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					               MALAWI: ‘Home-made’ toys in Rural Africa

They are often made by the children out of things which are broken, thrown away, or out
of the natural vegetation (skipping ropes are made by the children from the sisal plant).
   The younger children will be helped by their parents or older brothers and sisters.




            kite (plastic & sticks)              helicopters (grasses & sticks)




                   car    (wire)                    dolls furniture (grasses)




            skipping rope        (sisal)              hoop (old bicycle wheel)

                                           -1-
     RECYCLING/CONSERVATION ACTIVITIES                  Roger Bamfield, Highland Council, 2008
                                          Make a Doll

Children in rural Africa are not able to go to a toy shop. They make their toys out of
things which are around them and which nobody else is using.

They would make a doll out of long grasses and old plastic bags. They may have no
sellotape or other adhesive; they would use fine hand made string if anything extra is
needed to tie it.

Make a doll with your partner.




                                              -2-
      RECYCLING/CONSERVATION ACTIVITIES                  Roger Bamfield, Highland Council, 2008
                                          Make a Ball

Children in rural Africa are not able to go to a toy shop. They make their toys out of
things which are around them and which nobody else is using.

They would make a ball out of old plastic bags. They have no sellotape or other adhesive,
they would use fine hand made string to make a net to hold the plastic together or they
would melt the plastic a little using the kitchen fire after adding each plastic bag.

Make a ball with your partner. You will need 10 – 20 old plastic bags.




                                              -3-
      RECYCLING/CONSERVATION ACTIVITIES                   Roger Bamfield, Highland Council, 2008
                                          Using a Ball

In rural Africa Children make up games using hardly any equipment. Many are very good
at football and Malawi has had one of the best national netball teams in the world for a
long time. They play many other games with the balls they make and these help them to
have very good skills for the team games like football and netball.

Some people say recycling and conservation is not about what you have to conserve or
recycle, it is about making the most of what you have.

In groups of four or five play with one of the balls you have made (hopefully it is well
made and can be used as a ball).

What are the different games you can play with just a ball (not including proper team
games but you can include things which will help you develop the skills for these – e.g.
shooting)? You cannot go to get a racquet, goals, netball basket etc. All you can use are
the things which are around you and available to you in the hall/playground – no
manufactured games equipment. In rural Africa they would just use what is around
them, a rounders bat would be a piece of dead wood lying nearby….
Try playing the games you can think of.

Tell the rest of the class the games that you have been playing.

Sit down in your group. Talk for five minutes and make up your own ball game, think of
the rules, think of a name. Remember all you can use are the things which are around you
and available to you in the hall/playground – no manufactured games equipment. Try out
your game.

Now sit down and think how your game worked out. Does anything need to be changed
because it didn’t work well, can anything be improved? Try playing again.

Your group is now paired with another group. Label yourselves 1 and 2.

Group 2 now need to teach their game to group 1 and watch them play. Then swap over
and Group 1 teacher their game to group 2.

Group 1 talk about the game Group 2 taught you. What are your two stars and 1 wish?

Group 2 talk about the game Group 1 taught you. What are your two stars and 1 wish?

                                              -4-
      RECYCLING/CONSERVATION ACTIVITIES                   Roger Bamfield, Highland Council, 2008
                              Clothes in Rural Africa

In rural Africa clothes are sold in the local market. Stallholders bring clean second
hand clothes which have been shipped from Europe to sell. It can be hard to find the
clothes you want in the right size. Children who are three years old might be wearing
clothes for a six year old, children aged 11 might be wearing clothes made for a small
adult.

Ask at home if you can borrow someone else’s clothes which are really too big for you
and bring them to school on __________. We will try wearing them for part of the day.
The children and the adults in our class will all do this.




                                          -5-
     RECYCLING/CONSERVATION ACTIVITIES                   Roger Bamfield, Highland Council, 2008
                        Troubled Wild Animals in Malawi

In most of southern and central Malawi you find villages and farmed land. There are
still some wild animals. There are three wild animals the Malawian people do not like
them living around their villages, the lion (there are very few), elephants and hyenas.

Choose one of these three animals. Use books/internet to find out what you can about
the animal you choose and why might be endangered. Make notes of what you find out on
this piece of paper. You may like to do this with a partner.




Using an A3 piece of paper make an illustrated poster/chart to tell people facts about
the animal you choose. Include reasons why it is endangered in places like Malawi.

                                           -6-
      RECYCLING/CONSERVATION ACTIVITIES                   Roger Bamfield, Highland Council, 2008
                   What is a Resource in Rural Africa (1)?

People in rural Africa usually think more carefully about what they have before they
throw it away. Scraps of food that we throw away would be fed to chickens, pigs and
other animals they keep.

Bring in to school 5 (cleaned) non-food items of rubbish which would normally go into the
dustbin. This might be packaging, clothing, old/broken (non-electrical equipment).

As a class sort these into groups and make a display. You choose the names of the
groups they go into (the chart below just has some ideas to get you started. Think
about things things which are old but still usable, packaging, damaged things, broken
things, packaging used once and so on.

Record your results on a chart like this:

 PACKAGING               OLD                BROKEN            ????                      ????




                                             -7-
      RECYCLING/CONSERVATION ACTIVITIES                  Roger Bamfield, Highland Council, 2008
                  What is a Resource in Rural Africa (2)?

In groups of 3 or 4 choose one resource from each of the categories in the previous
activity. If it was not thrown away how many things could it be used for?

Use a chart like the one below to record your results

Share your results with the class? Which is the most ‘re-usable’ thing your class has
brought in?

OLD SANDWICH BOX (no                     ????                                 ????
        lid)

water container
plant pot
desk tidy
box for odds & ends
box for old nails/screws
to make ‘sand castles’
keeping ‘top trumps’ cards
keeping CDs
punch holes in it to make a
water sprinkler if you have
no watering can
keeping fishing bait




                                          -8-
     RECYCLING/CONSERVATION ACTIVITIES                   Roger Bamfield, Highland Council, 2008

				
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