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2012 Summer Olympic Games London England disability equality scheme

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					Sustainability Report Olympic Delivery Authority 2008
Disability Equality Scheme December why How and 2007

London 2012 will host the greenest Games ever

disability equality

Sustainability Report 2008 How and why London 2012 will host the greenest Games ever

Contents

Foreword

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Introduction Context – Olympic Delivery Authority Context – the situation of disabled people Equality and Diversity Strategy Inclusive design Employment opportunities Business opportunities Targeted community engagement Integration and capability building Monitoring disability equality Involvement Disability equality impact assessments Delivery arrangements

2 3 7 11 12 16 20 23 25 27 29 30 31

Annexes A B Summary of points made during involvement meetings Disability Equality Action Plan 32 34

Foreword

The overarching vision for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games is to host an inspirational, safe and inclusive Games and leave a sustainable legacy for London and the UK. The Olympic Delivery Authority’s central job is to deliver the Park, new venues and infrastructure for the 2012 Games on time and on budget. As a public body we also recognise, and take very seriously, our statutory duty to promote disability equality. Easy access throughout the Olympic Park will be one of the main ways in which we can show that we have understood and responded to the needs of disabled spectators and athletes. We recognise the wide spectrum of barriers which disabled people face on a daily basis in most built environments. We have a wonderful opportunity to create an environment which does not replicate the barriers of the past and which can act as an inspiration to others of what can be achieved through inclusive design. In delivering our programme we will be responsible for creating many jobs, mostly in construction. We want disabled people to have their fair share of these jobs and so improve their future work prospects. Many stereotypes and mistaken assumptions pervade the construction industry regarding the employment of disabled people. We welcome the opportunity to contradict those assumptions and instead promote positive images of disabled people in construction work. We will be working hard with our contractors to identify and root out barriers to disabled people’s employment on site, in supporting work and in professional roles. We recognise the scale of what we are aiming to achieve, and know that we cannot achieve that alone. We look to many partners to work proactively with us to achieve our aims. During the three years covered by this Disability Equality Scheme the pace of activity will be increasing with the imminent approach of the Games. Now is the time for our organisation to embed all the disability principles developed so far and turn them in to action. I commend this Disability Equality Scheme to everyone involved in our work. It sets out our ambitions and the actions needed to achieve them. Anyone who plays a part in our work needs to understand this important aspect of our thinking. To achieve our aims we know that input from disabled people themselves will be critical. I extend our thanks to all the disabled people who have contributed so far. Their generosity in sharing their knowledge and experience has already been, and will continue to be, invaluable.

John Armitt Chairman Olympic Delivery Authority

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Introduction

This document is the Disability Equality Scheme (DES) of the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA). It sets out the ODA’s objectives and arrangements for promoting disability equality. This DES is based on the social model of disability. This means that people are disabled by negative attitudes and assumptions, physical and social barriers rather than their impairments or medical conditions. To achieve better equality of opportunity for disabled people, the ODA has to change attitudes, structures (including policies and practices) and activities that create barriers. The ODA will, therefore, review its policies and practices, discover the barriers, train its own staff and take proactive steps to encourage and support its contractors to do the same. One of the best ways of finding out what causes inequalities and problems is to ask disabled people themselves. The ODA has involved disabled people and their organisations in drawing up this DES, and will continue to do so as it works to turn these commitments into action. The DES is structured as follows: - Section 2 and 3 set the context in terms of the ODA, its statutory duties and the situation of disabled people; - Sections 4 to 9 set out the Equality and Diversity Strategy, what has been achieved so far in relation to each strand of the strategy and the disability equality objectives arising from each strand of the strategy; - Sections 10 to 12 set out the ODA’s arrangements for monitoring disability equality, involving disabled people and carrying out disability equality impact assessments; - Section 13 set out the arrangements for delivery; - Annex A summarised the key points made by disabled people in involvement meetings; - Annex B sets out the Disability Equality Action Plan.

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Context - Olympic Delivery Authority

The vision The overall vision for the London 2012 Games, agreed by the Olympic Board 1 is:

To host an inspirational, safe and inclusive Olympic and Paralympic Games and leave a sustainable legacy for London and the UK.

The four resulting strategic objectives are: 1. To stage an inspirational Olympic Games and Paralympic Games for the athletes, the Olympic Family and the viewing public. 2. To deliver the Olympic Park and all venues on time, within agreed budget and to specification, minimising the call on public funds and providing for a sustainable legacy. 3. To maximise the economic, social, health and environmental benefits of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games for the UK, particularly through regeneration and sustainable development in east London. 4. To achieve a sustained improvement in UK sport before, during and after the Games, in both elite performance - particularly in Olympic and Paralympic sports – and grassroots participation. The Olympic Delivery Authority The ODA is an Executive Non-Departmental public body accountable to the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport. It was established by the London Olympic and Paralympic Games Act 2006 on 30 March 2006. The ODA’s mission is:

To deliver venues, facilities, infrastructure and transport on time for the London 2012 Olympic Games and Paralympic Games that are fit-for-purpose and in a way that maximises the delivery of a sustainable legacy within the available budget.

The ODA’s key objectives of time and fit for purpose are underpinned by five priority themes. Equality and diversity is one of those five priority themes.

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The Olympic Board comprises representatives of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), the Greater London Authority (GLA), the London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) and the British Olympic Association (BOA). It is jointly chaired by the Secretary of State and the Mayor of London. It is responsible for coordinating the work of LOCOG and the ODA, resolving and determining issues raised by members and ensuring a sustainable legacy following the Games.

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The ODA is a relatively small organisation, growing to around 250 employees, commissioning work from designers, contractors, consultants, delivery partners, and other organisations to design and construct the Olympic Park, venues, and infrastructure, the facilities at Weymouth and Portland, and Broxbourne, and to provide the transport infrastructure associated with the Olympic Park. The ODA’s delivery partner will assist the ODA in managing the design and construction programme and delivery of the Olympic Park and venues. The ODA also works with additional transport delivery partners in the delivery of its transport programme, including Network Rail and Transport for London. Working in partnership As the body responsible for the design and construction of the Olympic Park and venues, and associated infrastructure, the ODA has a key role to play in delivering disability equality outcomes associated with the Games. However, it cannot deliver those outcomes alone. The organisations listed below are key organisations which the ODA is working in partnership with to deliver its disability equality aims. These organisations are integral to delivering the Games and the wider benefits associated with the Games and also have their own equalities related activities: - the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games are responsible for the staging, planning and hosting of the Games, including the overlay of signage and communications that will be required for the Games, which will by key to ensuring an inclusive experience for disabled spectators; - the Greater London Authority is responsible for maximising the economic, social, health and environmental benefits the Games bring to London and all Londoners; - the Department for Culture, Media and Sport is responsible for maximising the economic, social, health and environmental benefits the Games bring the UK; - the London Development Agency is leading the land acquisition activity on the Olympic Park; is funding a package of employment, training and business support in the five Host Boroughs 2 surrounding the Olympic Park through the Local Employment and Training Framework; and is leading on the development programme arising from the Games on employment, skills and business; - the five Host Boroughs, as representatives of local people, communities, business and knowledge are partners in running local labour and business schemes and ensuring these are accessible to disabled people; - Transport for London and other transport delivery agencies such as Network Rail, Highways Agency and BAA are responsible for delivery of necessary transport improvements, including ensuring frontline staff understand disabled people’s needs;
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Greenwich, Hackney, Newham, Tower Hamlets, Waltham Forest

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- many agencies are involved in employment, skills, and business support initiatives – including the Learning and Skills Council, Jobcentre Plus, ConstructionSkills and other sector skills councils; - organisations representing employers and employees: the Confederation of British Industry, Trades Union Congress and key unions, and construction industry bodies such as the Strategic Forum for Construction; - private sector organisations and businesses across the UK are working with the ODA through contracts or other commercial arrangements; - the voluntary and community sector, including local and national organisations of disabled people, are providing expert advice and services. The ODA’s programme The ODA’s programme falls into four distinct phases: - to summer 2008: ‘demolish, dig, design’, when the site is being cleared and prepared for development and the designs are being agreed for venues and infrastructure to summer 2008; - to summer 2011: ‘the big build’, when the construction of venues and infrastructure will take place; - to July 2012: a series of ‘test events’ that have to be staged at the completed venues before the Games; - to 2013: the ‘legacy conversion’ when the venues and sites will be prepared for their long term use. Duty to promote disability equality The ODA’s statutory duties to promote disability equality arise from the Disability Discrimination Act 2005. Since December 2006 the ODA has had a general duty to give due regard, in carrying out its functions to the need to: - promote equality of opportunity between disabled persons and other persons; - eliminate discrimination that is unlawful under the Act; - eliminate harassment of disabled persons that is related to their disabilities. Promote positive attitudes towards disabled persons; - encourage participation by disabled persons in public life; and - take steps to take account of disabled persons’ disabilities, even where that involves treating disabled persons more favourably than other persons. The weight which the ODA gives to disability equality should be proportionate to its relevance to a particular function or project. The ODA has considered the extent to which disability equality is relevant to its functions and determined its disability equality objectives accordingly.

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The duty applies equally to functions which the ODA carries out itself, and those functions which it contracts out to other bodies. The ODA requires all its contractors to take appropriate action to promote disability equality. The ODA has a specific duty to publish a Disability Equality Scheme (DES), developed with the involvement of disabled people, by 3 December 2007. The DES must show: - steps the ODA intends to take to meet the general duty; - the ways in which disabled people have been involved in the development of the DES; - how the ODA has, and will, assess the impact of its functions on disability equality; and - how the ODA will gather and use information on disabled people in relation to employment and its functions. The ODA must publish annually a report which summarises the steps taken to implement the DES, the results of, and use made of, disability equality monitoring. Within three years of publishing this DES, the ODA must: - take the steps set out in the action plan; - put into effect its arrangements for disability equality monitoring; and - review this DES and publish a revised scheme.

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Context – the situation of disabled people

Meaning of disability 3 The ODA uses the terms ‘disability’ and ‘disabled people’ as they are defined in law by the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). The Act sets out the circumstances in which a person is ‘disabled’. It considers a person disabled if they have a mental or physical impairment that has a substantial long-term adverse effect on their ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities. This includes people with physical, sensory and mental impairments. It also includes many long-term health conditions from the moment the condition has some effect on a person’s ability to carry out such activities, and covers people who have cancer, HIV and multiple sclerosis from the point of diagnosis. The DDA protects a wide spectrum of people from discrimination around one in five of the population. The term ‘disabled people’ is useful both as a term of convenience, and to show understanding that disabled people are ‘disabled by society’ and the barriers it erects. But many people who are protected by the DDA do not describe themselves as disabled. Half of the people with rights under the DDA do not describe themselves as ‘disabled people’. Many people see themselves not as a ‘disabled person’ but as having a particular condition (such as depression, cancer or a hearing impairment). Research 4 found that when informed that they were ‘disabled’, many of those who did not identify themselves in this way reacted by feeling angry, patronised or upset. Disabled people, like all people, have composite identities, based on their gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, age, religion, marital and parental status, social class, income, the country or region in which they were born, and their job or profession. When the term ‘disabled people’ is used with employers, they generally think only in terms of people with physical or sensory impairments. This means that the ODA must take action to increase understanding of disability, and promote positive attitudes toward disabled people with its designers and construction contractors and among disabled people themselves. Disabled people in the population According to the Disability Rights Commission, about one in five (20 per cent) of people in the total population are disabled people 5 . This is a key

This section is based upon Creating an Alternative Future: the Disability Agenda published by the Disability Rights Commission in February 2007 4 Disability Rights Commission (2004) Who do they think they are?
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3

Estimates of numbers of disabled people vary according to the questions used to define disability in surveys. The ODA has followed the advice of the Department of Work and Pensions in relation to the figures used in this DES (DWP User’s Guide to Disability Estimates and Definitions).

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issue to be considered by the ODA in designing venues and planning for transport for spectators. Of all people in Britain without any formal qualifications, over one-third are disabled. There are more disabled adults of working age living in relative poverty now than ten years ago, suggesting that disabled people have not shared fully in the benefits of a sustained period of economic growth. Of all children living in poverty, one in three has at least one disabled parent 6 . The age structure of the Five Boroughs is relatively young, with 56 per cent of the population aged less than 35 years, compared to 44 per cent in Great Britain. Just 10 per cent of the population are aged over 65 in the Five Boroughs, compared to 16 per cent in Great Britain. 7 Yet despite that younger age structure (which would suggest there would be fewer disabled people), there are slightly more disabled people in the working age population of the five Host Boroughs (18.7 per cent) than in the UK (18.6 per cent) and in London (16.5 per cent) 8 . Disabled people and employment Disabled people form a significant part of the working age population in the UK – 18.6 per cent 9 . There are over 2.6 million working age disabled people in employment, and evidence suggests that of the 3 million not in employment around 1 million would like to work. 10 Of all people out of work, 40 per cent have a disability or long term health condition. 11 The overall employment rate of disabled people has grown by about one per cent per year, from 43 per cent in 1998 to 50 per cent in 2006. Despite this, inequalities in the proportions of disabled and non-disabled people in work persist. Only half of disabled people are in work, compared with over 80 per cent of the non-disabled population. Even when working, disabled people tend to earn less than nondisabled people, on average earning 10 per cent less. 12 The employment rate among disabled people in the Five Boroughs is considerably lower, at 33.7 per cent, than the national rate of 50 per

Monitoring poverty and social exclusion in the UK Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2005 7 Midyear population estimates 2006 ONS 8 Annual population survey 2006 9 Annual Population Survey 2006 10 Improving the life chances of disabled people: first annual report from the Office for Disability Issues 2006 11 Celebrating the Journey: Impact Report 2000 – 2007 Disability Rights Commission 2007 12 Creating an Alternative Future: the Disability Agenda Disability Rights Commission 2007

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cent 13 . The employment rate among disabled people in London is slightly lower at 45.7 per cent. The ODA is committed, in working with its partners on employment and skills and the local labour scheme to taking a proactive approach to disability equality. Employment rates vary between impairment groups. The employment rate of people with mental health problems has risen at a faster rate but remains very low. It rose from 15 per cent in 1998 to just 20 per cent in 2005 – despite evidence that with support, 60 per cent of people with more serious mental health problems could work. One in five deaf people are unemployed and looking for work, compared to one in twenty of the UK population. 14 The ODA will, in working with its partners on employment outreach, take into account the specific barriers facing different impairment groups, while also taking a broad social model approach. Disabled people in construction According to the Labour Force Survey 15 it appears that some 13 per cent of construction industry employees in the UK are disabled people, compared to 10 per cent in London. The proportion of disabled people is slightly higher in manual construction jobs: 13.6 per cent in the UK, 11.2 per cent in London. In comparison, disabled people represent lower proportions in non-manual construction jobs: 11.7 per cent in the UK, 10.6 per cent in London. Beyond the Labour Force Survey data, data is sparse on the representation of disabled people in construction professions or companies. It is notable that there are only two construction companies among the 404 members of the Employers Forum on Disability. Disabled people in business The ODA undertook an equality impact assessment of its procurement function in 2007, and commissioned research into the characteristics of businesses owned by disabled people. This revealed that there is little available data at national or local levels on businesses owned by disabled people. Estimates range from 0.5 to 2 per cent of businesses having a majority of owners that are disabled 16 . There are 10,681 businesses in London (3.6 per cent) with one or more disabled owners, employing 78,265
Annual population survey 2006 Opportunity Blocked: the employment experiences of deaf and hard of hearing people RNID 2006 15 Source: Labour Force Survey Four quarter average Summer 2005 to Spring 2006 16 Access to innovation for disabled entrepreneurs, London Development Agency 2006
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people. These businesses are more likely to employ less than five people than the average for all London businesses. In London, self-employment is seen as a particularly good option for disabled entrepreneurs in that it allows flexible hours and working patterns, with the workplace often based in the familiar environment of home. In London there are 2 per cent more disabled people in selfemployment than non-disabled people.

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Equality and Diversity Strategy

In developing its Equality and Diversity Strategy the ODA undertook a high level assessment of its purpose and functions in order to decide where it could have the greatest impact in promoting disability equality. The ODA’s direct impact on disability equality will be felt in four ways: - What is created: the extent to which the venues and facilities created and the transport provided are accessible to disabled people, both for the Games and legacy. - How it is created: the extent to which the processes by which those facilities, venues and transport are created are barrier free. - Who does the work: The extent to which disabled people are represented among the people and businesses taking up business and employment opportunities on Games projects. - Whom the ODA involves: the extent to which the ODA listens to and involves disabled people in deciding what it does, how it does it and determining the design of what it creates. The ODA intends to also have an indirect impact on disability equality by demonstrating to others: - effective practical steps which can be taken to promote disability equality in construction; - the level of excellence which can be achieved through inclusive design. The ODA aims to deliver highly inclusive built environments and facilities for disabled people, older people and families with children which will act as an inspiration to others, and will be used as a benchmark by others. The ODA also aims to set a new benchmark for disability equality and diversity practice in construction which will create its own legacy. The ODA’s Equality and Diversity Strategy describe how this impact will be achieved across five strands. The aims, outcomes and disability equality objectives of each strand are described below. The ODA chose the aims and outcomes for each strand deliberately, bearing in mind its statutory duties to promote equality. The ODA believes they represent what the organisation can delivery on, given its particular role in delivering the 2012 Games and particular momentum which the immovable deadline of July 2012 creates. Each strand of the strategy is interlinked. The actions taken in relation to integration and capacity-building will enable the ODA to continually increase its effectiveness in delivering on the other strands. Engaging with disabled people will be essential in delivering its disability objectives in relation to inclusive design, employment and business opportunities.

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Inclusive design

Disabled people will use the venues, facilities, park and transport provided by the ODA as both athletes, spectators, employees and users of legacy facilities. Ensuring full accessibility of venues, and an accessible transport network is key to this DES.

Inclusive design Aim Create and build an Olympic Park, venues and facilities (both for the Games and for the legacy provision) which are inclusive for women and men of all cultures, faiths and ages and fully accessible to disabled people with a wide range of impairments, and provide an accessible transport network. Outcome Highly inclusive built environment and facilities, and an accessible transport network, for the Games and legacy provision.

Disability Equality Objectives Built Environment 1.1 Ensure all projects are designed according to the principles of inclusive design, and comply with the ODA’s inclusive design standards. 1.2 Finalise and implement the ODA’s Access Strategy 1.3 Ensure effective involvement of disabled people in the design of venues 1.4 Develop Access Statements for each venue. 1.5 Work with London Development Agency to ensure a full equality impact assessment is undertaken of the Legacy Masterplan Framework Accessible Transport Network 1.6 Develop, publish and implement an Accessible Transport Strategy for the Games 1.7 Develop the operating plan for the GamesMobility Service 1.8 Continue effective involvement of disabled people in the development of plans for accessible transport

Built Environment : what has been achieved so far? - Principles of inclusive design have been integrated into all project briefs.

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- Information about the needs and experience of disabled athletes is reflected in the venue requirements specified by LOCOG - following input from the British Paralympic Association (BPA) at many functional workshops. - A Design and Access Statement was submitted as part of the Planning Application in January 2007. This will underpin the design of all Games venues. - A Principal Access Officers is in post for the built environment. - Inclusive design standards have been drawn up, after consultation with disabled people and other members of the public; a process of compliance reporting is being piloted and the Principal Access Officer carries out a review of the access requirements at each key design and building stage. - A Built Environment Access Panel has been established to provide specialist disability and inclusive design experts to advise at appropriate stages of design and development. Members of the panel include access specialists and disabled people. - An Access and Inclusion Forum has been established with representation from a lead disability organisation within each of the Five Boroughs, as well as Borough Access Officers and key external stakeholders. It advises, comments on and influences areas of inclusive design through sharing of knowledge and experience. The Forum covers access issues related to both the built environment and transport. - A draft Access Strategy is being drawn up outlining the ODA’s aspirations for setting new standards; the value of inclusive design; key responsibilities within the ODA and its stakeholders and delivery partners; the methodology for involving the Built Environment Access Panel and the Access and Inclusion Forum. Accessible transport network: what has been achieved so far? - The ODA consulted widely and involved disabled people when drawing up the Transport Plan for the Games - The Transport Plan outlines the ODA’s aim to deliver both the Olympic and Paralympic Games with one transport strategy to serve the needs of all client groups and to minimise any transitional requirements between the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games. - The Transport Plan includes accessible transport objectives and the ODA’s commitment to: - ensuring venues and transport interfaces are accessible to all athletes, spectators, journalists and workforce; - working with all relevant stakeholders to deliver high quality accessible transport to all venues; - providing a range of accessible transport options which keeps distances between transport drop off and venue to a minimum;

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- provision of parking facilities for disabled people’s vehicles; - training staff and volunteers to respect and understand the needs and expectations of disabled people; - provision of a Games Mobility service throughout the Games; - provision of a real time travel and information function that will be tailored to the needs of its customers; and - provision of a legacy transport portfolio that will improve overall access. - A Principal Access and Inclusion Officer for Transport are in post. - A Transport Access Panel has been established. The specific involvement of disabled people that helped create the Transport Plan will continue through this Panel which includes groups such as the Disabled Persons’ Transport Advisory Panel. So far the Panel has considered the Accessible Transport Strategy, transport access to the Olympic Park, signage and way-finding, and door-to-door services. Built Environment: future plans - The inclusive design standards will be finalised and the assurance process for those standards will be continued, after learning and improvement from the current pilot stage. - The ODA Access Strategy will be finalised after consultation, published and implemented. - A review of the functioning of the Built Environment Access Panel and Access and Inclusion Forum will be undertaken to ensure optimum effectiveness, including the composition of the groups, their terms of reference and their programme of work. - The ODA’s Code of Consultation will be published, with disability equality an integral part of it, and there will be engagement with local disabled people to communicate the plans for the Games and the legacy of the Olympic Park. A process of community mapping, including disabled people’s groups, will be undertaken in order to continually improve the effectiveness of engagement. - Access Statements will be developed for each venue, whether permanent of temporary. The Statement will be reviewed at the completion of each building stage and used for licensing and building control approval and will specify the emergency evacuation strategy for the venue. - The ODA will work with the London Development Agency to ensure that the equality impact of the Legacy Masterplan Framework is assessed. Accessible Transport Network: future plans - An Accessible Transport Strategy is being drawn up, will be consulted upon, published and implemented. The Strategy will for the first time

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set out a vision of an Accessible Transport Network for the Games, and will include plans for: - more detailed research to assess the needs of disabled people and their demand for travel at Games time and in legacy mode, to inform decisions on the capacity of public transport to Games venues; - working with transport delivery partners such as Transport for London, London Underground Ltd, Network Rail, over 20 train operating companies and other specialist transport providers to provide accessible and easy to read transport information and promote staff training on access; - the Games Mobility Service - pictorial signage to convey information in a universally recognisable way all around the public transport network; - transport guides being available in a variety of languages and accessible formats.

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Employment Opportunities

The ODA believes it can make a positive impact on equality and diversity employment practices, and on combating workplace discrimination, within the construction industry.

Employment opportunities

Aims Ensure that all the processes used to recruit and manage employees working to build the venues, infrastructure and transport (including employees working within the supply chain) are demonstrably fair, make reasonable adjustments where necessary and offer equal opportunities to all. Work with partner organisations to encourage women, BAME and disabled people to train and apply for jobs in construction and allied areas where they have traditionally been underrepresented, and to combat workplace discrimination. Model good practice in equality and diversity as an employer itself.

Outcomes Demonstrably fair recruitment processes operating at all levels of the supply chain. Fair proportion of Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) and disabled people employed in building the Olympic Park infrastructure, venues, and transport. Visible contribution to tackling occupational gender segregation in construction and allied areas. Movement in the ODA toward a workforce representative of London

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Disability Equality Objectives 2.1 Explore ways of further involving disabled employees in construction, their representatives and/or disability organisations in the development of this strand of the strategy. 2.2 Support the London Development Agency and other partners in undertaking a disability equality review of the local labour scheme. 2.3 Support the London Development Agency and ConstructionSkills to develop and implement a plan to support more disabled people to work in construction. 2.4 Continue working to establish an effective equality assurance process for contractors throughout the supply chain, which includes explicit reference to the provision of reasonable adjustments and the elimination of harassment against disabled employees. 2.5 Continue working to better understand the complexities of disability monitoring in construction and to establish effective disability monitoring in respect of workforce, trainees and recruitment process used by contractors throughout the supply chain. 2.6 Establish a framework and mechanisms for supporting and encouraging contractors to promote disability equality. 2.7 Establish an equality award scheme for contractors which includes explicit criteria relevant to disability equality. 2.8 Develop and publish equality targets for increased representation of disabled people in the overall ODA programme workforce. 2.9 Continue to promote disability equality in employment across the wider industry through the ODA’s procurement process. Disability equality objectives for the ODA and Delivery Partner as employers themselves are contained in section 9

What has been achieved so far? - All companies seeking contracts with the ODA are encouraged to address equal opportunities issues such as the provision of reasonable adjustments and action to combat workplace harassment. Equality and diversity forms one element of the ODA’s evaluation in assessing companies at the pre-qualification and tendering stages of its procurement process. - Contractors are contractually required to collaborate in actively promoting disability equality and required to operate in accordance with all legislation on equality in employment. Contractors must also demonstrate practical implementation of the disability equality duty through: - the development of an equality action plan, with suitably qualified and experienced personnel to oversee it;

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- the operation of effective policies and procedures in relation to equal opportunities, recruitment, workplace harassment, reasonable adjustments and flexible working; - the operation of effective equality monitoring, including disability monitoring; - the development and implementation of diversity training plans. - The process of introducing disability monitoring of employment throughout the supply chain has begun; results to date are detailed in below. - A local labour scheme has been established in conjunction with partners. - Disabled people and their organisations have been involved in identifying barriers faced by disabled people working in construction, or wanting to do so. Issues to consider in further developing the employment opportunities strand The complexities and risks of operating effective disability monitoring are widely recognised – see section 9 for more on this. There is a significant gap between the Labour Force Survey figures on disabled people in construction (13 per cent) and the level of people within the ODA programme workforce who had declared a disability as at end September 2007 (0.7 per cent of 1,996 workers included in the equality monitoring system). This needs further exploration and understanding. The views of disabled people and disability organisations captured in involvement meetings on the Employment and Business Opportunities Strands. Key points raised by disabled people are shown in Annex A. Much of what was said has directly influenced the disability equality objectives of this DES. However, the involvement highlighted the importance of actions being taken by a far wider range of organisations than simply the ODA if disabled people are to benefit equally from the job opportunities arising from the Games. The ODA will, therefore, seek to work with, and influence a wide range of partners, through bodies like the London 2012 Equality and Diversity Forum. Success is likely to require a strategic approach that considers the disabled individual, intermediary organisations and the eventual employer. The strategy may include providing training for local work support organisations, planning an employment positive outreach programme, linking with colleges and universities that provide construction courses, construction skills, the relevant Trade Unions and more.

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Future plans - Ways of involving disabled people actually working in construction will be explored, in conjunction with contractors and the trades unions. - Given that 40 per cent of people out of work are disabled, and that one in five of the population of working age in the Five Boroughs is disabled, it will be essential that every aspect of the local labour scheme is accessible and inclusive for disabled people. The ODA will, therefore, work with the LDA and other partners to review the scheme from this perspective. - The ODA will also work with the LDA and other partners to develop further programmes and initiatives to support disabled people to work in construction. - The ODA will continue its work to establish effective support and assurance processes for disability equality in employment across the supply chain. Potential joint initiatives are being explored with the Employers Forum on Disability. - Work will be undertaken to better understand how contractors have introduced disability monitoring to date, and to support them to ensure it is effective. The equality monitoring system will be further developed to encompass the recruitment process, and will be extended to additional suppliers. Equality targets for increased disabled people’s representation will be developed.

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Business opportunities

The ODA wants contracts for the Games to be as open as possible for many different types of companies, including companies owned by disabled people and organisations run by disabled people.

Business opportunities

Aim Ensure that the procurement of all work, goods and services arising from the Olympic Delivery Authority's programme is transparent, fair and open to diverse suppliers, including businesses owned by BAME people, women and disabled people.

Outcomes Demonstrably fair tendering and contract award processes. Businesses owned by BAME, women, and disabled people operating in the supply chain.

Disability equality objectives 3.1 Conduct an access review of BRAVO (the ODA’s electronic procurement system); implement any changes within ODA’s control; make recommendations for other changes to the Office for Government Commerce. 3.2 Further review the criteria used for qualification in relation to smaller, corporate contracts with a view to removing unnecessary barriers to small and micro businesses. 3.3 Further develop disability equality monitoring of the procurement system and ownership of companies in the supply chain. 3.4 Implement an outreach programme targeted at businesses owned by disabled people. 3.5 Support the London Development Agency in improving the accessibility of CompeteFor.

What has been achieved so far? - An equality impact assessment of the procurement function has been undertaken. This included research to establish what was known about the characteristics of businesses owned by disabled people; a review of the criteria used at pre-qualification stage; a review of the methods used to communicate contracting opportunities. - An e-alert system has been established for ODA contracts above the value of £25,000. Any company can register for regular notification of contract opportunities at www.london2012.com/get-involved/businesscentre/business-e-alerts.php

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- Two surveys of businesses in the ODA’s direct supply chain have been undertaken to establish their size, location and whether or not they are owned (51 per cent of more) by disabled people, women or Black, Asian and minority ethnic people. The response rate was around 25 per cent of businesses. Of the 94 businesses that responded, one company was majority-owned by a disabled person. - Monitoring of the ownership of businesses has been introduced at the stages of registration, pre-qualification, tender and award for most ODA contracts, although more work is needed to analyse and report on this information. - The London Development Agency and other regional development agencies have developed and are now piloting an electronic brokerage system (CompeteFor) to link buyers with a diverse range of suppliers. The ODA will use CompeteFor to advertise contracts (apart from those subject to the requirements of the Official Journal of the European Union, most worth less than £25,000, and those where framework, or call-off, contracts already exist) and will encourage all its main contractors to use CompeteFor for sub-contracting opportunities on the ODA programme. An equality impact assessment has been carried out on CompeteFor by the LDA. Issues to consider in developing the business opportunities strand The ODA is heavily reliant upon electronic systems, both for advertising contracting opportunities through the e-alert system and CompeteFor, and for its actual procurement process. The ODA uses the BRAVO electronic tendering system for most of its direct contracts, including some valued at less than £25,000. BRAVO was procured by the Office for Government Commerce and is used by a range of public bodies including the Home Office, the Prison Service and parts of the NHS. The ODA recognises that reliance upon e-tendering and e-alerts can present barriers of access for some disabled people, and some smaller businesses. The ODA also recognises that many businesses owned by disabled people are likely to be small, or micro businesses, and that the processes and requirements it uses for larger contracts can create insurmountable barriers for such businesses if applied rigidly to low value contracts of below £25,000. This is the case, for example, in respect of a pre-qualification requirement based on annual turnover. In preparing this DES and further reviewing its procurement requirements, the ODA has recognised the need to consider how it can embed more flexibility into the procurement process. Involvement with disabled people in the preparation of this DES highlighted a number of barriers faced by businesses owned by disabled people in finding out about contracting opportunities, particularly smaller contracts. See Annex 1 for a full summary of points raised during involvement. The ODA recognises that it needs to do more to think about

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disabled entrepreneurs in its programme of outreach to minority-owned businesses, and to work with the London Development Agency to ensure that CompeteFor is fully accessible and open to businesses owned by disabled people. Future plans - a review of the BRAVO system has been commissioned, which will identify any accessibility barriers. The ODA will make changes within its control and pass other recommendations to the Office for Government Commerce as the sponsor of the system. - a further review of the approach to low value contracts will be undertaken to ensure unnecessary barriers are removed; - disability monitoring of the procurement process and supply chain will be fully implemented with effective analysis and reporting of the data; - an outreach programme targeted at businesses owned by disabled people will be developed and implemented; - the ODA will support the London Development Agency in improving the accessibility of CompeteFor.

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Targeted community engagement

The ODA understands that accessible information and communications are central to including disabled people when engaging with communities.

Targeted community engagement

Aim Engage with and involve diverse groups within the local communities.

Outcome A sense of ownership of the design and construction of the Olympic Park and venues across all communities, which specifically includes BAME and different faith communities, women, disabled people, younger and older people, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people.

Disability equality objectives 4.1 Ensure all engagement activities and events are fully accessible to disabled people, through active implementation of the Code of Consultation, which will embed disability equality. 4.2 Continuously improve the accessibility of the london2012.com website. 4.3 Improve communications with disabled people through improved policy and process for providing publications in accessible formats. 4.4 Continue involvement of disabled people through the Access Panels, Access and Inclusion Forum 4.5 Develop new ways of involving disabled people working in construction and businesses owned and run by disabled people.

What has been achieved so far? - a draft Code of Consultation has been developed, and is under consultation, which embeds disability equality considerations; a community mapping exercise is underway, which will increase the number of local disability organisations on the ODA’s stakeholder database;

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- the Website Content Accessibility Guidelines are being used to assess how well disabled people are able to use the london2012.com website. The website incorporates many access features, such as: - links are provided so that users can download software that will read the site aloud; - video clips have sub-titles and audio-description or transcripts; and - an accessibility help feature is available www.london2012.com/help-advice/index.php. - A policy on information accessibility for publications sets out the accessible formats that will be provided and contact details for obtaining such. The importance of simple English is highlighted. However, so far, too few requests for documents in accessible formats have been received to discern any trend. Future plans - The Code of Consultation will require engagement with disability organisations, and will set out the steps which must be taken to ensure accessibility of all events; the community mapping exercise currently underway will ensure the ODA is able to consistently communicate and engage with local disability organisations; - LOCOG has lead responsibility for the joint website and has agreed the objective of improving its accessibility even further. In the coming months, the site will be tested with accessibility experts, disabled people and their organisations, plus other user feedback. Necessary changes will be made and other accessibility features such as glossaries will be included. Issue of a new standard on website accessibility by the World Wide Web Consortium is expected within the next 12 months. It will take account of the large numbers of technical developments that have arisen since 1999 when the standard was first introduced. LOCOG intends to achieve and, where possible, exceed the new standard within a year of its issue; - the ODA has set an objective of increasing the take-up of information in accessible formats. A key step is the current review of the process for providing accessible documents, which will include: - mandatory consideration of formats needed; - specifications in the respective design brief; and - consistent notices to readers about the formats available and how to obtain them; - a range of involvement activities specifically targeting disabled people and disability organisations are set out under the relevant strands of this DES; further ways of involving disabled people actually working in construction and disabled entrepreneurs will be explored.

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Integration and capability building

The ODA recognises that creating positive attitudes towards disabled people and increasing understanding of their needs will assist to fulfil both the Equality and Diversity Strategy and disability equality duty. This strand of the DES is a vital enabler toward delivering on the other strands.

Integration and capability building

Aim Build the ODA’s own organisational capacity in equality and diversity and develop the equality competence of its direct employees. Integrate equality and diversity into the ODA’s business processes.

Outcomes Increased organisational capacity and individual competence in equality. Equality integrated into business processes.

Disability equality objectives 5.1 Ensure all HR policies and procedures present no barriers to disabled employees and applicants 5.2 Ensure the process for providing reasonable adjustments to applicants, employees and contractors operates effectively 5.3 Promote positive staff attitudes towards disability 5.4 Increase the proportion of disabled people employed 5.5 Increase the competence in disability equality of staff working in design, procurement and communications 5.6 Continue to involve disabled staff in developing the disability equality programme.

What has been achieved so far? - A suite of HR policies and procedures has been developed; - Job vacancies are advertised in the disability media; - Candidates are offered a range of contact methods, including minicom; - Training in equality and diversity has been provided to senior management, and is now being commissioned in general equality and diversity awareness for all staff; accessible communications for communications staff; equality in procurement for procurement staff; inclusive design and the social model of disability for design staff.

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Issues to consider in developing the Integration and Capability Strand - It is recognised that further refinement of the ODA’s recruitment process and effective compliance are needed to ensure that it is consistent in providing equality of opportunity for disabled people. The issues identified by disabled people in relation to employer attitudes (see Annex 1) can be equally applicable to the ODA. - The ODA recognises that its HR policies and procedures, especially those relating to discrimination and harassment, can have high relevance for disabled people and significant impact if not effective. - Equality of opportunity during recruitment can be undermined if disabled people are recruited but then face barriers in the workplace. Although the ODA has a policy and procedure on providing reasonable adjustments, this process needs to be kept under review in the light of actual experience to ensure it is effective. - The ODA needs to develop the internal culture that equips all its people with positive attitudes towards both diversity amongst colleagues and eventual users of the Games facilities. During involvement, the need for focus on disability training was highlighted: many staff come from construction backgrounds in which the culture can be dismissive of disabled people. Staff need better understanding that the Games facilities will be used by a significant proportion of people with disabilities and that their voices need to be heard during design and construction activities. - Staff working in certain key areas need specialist training in aspects of equality and diversity to equip them to carry out their duties. Key groups identified to date include: HR, IT and facilities staff in relation to recruitment and provision of reasonable adjustments; communications staff; procurement staff; design teams. Future plans - Disability equality impact assessments will be carried out on all HR policies and procedures, including recruitment. Following review, the revised policies will be re-published. Further refinement and development is expected to evolve during subsequent years; - training will be provided to all staff in equality awareness, including disability equality; specialist job-related equality training will be provided to staff in HR, communications, procurement and design; - regular reviews of the reasonable adjustment process will form the structure to fulfil the further objective of on-going involvement of disabled staff. This programme will also cover monitoring progress of the other relevant objectives in the Action Plan plus contribution to the next DES due in 2010; - the annual staff attitude surveys will include questions about equality, diversity and disability. Each survey will be followed up by analysis of the results and action to resolve any problem areas.

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Monitoring disability equality

The ODA’s performance management system is under development, and an interim system for monitoring disability equality in employment is in operation. The key performance measures for this DES have been agreed as: - Outcome of access testing at various stages of construction, and during the test year 2011 – 2012. - Levels of satisfaction with the built environment and transport facilities among different groups of disabled people. - Representation of disabled people 17 at different levels and in different types of job, including among trainees and those on work experience. This will be measured within the programme workforce as a whole, and for individual contractors. Once contractors have agreed equality action plans in place, targets for increased representation of disabled people will be agreed. These targets will be the anticipated outcome of action to promote disability equality. - The proportion of disabled people among those applying for, being short-listed for and being appointed for jobs. This will allow the identification of any adverse impact of recruitment processes over time. - Representation of businesses owned by disabled people in the supply chain. - The proportion of businesses owned by disabled people at stages of registration, pre-qualification, tender submission and award in the procurement process. The ODA’s main contractors are required to collect this information and to require it of their next tier of sub-contractors. At subsequent tiers of sub-contracting the main contractors are required to use their best endeavours to collect the information. The ODA recognises that introducing disability monitoring into an industry which has little or no previous track record in disability equality poses some particular challenges: - Low levels of self-declaration are to be anticipated, particularly in the beginning stages, when little visible action has been taken to eliminate discrimination and harassment against disabled people. - Some people may not understand the wide definition of disability, some may see risk rather than benefit in making the declaration and some may not wish to consider themselves as disabled people. - There is also a risk that contractors will not comply with the ODA’s policy of self-declaration, and will make management categorisations. The very high level of data held on employees’ disability status (93 per cent) in the first analysis of disability workforce data at end September

The disability data will be held alongside data on ethnic origin, gender and area of residence, so it will be possible to track progress of, for example, disabled women, African-Caribbean disabled people, or disabled people living in the Five Boroughs.

17

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2007 indicates a high probability that this may be the case. Contractors may have felt pressurised to make returns while not having been supported to understand the wider context of equality monitoring. Work will be undertaken with contractors as part of the equality assurance and support process to investigate this further, and rectify it should problems be confirmed. - During involvement meetings, disabled people indicated that some business owners may be reluctant to declare their disability unless re-assured that it will not influence contract decisions. The information from monitoring will be analysed and reported on a quarterly basis to the Equality and Diversity Board, as well as being disseminated to contractors, internal and external stakeholders and published.

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Involvement

The ODA appreciates that involvement of disabled people is more than consultation. It is a long term exchange of opinions and ideas that enables disabled people to influence and change the thinking and decision-making of the ODA. Throughout this Scheme and its supporting Action Plan, there are many areas where the ODA will involve disabled people in the future. The methods of involvement will progressively evolve and strengthen so that the ODA and disabled people work as partners. Involvement activities so far have helped in developing associated policies and processes including funding participants’ travel and time, finding accessible venues, providing accessible information and extending a network of contacts. The ODA has tried to include relevant members of staff so that they hear first hand from disabled people and increase their level of understanding and knowledge. Those staff members were provided with information about inclusive events, accessible communications and disability etiquette. Examples of involvement so far include: - A range of national disability organisations were involved in the development of the Equality and Diversity Strategy and its five priority strands. - In relation to Inclusive design, disabled people have already been involved in the two Access Panels and the Access and Inclusion Forum as described above. - A group of the ODA team managers attended the GLA “Disability Capital” event in October 2007. This was an ideal opportunity to learn direct from over 700 disabled people and representatives of their organisations. The event was also used to undertake dynamic research into individuals’ travel patterns. This information will contribute to planning accessible public transport for the Games. - The ODA has held its first involvement meetings attended by both national disability organisations, including members of the BCODP, and disabled individuals. The purpose was to understand the barriers that disabled people can face when: - pursuing a career in the construction industry; and - seeking contract opportunities as a business owner. - The discussions were highly constructive and have helped in creating this DES: - Two involvement events were arranged for disabled people on the staff of the ODA and CLM. Discussions were centred on recruitment and provision of reasonable adjustments. Again, the involvement provided insight in to a range of issues and specific examples of typical barriers. The Disability Equality Objectives of each of the five strands of this DES include objectives for ongoing involvement of disabled people in the implementation of this DES.

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Disability equality impact assessments

In developing its overarching Equality and Diversity Strategy, the ODA undertook a high level assessment of its purpose and functions in order to decide where it can make the greatest impact in promoting disability equality. The result of that assessment is reflected in the five strands of the Equality and Diversity Strategy and this DES. The ODA has incorporated equality impact assessment into the process of developing business cases for its major projects. The ODA’s purpose in conducting an equality impact assessment is two-fold: - to identify any possible unintended adverse disability impact and the actions required to eliminate this; and - to identify those areas where the ODA can actively promote disability equality and the actions required to achieve this. Project sponsors are responsible for undertaking equality impact assessments of their projects with the support of the Principal Access Officer and specialist help from the Equality and Inclusion team. Typical examples include: - For the Aquatics Centre, the initial review identified a number of areas that had equality impact. The Design team, supported by the Principal Access Officer, investigated further with the assistance of monthly meetings of the Built Environment Access Panel. A number of changes and recommendations were then included in the design. - A similar process is being used to assess the system that simulates spectator journeys through the Olympic Park. It will be used to develop “way-finding” support in key locations for all spectators including disabled people. The procurement function was identified as top priority for equality impact assessment and a full assessment has been undertaken. The outcome of that assessment is reflected in the objectives of this DES. As part of preparing the DES, three function areas were considered in: - Communications: accessible documents, website and community engagement; - Human Resources: recruitment and provision of reasonable adjustments; - Procurement: a further review of the reliance on e-tendering and barriers likely to be faced by SMEs was undertaken. The Disability Equality Objectives (see sections above) and the Action Plan outline what is now happening in each of these areas and what needs to be done. A further programme of equality impact assessments of other functions will be developed, once the full Equality and Inclusion team is in place early in 2008. One area which has already been identified is the move of the majority of staff to the construction site within the next few years. This will require a full disability equality impact assessment covering accessibility, transport and provision of reasonable adjustments. A sponsor and programme for this work will be identified.

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Delivery arrangements

The Chairman and Chief Executive have taken personal responsibility for delivering the disability equality objectives. A member of the ODA Board acts as champion for equality and diversity. An Equality and Diversity Board, chaired by the Chief Executive, meets quarterly. Its membership includes all the Directors with accountability for the five strands of this DES, as well as the Board Champion, the Chief Programme Officer of the Delivery Partner and the Head of Equality and Inclusion The Action Plan at Annex 2 sets out the objectives and key milestones of the DES. These will be incorporated into the overall Equality and Inclusion milestone plan, progress against which is reported quarterly to the Equality and Diversity Board. The Action Plan reflects the priorities for impact assessments and change that have already been identified with the help of disabled people so far. But more priorities may emerge and these will also be added to the Plan although not all may be completed within the life of this DES. During the period December 2007 to December 2010, the ODA will, as far as is reasonable and practicable: - achieve all the outcomes set out in the Action Plan; - implement the ODA arrangements for gathering and using information; - involve disabled people in monitoring the progress of the Action Plan for annual reports; and - involve disabled people in the preparation of the next DES. If any of these activities appear unreasonable or impracticable, the ODA will investigate and implement alternative means of promoting equality of opportunity, where possible, and record such.

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Annex A

Summary of points made by disabled people and disability organisations during involvement meetings on the Employment and Business Opportunities Strands of the DES Employment Opportunities During involvement meetings, disabled people commented: - The biggest barrier to work is the attitude of any employer, whether or not in the construction industry. Employers can have stereotypical perceptions of disabled people and not appreciate the wide range of people with impairments. - Such negative attitudes cause employers to see disabled people only in terms of difficulty and cost and so result in negative behaviour. Training that is based on personal interactions with disabled people, rather than just legal compliance, can help remove the negative attitudes and their consequences. - Employers can mistakenly believe that avoiding employing disabled people removes the risk of litigation. - The construction industry was seen as using Health and Safety processes to reject disabled workers while often not having sound understanding of disability issues. The industry was thought to have a culture of excluding people who are not “able-bodied”. The industry can see itself as “macho” and not recognise that disabled people can work as construction workers, in ancillary roles and related professions. - The disability media may not be used for advertising jobs and so disabled people may have limited knowledge of the range of work available in the industry. - Recruitment paperwork can be daunting for disabled people and thus exclude them regardless of their skills. - There may still be perceived stigma that stops disabled workers revealing an impairment or workers may not understand that they have protection under the Disability Discrimination Act 1995. - Disabled workers may be reluctant even to use the support and alternative methods of completing site safety tests because they are worried about revealing an impairment. Low literacy levels in the industry are a further factor. - Some disabled people will have the necessary skills and may have worked in the industry previously. They may lack the self-confidence to apply for jobs. Early support and role models might assist. - Disabled people completing construction training can experience difficulties making the transfer in to employment. - The industry will need help to move attitudes and behaviour through better understanding of the wide meaning of disability, the scope of skills that disabled people offer, legal requirements, the balance between Health and Safety and disability discrimination legislation, reasonable adjustments and sources of support, examples of good

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practice and case studies, accessible recruitment and communications plus introducing systems to support them. - Contractors could also be encouraged to offer work opportunities that match social security benefit entitlements (up to 16 hours a week and limits on pay); support schemes such as Pathways to Work; offer work experience for disabled people and students; become Jobcentre Two Tick employers. - To achieve a fair proportion of disabled people employed in the construction industry, support for them will also be needed including: re-skilling former construction workers; improving self-confidence; increasing understanding about the industry job opportunities; ensuring that construction training courses are accessible and inclusive. - The improved equality and diversity requirements of contractors and their sub-contractors would be difficult to achieve if the ODA itself, and its Delivery Partner, are not exemplars of best practice. Business opportunities During involvement meetings disabled people raised: - learning about contracting opportunities can be the first main barrier they face; - training for SMEs in effective completion of the various procurement stages, including the construction industry EXXOR system, could help more businesses owned by disabled people win contracts; - the voluntary and community sector that includes many organizations run by disabled people was often not considered in procurement. Yet such organizations can have considerable experience in delivering sizeable contracts in many areas of work; - disabled people advocated initiatives to assist businesses to form consortia to undertake work and “business opportunity fairs” where main contractors could show-case forthcoming opportunities to prospective sub-contractors - alternatives to electronic procurement and adequate time to make responses when support was required were considered important; - use of disability media to promote CompeteFor was advocated.

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Annex B
Disability Equality Action Plan Objective Inclusive design and accessible transport 1.1 Ensure all projects are designed according to the ODA principles of inclusive design and comply with the ODA Inclusive Design Standards. 1.2 Finalise and implement the ODA Access Strategy. 1.3 Ensure effective ongoing involvement of disabled people in the design of venues. 1.4 Develop Access Statements for each venue. 1.5 Work with London Development Agency to ensure appropriate priority is given to disability and diversity issues in the proposals for the Legacy Masterplan Framework. 1.6 Develop, publish and implement an Accessible Transport Strategy for the Games. 1.7 Develop the operating plan for the GamesMobility Service. 1.8 Continue effective involvement of disabled people in the development of plans for Accessible Transport. Director of Design and Regeneration Final inclusive guidelines and assurance process agreed by December 2007 Accountable Milestones

Director of Design and Regeneration Director of Design and Regeneration

Access Strategy published early 2008 (target date is end of January/early February) Review of functioning of Built Environment Access Panel and Access and Inclusion Forum complete by end of December 2007 According to stages of design and planning applications for each venue Timescale for LMF is for significant progress in 2008, with planning applications being submitted in mid 2009.

Director of Design and Regeneration Director of Design and Regeneration

Director of Transport Director of Transport Director of Transport

Accessible Transport Strategy published for consultation by end December 2007 First draft complete for consultation by end March 2008 Ongoing through Transport Access Panel and Access and Inclusion Forum

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Objective Employment opportunities 2.1 Explore ways of further involving disabled employees in construction, their representatives and/or disability organisations in the development of this strand of the strategy. 2.2 Support the London Development Agency and other partners in undertaking a disability equality review of the local labour scheme.

Accountable

Milestones

Director of Finance and Corporate Services (Head of E&I)

Way forward agreed by end April 2008

Director of Construction (Head of Employment, Skills and Performance)

Discussions with LDA complete by end December 2007 Review complete by end June 2008

2.3 Support the London Development Agency, ConstructionSkills and other partners to develop and implement a plan to support more disabled people to work in construction. 2.4 Continue working to establish an effective equality assurance process for contractors throughout the supply chain, which includes explicit reference to the provision of reasonable adjustments and the elimination of harassment against disabled employees. 2.5 Continue working to better understand the complexities of disability monitoring in construction and to establish effective disability monitoring in respect of workforce, trainees and recruitment process used by contractors throughout the supply chain. 2.6 Establish a framework and mechanisms for supporting and encouraging contractors to promote disability equality.

Director of Construction (Head of Employment, Skills and Performance)

Plan developed by end January 2008

Director of Construction (Head of E&I)

Initial evaluation process operational end November 2007 Equality and inclusion assurance process operational end February 2008 Quarterly reporting on contractors’ equality performance operational by end January 2008

Director of Construction (Head of E&I)

Interim system operational by end November 2007 Permanent solution operational by end March 2008

Director of Construction (Head of E&I)

Contractor support mechanisms operational end January 2008

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2.7 Establish an equality award scheme for contractors which includes explicit criteria relevant to disability equality. 2.8 Develop and publish equality targets for increased representation of disabled people in the overall ODA programme workforce. 2.9 Continue to promote disability equality in employment across the wider industry through the ODA’s procurement process.

Director of Construction (Head of E&I)

First awards made by September 2008

Director of Construction (Head of E&I)

Targets agreed by end March 2008

Director of Construction (Head of Procurement)

Ongoing (All systems and criteria in place already)

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Objective Business opportunities 3.1 Conduct an access review of BRAVO (the ODA’s electronic procurement system); implement any changes within ODA’s control; make recommendations for other changes to the Office for Government Commerce.

Accountable

Milestones

Director of Construction (Head of Procurement)

Review commences January 2008 Review complete March 2008 Changes under ODA control implemented by end June 2008 Recommendations for wider changes forwarded to Office for Government Commerce by end April 2008

3.2 Further review the criteria used for qualification in relation to smaller, corporate contracts with a view to removing unnecessary barriers to small and micro businesses. 3.3 Further develop disability equality monitoring of the procurement system and ownership of companies in the supply chain. 3.4 Implement an outreach programme targeted at businesses owned by disabled people. 3.5 Support the London Development Agency in improving the accessibility of CompeteFor

Director of Construction (Head of Procurement)

Review commences January 2008 Review complete March 2008

Director of Construction (Head of Employment, Skills and Performance) Director of Construction (Head of Employment, Skills and Performance) Director of Construction (Head of Procurement)

Permanent system operational by end March 2008

Outreach plan agreed by end January 2008

Phase One of CompeteFor operational by end January 2008

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Objective Targeted community engagement 4.1 Ensure all engagement activities and events are fully accessible to disabled people, through active implementation of the Code of Consultation, which will embed disability equality. 4.2 Continuously improve the accessibility of the london2012.com website.

Accountable

Milestones

Director of Communications (Head of External Relations)

Code of Consultation published by end December 2007

Head of New Media, LOCOG

Accessibility testing complete by end March 2008 Changes following testing implemented by end September 2008

4.3 Improve communications with disabled people through improved policy and process for providing publications in accessible formats. 4.4 Continue involvement of disabled people through the Access Panels, Access and Inclusion Forum 4.5 Develop new ways of involving disabled people working in construction and businesses owned and run by disabled people.

Director of Communications

Publish policy and process for alternative formats by end December 2007

Director of Design & Regeneration, Director of Transport

Ongoing

See objective 2.1 above

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Objective Integration and capability building 5.1 Ensure all HR policies and procedures present no barriers to disabled employees and applicants.

Accountable

Milestones

Director of Finance and Corporate Services (Head of HR)

Review complete by end November 2007 Revised policies published by end January 2008 Revised recruitment process implemented from end February 2008

5.2 Ensure the process for providing reasonable adjustments to applicants, employees and contractors operates effectively. 5.3 Promote positive staff attitudes towards disability. 5.4 Increase the proportion of disabled people employed 5.5 Increase the competence in disability equality of staff working in design, procurement and communications. 5.6 Continue to involve disabled staff in developing the disability equality programme. 5.7 Agree and deliver programme of functional Equality Impact Assessments

Director of Finance and Corporate Services (Head of HR)

Revised process published by end December 2007 Ongoing implementation and communication

Director of Finance and Corporate Services (Head of HR) Director of Finance and Corporate Services (Head of HR) Director of Finance and Corporate Services (Head of HR) Director of Finance and Corporate Services (Head of HR) Director of Finance and Corporate Services (Head of E&I)

Annual staff survey analysed and remedial action implemented by end March 2008, and subsequent years Ongoing implementation of Human Resources Equality Action Plans by ODA and Delivery Partner Training delivered by end March 2008 Evaluation complete by end April 2008 Programme of six monthly meetings involving disabled staff (including review of reasonable adjustments process) commences by end June 2008 Two year programme of functional EqIAs agreed by end February 2008 Programme delivered and outcome reports published by end February 2010

5.8 Publish annual progress report on DES 5.9 Publish revised DES

Director of Finance and Corporate Services (Head of E&I) Director of Finance and Corporate Services (Head of E&I)

Progress report published by end November 2008, and annually thereafter Revised DES published by end November 2010

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Sustainability Report 2008 How and why London 2012 will host the greenest Games ever

The London Organising Committee of the Olympic Delivery Authority Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Ltd. One Churchill Place, 23rd floor, One Churchill Place Canary Wharf, Canary Wharf, London E14 5LN London, E14 5LN Reception +44 (0) 203 2012 000 Reception 0203 2012 000 Fax +44 (0) 203 2012 001 Email enquiries@london2012.com london2012.com www.london2012.com Other languages This publication is available on request in other languages. 0808 100 2012 For free translation phone: Reference: ODA2007/032

Other formats This publication is available on request in other formats. For a large print, easy read, braille or audio version please call 0808 100 2012 or email enquires@london2012.com and quote reference: ODA2007/032
© Olympic Delivery Authority. The official Emblem of the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Ltd is protected by copyright. © London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Ltd 2007. All rights reserved. Published December 2007. Printed on recycled paper.

The construction of the venues and infrastructure for the London 2012 Games is funded by the National Lottery through the Olympic Distributor, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, the Greater London Authority and the London Development Agency.


				
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