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									    ONE WORLD, MANY FAITHS




     The Kirklees Agreed Syllabus for Religious
                     Education
                    2007-2012




1
                                CONTENTS:

1   Introduction to the Syllabus                                                3
    Chief Executive; Head of Children and Young People Service ; Head of
    Learning - Kirklees Council
    Chair of SACRE



2   The Importance of Religious Education                                       5
    The Importance of Religious Education
    The Importance of the Kirklees Agreed Syllabus
    The Aims of the School Curriculum and the Place of Religious Education
    Learning About and Learning From Religion
    Skills and Attitudes in Religious Education
    The Status of Religious Education and Legal Requirements:
    Time for Religious Education
    Planning for Religious Education: Requirements of the Kirklees Agreed
    Syllabus



3   The Learning Journey: Providing Effective Learning                          16
    Opportunities for All Pupils
    Providing Access to Religious Education
    The Learning Journey in Religious Education: Making Links and Scaffolding
    Learning Through Concept-Building
    Learning Across the Curriculum: Every Child Matters


4   Objectives and Programmes of Study                                          28
    Foundation Stage
    Key Stage 1
    Key Stage 2
    Key Stage 3
    14 – 19
    The Programmes of Study



5   Assessment in Religious Education                                           72
    Assessment and Learning
    The Attainment Target in Religious Education
    Assessing Pupils in Religious Education: Summative and Formative
    Performance Descriptions in Religious Education
    Progression Through the Level Descriptors: Key Ideas / Key Words
    Level Descriptors
    Level Descriptors and General Pupil-Speak Statements
    14 – 19 Assessment Objectives



6   Appendices                                                                  97
    Legal Requirement Checklist: Religious Education
    Concepts in Religious Education
    Contributors to the Syllabus and Acknowledgements




2
SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION
The Kirklees Agreed Syllabus 2007 – 2012



We are delighted to introduce the new Kirklees Agreed Syllabus for Religious
Education, 'One World, Many Faiths' which underpins our central vision in
Kirklees for a young, green, diverse and economically successful borough.
There is a huge amount to celebrate within our unique Kirklees communities
which encompass a wide diversity of vibrant cultures, religions and ethnicity.
We hope that the syllabus, with its emphasis on a widened range of world
religions, diversity and a broadened awareness of local and global
perspectives will play a significant role in strengthening community cohesion
in Kirklees.

Our Children and Young People plan which sets out the strategic objectives
for the direction of travel over the next three years, along with our Three Year
Strategy will provide the overarching vision through which pupils across
Kirklees will engage with the important knowledge, understanding and skills in
'One World, Many Faiths'.

The Local Authority is placing an increasing emphasis on listening and
responding to the voice of Children and Young People and the units of work
set down as non statutory guidance are designed to assist teachers and
pupils in approaching the work through exploratory and interactive discussion
and through philosophical and critical analysis. In this way we hope that the
study of Religious Education through this revised syllabus will be 'brought to
life' in classrooms, so that children can relate its central concepts to their
every day life in the 21st Century alongside the wealth of technological
communication, the increased pace of contemporary living and broader
horizons for participation in different types of learning, greater ambitions and
the expectations for employment and economic success.

Most of all, we hope that children and young people will enjoy their learning
from 'One World, Many Faiths' and be inspired by the sense of empowerment
and identity that faith, belief and culture can bring to communities, families
and individual citizens.

We present this syllabus to embrace and enjoy.




Rob Vincent                Alison O'Sullivan                  Caroline Gruen
Chief Executive            Director for Children              Head of Learning
                           and Young People




3
Chair of SACRE


4
SECTION 2
The Importance of Religious Education

Religious Education provokes challenging questions about the ultimate
meaning and purpose of life. It explores beliefs about God, the nature of
reality, issues of right and wrong and encourages contemplation on what it
means to be human. It develops pupils’ knowledge and understanding of
Christianity, of the other five principal world religions1 and of other religious
traditions and world views that offer answers to questions such as these2.

This core area of the curriculum enhances pupils’ awareness of religious
beliefs, teachings, practices and forms of expression, and also encourages
exploration of the influence of religion on individuals, families, communities
and cultures. Religious Education thereby promotes not only learning about,
but also learning from, different religious beliefs, values and traditions whilst
challenging pupils to explore their own personal beliefs and questions of
meaning. Pupils reflect on, analyse, interpret and evaluate issues of truth,
belief and ethics and they are taught to communicate their responses.

Religious Education encourages pupils to develop their sense of identity and
belonging. It helps them to flourish individually within their communities and as
citizens in a pluralistic society and global community. Religious Education
plays an important role in preparing pupils for adult life, employment and
lifelong learning as they develop an understanding of their roles and
responsibilities as citizens in a modern democracy.

It plays a significant part alongside other aspects of the curriculum and school
life, in helping pupils to engage with challenging spiritual, moral, social and
cultural questions that arise in their lives and society. It promotes the
development of respect for, and sensitivity towards, others including those
whose faiths and beliefs are different from their own. Good Religious
Education promotes discernment and aspires to equip pupils with the tools to
combat prejudice.

An entitlement to Religious Education must, therefore, be an entitlement for all
pupils, who need to understand the role and significance of religion in the
modern world and the important beliefs and values that shape it. Good quality
Religious Education can transform pupils’ perception and assessment of
themselves and others and their understanding of the wider position of the
world in which they live.

Religious Education is a core area of the curriculum precisely because it is so
very important.




1
    Buddhism, Hindu Dharma (Hinduism), Islam, Judaism and Sikhism
2
    Other religious traditions and world views may be theistic or non theistic
5
The five outcomes and key principles from Every Child Matters3 are central
to Religious Education. These can be found in Section 4 of this syllabus.



The Importance of the Kirklees Agreed Syllabus:

         It articulates an entitlement for all pupils irrespective of social
          background, culture, race, religion, gender and additional need. This
          entitlement contributes to pupils’ developing knowledge, skills,
          understanding and attitudes necessary for self-fulfilment and
          development as active and responsible citizens

         It establishes expectations for learning and standards that are
          explicit to pupils, parents, teachers, governors, employers and the
          public. It establishes standards for the performance of all pupils in
          Religious Education. These standards may be used to support
          assessment for learning. They may also be used to help pupils and
          teachers set targets for improvement and evaluate progress towards
          them.

         It promotes continuity, coherence and consistency through the
          curriculum it offers pupils at all stages. It helps the transition of pupils
          between schools and phases of education and can provide a
          foundation for further study and lifelong learning.

         It promotes public understanding and aspires to contribute to
          community cohesion and, through the syllabus and such initiatives as
          ‘Interfaith Kirklees’4, aims to increase public understanding of, and
          confidence in, the work of schools in Religious Education.




3
    DfES 2004
4
    The Kirklees Faith Centres project, initiated and supported by Kirklees SACRE
6
The Aims of the School Curriculum and the Place of RE

Aim 1: To provide opportunities for all pupils to learn and achieve

Religious Education should be a stimulating, interesting and enjoyable subject. The
knowledge, skills and understanding outlined in the Programme of Study (Section 5)
and described in the Learning Journey (Section 3) are designed to promote
excellence and enjoyment for all. Religious Education develops independent and
interdependent learning. It makes an important contribution to pupils’ skills in literacy
and information and communication technology (Section 3). Religious Education
promotes an enquiring approach in which pupils carefully consider issues of belief
and truth. By enhancing the capacity to think creatively, critically and coherently it
develops pupils’ capacity to evaluate thoughtfully their own and others’ views in a
reasoned and informed manner.

This relates to Religious Education, which aims:

                       i. To foster in pupils, an understanding of religious beliefs
                          and practices both locally and globally and to develop an
                          awareness of the influence of these on society;

                       ii. To encourage pupils to learn, enquire and evaluate, what
                           religions have to say about the fundamental questions of
                           life raised by human experiences.


Aim 2: To promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural
development and prepare all pupils for the opportunities,
responsibilities and experiences of life

Religious Education seeks to develop pupils’ awareness of themselves and others, to
distinguish right from wrong and to enable them to appreciate their own and others’
beliefs and cultures and how these influence individuals, communities and societies.
Religious Education consequently plays a significant role in the promotion of spiritual,
moral, social and cultural development (see Section 3).
At the heart of this syllabus is a focus on ultimate questions and ethical issues. It
aims to promote religious understanding, discernment and respect and to challenge
prejudice and stereotyping. Pupils are encouraged to reflect on their uniqueness as
human beings, share their feelings and emotions with others and appreciate the
importance of forming and maintaining positive relationships.

This relates to Religious Education, which aims:

                 i.       To enable pupils to appreciate their own and others’
                          beliefs and cultures and how these impact on individuals,
                          communities, societies and cultures;

                 ii.      To nurture pupils’ self-awareness and self-worth, and
                          their awareness and appreciation of the worth of others.




7
Learning About and Learning From Religion

The aims are encapsulated in the two targets for Religious Education around
which the Programme of Study is constructed:


Target 1 (T1): Learning about Religion
Learning about religion includes enquiry into and investigation of, the nature
of religion, its beliefs, teachings and ways of life, sources, practices and forms
of expression. It includes the skills of interpretation, analysis and expression.
Pupils learn to communicate their knowledge and understanding using
specialist vocabulary. It also includes identifying and developing an
understanding of ultimate questions and ethical issues. Learning about
religions covers pupils’ knowledge and understanding of individual religions
and how they relate to each other as well as the study of the nature and
characteristics of religion.




Target 2 (T2): Learning from Religion
Learning from religion is concerned with developing pupils’ reflection on and
response to their own and others’ experiences in the light of their learning
about religion. It develops pupils’ skills of application, interpretation and
evaluation of what they learn about religion. Pupils learn to develop and
communicate their own ideas, particularly in relation to questions of identity
and belonging, to meaning, purpose and truth and to values and commitment.
They consider what it is to be human as they search for personal meaning.




8
Skills and Attitudes in RE

Skills in RE
Religious Education provides opportunities for the development of a number
of key skills:


       communication through developing a broad and accurate religious
        vocabulary, reading and responding to a range of written and spoken
        language (including sacred texts, stories, poetry, prayers, liturgy and
        worship), communicating ideas using the creative and expressive arts,
        talking and writing with understanding and insight about religious and
        other beliefs and values, reflecting critically on ultimate questions of life,
        using reasoned arguments

       use of information and communication technology through using
        DVDs, CD Roms, the internet and Virtual Learning Environments
        selectively, researching information about religions, using email to
        communicate and analyse information with people of differing beliefs and
        faiths, using spreadsheets and databases to handle and present data
        relevant to the study of RE

       working with others through sharing ideas, discussing beliefs, values
        and practices, collaborating with each other and developing respect and
        sensitivity

       improving own learning and performance through setting personal
        targets in Religious Education, reviewing their achievements and
        identifying ways to improve their own work

       problem solving through recognising key issues to do with religious
        belief, practice and expression, interpreting and explaining findings and
        making personal decisions on religious issues (for example, considering
        their own and religious ideas on good and evil), ethical dilemmas and
        priorities in life.

The Kirklees Agreed Syllabus places particular emphasis on a more specific
set of skills that are then broken down to form the Level Descriptors 5. These
are:


T1: Learning About Religion

KEY SKILLS: Enquiry, Investigation and Expression


T2: Learning From Religion

KEY SKILLS: Application, Creative Thinking and Evaluation



5
    See Section 5
9
Attitudes in Religious Education

Apart from developing skills, knowledge and understanding in Religious
Education, it is also critical that the subject equips pupils to develop positive
attitudes to their learning and to the beliefs and values of others. Four
attitudes are particularly significant and should be developed at each key
stage:

        Self-awareness
        Respect for all
        Open-mindedness
        Appreciation and wonder


Self-awareness in Religious Education involves pupils:
    feeling confident about their own beliefs and identity and sharing them
      without fear of embarrassment or ridicule
    developing a realistic and positive sense of their own religious, moral
      and spiritual ideas
    recognising their own uniqueness as human beings and affirming their
      self-worth
    becoming increasingly sensitive to the impact of their ideas and
      behaviour on other people.

Respect for all in Religious Education involves pupils:
   developing skills of listening and a willingness to learn from others,
     even when others’ views are different from their own
   being ready to value difference and diversity for the common good,
     appreciating that some beliefs are not inclusive and considering the
     issues that this raises for individuals and society
   being prepared to recognise and acknowledge their own bias
   being sensitive to the feelings and ideas of others.

Open-mindedness in Religious Education involves pupils:
   being willing to learn and gain new understanding
   engaging in argument or disagreeing reasonably and respectfully
     (without belittling or abusing others) about religious, moral and spiritual
     questions
   being willing to go beyond surface impressions
   distinguishing between opinions, viewpoints and beliefs in connection
     with issues of conviction and faith.

Appreciation and wonder in Religious Education involves pupils:
   developing their imagination and curiosity
   recognising that knowledge is bounded by mystery
   appreciating the sense of wonder at the world in which they live
   developing their capacity to respond to questions of meaning and
     purpose.




10
The Status of Religious Education and Legal Requirements

This syllabus forms part of every child’s entitlement as required by the
Education Reform Act 1996.

Since 1944 Religious Education has been regarded as an essential part of the
school curriculum. The 1988 and subsequent Education Acts have reaffirmed
the contribution of Religious Education to the curriculum, For example,
Section 352 of the Education Act 1996 identifies the distinctive place of
Religious Education as part of the basic curriculum alongside the National
Curriculum. Along with English, Mathematics, Science and Information and
Communication Technology, Religious Education forms the core curriculum.

Religious Education differs from the subjects of the National Curriculum in that
it is not bound by national prescription in terms of attainment targets and
programmes of study. It is a matter for the Agreed Syllabus Conferences to
recommend locally prescribed procedures for the Local Authority.

The Education Act 1996 requires that:

        Religious Education should be taught to all pupils other than those in
         nursery classes and except for those withdrawn at the wish of their
         parents. Teachers’ rights are safeguarded should they wish to withdraw
         from the teaching of Religious Education
        Religious Education in all county and voluntary controlled schools
         should be taught in accordance with the local agreed syllabus (ie: the
         Kirklees Agreed Syllabus)
        An agreed syllabus should reflect the fact that the religious traditions in
         Great Britain are in the main Christian, while taking account of the
         teachings and practices of the other principal religions in Great Britain
        An agreed syllabus must not be designed to convert pupils, or to
         impose a particular religion or religious belief on pupils
        An Agreed Syllabus Conference must be convened every five years to
         review the existing syllabus

The review and compilation of this syllabus has been based on legal
requirements, the most recent of which are:

        The Education Act 1996
        The Schools Standards and Framework Act 1998
        The Education Act 2002

The review takes account of guidance issued in circulars by the Department
for Education and Skills (DfES) which do not carry the force of law.




11
Time for Religious Education

Religious Education is a core area of the curriculum.

This syllabus is based on the requirement that the equivalent of at least one
hour a week is devoted to Religious Education at each of the four Key Stages.
A minimum of 18 hours each year should be provided for Post 16 students.

Students taking full course GCSE or A Level Religious Studies will require
considerably more time than this minimum requirement.

The requirement to teach Religious Education does not apply to nursery
classes but it does apply to children in Reception classes.

Collective Worship is not part of the taught curriculum and cannot be
considered as part of the recommended time for teaching Religious
Education.



Unless this minimum requirement is provided, the standards required in
this syllabus cannot be met. Also, a school would not be fulfilling
statutory requirements.




12
Planning for RE: Requirements of the Kirklees Agreed
Syllabus – Content and Breadth of Study
The school’s RE provision should be planned around a number of
requirements:
    Christianity should be taught across all Key Stages
    The Kirklees Agreed Syllabus Conference has agreed five principal
       world religions to be studied in addition to Christianity. They are
       Buddhism, Hinduism (Hindu Dharma), Islam, Judaism and Sikhism
    Schools can also choose to study other belief systems and religious
       traditions – theistic or non theistic – as appropriate
    It is important to consider the community and population of the school
       and the wider community in determining the religions that are chosen
       for study

The following represents the minimum requirements in relation to the
religions studied
                          By the time they leave primary school, all pupils will
 During the course         have studied Christianity and two of the world’s
 of their school           principal religions – either Islam OR Judaism AND
 career, pupils will       either Buddhism OR Sikhism - in depth
 study the six major
 faiths: Buddhism,        Although pupils are to study all six major world faiths
 Christianity, Hindu       at Key Stage 3, not all are to be studied in depth
 Dharma, Islam,
 Judaism and              Hindu Dharma is to be introduced and studied from
 Sikhism.                  Key Stage 3 onwards, partly because of its relative
                           complexity and diversity of expression
 Christianity is to be
 studied in all Key       Pupils at Key Stage 4 and Post 16 are to follow an
 Stages                    accredited course in Religious Studies

 There is an              Pupils at all Key Stages may also study other theistic
 opportunity for           or non theistic beliefs and religious traditions as
 pupils to also study      appropriate. The teaching of these must avoid
 other belief              tokenism and will often be determined by the nature
 systems – theistic        of the school population.
 or non theistic, as
 appropriate              In order to ensure continuity and progression, each
                           pyramid of schools must agree on those
 Pupils will               religions to be studied in depth and when these
 increasingly              are to be taught.
 investigate how
 religions are            The Transition Unit ‘Guidelines for Living’ is to be
 relevant to               taught in all relevant schools as a bridging unit
 contemporary,             from Year 6 and 7.
 moral and ethical
 issues                   Relevant schools can opt whether or not to teach
                           the Year 2 to 3 Transition Unit ‘What Does it
                           Mean to Belong?’ This decision must be subject to
                           pyramid agreement.

13
Key Stage Requirements

Foundation Stage: (reception children only)
A thematic approach should be planned, using the Foundation Stage Guidance and the
Agreed Syllabus Foundation Stage objectives. Particular religions may arise in the course of
activity but these are not specifically identified or planned for in the Programme of Study

Note: From Key Stage 1 onwards schools are required to study certain
religions in depth6 and others in outline7. It is only the religions studied in
depth that have to be agreed by each pyramid of schools.

Key Stage 1
     Religions to be Studied          Depth or          Statutory          Need for Pyramid
                                      Outline?        Requirement?           Agreement?


     Christianity                  In depth        Yes                   Yes
     One religion from either
      Group A or Group B

     Other belief systems          In outline      No – schools may      No
      and religious traditions                      choose
      as is appropriate to the
      school’s local community

     Year 2/3 Transition Unit:     Unit provided   No – relevant         Yes - they must
      ‘What Does it Mean to         in Handbook     schools may           chose whether or not
      Belong?’                                      choose                to teach this

Key Stage 2
     Religions to be Studied          Depth or          Statutory          Need for Pyramid
                                      Outline?        Requirement?           Agreement?

     Year 2/3 Transition Unit:     Unit provided   No – relevant         Yes - they must
      ‘What Does it Mean to         in Handbook     schools may           choose whether or
      Belong?’                                      choose                not to teach this

     Christianity                  In depth        Yes                   Yes
     The chosen religion
      from KS1
     One religion from the
      other group

     Other belief systems          In outline      No – schools may      No
      and religious traditions:                     choose
      theistic or non theistic as
      appropriate

     Year 6/7 Transition Unit,     Unit provided   Yes                   No – This must be
      ‘Guidelines for Living’ &     in Handbook                           taught in all relevant
      pupil self-assessment                                               schools
      record




6
  Depth: All objectives from the relevant key stage are explored in the context of Christianity
and the chosen religions
7
  Outline: Schools can choose which of the objectives to concentrate on, but should aim for a
balance of those focused on Beliefs and Teachings and those focused on Practices and
Ways of Life
14
                                Group A            Group B
                                Islam              Buddhism
                                Judaism            Sikhism
Key Stage 3
     Religions to be Studied            Depth or         Statutory        Need for Pyramid
                                        Outline?       Requirement?         Agreement?

     Year 6/7 Transition Unit,     Unit provided in   Yes               N/A
      ‘Guidelines for Living’ &     Handbook
      pupil self-assessment
      record

     Christianity                  In depth           Yes               Yes
     At least TWO of the
      principal world religions

     Minimum provision of          In outline         Yes               No
      the equivalent of one unit
      of work on each of the
      other principal world
      religions that are not to
                          8
      be studied in depth

     Other belief systems          In outline         No – schools      No
      and religious traditions:                        may choose
      theistic or non theistic as
      appropriate

KS4:
The minimum requirement is the provision of an accredited RE or RS course approved
                                                         9
under Section 96(6) of the Learning and Skills Act (2000) , whether or not students are
entered for the public examination


Post 16:
Students should follow either:
a) An accredited RE or RS course approved under Section 96(6) of the Learning and Skills
              10
    Act (2000) and which represents progression from 14-16.
OR
b) A multi-faith approach with units of work constructed by the school, along the lines
    suggested in this syllabus

NOTE:
Where, for whatever reason, there is no pyramid agreement over the religions studied
in depth, the default position to be followed by primary schools is:
KS1: Christianity and Islam
KS2: Christianity, Islam and Sikhism

Schools should monitor their fulfilment of all requirements by completing the checklist
in the Appendix

8
  It is not intended that RE be taught religion by religion, rather in a more thematic and
comparative manner, hence the word, ‘equivalent’
9
  Section 96(6) of the Learning and Skills act (2000) requires maintained schools to provide
only qualifications approved by the Secretary of State. For some pupils with additional needs,
an Entry Level Certificate may be appropriate. For those for whom it would not, schools
should follow a programme from this syllabus.
10
   Section 96(6) of the Learning and Skills act (2000) requires maintained schools to provide
only qualifications approved by the Secretary of State. For some pupils with additional needs,
an Entry Level Certificate may be appropriate. For those for whom it would not, schools
should follow a programme from this syllabus.
15
SECTION 3
The Learning Journey: Providing Effective Learning
Opportunities for All Pupils

Inclusion: Providing Access to Religious Education

The knowledge, skills and understanding that underpin T1 – Learning about
religion and T2 – Learning from religion – should be taught in ways that match
pupils’ abilities yet challenge them.


Staff can modify the curriculum for RE by:

      Choosing material from different key stages for those pupils with
       additional needs, planning learning opportunities to the needs of pupils
      Using other sources and resources where appropriate: for example the
       ‘Equals’ Scheme, which is specifically written for pupils with Profound
       and Multiple Learning Difficulties


Staff can improve pupils’ access to RE by:

      Focusing on one aspect, or a limited number of aspects, in depth or in
       outline; maintaining, consolidating, reinforcing and generalising, as well
       as introducing new knowledge, skills and understanding
      Providing a range of teaching approaches to meet the needs of
       individuals and groups – eg: use of a multi-sensory approach and one
       which creates a balance of visual, auditory and kinaesthetic activities;
       accessing RE through personal exploration and contact with a range of
       people; giving pupils first hand experiences e.g. visits to religious
       buildings; organising a range of activities to give personal experiences
       e.g. dance, drama, visits to a range of environments
      Providing a variety of learning environments and contexts in which
       content can be delivered, using sensory materials and resources
       through sight, touch, sound, taste or smell e.g. music, artefacts
      Being aware of the pace at which pupils work and of the physical and
       mental effort required. Adapting tasks or environments or providing
       alternative activities where necessary
      Engaging in activities which broaden pupils’ horizons from their own
       experiences to those of others – see section on the Learning Journey
      Helping pupils to understand and appreciate their world and its
       diversity
      Using a range of resources e.g. interactive/sensory stimuli, ICT
      Using specialist aids and equipment
      Providing support from adults or pupils when necessary while allowing
       pupils the space, time and freedom to develop skills for themselves
      Integrating RE with other subjects

16
Gifted pupils are those who can easily, quickly and at an expert level apply the
specific skills and processes of RE, and who demonstrate high levels of
understanding, insight, maturity and achievement.

RE is concerned with ultimate questions, and with very complex and
multifaceted phenomena and concepts. This provides interest and motivation
for the most able. Gifted pupils in RE can apply knowledge, understanding,
and the processes important to RE such as critical thinking, interpretation,
insight, reflection, and synthesis. Pupils need to have the opportunity to
demonstrate these high levels. This can be achieved through:

        Careful task setting. Differentiated tasks enable gifted students to not
         only learn at a faster pace, but also in more depth
        The use of a variety of challenging questioning strategies to enable
         pupils to explore religious phenomena and questions deeply
        Setting extension tasks that avoid mere repetition, or ‘extra’ work, but
         pursuing instead the depth of understanding and reflection
        Using authentic faith-based material to provide complex stimuli for
         learning.
        Carefully planned self-assessment instruments that enable gifted
         students to identify their own learning needs
        Encouraging ambitious work, using target setting strategies
        The use of ultimate or fundamental questions that lie below the surface
         of religious practice, to open up for learners the ways in which they
         might learn from religion



Inclusion: RE and Respect for All

No young person, whatever their background, should leave school unaware of
or unprepared for the challenges of life in our complex pluralistic, multicultural,
multi-faith society. This is why both statutory guidelines and the law require
teachers to address issues of racism, diversity and inclusion in RE and across
the curriculum.

Schools are bound by the duties outlined in the Race Relations (Amendment)
Act (2000) and each should be able to demonstrate that account has been
taken of race equality for all five of the aims of Every Child Matters:

Being Healthy – are all pupils encouraged to have positive self-esteem and a
healthy respect for others?

Staying Safe – are pupils free from bullying, harassment and violence?

Enjoying and Achieving – are all ethnic groups engaged in their learning
and achieving?

Making a Positive Contribution – are pupils encouraged to become active
citizens, with respect for equality and awareness of religious, cultural, social
and global diversity?

17
Achieving Economic Well-Being – are pupils from disadvantaged
backgrounds encouraged to have high aspirations?

Virtually every aspect of life in Britain has been shaped and influenced by
contributions from a variety of cultural and global perspectives. Opportunities
are provided in ‘One World, Many Faiths’ for schools to focus on the benefits
and challenges within RE of global diversity and of living in a pluralistic
society. The key concepts of identity and community, diversity and respect,
run throughout the Programmes of Study, encouraging Respect for All.

Respect for diversity should be promoted in RE by drawing examples from the
locality of Kirklees, from different countries, cultures and communities. Pupils
should reflect on the manner in which diversity enriches lives and helps to
address the question, ‘What does it mean to be human?’

The RE curriculum should, consequently, open doors and expand horizons.
Positive examples and non-stereotypical images that show diversity both
within and between religions should be central to the curriculum. Skills and
attitudes should be taught to encourage respect, to promote community
cohesion and positive pluralism.


Duty to Promote Community Cohesion

As migration and economic change alter the shape of our increasingly diverse
communities, it is more important than ever that all schools play a full part in
promoting community cohesion. Every school should be a thriving, cohesive
community, and each has a vital part to play in building a more cohesive
society.

The term ‘community cohesion’ implies working towards a society in which
there is a common vision and sense of belonging by all communities; a
society in which the diversity of people’s backgrounds and circumstances is
appreciated and valued; a society in which similar life opportunities are
available to all; and a society in which strong and positive relationships exist
and continue to be developed in the workplace, in schools and in the wider
community. RE must contribute to this.

Every school in Kirklees - whatever its intake - is responsible for educating
children and young people who will live and work in a country which is diverse
in terms of culture, faith, ethnicity and social background. The staff and pupil
populations of some schools reflect this diversity, allowing pupils to mix with
those from different backgrounds. Others do not, and need to make links with
other schools and organisations in order to give their pupils the opportunity to
mix with and learn with, from and about those from different backgrounds. The
Kirklees Schools Twinning Project and Interfaith Kirklees, the Faith Centres
initiative, have been set up in order to support schools in this.

Following the Education and Inspections Act, 2006, a new duty of schools to
promote community cohesion becomes effective with the implementation of
One World, Many Faiths, from September 2007.



18
A significant feature of the non-statutory units of work which support the
Programmes of Study of ‘One World, Many Faiths’ is the thematic, ethical,
interfaith and question-based approach. There is a clear focus on
understanding and respect by encouraging comparison within and between
religions. By investigating what religions have to say about contemporary and
topical issues, the philosophical approach supports the promotion of
community cohesion.




19
The Learning Journey in Religious Education: Making Links
and Scaffolding Learning Through Concept-Building


When encountering new ideas and concepts all pupils should progress from
the familiar to the unfamiliar. In RE, this Learning Journey should be so
structured and scaffolded to allow all pupils at all levels and phases to make
parallels between their own beliefs, values, practices and lifestyles – the
familiar, and the beliefs, values, practices and lifestyles of others – the
unfamiliar.

High standards in RE can be achieved only with support from a challenging
curriculum which meets the needs of its pupils and attends to and makes links
between four critical elements, summarised by an understanding of what it
means to be human:


             The development of an understanding of shared human
              experiences

             An exploration of the principal religious traditions and practices

             An investigation of the beliefs and values which form the core of
              these traditions

             Reflection on and search for personal meaning as a result of
              investigations




It is the links between these elements that are important and which are
consequently the pre requisites for the development of high quality RE.

The concept-building approach outlined below, provides a path within the
Learning Journey whereby concepts and ideas common to non religious
experience are linked to concepts and ideas common to many religions, and
then to those concepts and ideas particular to specific religions. Three critical
elements are emphasised:

            Making links between ideas and concepts
            Application of ideas
            Reflection on ideas and personal views




20
Concept-Building

Concepts are tools for making sense of the world. They are frameworks or
categories that help us to interpret human experience.

Within religious traditions people use distinctive concepts and ideas to
express their experience and understanding of the world. Those which apply
to the development of religious understanding can be divided into three
general types:

Concepts and ideas common to non-religious and religious experience
For example: belonging, specialness, celebration

Concepts and ideas common to many religions and that are used in the
study of religions
For example: God, worship, prayer

Concepts and ideas particular to specific religions
For example: moksha, incarnation, tawheed


Examples of each type of concept and idea can be found in Appendix 1


Pupils would be expected to progress from concepts and ideas common to
non-religious and religious experience through concepts and ideas common
to many religions to concepts and ideas particular to specific religions.

An approach which plans the teaching experience of a complex religious
concept by moving pupils gradually from the familiar to the unfamiliar is one
which supports challenge. For example, in exploring the concept of crucifixion
and resurrection in Christianity, a unit of work might progress from exploring
the concept of remembering (concepts and ideas common to non-religious
and religious experience) to making specific links to the concept of
remembrance and only then to crucifixion and resurrection (concepts and
ideas particular to specific religions). The activities planned would then link
one concept or idea to another.

Examples of concept builders which demonstrate progression from one
concept or idea type to another can be found in the Kirklees Agreed
Syllabus Handbook.




21
The Learning Journey in RE: The Process of Learning



                                      START HERE
                                      1. Investigating
                                      shared human
                                      experiences (T2)

      by reflecting on and
      evaluating each concept
      or idea in the light of own
      beliefs and those of others
                                                    by reflecting on and enquiring
                                                    into non-religious / religious
                                                    concepts and ideas

 4. Reflection on
 and search for
 personal                                                      2. Investigating
 meaning (T2)                                                  religious
                                                               traditions and
                                                               practices (T1)

     by reflecting on and
     investigating concepts and ideas
     specific to particular religions
                                               by reflecting on and
                                               applying each concept in the
                                               context of religious practice:
                   3. Investigating            concepts and ideas common
                   the beliefs and             to many religions
                   values which
                   underpin
                   traditions and
                   practice (T1)




22
Learning across the Curriculum

The Kirklees Agreed Syllabus is concerned with the journey of personal
understanding and meaning - what it means to be human. Religious
Education has a significant, but by no means exclusive, role to play in
exploring this journey.

RE can promote learning across the curriculum in a number of areas such as
spiritual, moral, social and cultural development, key skills and thinking skills.
It plays a significant part in contributing to all five outcomes of ‘Every Child
Matters’11

Religious Education and Every Child Matters

 Being               Staying safe       Enjoying            Making a              Achieving
 healthy                                & achieving         positive              economic
                                                            contribution          well-being
 Encouraging         Exploration of     Encouraging         Encouraging           Encouraging a
 respect for the     the concept of     pupils to be        awareness of          positive
 body: reflecting    security: family   challenged and      self, family, local   appreciation of
 on appreciation     life, religious    to achieve          and wider             growing up in a
 of creation;        rules and ritual   stretching          community             diverse society
 religious                              standards.
 teachings about     Exploration of                         Appreciation of       Preparing pupils
 food; the need      how religious      Encouraging         the need for          for
 to care for the     rules guide and    pupils to enjoy     rules and for         opportunities,
 environment;        support            Religious           living within         responsibilities
 appropriate         individuals,       Education           acceptable and        and experiences
 attitudes to        groups and         through an          legal guidelines      of life
 sexual              communities        appropriate
 relationships                          curriculum          Encouraging           Giving pupils
                     Exploration of                         broad                 the ability to
 Encouraging a       how religions      Encouraging         mindedness and        consider
 healthy mind        promote values     pupils to enjoy     appreciation that     critically what
 through for         and morals         Religious           there are often       ‘economic well
 example stilling,   through            Education by        no right answers      being’ means,
 meditation,         teachings and      providing a                               looking at
 debate,             role models        variety of active   Encouraging           wealth and
 philosophy for                         learning            pupils’ personal      poverty;
 children,           Encouraging        strategies to       contributions,        responsibility
 personal            pupils to make     challenge,          emphasising a         and faith
 reflection and      choices based      motivate and        search for
 the need for        upon thorough      enthuse             personal              Giving all pupils
 positive self-      analysis                               meaning               the opportunity
 image                                  Creating a fully                          to gain an
                     Helping pupils     inclusive           Encouraging a         accreditation in
                     to appreciate      curriculum in       willingness to        Religious
                     prejudice and      which all           communicate           Studies
                     discrimination     children’s          views
                     and to show        needs are           respectfully, to
                     and feel respect   valued and met      stand up for and
                     for our diverse                        also to adjust
                     society                                views when
                                                            appropriate
                     Helping pupils
                     to take                                Encouraging the
                     responsibility                         valuing of one
                                                            another

11
     DfES 2004
23
Promoting Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Development through
Religious Education

Religious Education provides opportunities to promote spiritual development
through:

  discussing and reflecting on key questions of meaning and truth such as the origins of
   the universe, life after death, good and evil, beliefs about God and values such as
   justice, honesty and truth
  learning about and reflecting on important concepts, experiences and beliefs that are at
   the heart of religious traditions and practices
  considering how beliefs and concepts in religion may be expressed through the creative
   and expressive arts and related to the human and natural sciences, thereby contributing
   to personal and communal identity
  considering how religions and other world views perceive the value of human beings,
   and their relationships with one another, with the natural world, and with God
  valuing relationships and developing a sense of belonging
  developing their own views and ideas on religious and spiritual issues.



Religious Education provides opportunities to promote moral development
through:

  enhancing the values identified within the National Curriculum, particularly valuing
   diversity and engaging in issues of truth, justice and trust
  exploring the influence of family, friends and media on moral choices and how society is
   influenced by beliefs, teachings, sacred texts and guidance from religious leaders
  considering what is of ultimate value to pupils and believers through studying the key
   beliefs and teachings from religion and philosophy about values and ethical codes of
   practice
  studying a range of ethical issues, including those that focus on justice, to promote racial
   and religious respect and personal integrity
  considering the importance of rights and responsibilities and developing a sense of
   conscience.

Religious Education provides opportunities to promote social development
through:

  considering how religious and other beliefs lead to particular actions and concerns
  investigating social issues from religious perspectives, recognising the diversity of
   viewpoints within and between religions as well as the common ground between
   religions
  articulating pupils’ own and others’ ideas on a range of contemporary social issues.



Religious Education provides opportunities to promote cultural development
through:

  encountering people, literature, the creative and expressive arts and resources from
   differing cultures
  considering the relationship between religion and cultures and how religions and beliefs
   contribute to cultural identity and practices
  promoting racial and interfaith harmony and respect for all, combating prejudice and
   discrimination, contributing positively to community cohesion and promoting awareness
   of how interfaith cooperation can support the pursuit of the common good.




24
Religious Education and the Use of Language

Religious Education can make an important contribution to pupils’ use of
language by enabling them to:

  acquire and develop a specialist vocabulary
  communicate their ideas with depth and precision
  listen to the views and ideas of others, including people from religious traditions
  be enthused about the power and beauty of language, recognising its limitations
  develop their speaking and listening skills when considering religions, beliefs and ideas
   and articulating their responses
  read from religious stories and sacred texts
  write in different styles, such as poetry, diaries, extended writing and the synthesis of
   differing views, beliefs and ideas
  evaluate clearly and rationally, using a range of reasoned, balanced arguments.



Religious Education and the Use of Science

Religious Education can make an important contribution to science by
enabling pupils to:

  investigate the links between science and religion
  investigate how conscience and faith can affect action
  investigate the existence of God from a cosmological, ontological and teleological
   perspective
  investigate contemporary perspectives on euthanasia, abortion etc
  investigate the nature of reality from a Buddhist and Hindu perspective: that the world
   and its inhabitants and objects are nothing more than a thought; the concept of relativity
   and quantum physics

Religious Education and the Use of the Other Humanities

Religious Education can make an important contribution to history and
geography by enabling pupils to:

    place religious teachings and practices into historical and political context and vice versa
    place religious teachings and practices into geographical context and vice versa
    investigate religious settlements
    investigate the oral and written traditions in religions
    develop skills similar to those required of the other humanities subjects, including skills
     of investigation, enquiry, information processing, application, synthesis, creative thinking
     and evaluation



Religious Education and the Use of the Arts

Religious Education can make an important contribution to the Arts by
enabling pupils to:

    understand the significance of art in religions and vice versa
    understand the significance of music in religions and vice versa
    understand the significance of dance in religions and vice versa
    understand how the arts can enhance spirituality
    understand the function of the arts in religious storytelling
    explore the relationship between religious symbolism and the arts

25
Religious Education and the Use of Information and Communication
Technology

Religious Education can make an important contribution to pupils’ use of ICT
by enabling pupils to:

      make appropriate use of the internet, DVD or CD-ROM sources to investigate, analyse
       and evaluate different aspects of religious beliefs and practices, ultimate questions and
       ethical issues
      use email or videoconferencing to communicate and collaborate with individuals in
       different locations, enabling links to be made between religions and individual, national
       and international life
      use multimedia and presentation software to communicate a personal response, the
       essence of an argument or a stimulus for discussion
      use writing-support and concept-mapping software to organise thoughts and
       communicate knowledge and understanding of the diversity of belief and practice within
       and between religious traditions
      use equipment such as digital cameras and digital video to bring authentic images into
       the classroom to support discussion and reflection, and to enhance understanding of the
       impact of religious beliefs and practices on the lives of local individuals and faith
       communities.

‘Inter Faith Kirklees’, our Faith Centres project, can contribute significantly to
the links between ICT and RE with its dedicated website, on line resources
and interactive learning packages12.

Promoting Personal, Social, Health and Citizenship Education through
Religious Education

Religious Education plays a significant part in promoting citizenship through:

      developing pupils’ knowledge and understanding about the diversity of national, regional,
       religious and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom and the need for mutual respect
       and understanding
      enabling pupils to think about topical spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues
      including the importance of resolving conflict fairly
      exploring the rights, responsibilities and duties of citizens locally, nationally and globally
      enabling pupils to justify and defend orally, and in writing, personal opinions about
       issues, problems and events.

Religious Education plays a significant part in promoting personal, social
and health education through pupils:

      developing confidence and responsibility and making the most of their abilities
      learning about what is fair and unfair, right and wrong and being encouraged to share
       their opinions
      developing a healthy, safer lifestyle by learning about religious beliefs and teachings on
       drug use and misuse, food and drink, leisure, relationships and human sexuality,
       learning about the purpose and value of religious beliefs and sensitivities in relation to
       sex education and enabling pupils to consider and express their own views
      developing good relationships and respecting the differences between people by
       learning about the diversity of different ethnic and religious groups and the destructive
       power of prejudice, challenging racism, discrimination, offending behaviour and bullying,
       being able to talk about relationships and feelings, considering issues of marriage and
       family life and meeting and encountering people whose beliefs, views and lifestyles differ
       from their own.


12
     See RE Handbook
26
Promoting Other Areas and Aspects

Religious Education provides opportunities to promote:

  thinking skills through helping pupils to research, select, interpret and analyse
     information from religious traditions, reflect and question their own views and ideas and
     those of others and communicate their ideas in a variety of ways. A philosophical
     approach is fostered with pupils who should be encouraged to use skills of
     metacognition and develop multiple intelligences through the multi-sensory with
     emphasis on the visual, auditory and kinaesthetic.

  financial capability through considering the responsible use of money, the
     importance of giving and the ethics of wealth, debt, poverty, gambling, business and
     investment

  creativity and culture through considering the scope of human nature, sources of
     inspiration and discovery, connections between beliefs, values and forms of artistic
     expression, appreciating the value of cultural distinctiveness and reflecting on beauty,
     goodness and truth in creative and expressive arts

  education for racial equality and community cohesion through studying
     the damaging effects of xenophobia and racial stereotyping, the impact of conflict in
     religion and the promotion of respect, understanding and cooperation through dialogue
     between people of different faiths and beliefs

  effective contributions to scientific, medical and health issues through
     exploring philosophical and ethical questions of the origin, purpose and destiny of the
     cosmos and life within it, exploring the nature of humanity and human interaction with
     the world, exploring developments in genetics and medicine and their application and
     use and exploring concepts of health and well-being and their promotion

  links to employment, vocations and work-related learning through a
     focus on individual sense of purpose and aspiration in life, through considering the
     appropriateness and relevance of Religious Education to a wide range of employment
     opportunities and the development of spiritual and ethical issues linked to the world of
     work

  education for sustainable development through helping pupils consider the
     origins and value of life, the importance of looking after the environment and studying
     the ways in which religious beliefs and teachings have influenced attitudes to the
     environment and other species




27
     SECTION 4:
     THE OBJECTIVES and PROGRAMME OF STUDY
     There are two Key Strands which run through the Syllabus Objectives and Programme of Study and a
     number of related Key Themes:

     Key Strand:           BELIEFS and TEACHINGS
     Key Themes:           Belief
                           Authority

     Key Strand:           PRACTICES and WAYS OF LIFE
     Key Themes:           Ritual and Spirituality
                           Commitment and Responsibility

     Each Key Stage is allocated a set of objectives for which there is a Focus Statement outlining the nature of
     the learning experiences. The general objectives are then contextualised and applied to the six major faiths
     to form the Programme of Study. This allows pupils to compare and contrast aspects of religions and
     religious responses to ethical and moral issues.

     Requirements for students aged 14 – 19 are outlined separately.

     NOTE: The Programme of Study is set out in an objective-focused, religion by religion manner in order to
     facilitate planning and to ensure there is appropriate breadth and balance. It is NOT intended that RE be
     taught in a phenomenological, religion by religion manner. Rather, the Learning Journey outlined above,
     promotes a predominantly question-orientated, thematic and reflective approach allowing the exploration of
     issues and the responses of different religions to these. This encourages pupils to compare and contrast both
     between and among religions and to explore personal responses.

     A balance should be planned between units of work which give pupils the necessary knowledge and
     understanding and those which encourage application to different situations. Consequently it is important to
     use the syllabus to create units of work which balance religion–specific units, with those which focus on more
     than one religion, with those that are more general and thematic.

28
The Foundation Stage
The Foundation Stage is a journey of discovery for children aged 3 to 5, where foundations for later understanding of religious
ideas and concepts are laid through a child-centred, play-based approach.


It is appropriate to foster an awareness of, and an interest in faiths, particularly those from the community in which the children live.


Children will begin to develop an understanding of themselves and the world around them as they begin to ask questions about life
and the environment. Learning from Religion (Target 2) is, therefore, the starting point. They expand on their own experiences and
use these to create links to specific faiths.


Like all curriculum areas within the Foundation Stage, RE should be approached in a hands-on, experiential way. It should not be
viewed in isolation but seen as an integral part of school life and the curriculum, with natural links to a number of Early Learning
Goals, particularly:

        Personal, Social and Emotional Development
        Communication, Language and Literacy
        Knowledge and Understanding of the World
        Physical Development
        Creative Development


These Goals form a substantial part of the Foundation Stage curriculum and underpin children’s learning as they progress through
key stages.




29
Foundation Stage Objectives


Foundation Stage: Beliefs and Teachings                                       Foundation Stage: Practices and Ways of Life

            To develop an awareness that people believe different things                                To experience some special places and objects including places of
            and that some people believe in God                                                         worship




                                                                              Ritual and Spirituality
            To ask and talk about puzzling questions which arise from their                             To experience and talk about a variety of special times and
Belief




            own experience                                                                              celebrations


                                                                                                        To experience stillness and times of reflection, responding to what
                                                                                                        they see, hear, smell, touch and feel



            To listen to and respond to stories from different cultural and                             To explore the sense of belonging to the family and community




                                                                              Commitment and
            religious traditions




                                                                               Responsibility
Authority




                                                                                                        To develop an awareness of right and wrong and the need for agreed
            To develop an understanding of the concept of ‘leader’ – in the                             codes of conduct
            family, in the local community and in religion




30
The RE Objectives and Links to the Early Learning Goals

Foundation Stage                        Personal, Social and   Communication,   Knowledge and          Creative
Objectives:                             Emotional              Language and     Understanding of the   Development
Beliefs and Teachings                   Development            Literacy         World
            To develop an awareness
            that people believe                                                                     
            different things and that
            some people believe in
            God
Belief




            To ask and talk about
            puzzling questions which                                                                
            arise from their own
            experience


            To listen to and respond
            to stories from different                                                               
            cultural and religious
            traditions
Authority




            To develop an
            understanding of the                                                                    
            concept of ‘leader’ – in
            the family, in the local
            community and in religion




31
Foundation Stage                                           Personal, Social and   Communication,   Knowledge and          Creative
Objectives: Practices                                      Emotional              Language and     Understanding of the   Development
and Ways of Life                                           Development            Literacy         World
                                To experience some
                                special places and                                                                     
                                objects including places
                                of worship
Ritual and Spirituality




                                To experience and talk
                                about a variety of                                                                     
                                special times and
                                celebrations

                                To experience stillness
                                and times of reflection,                                                               
                                responding to what they
                                see, hear, smell, touch
                                and feel

                                To explore the sense of
                                                                                                                       
Commitment and Responsibility




                                belonging to the family
                                and community


                                To develop an
                                awareness of right and                                                                 
                                wrong and the need for
                                agreed codes of
                                conduct




32
Key Stage ONE Objectives

FOCUS STATEMENT:
During Key Stage 1, pupils will learn about some of the richness of Christianity and another principal religion. They are able to talk
about beliefs about God and express their own ideas simply. They encounter and respond to a range of stories, artefacts and other
religious materials. They are able to use simple information about religion, recognising that ideas are communicated in a variety of
ways. They begin to understand the importance and value of religion for believers.
T1: pupils ask relevant questions, showing that they are developing an enquiring approach to life and a sense of wonder at the
world.
T2: They are able to talk simply about what is important to them, valuing themselves, reflecting on their own feelings and
experiences and developing a sense of belonging.

Key Stage 1: Beliefs and Teachings                                            Key Stage 1: Practices and Ways of Life




                                                                              Ritual and Spirituality
            To develop an awareness that for many people religious belief                               To experience some places of worship and symbols, their purpose,
            (for example, belief in God) is important                                                   meanings and the feelings they evoke.
Belief




            To develop an awareness that some questions are puzzling and                                To explore some forms of religious expression, noting similarities where
            difficult to answer.                                                                        appropriate:
                                                                                                             Worship, prayer and meditation
                                                                                                             Thanksgiving and celebrations
                                                                                                             Art and music


            To experience and reflect on a range of religious stories and     Commitment and            To develop an awareness of how belonging to a religion can make a
            sacred writings, suggesting and discussing their meanings          Responsibility           difference to people’s lives, including the effect on individuals and on the
Authority




                                                                                                        family
            To develop an awareness of key figures within the chosen faiths
            (for example, stories and teachings)                                                        To investigate work of local leaders and the difference they make

                                                                                                        To reflect on spiritual and moral values and how these affect behaviour




33
Key Stage TWO Objectives

FOCUS STATEMENT:
During Key Stage 2 pupils will extend their learning about Christianity and other principal religions both locally and globally. In so
doing, they will develop their understanding of some concepts and feelings central to religion. They explore the range of symbolic
forms of religious expression in words and pictures, playing and praying, feasting, fasting and celebrating festivals. They become
familiar with some religious texts and other sources and learn about their meaning. They investigate some issues raised by religion
and learn about similarities and differences in religious belief and practice. They become increasingly competent and confident in
their use of religious vocabulary and in developing the ability to discuss beliefs and values thoughtfully in the light of religious
viewpoints.
T1: Pupils recognise the challenges involved in distinguishing right and wrong, and in recognising what is good and true.
T2: They are able to engage with, reflect on and respond to religious and spiritual questions, making links with the religions they
have studied.

Key Stage 2: Beliefs and Teachings                                              Key Stage 2: Practices and Ways of Life

            To explore key beliefs and teachings of religions through                                     To explore a range of practices in religions, their meanings and their




                                                                                Ritual and Spirituality
            people, stories and traditions, including:                                                    connection to beliefs and teachings:
                 Belief in God                                                                                Worship, prayer and meditation
                 Attitude to others                                                                           Thanksgiving and celebrations, including rites of passage
Belief




                 Religious rules (for example: ‘right’ and ‘wrong’)                                           The Arts


            To begin to gain awareness that religious beliefs and                                         To consider the variety of such practices within and among religions, thinking
            teachings address ultimate and ethical questions                                              about the local area and more widely



            To explore the concept of religious authority: origin, meanings                               To develop an awareness of the challenges from commitment to a religion,
            and importance of scriptures and religious stories                                            both individually and within a religious community
                                                                                Commitment and
                                                                                 Responsibility
Authority




            To explore the concept of religious authority: role and qualities                             To develop an awareness of religious rules and what different religions have
            of religious leaders                                                                          to say about ‘right’ and ‘wrong’, values and commitment


                                                                                                          To respond to ethical issues: how religious beliefs influence actions and
                                                                                                          responses to issues of human rights and fairness

34
Key Stage THREE Objectives


FOCUS STATEMENT:
During Key Stage 3, pupils will deepen and broaden their understanding of Christianity and other principal religions in local,
national and global contexts. In so doing, they extend their understanding of significant concepts and attitudes in religion. They
learn to explain literal and symbolic forms of expression in religious ritual, action, ethics and the arts. They explain and respond to
religious texts and other sources to show their understanding of some ways in which religious teachings can be interpreted within
faith communities. They explore some personal, theological and cultural reasons for similarities and differences in religious beliefs
and values, both within and between religions. They make effective use of religious terminology in deploying the skills for reasoned
argument in believing and making value judgments.
Key Stage 1 Buddhism – Strandwithin religious traditions as applied to relationships, rights and responsibilities,
T1: They investigate and analyze viewpoints from 1: Beliefs and Teachings
moral dilemmas and ultimate questions, relating these to their own ideas and experience.
T2: They interpret religious ideas for themselves, and develop their own responses to key questions of meaning, truth and values
thoughtfully.

Key Stage 3: Beliefs and Teachings                                               Key Stage 3: Practices and Ways of Life




                                                                                 Ritual and Spirituality
            To explore and develop an awareness of key beliefs including                                   To understand how and why belief is expressed through
            those revealed through writings and those revealed through                                     practices and spirituality
            individuals
Belief




            To consider responses to ultimate questions from a variety of                                  To explore how beliefs may lead to diversity within a religion or
            religious and secular viewpoints: existence of God, questions of                               between them
            suffering, exploration of ‘truth’, life after death




                                                                                 Responsibility
            To compare different sources of authority and how they inform        Commitment                To understand that belief and conviction influence action
Authority




            believers’ lives: the function of sacred writings, an awareness of       and
            the influence of key figures and of faith on the lives of such                                 To respond to ethical issues: questions, influences and beliefs
            individuals                                                                                    that inform moral, religious and secular choices and the
                                                                                                           interrelationships between such issues




35
Key Stage FOUR / 14 - 19 Objectives

FOCUS STATEMENT:
During Key Stage 4 students analyse and interpret a wide range of religious, philosophical and ethical concepts and ideas in
increasing depth. They investigate issues of diversity within and between religions and the ways in which religion and spirituality
are expressed in philosophy, ethics, science and the arts. They expand and balance their evaluations of the impact of religions on
individuals, communities and societies, locally, nationally and globally. They understand the importance of dialogue between and
among different religions and beliefs. They gain a greater understanding of how religion and belief contribute to community
cohesion, recognising the various perceptions people have regarding the roles of religion in the world.


Students should receive a balanced religious education programme, both learning about and learning from religion.

Learning about religion
Students should be taught to:
    investigate, study and interpret significant religious, philosophical and ethical issues, including the study of religious and
      spiritual experience, in light of their own sense of identity, experience and commitments
    think rigorously and present coherent, widely informed and detailed arguments about beliefs, ethics, values and issues,
      drawing well-substantiated conclusions
    develop their understanding of the principal methods by which religions and spirituality are studied
    draw upon, interpret and evaluate the rich and varied forms of creative expression in religious life
    use specialist vocabulary to evaluate critically both the power and limitations of religious language.

Learning from religion
Students should be taught to:
    reflect on, express and justify their own opinions in light of their learning about religion and their study of religious,
      philosophical, moral and spiritual questions
    develop their own values and attitudes in order to recognise their rights and responsibilities in light of their learning about
      religion
    relate their learning in religious education to the wider world, gaining a sense of personal autonomy in preparation for adult
      life
    develop skills that are useful in a wide range of careers and in adult life generally, especially skills of critical enquiry, creative
      problem-solving, and communication in a variety of media.


36
The Contextualized Programmes of Study

 The following pages contextualize the objectives for Key Stages 1 to 3 to each of the six major faiths.



         The Objective and Key Ideas columns contain the statutory material


         The Examples columns are non statutory, giving a series of possible statements and ideas around which to plan activities.
          The non-statutory elements are presented in boxes with a grey background


         Teachers must follow the statutory elements for each faith studied in depth but they can choose elements from the non-
          statutory statements and examples as appropriate. For those faiths studied in outline, schools can choose which of the
          objectives to concentrate on, but should aim for a balance of those focused on Beliefs and Teachings and those focused on
          Practices and Ways of Life.




 37
Key Stage 1 Buddhism – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                        Key Ideas          Examples
Belief
To develop an awareness that for many             Buddhist beliefs      Buddhists do not believe in a creator God
people religious belief (for example, belief in                         Buddha appeared as a human being
God) is important                                                       Buddhists believe that they should follow the teachings of Buddha
                                                                        Buddhists try to live a life that will lead to happiness for themselves and others
                                                                        They believe that the way to happiness starts with being kind and considerate to others

To develop an awareness that some                 Difficult           Consider questions faced in everyday life, such as what makes us happy or caring for
questions are puzzling and difficult to answer    questions            the local environment
                                                                      Listen to Buddhist stories which illustrate the quality of caring – eg The Monkey King or
                                                                       Siddhartha and the Swan
Authority
To experience and reflect on a range of           Buddhist              The Buddhists have holy scriptures which explain how to lead a happy life
religious stories and sacred writings,            teachings are         The scriptures contain the teachings of the Buddha and are regarded as precious – like
suggesting and discussing their meanings          found in the           a jewel. They are treated with care and devotion
                                                  Buddhist
                                                  scriptures


To develop an awareness of key figures            Buddhist              Siddhartha Gautama, his birth and upbringing as a prince
within the chosen faiths (for example, stories    teachings and         The teachings of the Buddha about how to live – eg: to practice non-harm
and teachings)                                    the Buddha




38
Key Stage 1 Buddhism – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                 Key Ideas         Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To experience some places of worship       Buddhist places    Buddhists worship in a temple, a shrine room and at home
and symbols, their purpose, meanings       of worship and     Exploration of what children might see in a shrine room – some of the artefacts and symbols –
and the feelings they evoke                symbols             eg: the Buddha image, the lotus flower, mandalas, offerings

To explore some forms of religious         The Buddhist       Worship, Prayer and Meditation:
expression, noting similarities where      community and         - Buddhists often have a shrine at home
appropriate                                worship               - Buddhists chant and meditate in a temple, a shrine room and at home
                                                                 - They meditate to find inner peace
                                                                 - Buddhist worship is called Puja
                                                              Thanksgivings and Celebrations:
                                                                 - Wesak is an important Buddhist festival that celebrates the life of the Buddha
                                                              Art and Music:
                                                                 - Buddhist art uses colour and symbols to express ideas

Commitment and Responsibility
To develop awareness of how                The Buddhist       The concept of belonging; why people belong to groups; the importance of belonging
belonging to a religion can make a         community (the     Being part of the Sangha – consider why Buddhists belong to the Sangha and the effect it has
difference to people’s lives, including    Sangha)             on their lives
the effect on individuals and on the                          Life in a Buddhist family
family

To investigate the work of local leaders   The work of        Explore the work of Buddhist monks, nuns and lay people
and the difference they make               local Buddhist
                                           monks and
                                           nuns
To reflect on spiritual and moral values   The importance     The importance of key rules and values – eg:
and how these affect behaviour             and meaning of       - Buddhists use the 5 Precepts to help guide their behaviour and avoid the three ‘poisons’
                                           Buddhist rules       - They practice non-harm
                                           and values




39
Key Stage 2 Buddhism – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                   Key Ideas      Examples
Belief
To explore key beliefs and teachings of      Aspects of      Buddhism does not involve belief in a transcendent God
religions through people, stories and        Buddhist        There is a personal commitment to care for others, as illustrated in the 5 Precepts
traditions                                   beliefs and
                                             teachings



To begin to gain awareness that religious    Responses to    Consider questions faced in everyday life, such as what makes us happy?
beliefs and teachings address ultimate       ultimate        Explore the Buddhist teachings around happiness, including that all things change and are
and ethical questions                        questions        impermanent


Authority
To explore the concept of religious          Sacred          The Buddhist scriptures explain how to live and include the beliefs and teachings (dharma)
authority: origin, meanings and              writings        The Jataka Tales tell of the Buddha’s previous lives before he was enlightened
importance of scriptures and religious                       The Buddhist scriptures are treated with care and devotion
stories


To explore the concept of religious          Religious       Stories about the Buddha and how he found the answer to suffering, eg:
authority: role and qualities of religious   leaders           - His birth and upbringing
leaders                                                        - The four signs and the great renunciation
                                                               - Years in the forest
                                                               - Enlightenment, teaching and death




40
Key Stage 2 Buddhism – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                      Key Ideas       Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To explore a range of practices in religions,   How              Worship, Prayer and Meditation:
their meanings and their connection to          buildings,         - Buddhists worship to express their devotion to the teachings of the Buddha and to help
beliefs and teachings                           artefacts,             them to follow his example
                                                rituals and        - They worship in temples, in shrine rooms and at home.
                                                symbols play       - A shrine is a special place where Buddhists do puja and meditate. Puja is a key act of
                                                a part in              worship
                                                Buddhist         Thanksgivings and Celebrations:
                                                worship            - Although Buddhist festivals vary, Wesak is celebrated by all Buddhists
                                                                 The Arts:
                                                                   - Buddhist art and images reflect the respect Buddhists have for the Buddha and his
                                                                       teachings – eg: Buddhas, rupas, thankas and mandalas
To consider the variety of such practices       Diversity        Investigate the Buddhist community in Kirklees – largely of the Mahayana tradition
within and among religions, thinking about                       Compare and contrast some practices within Buddhism with aspects of another religion
the local area and more widely                                    studied noting similarities and differences

Commitment and Responsibility
To develop awareness of the challenges          Commitment       Belonging to the Sangha
from commitment to a religion, both             and lifestyle    The Sangha is made up of ordained and lay people; monks and nuns teach and lead by
individually and within a religious                               example
community                                                        Symbols of the community, such as the robe, bowl, shaven head
                                                                 The importance of self-discipline and meditation
                                                                 How Buddhists involve themselves in the community, for example, supporting the monastic
                                                                  Sangha
To develop awareness of religious rules                          The practice of the Sangha can be related to the Buddhist beliefs; the Five Precepts, Four
and what different religions have to say                          Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path provide the guidance for living
about ‘right’ and ‘wrong’, values and
commitment
To respond to ethical issues: how religious     Belief and       Investigate how the 5 Precepts and other Buddhist teachings give guidelines for living
beliefs influence actions and responses to      decisions        Apply this awareness to a specific example – eg: to the care of the environment
issues of human rights and fairness




41
Key Stage 3 Buddhism – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                        Key Ideas        Examples
Belief
To explore and develop an awareness of            Key Buddhist        Buddhists do not have a concept of a transcendent God.
key beliefs including those revealed              beliefs             Their key teachings are truths revealed through the Buddha:
through writings and those revealed                                      - The Three Jewels – the Buddha, Dharma and Sangha
through individuals                                                      - Wisdom and compassion in Buddhist teaching
                                                                         - The Four Noble Truths which include the Noble Eightfold Path
                                                                         - Karma – the law of cause and effect
                                                                         - Samsara and Nirvana – the state of perfect peace
                                                                         - The concept of impermanence
To consider responses to ultimate                 Responses to        Existence of God
questions from a variety of religious and         ultimate               - Consider what Buddhists understand by the concept of God: existential/
secular viewpoints: existence of God,             questions                 transcendental
questions of suffering, exploration of ‘truth’,                       Questions of Suffering
life after death                                                         - Buddhists believe that suffering is a part of the human condition, but can be overcome
                                                                            by following the path to enlightenment (Four Noble Truths)
                                                                      Exploration of Truth:
                                                                         - Explore the Buddhist perspective regarding delusions and impermanence
                                                                         - Explore the Buddhist perspective regarding Karma and the relationship between
                                                                            actions and consequences
                                                                      Life after Death
                                                                         - Explore the wheel of life, the concept of cause and effect and connections to karma
                                                                            and samsara
Authority
To compare different sources of authority         The                 The importance of the 3 Jewels – Buddha, Dharma and Sangha
and how they inform believers’ lives: the         importance of       The Buddhist scriptures explain how to attain enlightenment
function of sacred writings, an awareness         scriptures and      The Buddha’s discovery of how to overcome suffering and unhappiness:
of the influence of key figures and of faith      key figures in         - His renunciation
on the lives of such individuals                  Buddhism               - His compassion
                                                                         - His wisdom
                                                                         - His enlightenment




42
Key Stage 3 Buddhism – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                     Key Ideas        Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To understand how and why belief is            Belief              Personal Faith:
expressed through practices and spirituality   expressed              - Learning and practising the Dharma and its support of the sangha in developing faith
                                               through             The Relationship between Belief, Practice and Spirituality
                                               practice              - The Five Moral Precepts and resultant action and practice
                                                                     - The Four Noble Truths (including the Noble Eightfold Path and the relationship
                                                                        between samsara, Nirvana and action (eg meditation; the work of the sangha)
                                                                     - Accumulating merit through meditation, making offerings, showing care and
                                                                        compassion (both actual and imagined) and the relationship to the spiritual path
                                                                   Buddhist spirituality expressed through the Arts:
                                                                    - Belief expressed in symbolism through art forms – eg: mandalas, lotus
                                                                    - The diversity of different images of the Buddha and their significance

To explore how beliefs may lead to             Diversity           Comparison of different forms of Buddhism: Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism.
diversity within a religion or between them    within or
                                               between
                                               religion
Commitment and Responsibility
To understand that belief and conviction       Values and          How the belief in the Buddha and Dharma is supported by the work of the Sangha
influence action                               lifestyle           Investigate how Buddhist beliefs result in action – eg: giving hospitality; giving generously;
                                                                    teaching by example


To respond to ethical issues: questions,       Ethical issues      The Five Precepts as a guide to ethical living
influences and beliefs that inform moral,                          Examples of ethical living in following the path to enlightenment: eg: care for the
religious and secular choices                                       environment, belief in non harm etc




43
Key Stage 1 Christianity – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                     Key Ideas        Examples
Belief
To develop an awareness that for many          Christian           Christians believe God is Creator and loving Father
people religious belief (for example, belief   beliefs about       Christians learn about God by reading the Bible
in God) is important                           God                 Explore the creation story – though stories, songs, prayers, pictures, poems
                                                                   The story of creation is found in the Bible
                                                                   Engage in reflective activities to explore how God might be experienced through music,
                                                                    nature, a sense of awe and wonder


To develop an awareness that some              Difficult           Use the creation story as a stimulus to generate questions
questions are puzzling and difficult to        Questions           Consider questions faced in everyday life, such as the death of a pet or caring for the local
answer                                                              environment


Authority
To experience and reflect on a range of        The Bible is a      The Bible is a special book and is treated in a special way
religious stories and sacred writings,         special book        Christians read it to learn about their faith, about God and Jesus, about their faith and how
suggesting and discussing their meanings       for Christians       to live.
                                                                   It is the main source of authority.



To develop an awareness of key figures         Christian           Jesus is a particularly special person for Christians
within the chosen faiths (for example,         teachings and       He is God made man and is called the Son of God
stories and teachings)                         Jesus               Jesus’ birth and childhood
                                                                   Jesus’ disciples and friends
                                                                   He told stories, taught others and did marvelous things : some parables – eg: The Parable
                                                                    of the Lost Sheep, some miracles
                                                                   He died and rose again




44
Key Stage 1 Christianity – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                 Key Ideas         Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To experience some places of worship       The church and       Christians worship and pray in a church and at home
and symbols, their purpose, meanings       its building         The church is a special place where Christians meet
and the feelings they evoke                                     Expressions of spirituality – eg: awe and wonder
                                                                Exploration of what children might see in a church – some artefacts and symbols – eg:
                                                                 cross, stained glass, organ, font, pulpit, altar, candles, hymn books, pictures
To explore some forms of religious         The Christian        Worship, Prayer and Meditation:
expression, noting similarities where      community and           - Keeping Sunday as a special day
appropriate                                worship                 - Worshipping together, singing, Bible reading and teaching
                                                                   - Prayer and reflection: use of special prayers, silence, music
                                                                Thanksgiving and Celebrations:
                                                                   - Christmas – the story of Jesus’ birth; symbols/themes associated with Advent and
                                                                     Christmas – eg the coming of Jesus, journeys, birth, light
                                                                   - Holy Week and Easter – the story of Jesus’ death and resurrection; stories linked to
                                                                     the meaning of Easter: eg Selfish Giant; Badger’s Parting Gift; themes – Easter eggs,
                                                                     new life, loss and joy, remembering Jesus (sharing bread and wine)
                                                                   - Harvest – celebration of creation; themes – harvest supper; sharing
                                                                Art and Music:
                                                                   - Explore art and decoration in the church - eg: stained glass windows; why some
                                                                     churches are plain and others are decorated
                                                                   - Listen to church music – eg: the organ and choir; worship songs

Commitment and Responsibility
To develop awareness of how                The Christian        The concept of belonging – why people belong to groups; the importance of belonging
belonging to a religion can make a         community            Belonging to a church – why people belong and the effect it has on their lives
difference to people’s lives, including                         Life in a Christian family
the effect on individuals and on the
family
To investigate the work of local leaders   The work of          Investigate the work of local leaders in the church
and the difference they make               church leaders
To reflect on spiritual and moral values   The importance       Christians use the teachings of Jesus to help guide their behaviour
and how these affect behaviour             and meaning of       Teaching of Jesus: The Two Great Commandments: love God and love your neighbour
                                           Christian rules      Teaching of Jesus: need for repentance; need to receive God’s forgiveness and offer it to
                                           and values            others; importance of treating others as we would wish to be treated, the need to find
                                                                 spiritual help from Jesus
45
Key Stage 2 Christianity – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                   Key Ideas           Examples
Belief
To explore key beliefs and teachings of      Aspects of           Belief in God as Father, Son and Holy Spirit; Creator, Saviour, Comforter, Almighty
religions through people, stories and        Christian beliefs    Christians believe Jesus is God made man: His claims, stories which suggest his divinity: eg
traditions                                   and teachings         an appropriate miracle
                                                                  The obligation to care for others:
                                                                       - Jesus’ own example – The Feeding of the 5000
                                                                       - A parable: eg The Good Samaritan; Parable of The Sheep and the Goats
                                                                       - Duty to spread the gospel
                                                                       - The work of local Christians, churches and missionary societies

To begin to gain awareness that              Responses to         Christian beliefs about the death and resurrection of Jesus:
religious beliefs and teachings address      ultimate               - Bible narratives: Why did Jesus die? Why is the resurrection of Jesus so important to
ultimate and ethical questions               questions                  Christians?
                                                                    - How these beliefs link to questions about life and death

Authority
To explore the concept of religious          Sacred writings      The Bible:
authority: origin, meanings and                                     - Its importance for Christians
importance of scriptures and religious                              - How it is used – worship, home, private study
stories                                                             - The nature of the Bible – what it comprises; different kinds of literature; its origins and
                                                                       how it was written; the relationship between the Bible and the Tenakh (part of which is
                                                                       the Torah)

To explore the concept of religious          Religious leaders    Jesus’ life and teachings:
authority: role and qualities of religious                          - Baptism and temptations
leaders                                                             - Teaching about the Kingdom of God – parables and miracles; controversy with Jewish
                                                                       religious leaders
                                                                    - Events of the last week of His life and the resurrection stories
                                                                    - The qualities of Jesus as a religious leader
                                                                    - The continuing Jesus: the Holy Spirit in the life of the believer




46
Key Stage 2 Christianity – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                  Key Ideas            Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To explore a range of practices in          How buildings,        Worship, Prayer and Meditation:
religions, their meanings and their         artefacts, rituals          - Explore key features of an act of worship – eg Eucharist, Morning Prayer
connection to beliefs and teachings         and symbols                 - Explore religious symbolism eg: the cross, icons, baptistery, chalice
                                            play a part in              - Explore some prayers and their meanings, especially the Lord’s Prayer
                                            Christian                   - Explore the ways in which different Christians pray: different postures in worship
                                            worship                     - Explore any artefacts worshippers use – eg: Bible, rosaries, icons
                                                                  Thanksgiving and Celebrations:
                                                                        - Stories and symbols associated with Advent, Christmas, Holy Week, Easter
                                                                        - How other key events are celebrated and remembered – Epiphany, Lent, Ascension,
                                                                          Pentecost, Harvest, All Saints
                                                                  Initiation Ceremonies:
                                                                        - Practice, purpose and symbolism of infant baptism and believer’s baptism.
                                                                        - Confirmation and First Communion
                                                                  The Arts
                                                                        - Explore how art and music are used to help people worship God
To consider the variety of such practices   Diversity             Explore examples of worship in at least two contrasting Christian denominations
within and among religions, thinking                               represented in the local area. For example, investigating the variation in baptism or
about the local area and more widely                               communion in two different denominations or Churches

Commitment and Responsibility
To develop awareness of the challenges      Commitment            The work and responsibilities of local church members
from commitment to a religion, both         and lifestyle         Pupils might explore the concept of love, forgiveness, self-sacrifice, justice, commitment in
individually and within a religious                                relation to a variety of stories and parables – eg: The Prodigal Son, Parable of the Talents
community
To develop awareness of religious rules                           Jesus’ teachings about rules and behaviour
and what different religions have to say                          The Ten Commandments
about ‘right’ and ‘wrong’, values and
commitment
To respond to ethical issues: how           Belief and            Explore how Christian values are reflected in relation to human rights and fairness – eg:
religious beliefs influence actions and     decisions              stories told by Jesus, the work of Christian Aid
responses to issues of human rights and                           The obligation to care for others: (See Belief section above)
fairness                                                             - A parable: eg The Good Samaritan, The Rich Man and the Beggar, Lazarus
                                                                     - The work of local Christians or churches

47
Key Stage 3 Christianity – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                 Key Ideas        Examples
Belief
To explore and develop an awareness        Key Christian     Explore the concept of God as Trinity:
of key beliefs including those revealed    beliefs             - Jesus as the revelation of God to humankind – the Incarnation. Consider the nature of Jesus
through writings and those revealed                            - Study a creed as an expression of this belief. Look at modern versions and adaptations of a
through individuals                                              creed, for example from Latin America or Africa
                                                               - Jesus’ belief in God, and Himself as the incarnation: highlighted in His teachings about belief
                                                                 and receiving eternal life. These ultimately lead to His suffering, crucifixion and resurrection
                                                             The Bible as the main source of revelation
To consider responses to ultimate          Responses to      Existence of God:
questions from a variety of religious      ultimate             - Consider evidence for and against the existence of God through reason, for example
and secular viewpoints: existence of       questions               Teleological, Cosmological, Ontological arguments
God, questions of suffering, exploration                     Questions of Suffering:
of ‘truth’, life after death                                    - Reflection on the purpose of suffering through the story of Job. Christian martyrs and
                                                                   persecution today. How can you have suffering and a God of love?
                                                             Life after Death:
                                                                - Look at the implications of the Christian doctrine about the Resurrection for beliefs about life
                                                                   after death; Christian belief in Heaven and Hell; purgatory in Catholicism
Authority
To compare of different sources of         Importance of     How Christians interpret the Bible:
authority and how they inform              scriptures and       - Some see it as literally true
believers’ lives: the function of sacred   key figures in       - Others see sections as allegorical and symbolic e.g. creation, story, psalms
writings, an awareness of the influence    Christianity      The Bible was written for different audiences in a variety of styles, for different purposes
of key figures and of faith on the lives                     The key figure of Jesus:
of such individuals                                             - As the fulfilment of OT prophecies
                                                                - The distinctive Christian teachings of Jesus – His relationship with God; that He is the way to
                                                                  God; loving God and your neighbour, thereby moving from Jewish ritual to helping anyone
                                                                  who is in need
                                                                - Investigate key stories in the life of Jesus, especially miracles. How can these be understood?
                                                                  What do Christians believe about them?
                                                                - Investigate what the stories about Jesus, His teachings and life tell us about His nature,
                                                                  character and qualities
                                                             Investigate the concepts of discipleship and evangelism: key figures such as St Paul and how
                                                              Christianity spread
                                                             Key individuals who have demonstrated their faith through evangelism, persecution, non violent
                                                              action
48
Key Stage 3 Christianity – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                  Key Ideas    Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To understanding how and why belief is      Belief        Personal Faith:
expressed through practices and             expressed       - Explore how personal faith is a response to Jesus’ teaching e.g. love, forgiveness and
spirituality                                through            repentance
                                            practice      The Relationship between Belief, Practice and Spirituality:
                                                            - Explore how Jesus is experienced and expressed in the practice and ways of life of
                                                                individuals and the community – eg: in ritual, prayer, social action. Focus on one practice in
                                                                depth – eg: The Eucharist
                                                            - Explore the concept of discipleship and how beliefs are put into practice
                                                            - Explore expressions of spirituality – eg: the significance of Pentecost and the Holy Spirit and
                                                                the relevance to Christians today
                                                          Christian spirituality expressed through the Arts:
                                                            - The use of symbolism in art, architecture and music, church buildings, contemporary music
                                                                and film and their effect on worship, practice and spirituality
To explore how beliefs may lead to          Diversity     How different Christians express their beliefs and values through diverse forms of worship and
diversity within a religion or between      within or      celebration – eg:
them                                        between          - Two contrasting denominations in terms of their style of worship, celebration of a major festival
                                            religion           and rites of passage – eg: Quaker and Pentecostal worship; Anglican and Free Churches;
                                                               Baptism in the Orthodox Church compared with that in the Baptist Church.
                                                             - The distinctive character of the expression of faith in particular communities, e.g. religious
                                                               orders, Taize, the Corrymeela community, Iona, missionary societies
Commitment and Responsibility
To understand that belief and conviction    Values and         Explore the practice and conviction of people who have worked to develop Christian
influence action                            lifestyle           understanding and practice; how Christianity has related in different ways to other faiths
                                                               Investigate the work of a Christian aid agency and its relationship between faith and action

To respond to ethical issues: questions,    Ethical            How Christian values are reflected in social action and global issues: e.g. sanctity of life; war
influences and beliefs that inform moral,   issues              and peace; wealth and poverty; animal rights; the environment; relief and development work;
religious and secular choices and the                           morality and sexual behaviour; sex equality
interrelationships between such issues




49
Key Stage 1 Hindu Dharma – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                Key Ideas          Examples
Belief
To develop an awareness that for          Hindu beliefs       Hindus believe in one God (Brahman)
many people religious belief (for         about God           The different qualities of Brahman are manifest through deities – eg: Lord Brahma, Lord Vishnu,
example, belief in God) is important                           Lord Shiva, Lakshmi, Lord Krishna

To develop an awareness that some         Difficult           Consider questions faced in everyday life, such as what makes us happy
questions are puzzling and difficult to   questions           Listen to Hindu stories which illustrate the quality of caring and respect for all living things
answer

Authority
To experience and reflect on a range of   Hindu teachings     Hindus have special holy books - the Vedas, Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita with many stories in
religious stories and sacred writings,    are found in the     them
suggesting and discussing their           Hindu               The Hindu stories give important messages about God and how Hindus should live their lives.
meanings                                  scriptures and      The Hindu scriptures must be treated with care and respect
                                          stories

To develop an awareness of key            Hindu teachings     Hindu Dharma has no key founder but has a number of deities – eg: Lord Brahma , Lord Vishnu,
figures within the chosen faiths (for     and the deities      Lord Shiva, Lakshmi, Lord Krishna
example, stories and teachings)                               Hear some stories about the deities and discuss some of their meanings and teachings




50
Key Stage 1 Hindu Dharma – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                  Key Ideas        Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To experience some places of worship        Hindu places      Hindus worship in the home and in a mandir
and symbols, their purpose, meanings        of worship        Exploration of what pupils might see in a Hindu home and in a mandir - some of the symbols
and the feelings they evoke                 and symbols        and artefacts – eg: deities, arti lamp, offerings

To explore some forms of religious          The Hindu         Worship, Prayer and Meditation:
expression, noting similarities where       community           - The practice of performing puja at shrines and in the home
appropriate                                 and worship         - The Arti ceremony
                                                                - The blessing and serving of prashad after prayer
                                                              Thanksgiving and celebrations
                                                                - Explore some stories, symbols and food associated with a festival – eg: Holi, Diwali, the
                                                                     birthdays of Lord Rama and Lord Krishna
                                                              Art, Music and Dance:
                                                                - Explore art and decoration in the mandir – eg: the deities
                                                                - Listen to Hindu music
                                                                - Use dance to stimulate movement (eg: the dhandiya dance)
Commitment and Responsibility
To develop awareness of how belonging       The Hindu         The concept of belonging – why people belong to groups; the importance of belonging
to a religion can make a difference to      community         Being part of the Hindu community: consider why Hindus belong and the effect it has on their
people’s lives, including the effect on                        lives
individuals and on the family                                 Life in a Hindu family

To investigate the work of local leaders    The work of       The work of a Hindu priest (pandit) – leading worship and teaching; performing marriage
and the difference they make                the Hindu          ceremonies and other rites of passage
                                            priest
Reflections on spiritual and moral values   The               The importance of key rules and values values, eg:
and how these affect behaviour              importance          - Devotion to God
                                            and meaning         - Respect for all people and living things and the significance of vegetarianism
                                            of Hindu rules      - Love and loyalty between members of the family, such as the respect shown for
                                            and values              grandparents




51
Key Stage 2 Hindu Dharma – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings


Strand: Beliefs and Teachings
Objectives                                   Key Ideas       Examples
Belief
To explore key beliefs and teachings of      Aspects of       Brahman, the one God, is revealed in many forms – called deities. Three main deities are
religions through people, stories and        Hindu beliefs     Brahma (creator), Vishnu (sustainer) and Shiva (destroyer)
traditions                                   and teachings    The concept of avatar (incarnations of Vishnu)
                                                              The obligation to care for others as illustrated by ahimsa (non-violence)
                                                              Karma – Following one’s duty diligently knowing that all actions are accountable


To begin to gain awareness that religious    Responses to     Use the Hindu story of creation to generate questions
beliefs and teachings address ultimate       ultimate         Consider the link between the creation story and the importance of caring for the environment:
and ethical questions                        questions         all living things have value in the eyes of God and, therefore, should be respected. Pupils might
                                                               explore vegetarianism in relation to this belief

Authority
To explore the concept of religious          Sacred           The Vedas are concerned with Hindu beliefs
authority: origin, meanings and              writings         They are based on knowledge revealed by Brahman to Lord Brahma at the beginning of
importance of scriptures and religious                         creation
stories

To explore the concept of religious          Religious        The name Hindus give to their own religion is Sanatan Dharma which means eternal dharma.
authority: role and qualities of religious   leaders           There is no founder as such, the religion (or dharma), has always existed since time began.
leaders                                                       How stories from the deities teach about the nature of Brahman and give guidelines for living –
                                                               eg Lord Krishna; The Story of Mrigari the Hunter




52
Key Stage 2 Hindu Dharma – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Strand: Practices and Ways of Life
Objectives                                           Key Ideas       Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To explore a range of practices in religions,        How              Worship, Prayer and Meditation:
their meanings and their connection to beliefs       buildings,         - Puja at home and in the mandir
and teachings                                        artefacts,         - the family shrine
                                                     rituals and        - the Arti ceremony
                                                     symbols            - the role of murtis (divine images) in worship
                                                     play a part        - yoga, meditation and mantras
                                                     in                 - Aum – the sacred sound of the universe
                                                     Hindu            Thanksgiving and Celebrations
                                                     worship            - The significance of Diwali and the Ramayana; Ramnavami (Lord Rama’s birthday)
                                                                      Initiation ceremonies:
                                                                        - The initial samskars (eg 1 – 9)
                                                                      The Arts:
                                                                        - The use of dance, music and art in the mandir; Watch the movements of Bharat
                                                                              Natyam (Indian classical dance closely linked with Hindu religion)

To consider the variety of such practices within     Diversity        How different communities dedicate their mandir to different deities and why this is
and among religions, thinking about the local
area and more widely

Commitment and Responsibility
To develop awareness of the challenges from          Commitment         Belonging to a local Hindu community
commitment to a religion, both individually and      and lifestyle      Hindu action is influenced by dharma (duty) which involves sacrifice and giving
within a religious community                                            The idea of the whole world being one’s family influences a Hindu’s behaviour
                                                                        Hindus will take what they need from the world and no more
To develop awareness of religious rules and
what different religions have to say about ‘right’
and ‘wrong’, values and commitment

To respond to ethical issues: how religious          Belief and       Investigate how Hindus express their belief in the upkeep and care of the world’s
beliefs influence actions and responses to           decisions         environment
issues of human rights and fairness
53
Key Stage 3 Hindu Dharma – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Strand: Beliefs and Teachings
Objectives                                            Key Ideas       Examples
Belief
To explore and develop an awareness of key            Key Hindu          Brahman as the impersonal, formless, absolute and supreme being
beliefs including those revealed through              Beliefs            Brahman is expressed in different forms – eg the Trimurti – Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva
writings and those revealed through individuals                          God is worshipped in diverse forms and/or is believed to be formless
                                                                         The concept of avatar, especially the incarnations of Vishnu
                                                                         Key beliefs including: atman, seva, karma, dharma, samsara, moksha


To consider responses to ultimate questions           Responses        Existence of God:
from a variety of religious and secular               to                  - Consider how the belief that a part of Brahman resides in each one of us helps Hindus
viewpoints: existence of God, questions of            ultimate               to understand the individual’s relationship with God
suffering, exploration of ‘truth’, life after death   questions        Questions of suffering:
                                                                          - Exploration of karma. The relationship between karma and samsara
                                                                       Life after death:
                                                                          - The real self (atman – spirit or Brahman) is distinct from the temporary (physical) body
                                                                             and is eternal and conscious
Authority
To compare different sources of authority and         Importance       Explore the two categories of Hindu scriptural literature:
how they inform believers’ lives: the function of     of scriptures      - Shruti (the eternal – relating to the beliefs) - The Vedas;
sacred writings, an awareness of the influence        and key            - Smriti (the practical application of these beliefs) – eg: The Bhagavad-Gita, Upanishads,
of key figures and of faith on the lives of such      figures in             Ramayana, Puranas
individuals                                           Hindu
                                                      Dharma           There is no key founder of Hindu Dharma, but a number of key figures who have influenced
                                                                        the development of Hindu values – eg:
                                                                         - Gandhi – putting beliefs into practice – seva; ahimsa; self-discipline
                                                                         - A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada – International Society for Krishna
                                                                             Consciousness, who opposed the caste system and created Brahmins of those born of
                                                                             lower varnas




54
Key Stage 3 Hindu Dharma – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                     Key Ideas          Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To understand how and why belief is            Belief              Personal Faith:
expressed through practices and spirituality   expressed              - The importance of dharma
                                               through practice    The Relationship between Belief, Practice and Spirituality:
                                                                     - Explore The Hindu spiritual path and the relationship between the attainment of
                                                                         perfection, spiritual experience and the ultimate goal of union of Brahman, the
                                                                         Supreme Spirit
                                                                     - Explore the relationship between belief , action (eg Ahimsa) and the four goals –
                                                                         Artha (wealth); Kama (pleasure); Dharma (righteousness) and Moksha (liberation)
                                                                     - Exploration of Yoga, Meditation, Mantra and Sacrifice in relation to the spiritual
                                                                         path
                                                                   Hindu spirituality expressed through the Arts:
                                                                      - Symbolism in Hindu arts: Story and myth, dance and drama, henna paste,
                                                                          incense, Aum, lotus, swastika
To explore how beliefs may lead to diversity   Diversity within    The 4 main denominations: Vaishnavas, Shaivas, Shaktas, Smartas
within a religion or between them              or between          Comparisons between Hindu Dharma in Southern India and in Britain (eg in Kirklees)
                                               religion             today:
                                                                     - The nature and function of the mandir in India and Great Britain
Commitment and Responsibility
To understand that belief and conviction       Values and          Key teachings from Gandhi: ahimsa and the relationship to Hindu beliefs
influence action.                              lifestyle           Hindu society: Varna, the traditional four fold classification of society and Jati (caste) as
                                                                         a kinship system and the support group
                                                                   Beliefs influence action:
                                                                      - Hospitality
                                                                      - Attitudes towards the environment and animals
                                                                      - Roles within the family; duties within the extended family; the role of women
To responses to ethical issues: questions,     Ethical issues      How Hindu values are reflected in social action and global issues: e.g. Sanctity of life;
influences and beliefs that inform moral,                           War and peace; Wealth and poverty; Animal rights; The environment
religious and secular choices




55
Key Stage 1 Islam – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                           Key Ideas             Examples
Belief
To develop an awareness that for many people         Muslim beliefs         Look at the Muslim belief that Allah is the one true God, with no equals, who is the
religious belief (for example, belief in God) is     about God               creator of all
important                                                                   There are no pictures of Allah
                                                                            Explore aspects of how Muslim belief in God comes through the Qur’an


To develop an awareness that some questions          Difficult questions    Consider questions faced in everyday life, such as the death of a pet or caring for
are puzzling and difficult to answer                                         the local environment.
                                                                            Think about puzzling and difficult questions, using a story to generate these – eg:
                                                                             the Muslim story of creation
Authority
To experience and reflect on a range of religious    The Qur’an is          Look at a copy of the Qur’an and think about how it is a special book for Muslims.
stories and sacred writings, suggesting and          special for             Consider how it is used and read
discussing their meanings                            Muslims                Hear some stories from the Qur’an and learn that Muslims believe that the Qur’an
                                                                             is the word of Allah



To develop an awareness of key figures within the    Muslim teachings       Look at some stories of Prophet Muhammad (pbub) to illustrate his importance for
chosen faiths (for example, stories and teachings)   and Muhammad            Muslims
                                                     (pbub)                 The teachings of the Prophet show Muslims how to live their lives – eg: believing in
                                                                             the one God




56
Key Stage 1 Islam – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                     Key Ideas     Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To experience some places of worship and       The mosque     Muslims worship and pray in a mosque, in other places and at home
symbols, their purpose, meanings and the       and its        Exploration of what children might see in a mosque – some of the artefacts and symbols – eg:
feelings they evoke                            building        Qur’an, prayer mat, qiblah, mihrab, prayer times

To explore some forms of religious             The Muslim     Worship, Prayer and Meditation:
expression, noting similarities where          community         - Daily salat (prayers) is important for Muslims
appropriate                                    and worship      - Salat can take place almost anywhere
                                                                - The call to prayer, the actions of prayer, the prayer mat
                                                                - Friday is a special day for prayer
                                                                - Wudu (cleanliness before one can pray) is essential
                                                                - Explore questions of why and when Muslims pray
                                                              Thanksgivings and Celebrations:
                                                                 - Explore the celebration of Eid-ul-Fitr and the season of Ramadan. Look at stories linked to
                                                                   this festival
                                                              Art and Music:
                                                                 - Explore art and decoration in the mosque
                                                                 - Listen to the call to prayer
Commitment and Responsibility
To develop awareness of how belonging to       The Muslim     The concept of belonging – why people belong to groups; the importance of belonging
a religion can make a difference to            community      Belonging to a mosque – consider why Muslims belong and the effect it has on their lives,
people’s lives, including the effect on                        including the 5 daily prayers
individuals and on the family                                 Life in a Muslim family

To investigate the work of local leaders and   The work of    Explore the role and importance of an imam, finding out about his work, including leading
the difference they make                       the Imam        Namaz (prayers), teaching the Qur’an and the Hadith


To reflect on spiritual and moral values and   The            The importance of key rules and values, including the 5 Pillars
how these affect behaviour                     importance     Muslims use the teaching and example of Muhammad (pbub) to help guide their behaviour
                                               and meaning
                                               of Muslim
                                               rules and
                                               values

57
Key Stage 2 Islam – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                   Key Ideas      Examples
Belief
To explore key beliefs and teachings of      Aspects of      Study Muslim belief that Allah is one, incomparable and unique
religions through people, stories and        beliefs and     Consider the 99 names of Allah
traditions                                   teachings       Consider why there are no pictures of Allah
                                                             Investigate the five pillars of Islam, including Shahadah (declaration of faith), salat (prayer),
                                                              sawm (fasting), linked to Ramadan and Eid-ul-Fitr), zakat (charity), hajj (pilgrimage and link to
                                                              Eid-ul-Adha). Consider the practices, symbolism and affect on believers
                                                             The obligation to care for others as illustrated in stories and the practice of zakat


To begin to gain awareness that religious    Responses to    The value of all human beings: for example a study of Muslim responses to poverty with
beliefs and teachings address ultimate and   ultimate         reference to zakat
ethical questions                            questions       All human beings are equal in the eyes of Allah and, therefore, all human beings should treat
                                                              each other equally. Study Muslim beliefs about this, for example, on Hajj

Authority
To explore the concept of religious          Sacred          The Qur’an:
authority: origin, meanings and importance   writings          - Its importance for Muslims; reverence for copies of the Qur’an; its authenticity
of scriptures and religious stories                            - How it is used – worship in the mosque; reading at home; for private study
                                                               - The nature of the Qur’an – what it comprises; different kinds of literature; origins, including
                                                                 the revelation to Muhammad (pbub)

To explore the concept of religious          Religious       Explore key events in the life of Muhammad (pbub) and the key beliefs that arise from this,
authority: role and qualities of religious   leaders          such as rejection of idols and worship of one true God.
leaders                                                      Muslim beliefs about the prophets, particularly the importance of Muhammad (pbub) as the
                                                              final prophet
                                                                 Hear and consider some stories about his life and the lives of some of the other prophets
                                                                 Differences from stories in the Old and New Testaments




58
Key Stage 2 Islam – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                      Key Ideas       Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To explore a range of practices in religions,   How              Worship, Prayer and Meditation:
their meanings and their connection to          buildings,             - Explore aspects of Muslim worship and the importance of the mosque:
beliefs and teachings                           artefacts,             - The meanings and symbolism related to mosques
                                                rituals and            - How Muslims prepare for worship
                                                symbols play     Initiation Ceremonies:
                                                a part in              - Explore how Muslims celebrate initiation
                                                Muslim                 - Study the ceremonies associated with birth and the naming of children
                                                worship          The Arts:
                                                                       - Explore how pattern is used in Muslim worship and why this is important
                                                                       - Consider why Muslims do not portray the human form in art
                                                                       - Most strict Muslims do not have any music in worship

To consider the variety of such practices       Diversity        Study how Muslims may celebrate festivals or seasons in a variety of ways. For example:
within and among religions, thinking about                         - Study how Ramadan is observed
the local area and more widely                                     - This might be compared and contrasted with other religions, for example, how Christians
                                                                       observe Lent
Commitment and Responsibility
To develop awareness of the challenges          Commitment       Explore story of Ibrahim, his decision not to make an idol and what this tells us about him
from commitment to a religion, both             and lifestyle    Consider the importance of the community, the mosque and the ummah
individually and within a religious                              Explore some of the key values in family life including:
community                                                          - Roles and responsibilities within the family
                                                                   - Respect for elders
                                                                   - Preparing for festivals
                                                                   - Study how Muslim belief is reflected in personal relationships, including distinctive
To develop awareness of religious rules
                                                                       features of home life, hygiene, diet, modesty
and what different religions have to say
about ‘right’ and ‘wrong’, values and
commitment
To respond to ethical issues: how religious     Belief and       Study the practice of zakat and explore how Muslims apply this. Look at the work of a charity
beliefs influence actions and responses to      decisions         such as Muslim Aid or projects undertaken by local mosques
issues of human rights and fairness


59
Key Stage 3 Islam – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                            Key Ideas       Examples
Belief
To explore and develop an awareness of key            Key Muslim           Explore the concept of Islam – peace through willing obedience and submission to the
beliefs including those revealed through              beliefs               will of Allah.
writings and those revealed through                                        Study Islamic beliefs about humanity and the relationship to Allah. He is the one true
individuals                                                                 God, creator and humanity is the greatest of his creation. He provides all things and
                                                                            guides human beings.
                                                                           Explore how Muslims find guidance through the Qu’ran as a revealed book.
                                                                           Review the five pillars (covered in KS2)

To consider responses to ultimate questions           Responses            Existence of God:
from a variety of religious and secular               to ultimate               - Consider the evidence and practices used by Islam to affirm the existence of God –
viewpoints: existence of God, questions of            questions                   eg Shahadah
suffering, exploration of ‘truth’, life after death                        Questions of Suffering:
                                                                              - Consider how Muslims deal with suffering and evil in relation to prejudice or being a
                                                                                   minority
                                                                           Life after Death:
                                                                                - Investigate Muslim beliefs about life and death. The belief in Akhirah and
                                                                                  accountability to God for creation and all actions.

Authority
To compare different sources of authority             Importance           Investigate the composition of the Qur’an and its final recension (revision) under Uthman
and how they inform believers’ lives: the             of scriptures        Investigate the importance of the Qur’an as the final undistorted revelation of Allah
function of sacred writings, an awareness of          and key              Investigate the relationship between the Qur’an and the Hadith
the influence of key figures and of faith on          figures in           Investigate the life of Muhammad (pbub) as the seal of the prophets and the recipient of
the lives of such individuals                         Islam                 the final revelation
                                                                           Consider what the stories about Muhammad (pbub) and his teachings tell us about his
                                                                            character and qualities




60
Key Stage 3 Islam – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                     Key Ideas          Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To understand how and why belief is            Belief              Personal faith:
expressed through practices and spirituality   expressed             - Investigate how belief is expressed through obedience to Allah and the idea of the
                                               through practice          Khalifah (custodians); Islamic culture: respect for people of other faiths, lives of
                                                                         influential Muslims, and how they are motivated by Islamic beliefs and values
                                                                   The Relationship between Belief, Practice and Spirituality:
                                                                     - Explore the relationship between beliefs and the support from the community (eg
                                                                         Mosque and Ummah) and spiritual development
                                                                     - The relationship between the Shahadah and the other Pillars, including the Hajj as a
                                                                         spiritual experience
                                                                   Muslim spirituality expressed through the Arts:
                                                                     - The use of symbolism in art, architecture and music: eg: calligraphy, mosques
                                                                     - Exploration of the relationship between the arts and beliefs in Islam

To explore how beliefs may lead to             Diversity within    Sunni and Shi`a branches of Islam; denominations and diversity of practice within these
diversity within a religion or between them    or between          Study the work of Muslims and those of other faiths working for reconciliation, eg: the joint
                                               religion             Israeli/Palestinian orchestra

Commitment and Responsibility
To understand that belief and conviction       Values and          The Ummah (Social life):
influence action                               lifestyle              - The role of the mosque
                                                                      - The importance of honesty and good manners
                                                                      - Concepts of social justice and equality
                                                                      - Following Shari’ah Law
To respond to ethical issues: questions,       Ethical issues      How Muslim values are reflected in social action and global issues: e.g. Sanctity of life; War
influences and beliefs that inform moral,                           and peace; Wealth and poverty; Animal rights; The environment
religious and secular choices and the                              Jihad: the Muslim struggle to resist selfishness
interrelationships between such issues                             The position of women in Muslim society




61
Key Stage 1 Judaism – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                     Key Ideas          Examples
Belief
To develop an awareness that for many          Jewish beliefs        Jews believe in one God who is the creator
people religious belief (for example, belief   about God             Jews learn about God by reading the Torah
in God) is important                                                 Explore the creation story – though stories, songs, prayers, pictures, poems
                                                                     The story of creation is found in the Torah
                                                                     Engage in reflective activities to explore how Jewish belief in one God might be experienced
                                                                      through music, nature, a sense of awe and wonder

To develop an awareness that some              Difficult           Consider questions faced in everyday life, such as unfairness
questions are puzzling and difficult to        questions           Use a story such as the Jewish creation story, the Exodus or the migration of Abram as a
answer                                                              stimulus to generate questions

Authority
To experience and reflect on a range of        The Torah is        The Torah is special to Jews and is treated in a special way
religious stories and sacred writings,         special for Jews    Jews read it to learn about God and their history and faith.
suggesting and discussing their meanings                           It is a source of authority.

To develop an awareness of key figures         Jewish              Moses’ birth and upbringing
within the chosen faiths (for example,         teachings and       His experience of God’s call in the burning bush to worship one God
stories and teachings)                         Moses               He led the Jews to freedom from Egypt




62
Key Stage 1 Judaism – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                     Key Ideas          Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To experience some places of worship and       The synagogue       Jews worship and pray in a synagogue and at home
symbols, their purpose, meanings and the       and its building    The synagogue is a special place
feelings they evoke                                                Exploration of what children might see in a synagogue – some of the artefacts and symbols
                                                                     – eg: ark, menorah
To explore some forms of religious             The Jewish          Worship, Prayer and Meditation:
expression, noting similarities where          community and           - Worshipping together
appropriate                                    worship                 - Keeping Shabbat as a special day
                                                                       - Prayer and reflection, for example, use of special prayers, silence, music, art
                                                                   Thanksgiving and Celebrations:
                                                                       - Special festivals and celebrations: eg: Shabbat, Pesach, Sukkoth
                                                                    Art and Music:
                                                                       - Explore art and decoration in the synagogue – eg: in relation to the Ark and Torah
                                                                       - Listen to Jewish music
Commitment and Responsibility
To develop awareness of how belonging to       The Jewish          The concept of belonging – why people belong to groups; the importance of belonging
a religion can make a difference to            community           Belonging to a synagogue – consider why Jews belong and the effect it has on their lives
people’s lives, including the effect on                            Life in a Jewish family
individuals and on the family

To investigate the work of local leaders and   The work of         Investigate the work of a rabbi
the difference they make                       Jewish leaders

To reflect on spiritual and moral values and   The importance      The importance of key rules and values – including the Ten Commandments
how these affect behaviour                     and meaning of      Jews use the teachings in the Torah to help guide their behaviour
                                               Jewish rules        Rules at home – eg: during Shabbat
                                               and values




63
Key Stage 2 Judaism – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                   Key Ideas         Examples
Belief
To explore key beliefs and teachings of      Aspects of           Explore the Jewish belief in God
religions through people, stories and        Jewish beliefs       Study stories in the Tenakh that illustrate the power and love of God – eg
traditions                                   and teachings             - Moses, David
                                                                       - The establishment of the kingdom
                                                                  The obligation to care for others, especially the stranger:
                                                                       - Explore the story of Ruth
To begin to gain awareness that religious    Responses to         Explore the concept of suffering: why do people suffer?
beliefs and teachings address ultimate and   ultimate             Consider the story of Job and the concept of suffering. Does God allow suffering?
ethical questions                            questions


Authority
To explore the concept of religious          Sacred writings      The Torah:
authority: origin, meanings and importance                            - Its importance for Jews
of scriptures and religious stories                                   - How it is used – worship, home, private study
                                                                      - The nature of the Torah – what it comprises; different kinds of literature; origin

To explore the concept of religious          Religious          The story of the covenant, the land and monotheism through Abraham
authority: role and qualities of religious   leaders            The role and qualities of a rabbi
leaders




64
Key Stage 2 Judaism – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                            Key Ideas       Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To explore a range of practices in religions, their   How               Worship, Prayer and Meditation:
meanings and their connection to beliefs and          buildings,          - Investigate the pattern of Jewish worship in the synagogue
teachings                                             artefacts,          - Investigate the place of the Torah in the synagogue
                                                      rituals and         - Investigate other symbolism and practice – eg: particular dress
                                                      symbols             - Explore some prayers and their meanings – eg: Psalms 23, 51
                                                      play a part         - Different contexts and types of prayer, for example at the Western Wall
                                                      in                  - Ceremonies and symbolism in prayer – eg: dress, use of the ark, processing the
                                                      Jewish                 Torah
                                                      worship          Thanksgiving and Celebrations:
                                                                          - Celebration of a festival and how it reflects Jewish identity/origins – eg: Shabbat ;
                                                                             Pesach; Hanukkah
                                                                       Initiation Ceremonies:
                                                                        - Explore the practice and symbolism of the birth ceremony in Judaism
                                                                       The Arts:
                                                                          - Explore how Jewish art and music helps Jews to worship God
                                                                          - The role of the cantor

To consider the variety of such practices within      Diversity          Pupils might explore examples of worship in a synagogue in Britain with worship
and among religions, thinking about the local                             elsewhere, for example at the Western Wall
area and more widely

Commitment and Responsibility
To develop awareness of the challenges from           Commitment         The work and responsibilities of belonging to a synagogue
commitment to a religion, both individually and       and lifestyle      Consider Jewish family life, especially the role of Shabbat and the importance of Friday
within a religious community                                              evening/Saturday
                                                                         Investigate Jewish traditions and practices such as the mezuzah identifying a Jewish
                                                                          home, thanks before meals, food laws
To develop awareness of religious rules and what                         Consider the Commandments ‘Love the Lord Your God…’ and ‘ Keep the Sabbath Day
different religions have to say about ‘right’ and                         Holy’ in the context of a Jew’s daily life
‘wrong’, values and commitment                                           Explore rules in the home: eg: the kosher food laws (kashrut)

To respond to ethical issues: how religious           Belief and         Explore how Jews show care for their family and the wider community and how this is
beliefs influence actions and responses to issues     decisions           linked to their beliefs
of human rights and fairness
65
Key Stage 3 Judaism – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                            Key Ideas        Examples
Belief
To explore and develop an awareness of key            Key Jewish            Study Jewish beliefs about God and humanity expressed through the Shema, psalms,
beliefs including those revealed through              beliefs                songs, stories and the Covenant
writings and those revealed through                                         Judgement and forgiveness
individuals                                                                 God’s attributes and names
                                                                            Shekhinah (God’s presence) and God’s action in history

To consider responses to ultimate questions           Responses to          Existence of God
from a variety of religious and secular               ultimate                 - Consider questions about the existence of God especially during times of
viewpoints: existence of God, questions of            questions                     abandonment and suffering – eg exile and Holocaust
suffering, exploration of ‘truth’, life after death                         Questions of suffering
                                                                               - Consider the Jews’ experience of the Holocaust. What effects did it have? How
                                                                                    does it relate to Jewish beliefs about God or their own history, such as the
                                                                                    Passover?
                                                                               - Consider the impact of the Holocaust and the beliefs that sustained or were
                                                                                    challenged by these event and people who experienced the Holocaust.
                                                                               - Consider the work of someone like Simon Wiesenthal

Authority
To compare different sources of authority             Importance of         Explore the ways Jews use and interpret the Torah.
and how they inform believers’ lives: the             scriptures and        The Ten Commandments as authority for the Jewish way of life
function of sacred writings, an awareness of          key figures in
the influence of key figures and of faith on          Judaism
the lives of such individuals




66
Key Stage 3 Judaism – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                     Key Ideas    Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To understand how and          Belief        Personal Faith:
why belief is expressed        expressed    - The relationship between Jewish faith and history
through practices and          through       The Relationship between Belief, Practice and Spirituality:
spirituality                   practice        - The spiritual and symbolic significance of Shabbat with particular reference to the family and worship
                                               - Bar / Bat Mitzvah as an expression of inner commitment to God and outer commitment to the Jewish
                                                   community
                                               - Explore the place of the Torah in worship and the relationship between Jewish law, ritual and the affect on
                                                   individuals and the community
                                               - Explore the relationship between belief and the Shema and how beliefs are translated into action through
                                                   tefillah (prayer); teshuvah (repentance) and tzedekah (social justice and charity)
                                               - The spiritual significance of Jerusalem , the first and second Temple and the Western Wall
                                             Jewish spirituality expressed through the Arts:
                                                - The use of symbolism in art, architecture and music and their relationship to spirituality
To explore how beliefs         Diversity     Investigate the differences between reformed and orthodox practice and the beliefs this diversity reflects
may lead to diversity within   within or
a religion or between them     between
                               religion
Commitment and Responsibility
To understand that belief      Values and    Consider how the land of Israel is important to Jews with emphasis on Jerusalem and the Temple Mount, the
and conviction influence       lifestyle      establishment of the state of Israel and its importance to Jews
action                                       History of the Jews and influence on their faith and practice: Abraham and the Covenant; Moses and the
                                              Exodus; The Exile; Israel today. The beliefs/conflicts behind divisions in the Middle East: the affect on Jews
                                             Investigate anti-semitism and other aspects of conflict today
                                             Consider people who have worked to develop interfaith understanding and practice – eg: Daniel Barenboim and
                                              the Israeli/Palestinian orchestra
To respond to ethical          Ethical       Explore some key Jewish values – repentance, social justice
issues: questions,             issues        How Jewish values are reflected in social action and global issues – eg: sanctity of life; war and peace; wealth
influences and beliefs that                   and poverty; animal rights; the environment
inform moral, religious and                  Responses to the events of the Holocaust
secular choices and the
interrelationships between
such issues.




67
Key Stage 1 Sikhism – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                              Key Ideas        Examples
Belief
To develop an awareness that for        Sikh beliefs      Sikhs believe in one God and only one God who is:
many people religious belief (for       about God            - Supreme truth
example, belief in God) is important                         - The creator of all things
                                                          Sikhs learn about God through their holy scriptures, the Guru Granth Sahib

To develop an awareness that            Difficult         Consider questions faced in everyday life, such as what makes us happy
some questions are puzzling and         questions         Listen to Sikh stories which illustrate the quality of caring and respect for all living things and use
difficult to answer                                        these to generate questions
Authority
To experience and reflect on a          The Guru          The importance of the Guru Granth Sahib – the holy book of the Sikhs, eg:
range of religious stories and          Granth Sahib        - It is placed on a takht (throne)
sacred writings, suggesting and         is special for      - It is never touched by unwashed hands
discussing their meanings               Sikhs

To develop an awareness of key          Sikh              There are different stories about the Gurus (eg Guru Nanak and Guru Gobind Singh).
figures within the chosen faiths (for   teachings and     These teach people about the Sikh beliefs and about right and wrong
example, stories and teachings)         the Gurus




68
Key Stage 1 Sikhism – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                            Key Ideas        Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To experience some places of          Sikh places of    Sikhs worship and pray in a gurdwara and at home
worship and symbols, their            worship and       Exploration of what children might see in a gurdwara – some of the artefacts and symbols – eg: the
purpose, meanings and the feelings    symbols            khanda, the 5 Ks, the Guru Granth Sahib, the palki, kara prashad, donations to the gurdwara
they evoke

To explore some forms of religious    The Sikh          Worship, Prayer and Meditation:
expression, noting similarities       community            - Worshippers remove their shoes and cover their heads
where appropriate                     and worship          - They participate in singing, playing music and praying
                                                           - They read, listen and show respect to the Guru Granth Sahib
                                                        Thanksgiving and Celebrations:
                                                           - The special Sikh naming ceremony
                                                           - Explore the Baisakhi celebrations
                                                        Art and Music:
                                                           - Explore art and decoration in the gurdwara – eg: the decoration of the palki, historical scenes
                                                               depicted by artists
                                                           - Listen to Sikh music - eg: ragas (musical measures)
Commitment and Responsibility
To develop awareness of how           The Sikh          All human beings are equal before God, and that this is shown in the way Sikhs:
belonging to a religion can make a    community            - Share everything
difference to people’s lives,         (Sangat)             - All sit, eat and worship together in the gurdwara, and welcome people of all backgrounds and
including the effect on individuals                            religions
and on the family                                       Explore religious activity in the family by talking to a practising Sikh

To investigate the work of local      The work of       Learn about the Granthi
leaders and the difference they       the
make                                  Granthi

To reflect on spiritual and moral     The               The importance of key rules and values - eg:
values and how these affect           importance           - The family, the role of parents in bringing up children
behaviour                             and meaning          - What is right and what is wrong
                                      of Sikh rules        - Sharing: the langar (shared meal) in the gurdwara
                                      and values




69
Key Stage 2 Sikhism – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                             Key Ideas      Examples
Belief
To explore key beliefs and teachings   Aspects of      Sikhs believe in one God: the significance of Ik Onkar
of religions through people, stories   Sikh beliefs    The way God is described in the Mool Mantra, eg: the truth; creator, without fear, beyond death and
and traditions                         and              birth, one and only one
                                       teachings       The Khanda, Khalsa and the 5 Ks
                                                       The obligation to care for others (sewa) – to give one example, by sharing in the langar


To begin to gain awareness that        Responses       Pupils might explore the Sikh belief that all human beings are equal in the eyes of God and people
religious beliefs and teachings        to ultimate      should, therefore, treat each other as equals
address ultimate and ethical           questions
questions


Authority
To explore the concept of religious    Sacred          The Guru Granth Sahib:
authority: origin, meanings and        writings          - Its importance for Sikhs
importance of scriptures and                             - How it is used in worship, at home, for private study – eg: its guidance is treated as that of a
religious stories                                            living Guru
                                                         - The ceremonial carrying of the Guru Granth Sahib at the beginning of the day; its placement on
                                                             the manji (stool); its opening at a random page and the reading of the hymn as the command of
                                                             the day (hukamnana); the ceremonial closing, covering and putting to rest of the Guru Granth
                                                             Sahib
                                                         - The weekly 48 hour continuous reading of the Guru Granth Sahib (Akhand Path) – in the
                                                             gurdwara and at home
To explore the concept of religious    Religious       Explore some of the stories about and teachings from Guru Nanak, the first Guru
authority: role and qualities of       leaders         Explore some of the stories about and teachings from Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Guru
religious leaders                                      Explore how and why the Guru Granth Sahib was established as the final Guru




70
Key Stage 2 Sikhism – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                 Key Ideas        Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To explore a range of practices in         How buildings,      Worship, Prayer and Meditation:
religions, their meanings and their        artefacts,             - The concept of the gurdwara - a place of worship which extends a welcome to men and
connection to beliefs and teachings        rituals and               women of all races and creeds
                                           symbols play a         - Explore how the features of the gurdwara include the sangat (congregation/ community),
                                           part in Sikh              langar (common shared meal), the Granthi, who reads the Guru Granth Sahib and explains
                                           worship                   the text
                                                                  - Prayer and reflection: use of special prayers, silence, music – eg raga (musical measures)
                                                               Thanksgiving and Celebrations:
                                                                  - The pattern and significance of important ceremonies, eg: birth and naming, Amrit, Baisakhi
                                                                     and the formation of the Khalsa
                                                               Initiation Ceremonies:
                                                                - Study Sikh initiation ceremonies - birth and naming
                                                               The Arts:
                                                                  - Explore how music is used in Sikh worship and its significance
To consider the variety of such            Diversity           Comparison of Sikhs who are members of the Khalsa (ie: baptised Sikhs) and those who are not
practices within and among religions,
thinking about the local area and
more widely

Commitment and Responsibility
To develop awareness of the                Commitment          The responsibilities of belonging to a gurdwara
challenges from commitment to a            and lifestyle       The key teachings of Guru Nanak and how these have influenced life in the home and the
religion, both individually and within a                        gurdwara
religious community                                            Sewa and service in the context of the langar

To develop awareness of religious
rules and what different religions
have to say about ‘right’ and ‘wrong’,
values and commitment
To respond to ethical issues: how          Belief and          The concept of equality and how this is expressed through practice
religious beliefs influence actions        decisions           Dasvand: One tenth of a Sikh’s earnings is given to charity
and responses to issues of human
rights and fairness



71
Key Stage 3 Sikhism – Strand 1: Beliefs and Teachings

Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                                      Key Ideas       Examples
Belief
To explore and develop an awareness of key beliefs              Key Sikh           The concept of God:
including those revealed through writings and those revealed    beliefs                   - One, Truth, Creator
through individuals                                                                       - Without form or enmity
                                                                                          - Beyond time
                                                                                          - Not incarnated, self-existent
                                                                                          - Descriptions of God in the Mool Mantra
                                                                                   The revelation of the divine experienced through the 10 Gurus
                                                                                   The Guru Granth Sahib as a source of revelation, and the status of this final
                                                                                    Guru

To consider responses to ultimate questions from a variety of   Responses          Existence of God :
religious and secular viewpoints: existence of God, questions   to ultimate                - Consider the evidence for the Sikh belief in one God: Ik Onkar
of suffering, exploration of ‘truth’, life after death          questions                  - Contrast this with evidence for the existence of God in Christianity
                                                                                   Questions of suffering:
                                                                                           - The importance of defending the weak and the belief in freedom of
                                                                                                all. The Kirpan reminds Sikhs of the importance of equality
                                                                                   Exploration of truth:
                                                                                           - The world is impermanent; believers should not attach too much
                                                                                                importance to material things, but rather concentrate on drawing
                                                                                                closer to God and spiritual well-being
                                                                                   Life after death:
                                                                                           - The transmigration of the soul governed by the law of Karma

Authority
To compare different sources of authority and how they          Importance         The Guru Granth Sahib – in the context of authority: the embodiment of the
inform believers’ lives: the function of sacred writings, an    of scriptures       10 masters of Sikhism
awareness of the influence of key figures and of faith on the   and key            Explore qualities of leadership in relation to the 10 Gurus, with particular
lives of such individuals                                       figures in          reference to the first Guru, Guru Nanak and the tenth, Guru Gobind Singh
                                                                Sikhism




72
Key Stage 3 Sikhism – Strand 2: Practices and Ways of Life
Statutory Requirements
Objectives                                     Key Ideas    Examples
Ritual and Spirituality
To understand how and why belief is            Belief         Personal Faith:
expressed through practices and spirituality   expressed       - Choosing to become a member of the Khalsa (Amrit ceremony and the Panj Pyares)
                                               through         - The implications of wearing the 5Ks
                                               practice      The Relationship between Belief, Practice and Spirituality:
                                                               - Explore the relationship between the concept of Naam (God) as in the Mool Mantar, the
                                                                   teachings of the Gurus and faith in action
                                                               - Explore the significance of the teachings on human weaknesses (lust, anger, greed,
                                                                   attachment to worldly things, pride) and how this is incorporated into the everyday life of
                                                                   the Sikh
                                                               - Explore the Amrit ceremony with a focus on the significance of the ceremony and the effect
                                                                   on the individual and their spiritual life
                                                             Sikh spirituality expressed through the Arts:
                                                               - The use of symbolism in art, architecture and music – eg: Khanda, kirtan, 31 ragas
                                                               - The Harimandir (Golden Temple) at Amritsar

To explore how beliefs may lead to             Diversity       Comparison of Sikhism in India with that in Britain
diversity within a religion or between them    within or       Compare Sikh Baisakhi celebrations across the world with those in Huddersfield.
                                               between
                                               religion
Commitment and Responsibility
To understand that belief and conviction       Values and    The importance of key values and how these are put into action:
influence action.                              lifestyle       - Sewa (service to all)
                                                               - Kirat (working to earn one’s living honestly)
                                                               - Vand Chhakna (sharing with others)
                                                               - All human beings are equal
                                                               - Respect for all creation
                                                               - Respect for all beliefs and religions

To respond to ethical issues: questions,       Ethical       How Sikh values are reflected in social action and global issues: e.g. sanctity of life; war and
influences and beliefs that inform moral,      issues         peace; wealth and poverty; animal rights; the environment
religious and secular choices




73
The 14 – 19 Programme of Study
Schools should provide RE to every student in accordance with the legal requirements of this Syllabus:

Key Stage 4
   Students should follow an accredited RE or RS course approved under Section 96(6) of the Learning and Skills Act (2000),
      whether or not they are entered for the public examination.

At Post 16
Students should follow either:
    An accredited RE or RS course approved under Section 96(6) of the Learning and Skills Act (2000) and which represents
      progression from 14-16, whether or not they are entered for the public examination.

        OR

       A multi-faith approach with units of work constructed by the school which is coherent, identifiable and of sufficient rigour and
        challenge. For those schools who prefer to construct their own programme of topics to include at Post 16, the following areas
        may be appropriate:


                        Contemporary belief systems
                         Theistic; non-theistic; other world views; the sociology of religion and beliefs

                        Meditation
                         The function and purpose of meditation; meditation and science: the effects of meditation on the brain and as a means of reducing
                         suffering and stress; meditation in different religions – eg Islam and Sufism, Buddhist meditation

                        Religion and medical ethics
                         The responses of different religions to euthanasia, abortion, stem cell research, cloning, contraception, transplants, animal
                         experimentation

                        Religion and philosophy
                         The existence of God; evil and suffering; religion, faith and reason; religion, faith and scientific challenges; religious language



   74
                       Secularisation
                        Exploration of the concept of secularisation; the growth of atheism; religious laws, modern lifestyles and morality; diversity and
                        integration

                       Religion and alternative lifestyles
                        Religious communities – eg: the Sangha in Buddhism; the Plymouth Brethren; the Hari Krishna movement etc.
                        Religious lifestyles – eg: the concept and purpose of asceticism; the yogi

                       Religion, theology and science
                        For example: God and evolution; theories of creation, including the chaos theory etc

                       Religion and the media
                        Bias, prejudice and discrimination; racial, religious and cultural stereotyping

                       Religion and the arts
                        The relationship of the arts to specific religious theologies; Artistic expression in relation to particular religions – eg: art, architecture and design;
                        music; poetry; dance

                       Religion and politics
                        For example: prejudice and discrimination; Islamaphobia; religion and politics in the Middle East; terrorism and society

                       Religion and sexuality
                        Religious responses to sexuality – eg: marriage: polygamy/polyandry; prostitution; homosexuality; gender alteration




RE is a statutory subject for all registered students, including students in school sixth forms, except for those withdrawn by their
parents. Although it is not a requirement in colleges of further education, similar arrangements should apply.

Schools should plan for continuity of provision of religious education that is progressive and rigorous from Key Stage 3 for all students.
Schools can make this possible by providing access to discrete courses or units leading to qualifications that meet legal requirements
regarding the study of Christianity, and/or other principal religions, and/or other beliefs, world views or philosophies, within the context
of a pluralistic society.

All courses should provide opportunities within and beyond school for learning that involves first-hand experiences and activities
involving people, places and events (for example the local area, places of worship and community activities, public meetings, and
places of employment, education, training or recreation).
   75
SECTION 5
Assessment in Religious Education

Assessment and Learning
Assessment should provide the basis of informed teaching, helping to ensure
that teaching builds on what has been learned. It is the means by which pupils
understand what they have achieved and what they need to do to improve
their work.

It is concerned both with making informed judgements about the level at which
pupils are working – Assessment of Learning - and with informing both
teachers and pupils of the next steps in learning – Assessment for Learning

Assessment is the process of seeking and interpreting evidence for use
by learners and their teachers to decide where those learners are in their
learning, where they need to go and how best to get there



Assessment gets to the heart of good teaching and learning by:

        Helping teachers help pupils to take the next steps in their learning
        Helping pupils help each other to take the next steps in their learning
        Helping pupils help themselves to take the next steps in their learning


Assessment is founded upon a number of key principles:

        It should be part of effective planning
        It should focus on how pupils learn
        It should be central to classroom practice
        It is a key professional skill
        It should be implemented both sensitively and constructively
        It fosters motivation since pupils are involved in their own learning and
         are aware of the next steps to be taken
        It promotes understanding of goals and criteria
        It helps learners know how to improve
        It develops the capacity for self and peer assessment
        It recognises all educational achievement
        It supports teachers in the target setting process




76
The Attainment Target in Religious Education

The Attainment Target and the Programme of Study set out the key skills,
knowledge, understanding and attitudes that pupils are expected to have
developed in RE during each Key Stage. It consists of the Performance or ‘P’
scales for pupils with additional needs working below Level 1; eight level
descriptions of increasing difficulty and a description for exceptional
performance above Level 8.

Children in the Foundation Stage will be assessed using the Stepping Stones
and Early Learning Goals of the Foundation Stage Guidance.

The conceptual elements of the Learning Journey, outlined earlier, are built
into the T1 Level Descriptors in statements that are categorised under the
relevant skills of:

        Enquiry
        Investigation
        Expression

T1: Learning About Religion
KEY SKILLS: Enquiry, Investigation and Expression

These include:
 Asking relevant and open questions
 Investigating and reflecting on the meaning of religious concepts and ideas
 Considering and reflecting on how beliefs and values can be applied in specific
   situations
 Selecting, organising and presenting information
 Communicating their understanding of concepts sensitively through the use of
   appropriate language


The T2 Descriptors focus on an additional set of skills:

        Application
        Creative Thinking
        Evaluation

T2: Learning From Religion
KEY SKILLS: Application, Creative Thinking and Evaluation

These include:
 Identifying questions and issues, reflecting on and providing a range of possible
   answers and solutions
 Considering and reflecting on the relationship between cause and effect
 Responding to a concept with an evaluative judgement, appreciating differing
   judgements and reflecting on their merits
 Communicating an informed judgement by reflecting on and taking account of the
   judgement of others




77
Assessing Pupils in Religious Education: Summative and
Formative
Summative Assessment

As pupils demonstrate competence in fulfilling the requirements of each
statement within a particular level, so they become increasingly secure within
that level.

        Pupils who have achieved a minimal competence across and within a
         level are described as working within the ‘c’ band of that level – for
         example, Level 3c
        Pupils who have achieved a moderate competence across and within a
         level are described as working within the ‘b’ band of that level – for
         example, Level 3b
        Pupils who have achieved a high level of competence across and
         within a level are described as working within the ‘a’ band of that level –
         for example, Level 3a

For practical purposes, this Syllabus determines the sub level by the number
of statements within each level against which pupils have demonstrated
competence. The following rule of thumb is simple and manageable:


        Pupils who have attained up to a third of the total statements for each
         level should be awarded a lower level grade for a particular
         assessment (c)

        Pupils who have attained between one and two thirds of the total
         statements, should be awarded a middle grade (b)

        Pupils who have attained more than two thirds of the total statements,
         should be awarded a high grade (a)



For example, Level 4 contains 7 statements:

Between 1 or 2 statements attained would count as Level 4c
Between 3 and 5 statements attained would count as Level 4b
Between 6 and 7 statements attained would count as Level 4a




78
Formative Assessment: The Learning Journey in Religious Education
and Progression Routes


T1: Learning About Religion
The T1 Learning Journey focuses on religious traditions and practices and the
beliefs and values that underpin these. Pupils develop their knowledge, skills
and understanding with reference to:

        Beliefs, teachings and sources
        Practices and ways of life
        Forms of religious expression


T2: Learning From Religion
The T2 Learning Journey focuses on considering what it means to be human
by reflecting on shared human experiences and the search for personal
meaning. Pupils express their responses and insights, in the light of their
learning about religion, with regard to questions and issues about:

        Identity and belonging
        Meaning, purpose and truth
        Values and commitments


Progression Routes

Progression Routes highlight next steps in learning and consequently support
Assessment for Learning. They are grouped under the headings outlined
above:

        Beliefs, teachings and sources; Practices and ways of life; Forms of
         religious expression – the T1 progression routes
        Identity and belonging; Meaning, purpose and truth; Values and
         commitments – the T2 progression routes

The six Progression Routes can be found in the RE Handbook.

Example: Beliefs, Teachings and Sources Progression Route


“Begin to show awareness of similarities in religions” (Level 2)

“Describe some key features of religions, recognising similarities and
differences” (Level 3)

“Make links between sources, practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and
experiences, and show understanding of some similarities and differences
both within and between religions” (Level 4)




79
It is particularly important when devising assessments in RE that there is a
balance of opportunities planned for pupils to demonstrate both T1 and T2,
with time built in for refection to develop links between religious beliefs and
practices and the personal search for meaning. This will allow a full
exploration of the Learning Journey.

It is also important to recognise that no single assessment task can
possibly assess all aspects of a level. It might be that for a particular task,
there is a greater focus on one or two areas whilst for another task a different
area is highlighted. Consequently it is important to plan a balance of tasks and
opportunities over time against which pupils are able to demonstrate
competence within and across levels so that they become aware of what it is
they have to do to improve their work.

Exemplar assessment tasks with associated progression routes can be found
in the RE Handbook.


The Pupil Speak Statements

The Pupil Speak Statements have been presented as a set of general
statements which are intended to apply to any theme or unit of work.

Teachers will need to use the general statements to create their own
contextual statements, according to specific themes or units of work13.

The Progression Routes will be helpful in the planning of these statements
and their progression from one level to another14.



Target Setting in RE

Teachers may wish to set targets for their pupils to determine likely
performance based on prior attainment. For those schools that use Average
Points Scores as guidance for the setting of targets, it is suggested that:

        Many pupils would be expected to progress by 3 points each year

        Some pupils may not be expected to make as much progress and
         might progress by 2 points each year

        Some pupils might be expected to make better progress – 4 points
         each year may consequently be more appropriate

Reference should be made to the guidance document, ‘Levels, Exploded
Levels and Points Scores in RE’15



13
   For an example of how the specific statements might be contextualised to specific themes
see RE Handbook
14
   Refer to RE Handbook for Progression Routes and further guidance
15
   See RE Handbook for the document ‘Levels, Exploded Levels and Points Scores in RE’
80
Performance Descriptions in Religious Education

These performance descriptions outline attainment before level 1 in eight
levels, from P1 to P8 and are appropriate for use with pupils with additional
needs. The performance descriptions can be used by teachers in the same
way as the National Curriculum level descriptions to:

    decide which description best fits a pupil's performance over a period of
     time and in different contexts;
    develop or support more focused day-to-day approaches to ongoing
     teacher assessment by using the descriptions to refine and develop long-,
     medium- and short-term planning;
    track linear progress towards attainment at National Curriculum level 1;
    identify lateral progress by looking for related skills at similar levels across
     their subjects;
    record pupils' overall development and achievement, for example, at the
     end of a year or a key stage.


Performance descriptions across subjects

The performance descriptions for P1 to P3 outline the types and range of
general performance that some pupils with learning difficulties might
characteristically demonstrate.


P1 (i) Pupils encounter activities and experiences. They may be passive or resistant. They
may show simple reflex responses, for example, starting at sudden noises or movements.
Any participation is fully prompted.

P1 (ii) Pupils show emerging awareness of activities and experiences. They may have
periods when they appear alert and ready to focus their attention on certain people, events,
objects or parts of objects, for example, becoming still in response to silence. They may give
intermittent reactions, for example, vocalising occasionally during group celebrations and acts
of worship.



P2 (i) Pupils begin to respond consistently to familiar people, events and objects. They react
to new activities and experiences, for example, briefly looking around in unfamiliar natural and
man-made environments. They begin to show interest in people, events and objects, for
example, leaning towards the source of a light, sound or scent. They accept and engage in
coactive exploration, for example, touching a range of religious artefacts and other objects in
partnership with a member of staff.

P2 (ii) Pupils begin to be proactive in their interactions. They communicate consistent
preferences and affective responses, for example, showing that they have enjoyed an
experience or interaction. They recognise familiar people, events and objects, for example,
becoming quiet and attentive during a certain piece of music. They perform actions, often by
trial and improvement, and they remember learned responses over short periods of time, for
example, repeating a simple action with an artefact. They cooperate with shared exploration
and supported participation, for example, performing gestures during ritual exchanges with
another person performing gestures.




81
P3 (i) Pupils begin to communicate intentionally. They seek attention through eye contact,
gesture or action. They request events or activities, for example, prompting a visitor to
prolong an interaction. They participate in shared activities with less support. They sustain
concentration for short periods. They explore materials in increasingly complex ways, for
example, stroking or shaking artefacts or found objects. They observe the results of their own
actions with interest, for example, when vocalising in a quiet place. They remember learned
responses over more extended periods, for example, following a familiar ritual and responding
appropriately.


P3 (ii) Pupils use emerging conventional communication. They greet known people and may
initiate interactions and activities, for example, prompting an adult to sing or play a favourite
song. They can remember learned responses over increasing periods of time and may
anticipate known events, for example, celebrating the achievements of their peers in
assembly. They may respond to options and choices with actions or gestures, for example,
choosing to participate in activities. They actively explore objects and events for more
extended periods, for example, contemplating the flickering of a candle flame. They apply
potential solutions systematically to problems, for example, passing an artefact to a peer in
order to prompt participation in a group activity.




Performance descriptions in Religious Education

From level P4 to P8, it is possible to describe pupils' performance in a way
that indicates the emergence of skills, knowledge and understanding in RE.
The descriptions provide an example of how this can be done.


P4 Pupils use single elements of communication, for example, words, gestures, signs or
symbols, to express their feelings. They show they understand 'yes' and 'no'. They begin to
respond to the feelings of others, for example, matching their emotions and laughing when
another pupil is laughing. They join in with activities by initiating ritual actions or sounds. They
may demonstrate an appreciation of stillness and quietness.



P5 Pupils respond appropriately to simple questions about familiar religious events or
experiences and communicate simple meanings. They respond to a variety of new religious
experiences, for example, involving music, drama, colour, lights, food, or tactile objects. They
take part in activities involving two or three other learners. They may also engage in moments
of individual reflection.



P6 Pupils express and communicate their feelings in different ways. They respond to others in
group situations and cooperate when working in small groups. Pupils listen to, and begin to
respond to, familiar religious stories, poems and music, and make their own contribution to
celebrations and festivals. They carry out ritualised actions in familiar circumstances. They
show concern and sympathy for others in distress, for example, through gestures, facial
expressions or by offering comfort. They start to be aware of their own influence on events
and other people.




82
P7 Pupils listen to and follow religious stories. They communicate their ideas about religion,
life events and experiences in simple phrases. They evaluate their own work and behaviour in
simple ways, beginning to identify some actions as right or wrong on the basis of the
consequences. They find out about aspects of religion through stories, music or drama,
answer questions and communicate their responses. They may communicate their feelings
about what is special to them, for example, using role play. They begin to understand that
other people have needs and to respect these. They make purposeful relationships with
others in group activity.




P8 Pupils listen attentively to religious stories or to people talking about religion. They begin
to understand that religious and other stories carry moral and religious meaning. They are
increasingly able to communicate ideas, feelings or responses to experiences or to retell
religious stories. They communicate simple facts about religion and important people in
religions. They begin to realise the significance of religious artefacts, symbols and places.
They reflect on what makes them happy, sad, excited or lonely. They demonstrate a basic
understanding of what is right and wrong in familiar situations. They are often sensitive to the
needs and feelings of others and show respect for themselves and others. They treat living
things and their environment with care and concern.




83
The Level Descriptors: Key Ideas / Key Words for Each Level

Level   T1: Learning About            T2: Learning From Religion
        Religion


1
          Name, Recall, Recognise               Talk about

2
               Identify, Retell            Respond Sensitively

3
                  Describe                      Make Links


4
            Show understanding                 Apply ideas


5
                   Explain                 Express their views


6
                Account for                   Express Insight


7
                  Interpret                      Evaluate


8
          Analyse and contextualise         Justify their views


X
              Critically analyse          Express critical insight




84
Level Descriptors: Levels 1 and 2




                                       T1: LEARNING ABOUT RELIGION                 T2: LEARNING FROM RELIGION


Skill Sets                             Enquiry, Investigation and             Application, Creative Thinking and
                                       Expression                             Evaluation
                          Talk about
             Name, Recall, Recognise
  1




                                       Using some simple religious words and phrases, pupils:
     Level




                                        Recognise and name features of         Talk about their own experiences
                                         religious life and practice             and feelings

                                        Recall religious stories and           Talk about what they find
                                         recognise symbols and other             interesting or puzzling
                                         verbal and visual forms of
                                         religious expression                      Talk about what is of value and
                                                                                    concern to themselves and to
                                                                                    others
             Respond Sensitively
                 Identify, Retell
  2




                                       Using religious words and phrases, pupils:
     Level




                                        Identify some features of religion     Ask and respond sensitively to
                                         and its importance for some             questions about their own and
                                         people                                  others’ experiences and feelings

                                        Begin to identify similarities in      Recognise that some questions
                                         religions                               cause people to wonder and are
                                                                                 difficult to answer
                                        Retell and suggest meanings for
                                         religious stories, actions and         Recognise their own values and
                                         symbols                                 respond sensitively to others’
                                                                                 opinions about right and wrong
                                        Identify how religion is expressed
                                         in different ways




85
Level Descriptors: Levels 3 and 4



                                  T1: LEARNING ABOUT RELIGION              T2: LEARNING FROM RELIGION


 Skill Sets                       Enquiry, Investigation and              Application, Creative Thinking and
                                  Expression                              Evaluation
             Make Links
               Describe
 3




                                  Using a developing religious vocabulary, pupils:
     Level




                                   Describe some key features of          Ask important questions about
                                    religions, recognising similarities     religion and beliefs, making links
                                    and differences                         between their own and others’
                                                                            responses
                                   Begin to identify and describe the
                                    impact religion has on believers’      Identify what influences them,
                                    lives                                   linking their own and others’
                                                                            experiences
                                   Describe links between beliefs
                                    and sources, including religious       Make links between values and
                                    stories and sacred texts                commitments, and their own
                                                                            attitudes and behaviour
                                   Describe some forms of religious
                                    expression, recognising
                                    similarities and differences
             Show understanding
                    Apply ideas
 4




                                  Using a developing religious vocabulary, pupils:
     Level




                                   Describe and show understanding        Raise and suggest answers to
                                    of sources, practices, beliefs,         questions of identity, belonging,
                                    ideas, feelings and experiences         meaning, purpose, truth, values
                                                                            and commitments
                                   Make links between them, and
                                    show understanding of some             Share ideas about what inspires
                                    similarities and differences both       and influences themselves and
                                    within and between religions            others

                                   Show understanding of the              Apply their ideas to their own
                                    impact of religion on people’s          and other people’s lives
                                    lives

                                   Suggest meanings for a range of
                                    forms of religious expression




86
Level Descriptors: Levels 5 and 6


                                       T1: LEARNING ABOUT RELIGION                    T2: LEARNING FROM
                                                                                           RELIGION


 Skill Sets                        Enquiry, Investigation and Expression        Application, Creative Thinking
                                                                                and Evaluation
                         Explain
             Express their views
 5




                                   Using an increasingly wide religious vocabulary , pupils:
     Level




                                       Explain the impact of beliefs on             Pose and suggest answers to
                                        individuals and communities                   questions of identity,
                                                                                      belonging, meaning,
                                       Explain why people belong to                  purpose and truth, values
                                        religions                                     and commitments, relating
                                                                                      them to their own and
                                       Know that similarities and                    others’ lives
                                        differences illustrate distinctive
                                        beliefs within and between religions         Explain what inspires and
                                        and suggest possible reasons for this         influences them, expressing
                                                                                      their own and others’
                                       Explain how religious sources are             views on the challenges of
                                        used to provide answers to ultimate           belonging to a religion
                                        questions and ethical issues,
                                        recognising diversity in forms of
                                        religious, spiritual and moral
                                        expression, within and between
                                        religions
                Account for
             Express Insight
 6




                                   Using religious and philosophical vocabulary, pupils:
     Level




                                       Give informed accounts of religions          Use reasoning and examples
                                        and beliefs, explaining the reasons           to express insights into the
                                        for diversity within and between              relationship between
                                        them                                          beliefs, teachings and world
                                                                                      issues
                                       Account for why the impact of
                                        religions and beliefs on individuals,        Express insight into their
                                        communities and societies varies              own and others’ views on
                                                                                      questions of identity and
                                       Using sources and arguments,                  belonging, meaning,
                                        account for the reasons for a                 purpose and truth
                                        variety of answers to ultimate
                                        questions and ethical issues                 Consider the challenges of
                                                                                      belonging to a religion in
                                       Account for the significance of               the contemporary world,
                                        different forms of religious,                 expressing insight into
                                        spiritual and moral expression                values and commitments




87
Level Descriptors: Levels 7 and 8



                                              T1: LEARNING ABOUT RELIGION                   T2: LEARNING FROM
                                                                                                 RELIGION


 Skill Sets                               Enquiry, Investigation and Expression         Application, Creative Thinking
                                                                                        and Evaluation
             Interpret
              Evaluate
 7




                                          Using a wide range of religious and philosophical terminology consistently,
     Level




                                          pupils:

                                              Show a coherent understanding by            Articulate personal and
                                               interpreting a range of religions            critical responses to
                                               and beliefs                                  questions of meaning,
                                                                                            purpose and truth and
                                              Interpret issues, values and                 ethical issues
                                               questions of meaning and truth
                                                                                           Evaluate the significance of
                                              Interpret how history and culture            religious and other views for
                                               have an impact on religious life and         understanding questions of
                                               practice                                     human relationships,
                                                                                            belonging, identity, society,
                                              Explain why the consequences of              values and commitments,
                                               belonging to a faith are not the             using appropriate evidence
                                               same for all people within the same          and examples
                                               religion or tradition
                    Justify their views
             Analyse and contextualise
 8




                                          Using a comprehensive range of religious and philosophical vocabulary,
     Level




                                          pupils:

                                              Analyse a range of religions and            Explore a wide range of
                                               beliefs                                      viewpoints on questions of
                                                                                            identity, belonging,
                                              Contextualise interpretations of             meaning, purpose, truth,
                                               religion with reference to historical,       values and commitments,
                                               cultural, social and philosophical           articulating and justifying
                                               ideas                                        their own views

                                              Analyse and contextualise the
                                               impact of religions and beliefs on
                                               differing communities and societies

                                              Analyse and contextualise varied
                                               forms of religious, spiritual and
                                               moral expression




88
Level Descriptors: Level X: Exceptional Performance



                                             T1: LEARNING ABOUT                     T2: LEARNING FROM RELIGION
                                                   RELIGION


 Skill Sets                             Enquiry, Investigation and             Application, Creative Thinking and
                                        Expression                             Evaluation
                  Critically analyse
             Express critical insight
 X




                                        Using a complex religious, moral and philosophical vocabulary, pupils:
     Level




                                            Provide a critical analysis of
                                             religions and beliefs                   Give independent, well informed
                                                                                      and critical insight into their own
                                            Explore and analyse the                  and others’ perspectives on
                                             importance of religious                  religious and spiritual issues,
                                             diversity in a pluralistic               providing well-substantiated and
                                             society                                  balanced conclusions

                                            Critically analyse how the
                                             impact of religion on different
                                             communities and societies has
                                             changed over time

                                            Critically analyse accounts of
                                             the varied forms of religious,
                                             spiritual and moral expression




89
Level Descriptors and General Pupil-Speak Statements

Level 1 - T1: Name, Recall, Recognise; T2: Talk about



Skills                         Descriptor                                                 Pupil-Speak Examples
T1 Enquiry, Investigation,




                               Recognise and name features of religious life and          I can name some of the things you find in a place
                               practice                                                   of worship
       Expression




                               Recall religious stories and recognise symbols and other   I can tell you the story about….
                               verbal and visual forms of religious expression
                                                                                          I can remember some things you would find in a
                                                                                          place of worship or what people do in the place
                                                                                          of worship

                               Talk about their own experiences and feelings              I can talk about what has happened to me and
   T2: Application, Creative




                                                                                          my feelings
     Thinking, Evaluation




                               Talk about what they find interesting or puzzling          I can talk about things that I find interesting or
                                                                                          puzzling

                               Talk about what is of value and concern to themselves      I can tell you about the things that matter to me
                               and to others                                              and to other people




90
Level 2 – T1: Identify, Retell; T2: Respond Sensitively


Skills                                  Descriptor                                              Pupil-Speak Examples

                                        Identify some features of religion and its importance   I can identify some important facts about a
                                        for some people                                         religion and how they are important for
T1 Enquiry, Investigation, Expression




                                                                                                believers

                                        Begin to identify similarities in religions             I can identify some things that are similar when I
                                                                                                compare 2 different religions


                                        Retell and suggest meanings for religious stories,      I can retell a story, tell you about a religions
                                        actions and symbols                                     symbol or something that happens in a place of
                                                                                                worship and suggest a meaning or some reasons
                                                                                                for this


                                        Identify how religion is expressed in different ways    I can identify how people show their beliefs in
                                                                                                different ways
T2: Application, Creative Thinking,




                                        Ask and respond sensitively to questions about their    I can give a thoughtful answer if someone asks
                                        own and others’ experiences and feelings                me about my own feelings and the feelings of
                                                                                                others
            Evaluation




                                        Recognise that some questions cause people to wonder    I know that there are some questions that are
                                        and are difficult to answer                             difficult to answer


                                        Recognise their own values and respond sensitively to   I can tell you what I think and I can listen
                                        others’ opinions about right and wrong                  carefully to what other people think about what
                                                                                                is right and what is wrong

91
Level 3 – T1: Describe; T2: Make Links


Skills                                  Descriptor                                                Pupil-Speak Examples

                                        Describe some key features of religions, recognising      I can describe some of the main things about a
                                        similarities and differences                              religion and can recognise some things that are
T1 Enquiry, Investigation, Expression




                                                                                                  similar and some things that are different from
                                                                                                  another religion

                                        Begin to identify and describe the impact religion has    I can describe how an aspect of a religion (for
                                        on believers’ lives                                       example, praying or going on a pilgrimage) has
                                                                                                  an effect on a believer’s life

                                        Describe links between beliefs and sources, including     I can describe how people’s religious beliefs are
                                        religious stories and sacred texts                        linked to their holy books and stories


                                        Describe some forms of religious expression recognising   I can describe different types of worship in
                                        similarities and differences                              different religions and how they are similar and
                                                                                                  different
T2: Application, Creative Thinking,




                                        Ask important questions about religion and beliefs,       I can ask a question about a religious belief and
                                        making links between their own and others’ responses      make a link between what I think and what
                                                                                                  others think
            Evaluation




                                        Identify what influences them, linking their own and      I can tell you what influences me and I can make
                                        others’ experiences                                       a link between my own experiences and the
                                                                                                  experiences of others

                                        Make links between values and commitments, and their      I can make a link between religious beliefs and
                                        own attitudes and behaviour                               the way believers behave and my own beliefs
                                                                                                  and the way I behave

92
Level 4 – T1: Show understanding; T2: Apply ideas


Skills                                  Descriptor                                            Pupil-Speak Examples

                                        Describe and show understanding of sources,           I can describe in detail different aspects of a
T1 Enquiry, Investigation, Expression




                                        practices, beliefs, ideas, feelings and experiences   religion – its main beliefs, worship, its holy book
                                                                                              and founders and the feelings of believers

                                        Make links between them, and show understanding of I can make links between religions and show some
                                        some similarities and differences both within and  understanding of things that are similar and things
                                        between religions                                  that are different

                                        Show understanding of the impact of religion on       I can describe in detail the effect that belonging to
                                        people’s lives                                        a religion has on people’s lives


                                        Suggest meanings for a range of forms of religious    I can describe what happens during the worship of a
                                        expression                                            particular religion and suggest the reasons for this
                                                                                              and the meanings behind it
T2: Application, Creative




                                        Raise and suggest answers to questions of identity,   I can ask questions and suggest answers about why
  Thinking, Evaluation




                                        belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and        people belong to a religion and what they promise
                                        commitments                                           to do to show they are a member of that religion

                                        Share ideas about what inspires and influences        I can the discuss things that inspire and influence
                                        themselves and others                                 me and other people

                                        Apply their ideas to their own and other people’s     I can apply my ideas to my own life and the lives of
                                        lives                                                 others




93
Level 5 – T1: Explain; T2: Express their views


Skills                                  Descriptor                                               Pupil-Speak Examples

                                        Explain the impact of beliefs on individuals and         I can explain the difference that religion makes to
                                        communities                                              individual believers and to a religious community
T1 Enquiry, Investigation, Expression




                                        Explain why people belong to religions                   I can explain why people belong to religions, giving
                                                                                                 examples

                                        Know that similarities and differences illustrate        I can explain reasons why there may be similarities
                                        distinctive beliefs within and between religions and     and differences within a religion and between
                                        suggest possible reasons for this                        religions


                                        Explain how religious sources are used to provide        I can explain how holy books, stories or religious
                                        answers to ultimate questions and ethical issues,        leaders can give answers to difficult questions.
                                        recognising diversity in forms of religious, spiritual    I can also describe differences in forms of worship
                                        and moral expression, within and between religions       and the spiritual and moral behaviour of people
                                                                                                 within and between religions
T2: Application, Creative




                                        Pose and suggest answers to questions of identity,       I can ask questions and suggest answers to why
  Thinking, Evaluation




                                        belonging, meaning, purpose and truth, values and        people belong to religions, their beliefs, values and
                                        commitments, relating them to their own and others’      commitments and I can relate these to my own life
                                        lives                                                    and to the lives of others

                                        Explain what inspires and influences them, expressing I can explain what inspires and influences me and I
                                        their own and others’ views on the challenges of      can give my own views and the views of others
                                        belonging to a religion                               about what is challenging about belonging to a
                                                                                              religion


94
Level 6 –T1: Account for; T2: Express Insight


Skills                                  Descriptor                                                 Pupil-Speak Examples

                                        Give informed accounts of religions and                    I can give an informed account of religions and their
                                        beliefs, explaining the reasons for diversity within and   beliefs, explaining the reasons for differences
T1 Enquiry, Investigation, Expression




                                        between them                                               within and between them

                                        Account for why the impact of religions and beliefs        I can account for why the impact of religions and
                                        on individuals, communities and societies varies           beliefs on individuals, communities and society
                                                                                                   varies

                                        Using sources and arguments, account for the reasons       I can use different sources and arguments to
                                        that are used in different ways by different traditions    account for the reasons used by different religious
                                        to provide answers to ultimate questions and ethical       traditions to provide answers to ultimate questions
                                        issues                                                     and ethical issues

                                        Account for the significance of different forms of         I can account for the reason why there are different
                                        religious, spiritual and moral expression                  forms of religious, spiritual and moral expression
T2: Application, Creative Thinking,




                                        Use reasoning and examples to express insights into        I can use reasoning and examples to express insights
                                        the relationship between beliefs, teachings and world      into the relationship between beliefs, teachings and
                                        issues                                                     world issues
            Evaluation




                                        Express insight into their own and others’ views on        I can express insight into my own views and those of
                                        questions of identity and belonging, meaning, purpose      others on questions of religious identity and
                                        and truth                                                  belonging, meaning, purpose and truth

                                        Consider the challenges of belonging to a religion in      I can suggest a number of challenges of belonging
                                        the contemporary world, expressing insight into            to a particular religion in today’s world and can
                                        values and commitments                                     state the values and commitments that help
                                                                                                   believers
95
Level 7 – T1: Interpret; T2: Evaluate


Skills                                  Descriptor                                                Pupil-Speak Examples

                                        Show a coherent understanding by interpreting a           I can interpret a range of religions and the beliefs
T1 Enquiry, Investigation, Expression




                                        range of religions and beliefs                            that underpin them

                                        Interpret issues, values and questions of meaning and     I can interpret issues, values and questions of
                                        truth                                                     meaning and truth

                                        Interpret how history and culture have had an effect      I can interpret how history and culture have had an
                                        on aspects of religious life and practice                 effect on aspects of religious life and practice


                                        Explain why the consequences of belonging to a faith      I can explain why the consequences of belonging to
                                        are not the same for all people within the same           a faith are not the same for all people within the
                                        religion or tradition                                     same religion or tradition


                                        Articulate personal and critical responses to questions   I can discus, critically, my own and others’
T2: Application, Creative




                                        of meaning, purpose and truth and ethical issues          responses to questions of meaning, purpose, truth
  Thinking, Evaluation




                                                                                                  and ethical issues

                                        Evaluate the significance of religious and other views    I can evaluate the significance of religious and
                                        for understanding questions of human relationships,       other views for understanding questions of human
                                        belonging, identity, society, values and commitments,     relationships, belonging, identity, society, values
                                        using appropriate evidence and examples                   and commitments, using appropriate evidence and
                                                                                                  examples




96
Level 8 – T1: Analyse and contextualise; T2: Justify their views


Skills                                  Descriptor                                                Pupil-Speak Examples
T1 Enquiry, Investigation, Expression




                                        Analyse a range of religions and beliefs                  I can analyse a range of religions and beliefs


                                        Contextualise interpretations of religion with reference I can analyse and contextualise different
                                        to historical, cultural, social and philosophical ideas  interpretations of religion with reference to
                                                                                                 historical, cultural, social and philosophical ideas

                                        Analyse and contextualise the impact of religions and     I can analyse and contextualise the impact of
                                        beliefs on differing communities and societies            religions and beliefs on differing communities and
                                                                                                  societies

                                        Analyse and contextualise varied forms of religious,      I can analyse and contextualise varied forms of
                                        spiritual and moral expression                            religious, spiritual and moral expression
T2: Application, Creative




                                        Explore a wide range of viewpoints on questions of        I can explore a wide range of viewpoints on
  Thinking, Evaluation




                                        identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values      questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose,
                                        and commitments, articulating and justifying their own    truth, values and commitments, articulating and
                                        views                                                     justifying my own views




97
Level X – T1: Critically analyse; T2: Express critical insight



Skills                                  Descriptor                                                  Pupil-Speak Examples
T1 Enquiry, Investigation, Expression




                                        Provide a critical analysis of religions and beliefs        I can provide a critical analysis of religions and
                                                                                                    beliefs

                                        Explore and analyse the importance of religious             I can explore and analyse the importance of
                                        diversity in a pluralistic society                          religious diversity in a pluralistic society

                                        Critically analyse how the impact of religion on            I can critically analyse how the impact of religion on
                                        different communities and societies has changed over        different communities and societies has changed
                                        time                                                        over time

                                        Critically analyse accounts of the varied forms of          I can critically analyse accounts of the varied forms
                                        religious, spiritual and moral expression                   of religious, spiritual and moral expression


                                        Give independent, well informed
Creative Thinking,




                                                                                                    I can give independent, well informed
 T2: Application,




                                        and critical insight into their own and others’             and critical insight into their own and others’
   Evaluation




                                        perspectives on religious and spiritual issues, providing   perspectives on religious and spiritual issues,
                                        well-substantiated and balanced conclusions                 providing well-substantiated and balanced
                                                                                                    conclusions




98
14 – 19 Assessment Objectives
GCSE Religious Studies

Candidates will be required to demonstrate their ability to:

  Recall, select, organise and deploy knowledge of the specification content (AO1)
  Describe, analyse and explain the relevance and application of a religion or religions (AO2)
  Evaluate different responses to religious and moral issues, using relevant evidence and argument (AO3)

Although these assessment objectives are expressed separately they are not wholly discrete.


GRADE DESCRIPTIONS

Grade F
Candidates demonstrate elementary knowledge and understanding of beliefs, values and traditions studied and their impact on adherents and others. They do this
through limited use of specialist vocabulary and knowledge, sometimes correctly but not often systematically, and by making simple connections between religion
and people's lives. They support and evaluate responses to issues studied by giving a reason in support of an opinion.

Grade C
Candidates demonstrate, generally with accuracy, a knowledge and understanding of beliefs, values and traditions and their impact on individuals, societies and
cultures. They do this by using correct specialist vocabulary when questions specifically demand it and describing accurately and explaining the importance of the
religion(s) studied. They support, interpret and evaluate different responses to issues studied by presenting relevant evidence to support arguments, incorporating
reference to different points of view and using arguments to make reasoned judgements.

Grade A
Candidates demonstrate detailed and comprehensive knowledge and understanding of beliefs, values and traditions and their impact on the lives of individuals,
societies and cultures. They do this by consistently using and interpreting a range of specialist vocabulary, drawing out and explaining the meaning and religious
significance of the religions studied and explaining, where appropriate, how differences in belief lead to differences of religious response. They support, interpret
and evaluate a variety of responses recognising the complexity of issues, weighing up opinions and by making judgements supported by a range of evidence and
well-developed arguments.




99
14 – 19 Assessment Objectives
GCE AS/Advanced Level Religious Studies

AO1: Select and demonstrate clearly relevant knowledge and understanding through the use of evidence, examples and correct language and
terminology appropriate to the course of study. In addition, advanced candidates should demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the
connections between different elements of their course of study.
AO2 Sustain a critical line of argument and justify a point of view. In addition, advanced candidates should relate elements of their course of study to
their broader context and to specified aspects of human experience.

GRADE DESCRIPTIONS
Grade E
Candidates recall, demonstrate and deploy a limited and partially accurate knowledge of the topics studied. They use some technical language and terminology
correctly in a variety of contexts in some of their work. They demonstrate a limited understanding with minimal analysis of the issues studied. They attempt to
compare, contrast and evaluate the views of scholars and schools of thought, as well as offering personal insights, but often do not do so convincingly. They make
some use of evidence to sustain an argument, rarely anticipating or counteracting views to the contrary, if at all. They demonstrate a very limited understanding of
the connections between the areas they have studied and their contribution to the nature of religion and aspects of human experience. There is little maturity of
approach, with unsophisticated expression, weak construction and poor quality of language. They communicate with little clarity most of the time.

Grade C
Candidates recall, demonstrate and deploy a good and mainly accurate knowledge of the topics studied. They use technical language and terminology accurately in
a variety of contexts in much of their work. They demonstrate some understanding with some analysis of the issues studied. They show some ability to compare,
contrast and evaluate the views of scholars and schools of thought, as well as offering some personal insights and independent thought, but not consistently. They
make good use of evidence to sustain an argument, sometimes anticipating and counteracting views to the contrary. They demonstrate some understanding of the
connections between the areas they have studied and their contribution to the nature of religion and aspects of human experience. There is evidence of some
maturity of approach, with fair expression, construction and quality of language, which enables them to communicate with some clarity.

Grade A
Candidates demonstrate a comprehensive and almost totally accurate knowledge of the topics studied. They use technical language and terminology accurately in
a variety of contexts throughout their work. They demonstrate a full understanding and analysis of the issues studied. They can compare, contrast and evaluate the
views of scholars and schools of thought, as well as offering personal insights and independent thought. They make full and effective use of evidence to sustain an
argument, anticipating and counteracting views to the contrary. They demonstrate a clear understanding of the connections between the areas they have studied
and their contribution to the nature of religion and aspects of human experience. There is a maturity of approach, with sophisticated and elegant expression,
construction, and quality of language, which enables them to communicate with clarity.




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      SECTION 7:
      APPENDICES

      Appendix 1:
      Legal Requirement Checklist: Religious Education

      The school fulfils the minimum legal requirement in this Syllabus for the
      religions studied:

      Key Stage 1:
          Christianity taught in depth;
          One religion from either Group A (Islam or Judaism) or Group B (Buddhism or
             Sikhism) taught in depth.

      Key Stage 2:
          Christianity taught in depth;
          The chosen religion at KS1 taught in depth;
          A religion from the other group (Group A or B as appropriate) taught in depth.

      Key Stage 3:
          Christianity taught in depth;
          At least two other principal religions taught in depth;
          All 6 principal religions taught during the Key Stage;
          Those taught in outline taught for a minimum of one unit.

      Key Stage 4:
           All pupils follow an accredited RE/RS course;
           For those pupils with additional needs for whom an Entry Level Certificate
             would not be appropriate, the school follows a programme from the KS3
             programme of study.

      Post 16: Either:
          An accredited course (GCSE Religious Education/Studies; GCE AS/A Level Religious
             Studies or Religious Education modules from the GCE AS/A Level General Studies)
             OR
          A multi-faith approach with units of work constructed by the school, along the lines
             suggested in this syllabus.

         Comment:




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      The School fulfils Minimum Statutory Requirements for Curriculum
      Time for RE:

      Reception and KS1:        1 hour per week
      KS2:                      1 hour per week
      KS3:                      1 hour per week
      KS4:                      1 hour per week
      Post 16:                  18 hours per year

      Comment:




      The Transition Unit, Guidelines for Living, is incorporated into the RE
      Programme:

      KS2 to 3: Years 6 and 7
      First to Middle Schools

      Comment:




      There is agreement amongst pyramid schools regarding the religions
      to be studied in depth at each phase and when these will be taught

      Comment:




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      Appendix 2:
      Ideas and Concepts in Religious Education

      Ideas and concepts common to non-religious and religious experience –
      some examples

      Celebration                          Looking forward
      Suffering                            Wisdom
      New Life                             Family
      Loyalty                              Cycle of life
      Teaching                             Belonging
      Belief                               Communication
      Storytelling                         Power
      Identity                             Purpose
      Change                               Journey
      Good                                 Death
      Evil                                 Teacher
      Changing emotions                    Creation
      Fire                                 Imagery
      Symbol of new life                   Thanking
      Devotion                             Forgiveness
      Welcoming                            Life giving
      Community                            Justice
      Specialness                          Peace
      Sacrifice                            Love
      Symbol of light                      Interpretation
      Submission                           Hope
      Remembering                          Authority
      Freedom                              Prejudice
      Rules                                Caring
      Puzzlement                           Right and Wrong
      Influence                            Expectations
      Truth                                Resolution




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      Ideas and concepts common to many religions and that are used in the study
      of religion – some examples

      God                          Congregation
      Worship                      Religious Teacher
      Symbol                       Scriptures
      Angels                       Thanksgiving
      Ritual                       Commitment
      Creation                     Good and Evil
      Prophethood                  Religious Conviction
      Sacred                       Revelation
      Holy
      Myth
      Ceremony
      Initiation
      Rites of passage
      Prophecy
      Pilgrimage
      Martyrdom
      Discipleship
      Stewardship
      Faith
      Salvation
      Covenant




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      Ideas and concepts particular to specific religions

      Buddhism – a few examples

         Buddha:           Enlightened or awakened one. One who sees things as
                           they really are.

         Dharma:           Teachings of the Buddha. Also, the Truth about the way things are.

         Dukha:            Suffering or disease. The unsatisfactoriness of worldly existence.

         Karma:            The state of rebirth through one’s attachment to the world and the
                           self.

         Nirvana:          Enlightenment. The extinguishing of ignorance and attachment that
                           binds one to worldly existence.

         Sangha:           The Buddhist community. Sometimes used specifically about the
                           monastic community




      Christianity – a few examples

         Church:            The whole community of Christians in the world throughout time.
                            Also a particular congregation or denomination of Christianity.
                            Also, the congregation of a particular church or worshipping
                            community.

         Grace:             The freely given and unmerited favour of God’s love for humanity.
                            The means to salvation through faith in Jesus Christ.

         Incarnation:       The doctrine that God took human form in Jesus Christ and the
                            belief that God in Christ is active in the Church and the world
                            through the Holy Spirit.

         Resurrection:      The rising from the dead of Jesus Christ, leading to the rising from
                            the dead of all believers at the Last Day, and the belief in the new,
                            or risen, life of Christians.

         Salvation:         The belief that all believers will be saved and live in
                            God’s presence.

         Sin:               Act or acts of rebellion against the known will of God. An
                            understanding of the human condition as being severed from its
                            relationship with God because of disobedience.




105
      Hindu Dharma – a few examples

         Ahimsa:         Non-violence

         Atman:          The presence of ultimate formless reality in a person or living being

         Brahma:         The Hindu God responsible for creation and creative power. One of
                         the trimurti (the three deities who control the gunas: the three
                         functions of creation, preservation and destruction)

         Brahman:        Ultimate Reality, the formless understanding of God

         Karma:          The laws by which one’s actions result in a higher or lower rebirth
                         according to whether one’s actions have good or bad effects

         Vedas:          The ancient scriptures that contain the revealed knowledge of
                         reality.




      Islam – a few examples

         Akhirah:        Life after death - the hereafter.

         Islam:          Submission to the will of Allah leading to peace.

         Jihad:          Individual striving toward Allah (greater jihad), preventing the
                         corruption of Allah’s creation (lesser jihad).

         Muslim:         One who submits.

         Tawheed:        The oneness of God and His creation.

         Ummah:          The community of Muslims worldwide.




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      Judaism – a few examples

          Covenant:       The agreement made between God and the Jewish people involving
                          promise and obligation.

          Israel:         One who struggles with God. This refers to the world-wide Jewish
                          community; the land of Israel and the modern state of Israel.

          Mitzvah/        Commandment in Torah.
          mitzvot (pl):

          Rabbi:          Ordained teacher of Torah (the Law). Often the religious leader of a
                          Jewish community.

          Redemption:     God’s promise in the Covenant, to release the world from its fallen,
                          sinful state.

          Torah:          Law, teaching. The five books of Moses.




       Sikhism – a few examples

          Amrit:          The Sikh rite of initiation into the Khalsa. Also the sanctified sugar
                          and water liquid (nectar) used in the initiation ceremony.

          Guru:           God manifest, as in Guru Granth Sahib.

          Ik Onkar:       The symbol representing God as One.

          Khalsa:         Fellowship of those who have taken amrit (both men and women).

          Langar:         The community meal expressing unity and equality of humankind,
                          not just Sikhs. The Langar is also the kitchen in the gurdwara.

          Maya:           The illusion that the world has an essential reality instead of being
                          temporary. The implication being that the soul has no true dwelling
                          in the world.




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      Humanism – a few examples

         Evolution:        Acceptance that human beings have evolved naturally over millions
                           of years as have all other forms of life.

         Moral values:     Derived from human knowledge and experience alone. Central to
                           civilised living for both individuals and societies.

         Rationalism:      Explanation of human and natural phenomena based on reason,
                           verifiable evidence and scientific method.

         Responsibility:   Self-reliance and independence of thought. Responsibility of
                           humans for their own destiny. Treating others in a way one would
                           like to be treated. Care for the environment, now and for the future.

         Secularism:       Impartiality towards, and equal treatment of, individuals and groups
                           with different religious and non-religious beliefs.

         Value of life:    Seeking to make the better of the one life humans have by creating
                           meaning and purpose.




108
Appendix 3: Contributors to the Syllabus and
Acknowledgements




109

								
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