Marcia L. Kosanovich, Ph.D

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Student Center Activities

     Marcia L. Kosanovich, Ph.D.


The Florida Center for Reading Research
         Florida State University
              www.fcrr.org

            July 17-20, 2006
   National Reading First Conference
             Reno, Nevada
       Objectives for Today
• Learn about Professional Development
  that can be utilized with teachers to help
  them differentiate instruction
  – Implementing and managing student
    centers by using Student Center Activities
     Reading First
Four Pillars of an Effective
   Reading Program:
• Valid and Reliable Assessments
• Instructional Programs and Aligned
  Materials
• High Quality Professional Development
• Dynamic Instructional Leadership
 Reading First Site Visits
• Classroom Observations
• Student Data
• Interviews
   – Teachers
   – Reading Coaches
   – Principals
Determination:
          Florida’s Formula

5 Components      3 Types of       Initial        Immediate
                 Assessment     Instruction        Intensive
                                                 Intervention
   •Phonemic     •Screening    •Whole Group
   Awareness      •Progress    •Differentiated
    •Phonics     Monitoring
    •Fluency     •Diagnostic
  •Vocabulary
•Comprehension
   Quality Initial Instruction
  “The best intervention is effective instruction.”
                             - National Research Council
Whole group instruction
•core reading program (meeting 80% of classroom needs)

Differentiated instruction
•small group rotations II
                  TIER
•small, flexible groups
•core & supplementary reading programs
•teacher selected materials which reflect whole group lesson

Differentiated classroom intervention
•small, flexible group(s)
•supplemental & intervention programs
          Materials: K-1
A Professional Development DVD and 3 Books:


1. Phonological Awareness and Phonics
   Student Center Activities
2. Fluency, Vocabulary, and Comprehension
   Student Center Activities
3. Teacher Resource Guide to accompany
   the professional development DVD
  Materials: Grades 2 & 3
A Professional Development DVD and 3 Books:


1. Phonemic Awareness and Phonics
   Student Center Activities
2. Fluency, Vocabulary, and Comprehension
   Student Center Activities
3. Teacher Resource Guide to accompany
   the professional development DVD
           Expectations

• Not mandatory
• A free resource
• Available on FCRR’s website:
  www.fcrr.org
  Role of the Reading Coach
• If the Student Center Activities are
  going to be used, it is expected that the
  Reading Coach will provide professional
  development to the teachers.
• The Teacher Resource Guide and the
  DVD are designed to support this
  professional development.
  Teacher Resource Guide
• The Five Components of Reading Instruction
• Frequently Asked Questions
• Implementing and Managing Student Centers
  in the Classroom: System One
• Implementing and Managing Student Centers
  in the Classroom: System Two
• Interpretation of Activity Plans
• Implementation of Activity Plans
• Crosswalk
• Glossary
      The Five Components of
        Reading Instruction
• For each of the 5 components of reading:
  – Definition
  – Goal
  – A brief description of how the K-3 Student
    Center Activities support growth in each
    component of reading
    • Sequenced by concept in a logical order of
      instruction
                 Phonics (K-1 example)
• Letter Recognition
   – Students practice matching, identifying, and ordering the letters in
     the alphabet.
• Letter-Sound Correspondence
   – Students practice identifying and ordering letter sounds (initial, final,
     and medial).
• Onset and Rime
   – Students first practice identifying the initial consonant or
     consonants (onset) and the vowel and any consonants that follow it
     (rime); then practice blending, sorting, and segmenting the onset
     and rime.
• Word Study
   – Students practice sorting, blending, segmenting, and manipulating
     the sounds of letters in words and practice identifying high-
     frequency words.
• Syllable Patterns
   – Students practice blending and segmenting syllables in words.
• Morpheme Structures
   – Students practice blending compound words, roots and affixes, and
     roots and inflections to make words.
    Comprehension (2-3 example)
• Narrative Text Structure
  – Students practice identifying story elements
    (characters, setting, sequence of events, problems,
    solution, plot, and theme).
• Expository Text Structure
  – Students practice identifying details, main idea,
    and important information in expository text.
• Text Analysis
  – Students practice identifying and organizing text.
• Monitoring for Understanding
  – Students practice using strategies to comprehend
    text.
FAQ’s Concerning Reading Centers
1. What is differentiated instruction?
2. What is a Reading Center?
3. What are examples of Reading Centers
   and Activities?
4. How are these Reading Centers different
   from the centers of the past?
5. Why should Student Center Activities
   be implemented in second and third
   grades?
              VIDEO for questions 1 and 2
                           5:10-10:14
       Implementing and Managing
     Student Centers in the Classroom

I. Form Flexible Groups Based on Assessment
II. Identify Appropriate Center Activities Based
     on Assessment
III. Design Center Management System
IV. Implement a Behavior Management System
V. Give Explicit Center Directions
VI. Organize the Classroom
VII. Manage Transitions
VIII.Establish Accountability
      Implementing and Managing
   Student Centers in the Classroom:
             Pre-Planning
I. Form Flexible Groups Based on
     Assessment
II. Identify Appropriate Center Activities
     Based on Assessment
III. Design Center Management System
  Implementing and Managing Student
  Centers in the Classroom: Executing


IV. Implement a Behavior Management
      System
V. Give Explicit Center Directions
VI. Organize the Classroom
VII. Manage Transitions
VIII. Establish Accountability
    Interpretation Activity Plans
• Activity Plans
   – Used by the teacher to plan and teach an activity
   – Sequenced by concept in a logical order within each
     component

• Activity Masters
   – Used by the students
   – May need to be copied
   – Can be laminated and stored for future use

• Student Sheets
   – Used by students (consumable)
   – Need to be copied for each student
Implementation of Activity Plans
• Preparing and Organizing Materials
• Setting Up Centers
• Computer-Based Centers
• Selecting Quality Computer Software
  and Technology-Based Curricula
  Materials
• Materials Needed for Student Center
  Activities
            Crosswalk
Crosswalks are sorted by
1. Activity Number and Subcomponent
2. DIBELS measures
3. Grade Level Expectation
  • K, 1, 2, & 3
Glossary
Book One
Book Two
  Guiding Questions for Principal
          Walkthroughs
What is the goal or objective for student
outcome?

Are the Activities at the Centers based on
  SBRR?

Is the goal directly related to reading?
Guiding Questions for Principal
        Walkthroughs
Has the skill already been taught explicitly
by the teacher?

Has the student demonstrated the skill
correctly?

Is the student practicing, demonstrating, or
extending a skill?
                Acknowledgements
Just Read, Florida! at the Florida Department of Education
                Mary Laura Openshaw, M.A.
                    Barbara Elzie, M.A.
                       Cari Miller, M.A.

             2-3 Development Team at FCRR
                 Marcia Kosanovich, Ph.D.
                   Teresa Logan, B.A.
                 Connie Weinstein, M.Ed.
                    Kelly Magill, M.S.

            Curriculum Review Team at FCRR
                   Georgia Jordan, M.S.
                   Michelle Wahl, M.S.
                  Mary Van Sciver, M.S.
                     Lila Rissman, M.S.
                  Elissa Arndt, M.S. CCC
Questions?
 Thank You!
www.fcrr.org

				
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