Studies Bulletin, Undergraduate Catalog, and
relevant program student handbook(s). You can find the Code of Student
Conduct on the UMass Boston website at
www.umb.edu/student_services/student_rights/code_conduct.html.

It is the expressed policy of the University that every aspect of academic life not
only formal coursework situations, but all relationships and interactions
connected to the educational process shall be conducted in an absolutely and
uncompromisingly honest manner. The University presupposes that any
submission of work for academic credit indicates that the work is the student’s
own and is in compliance with University policies. In cases where academic
dishonesty is discovered after completion of a course or degree program,
sanctions may be imposed retroactively, up to and including revocation of the
degree. Any student who reasonably believes another student has committed an
act of academic dishonesty should inform the course instructor of the alleged
violation.

Students are advised to retain a copy of this syllabus in personal files for use
when applying for certification, licensure, or transfer credit.

Technical Assistance:
Students experiencing technical difficulties should use the following resources for
assistance:
    1. Send email to bostonsupport@umassonline.net
    2. Call 617-287-5220 between 8:30AM and 5:00PM EST during the week, or 1-
       800-569-6505 between 5:00PM and 8:30AM and on weekends and
       holidays.
    3. Contact support via live text chat between 5:00PM and 8:30AM and on
       weekends and holidays by clicking on the above link.

Biography:

My name is Tammy Reisman and I will be your instructor for this course. In this
capacity, my primary job is to guide you through this on-line learning
experience. I will provide you with a structured course website that is full of
information, resources, activities, and other measures of your knowledge.
Additionally, I will be providing you with feedback to your work submitted over
the duration of the semester.

For the past 19 years, I have worked as a Teacher of Students with Visual
Impairments for Perkins School for the Blind as well as several public school
systems throughout Massachusetts. I am currently working in the Newton
Public Schools in Massachusetts. I also am participating in additional projects
at Umass Boston and DESE including developing professional development
courses.

What most of you do not know is a little bit about my background. I was born
and raised in New York. I came to Boston to do my undergraduate work in
social work at Northeastern University. During my junior year at Northeastern,
I became employed by Perkins as a program aide. I really enjoyed the work
though following my graduation I worked as a social worker for the Salvation
Army and the Department of Social Services as well as a guardian ad litem for
children at risk in several district courts. My interest in visual impairment and
blindness remained, however, and I began graduate school at Boston College. I
graduated with a M.Ed., and Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies in
Elementary Education, Special Education in Visual Impairment and later,
literacy. Throughout all this I did work full-time, thus, I completely understand
what it is like to work full time and still be a student!
On a more personal note, I am married; my husband and I have a wonderful
son, who is 13 years old. We also have fun caring for an aquarium with two fish,
several snails and hermit crabs and an array of coral. In my free time, I enjoy
spending time with my family, reading fiction books, playing tennis, swimming
and biking.

I hope that this offers you a small glimpse into my life and where I came from. I
have a very strong belief in higher education and personnel preparation, which I
think is reflected in much of my work and I thoroughly enjoy teaching skills
related to visual impairment and blindness, both to students with visual
impairments and blindness and graduate students. I am looking forward to
working with each of you in this course. Please contact me directly if you have any
questions throughout this course.

COMMUNICATION WITH INSTRUCTOR
My schedule is variable as I am often teaching and not in the office. The best way
to contact me in general is by e-mail. I check-in with e-mail several times per day
during the week, and at least once per day on the weekend. If you have an urgent
matter, please follow up your e-mail by leaving a voice mail message for me @
781-799-4745. I will usually respond to you that day or within a 24 hour period.

This syllabus is subject to change.

Schedule

Module 1. Topic: Overview of Assessment and the Transdisciplinary
Approach
Objectives: 1, 2, 3, 5
What is the IDEA process for evaluation?
What is the Transdisciplinary Team?
How students with visual impairments are evaluated.
Processes and learning methods:
Class lecture with PowerPoint presentation
Group discussion
Readings:
Foundations of Education, Vol. II Chapter 2, 3, & 4
Assignment(s): Module 1 quiz

Module 2. Topic: Assessing Students with Visual and Multiple
Impairments
Objectives: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
The TVIs role in evaluating students with visual and multiple impairments
Genetics and medical information about multiple impairments
Cultural and socio-economic implications
Special considerations for evaluating students with visual and multiple
impairments
Processes and learning methods:
Class lecture with PowerPoint Presentation
Group Discussion
Teacher Demonstration
Readings:
Educating Students Who Have Visual Impairments with Other Disabilities -
Chapters 2,3&4
Teaching Students with Visual and Multiple Impairments (Smith & Levack, 1999)
Chapter 4: Assessment
Assignment(s): None

Module 3. Topic: Observations and Interviews
Objectives: 1, 2, 3, 5
Cultural and socio-economic implications
What is observation?
Asking questions of team member
Processes and learning methods:
Class Lecture with PowerPoint Presentation
Readings:
Collaborative Assessment
Chapter 3: Preparing for Assessment
Article: Guidelines for Classroom Observation of Students with Visual
Impairments
FVE/LMA Tool: Interviews and Observations
Assignment(s): Module 3 Activity

Module 4. Topic: Functional Vision Evaluations
Objectives: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
Strategies for performing functional vision evaluations for both students with
visual impairments and students with multiple and visual impairments
Processes and learning methods:
Class Lecture with PowerPoint presentation
Discussions
Student Videos
Readings:
Looking to Learn Chapter 1: Interpreting an Eye Report & Chapter 2: Performing
a Functional Low Vision Assessment
Assignment(s): None

Module 5. Topic: Evaluations of Students with CVI
Objectives: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
What is cortical or cerebral visual impairment?
Strategies for performing functional vision evaluations for students with cortical
or cerebral visual impairment
Processes and learning methods:
Class lecture with PowerPoint presentation
Student video/demonstration
Class discussion
Readings:
Cortical Visual Impairment: An Approach to Assessment and Intervention:
Chapter 1 - CVI an Overview,
Chapter 2 - Medical and Other Causes of CVI,
Chapter 3 - Visual and Behavioral Characteristics of Children with CVI, Chapter 5
– Functional Vision Assessment: The CVI Range
Assignment(s): Module 4&5 Activity

Module 6. Topic: Learning Media Assessment
Objectives: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
Methods for performing learning media assessments for both students with
visual impairments and students with multiple and visual impairments
Processes and learning methods:
Lecture with PowerPoint Presentation
Student Videos
Web Safari
Readings:
Learning Media Assessment, 2nd edition Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6
Basic Reading Inventory Sections 1 and 2 - Overview and Administration and
Scoring Procedures
Assignment(s): Module VI Discussion

Module 7. Topic: Evaluations in the ECC – part 1
Objectives: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
Strategies for performing Expanded Core Curriculum Evaluations for both
students with visual impairments and students with multiple and visual
impairments
Processes and learning methods:
Lecture with PowerPoint presentation
Web Safari
Discussion
Readings:
EVALS Kit, section 1: Compensatory Skills
Assessment of Braille Inventory Skills
Perkins Activity and Resource Guide (Heydt, Allon, Edwards, Clark & Cushman):
Functional Academics
Assignment(s): None

Module 8. Topic: Evaluations in the ECC – part 2
Objectives: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
Strategies for performing Expanded Core Curriculum Evaluations for both
students with visual impairments and students with multiple and visual
impairments
Processes and learning methods:
Class lecture with PowerPoint presentation
Readings:
EVALS Kit, section 1:
Social Interaction Skills
Sexuality Education
Independent Living Skills
Domestic Activities
Recreation & Leisure Skills
Recreation, Leisure, Fitness
Independent Living Assessment
Perkins Activity and Resource Guide (Heydt, Allon, Edwards, Clark & Cushman):
Daily Living and Independent Living Skills
Assignment(s): Group Resource File Project

Module 9. Topic: Evaluations in the ECC – part 3
Objectives: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
Strategies for performing Expanded Core Curriculum Evaluations for both
students with visual impairments and students with multiple and visual
impairments
Processes and learning methods:
Class lecture with PowerPoint Presentation
Web search
Readings:
EVALS Kit, Section 2:
Self-Determination
Career Education
Transition
Perkins Activity and Resource Guide (Heydt, Allon, Edwards, Clark & Cushman):
Vocational Skills
Assignment(s): None

Module 10. Topic: Evaluations in the ECC – part 4
Objectives: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
Strategies for performing Expanded Core Curriculum Evaluations for both
students with visual impairments and students with multiple and visual
impairments
Processes and learning methods:
Class Lecture
Teacher demonstration
Readings:
EVALS Kit, section 2:
Assistive Technology
Sensory/Visual Efficiency
Perkins Activity and Resource Guide (Heydt, Allon, Edwards, Clark & Cushman):
Visual Efficiency
Assignment(s): Modules 7-10 Activity

Module 11. Topic: Informal Communication Assessments
Objectives: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
What is communication?
Strategies for performing informal communication assessments for students with
multiple and visual impairments
Processes and learning methods:
Class lecture with PowerPoint Presentation
Class Discussion
Readings:
Expressive Communication: How Children Send Their Messages to You (Stremel,
2005)
Receptive Communication: How Children Receive Your Messages
Communication Interaction: It Takes Two (Stremel, 2000)
Infused Skills Communication Assessment by Linda Hagood
Assignment(s): Module 11 activity
                 Resource File Project

Module 12. Topic: Writing Reports and Communicating with the
TEAM
Objectives: 12, 13, 14
Writing skills
How to write comprehensive, yet clear and concise reports
Processes and learning methods:
Class lecture with PowerPoint presentation
Class discussion
Readings:
Assessment in Special Education: A Practical Approach.
Chapter 18. Writing a Comprehensive Report in Special Education
Collaborative Assessment
Chapter 10: Report Writing
Assignment(s): Pre-practicum Observation Log

Module 13. Topic: Interpreting Results to Determine Service Delivery
and Write IEP Goals and Objectives
Objectives: 12, 13, 14
What do the evaluations mean?
How do you determine appropriate service delivery by the TVI?
Lessons in writing measurable IEP goals and objectives
Processes and learning methods:
Class Lecture with PowerPoint Presentation
Videos of students with CVI
Readings:
Foundations of Education, Vol. II Chapter 6: Planning Instruction in Unique
Skills
Assignment(s): Module 13 Activity
                 IEP Assignment

References
Anderson, Sharon, et al. (2007). Oregon Project Skills Inventory (6th ed).
      Medford: Southern Oregon Education Service District.

Borich, Gary (2007). Observation Skills for Effective Teaching (5th ed). Upper
      Saddle River: Pearson.

Burnett, Rebecca, Sanford, LaRhea (2004). FVLMA Kit: Functional Vision and
      Learning Media Assessment. Louisville: American Printing House for the
      Blind.

Corn, A. and Koenig, Alan J. (1996) Foundations of Low Vision. New York: AFB
      Press.

Coster, Wendy, Deeney, Theresa, Haltiwanger, Jane and Haley, Stephen. (1998).
       School Function Assessment. San Antonio: The Psychological
       Corporation.

D’Andrea, Frances Mary and Farrenkopf, Carol. (2000). Looking to Learn:
     Promoting Literacy for Students with Low Vision. New York: AFB Press.

Goodman, Stephen A. and Wittenstein, Stuart H. (2003). Collaborative
     Assessment. New York: AFB Press.

Gronlund, Gaye and James, Marilyn (2005). Focused Observations: How to
      Observe Children for Assessment and Curriculum Planning. St. Paul: Red
      Leaf Press.

Hagood, L. (1997). Communication: A guide for teaching students with visual
     and multiple impairments. Austin, TX: Texas School for the Blind and
     Visually Impaired.

Heydt, K., Allon, M., Edwards, S., Clark, M.J., & Cushman, C. (2004). Perkins
      activity and resource guide: A handbook for teachers and parents of
      students with visual and multiple disabilities. Watertown, MA: Perkins
      School for the Blind.

Johns, Jerry (2008). Basic Reading Inventory: Pre-Primer Through Grade
      Twelve and Early Literacy Assessments. Dubuque: Kendall-Hunt.

Kitchel, Elaine et al (2007). Tools for Assessment and Development of Visual
       Skills. Louisville: American Printing House for the Blind.

Koenig, Alan J. and Farrenkopf, Carol. (1995). Assessment of Braille Literacy
      Skills. Houston: Region IV Education Center.
Koenig, Alan J. and Holbrook eds. (2000). Foundations of Education (2nd ed):
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      Visual Impairments. New York: AFB Press.

Koenig, Alan J. and Holbrook, M. Cay. (1995). Learning Media Assessment of
      Students with Visual Impairments. Austin: Texas School for the Blind and
      Visually Impaired.

Langley, Beth M. (1998). Individualized, Systematic, Assessment of Visual
      Efficiency. Louisville: American Printing House for the Blind.

Loftin, Marnee. (2005). Making Evaluation Meaningful. Austin: Texas School
       for the Blind and Visually Impaired.

Lueck, Amanda H. (2004). Functional Vision: A Practitioner’s Guide to
      Evaluation and Intervention. New York: AFB Press.

Miller, Cyral. (2005) Guidelines for Classroom Observation of Students with
       Visual Impairments. Retrieved May 1, 2009 from
       http://www.tsbvi.edu/Education/observation.htm.

Morgan, Elizabeth and Watkins, Sue. (1989). Assessment of Developmental Skills
     for Young Multihandicapped Sensory Impaired Children: An
     Instructional Manual for the INSITE Developmental Checklist. Logan:
     SKI HI Institute. This includes instructions, assessment tool and scoring
     sheet.

Pierangelo, Roger and Giuliani, George A. (2009) Assessment in Special
      Education: A Practical Approach, 3rd ed. Westerville: Merrill.

Roman-Lantzy, Christine (2007). Cortical Visual Impairment: An Approach to
     Assessment and Intervention. New York: AFB Press.

Sacks, S.Z. & Silberman, R.K. (1998) Educating students who have visual
       impairments with other disabilities. New York: AFB Press.

Sewell, Debra, et al. (2007). Evals: Evaluating Visually Impaired Students.
Austin: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired.

Stillman, Robert et al. (1978 & 1985) The Callier-Azusa Scale: G and H
       Administration. Dallas: University of Texas.

Swenson, Anna M. (1999). Beginning with braille. New York: AFB Press.

Venn, John J. (2007). Assessing Students with Special Needs. Upper Saddle
River: Pearson.
Wolffe, Karen E. (ed.). (1999). Skills for success. New York: AFB Press.

								
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