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2012 Summer Olympic Games London England demolish dig design update

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					Olympic Delivery Authority Demolish, Dig, Design Update on the milestones to the Beijing 2008 Games December 2007

demolish dig design

In April 2007 the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) set out 10 major milestones that it planned to achieve by the Closing Ceremony of the Beijing 2008 Games. These milestones will provide the foundations for the delivery of the venues and infrastructure of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games and the legacy beyond. The delivery of these milestones on time and within budget will be underpinned by five priority themes: design and accessibility, equality and inclusion, health and safety, legacy and sustainability. At the end of 2007 the ODA is on track to hit its milestones. This publication sets out these 10 milestones and the progress made by the end of 2007.

Contents

Ten milestones to the Beijing 2008 Games
Milestone 01 The majority of the Olympic Park will be cleared and cleaned. Page 6

Milestone 02 Page 10 With the tunnels and cabling complete, the power for the Olympic Park will be set to switch underground. Milestone 03 Page 12 The main temporary roads and bridges will have been built, giving access to a safe and secure construction site for the ‘big build’. Milestone 04 Page 14 The installation of new water and energy systems that will serve the Olympic Park during and after the London 2012 Games will have started. Milestone 05 Page 18 The regeneration of the waterways in the Olympic Park will have started, improving the environment and access for the ‘big build’. Milestone 06 Page 20 The transport enhancements that will open up east London and support the London 2012 Games will have started, with many complete. Milestone 07 Page 24 Construction will have started on the bridge that will take people over the Aquatics Centre to the Olympic Stadium. Building work on the Stadium will be about to begin. Milestone 08 Construction on the Olympic Village will have started. Page 28

Milestone 09 Page 0 Contracts will have been let and designs agreed for the ‘Big 4’ venues in the Olympic Park – and at venues outside London work on site will have started. Milestone 10 Page 4 The development of the Legacy Masterplan Framework for the Olympic Park will be well advanced.

Priority themes
Design and accessibility Equality and inclusion Health and safety Legacy Sustainability

Page 6

Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority 

Different materials are being sorted for recycling or reuse

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Foreword

In April this year the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) set out the 10 major milestones to deliver before the Beijing Games in August 2008. As well as providing the foundations for the delivery of the venues and infrastructure for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games these milestones also ensure we are transparent and accountable for the significant public investment being made in the project. It is an extremely challenging programme for us and our Delivery Partner – the delivery of a project twice the size of Heathrow’s Terminal  in half of the time. To maintain the confidence of our stakeholders and the public we have to keep hitting our targets, on time and within budget. At the halfway point between the publication of these milestones and the Beijing Games next summer it is a good time to take stock of how we are doing and I am pleased to say that we are in very good shape. We are right on track to hit the 10 milestones and this publication sets out the progress we have made against each one. The majority of the milestones are about preparing the site for the main construction phase, which will start in earnest in summer 2008. The site is currently a contaminated, industrial landscape, but it is an area of great potential. It is being transformed into a blank canvas, ready for the ‘big build’ and the creation of Europe’s largest urban park for 10 years. Others, such as milestone 06 – ‘Green light for transport’ – show work taking place that is already benefiting Londoners. Milestone 09 – ‘Grand designs’ – highlights the progress being made on the brand new sports venues that will be seen across the world in the summer of 2012, such as the Olympic Stadium and the Aquatics Centre. Across all of the milestones we are thinking of tomorrow today. The Games present a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to transform the Lower Lea Valley into a new urban environment that reflects the diverse and vibrant population of east London. We must continue to make the most of it.

John Armitt Chairman Olympic Delivery Authority

The construction of the venues and infrastructure for the London 2012 Games is funded by the National Lottery through the Olympic Lottery Distributor, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, the Mayor of London and the London Development Agency.

Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority 

Milestone 01

Changing the face of the earth
By Beijing 2008: The majority of the Olympic Park will be cleared and cleaned.
As soon as the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) took possession of the Olympic Park site in summer 2007, it started a vast clean-up operation. Zone by zone, the 2. square kilometre area is being cleared of buildings and decontaminated. The development platform is being created so that the ‘big build’ can begin in summer 2008. Across the site around 1. million cubic metres of soil is being excavated, cleaned where necessary and used to form a new landscape. Three ‘soil washing‘ machines have been installed on the site. These wash, sieve and shake out pollutants including petrol, oil, tar and heavy metals such as arsenic and lead. The first was located on the site of the Aquatics Centre throughout the autumn; this machine has now been moved to join a second machine at a soil treatment centre in the south of the Park. In addition, another machine was installed in the autumn in the north of the Park, close to the site of the International Broadcast Centre/Main Press Centre (IBC/MPC). Together all three have the capacity to wash 200 tonnes of soil an hour. Once washed, soil is then moved and reused around the Park, to alter the landscape and enable the development of a fully accessible site, both during and after the London 2012 Games. For example, throughout the autumn up to 7,000 cubic metres was exported every week from the site of the IBC/MPC to the far north of the Park, where the Wheelchair Tennis and Paralympic Archery will take place. To help ensure as much material as possible is reused on site a huge machine was installed in October 2007 in the north of the Park. The -tonne machine is sorting 70,000 cubic metres of industrial and domestic waste from a 100-year-old tip under the sites of the VeloPark and Olympic Village. Every day it is separating 00 tonnes of waste into piles of different metals, concrete and other materials, much of which will be reused on the site or recycled elsewhere. It is helping to keep the ODA on track to reuse or recycle as much waste material as possible. >

delivered:
– Over 90 per cent of demolition materials being reused or recycled. – Over two thirds of buildings demolished. – 9 per cent of site investigated. – 49 per cent of site cleared.

e site of chine on th ashing ma tre Soil w cs Cen the Aquati

Sorting machine in the north of the Olympic Park

6 Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority

1 million .
Amount of soil in cubic metres that will be excavated, cleaned where necessary and used to form a new landscape

90%

Proportion of material generated from demolition within the Olympic Park being reused or recycled

Piling taking place to widen the river on the site of the Aquatics Centre by Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority eight metres

7

Nearby, a concrete channel is being put into Hennikers Ditch, a medieval waterway along the route of the ancient River Leyton that passes through the site of the VeloPark. So far the channel has been inserted along 440m of the waterway. It is now being covered with a mixture of sand, rock and soil reclaimed from elsewhere on the site. More than 220 buildings need to be cleared across the site, and 1 of them have already been demolished. This includes the two tallest buildings on the site, which were formerly owned by the University of East London but have long been disused. Some buildings with relatively new steel-framed structures are potentially attractive for reuse, so these are being carefully taken down by hand, so the materials can be reused elsewhere. The clearance of invasive vegetation has also been taking place throughout the autumn. For example, the incineration of Japanese knotweed, which covered around four hectares of the site, is well underway.

Some existing woodland and waterside locations of high ecological value are being safeguarded in the construction phase and incorporated into the Park’s design. Flora and fauna are also being protected: seed collections for some species have already taken place on site, so that they can be reintroduced after construction; and newts, toads, and fish have been relocated. Already, 9 per cent of the site has been investigated and 49 per cent cleared. This keeps the ODA well on track to hit its target of clearing and cleaning the majority of the Olympic Park by the time of the Beijing 2008 Games.

Sidelines

Work has started on a major project that will open up a vital area for redevelopment in the Olympic Park. A new railway sidings facility is being built at Orient Way, just outside the north west boundary of the Park. It will replace the 2.km of railway sidings at Thornton’s Field in the centre of the site (pictured). This area is being cleared because it is a key logistics site needed for the construction of the Olympic Stadium and Aquatics Centre. Railway sidings are used to park trains that are not in use. These new sidings will park excess trains from peak hour periods close to Liverpool Street. Five kilometres of track, much of which will be reused from Thornton’s Field, will be installed at Orient Way to form 12 new sidings – covering an area equivalent to three full-size football pitches. Ballast and sleepers from Thornton’s Field will also be reused.

Demolition of London build the University of East ings

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2,000

Number of newts relocated from the Olympic Park to the Waterworks Nature Reserve before construction

A concrete channel is being inserted into Hennikers Ditch to move the waterway underground Olympic Delivery Authority Demolish, Dig, Design –

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Milestone 02

Going underground
By Beijing 2008: With the tunnels and cabling complete, the power for the Olympic Park will be set to switch underground.

delivered:
– Both 6km tunnels running underneath the Olympic Park completed. – More than a third of the 200km of cabling in the tunnels installed. – Temporary diversion of powerlines around Olympic Village site completed.

The 2 electricity pylons, each up to 6 metres high that dominate the landscape in and around the Olympic Park are being removed to enable the major phase of construction for the London 2012 Games to begin. It will help to open up the land to create one of the biggest urban parks in Europe for 10 years. Before the pylons can be dismantled, the cables they carry between Hackney and West Ham substations must be moved underground into two 6km tunnels up to 0 metres deep. In 2006 four boring machines were lowered down two shafts midway between the substations with each working outwards – two to West Ham and the other two to Hackney. These tunnels were both completed midway through 2007.

All the permanent brackets required to fix the cables to the sides of the walls have now been installed in both tunnels, along with more than a third of the 200km of cable being used in the tunnels. By the time of the Beijing 2008 Games, power will be set to switch underground, after which the pylons can be dismantled. However, to allow construction work on the site of the Olympic Village to start earlier, a 1km section of the powerlines has been temporarily diverted along four temporary pylons. This has allowed two existing pylons in the centre of the Olympic Village site to be removed.

More than a third of the cable being used in the tunnels has been installed

9,418 brackets are be to fix cabling inside ing installed the two tunnels

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Four temporary pylons are being constructed to divert powerlines away from the site of the Olympic Village

200km

Total length of cabling being used to move the power underground – the distance from London to Nottingham

200,000

Amount of material in cubic metres that will be excavated from the tunnels and shafts – enough to fill Wembley Stadium. The majority will be reused around the site

Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority 11

Milestone 0

Construction access all areas
By Beijing 2008: The main temporary roads and bridges will have been built, giving access to a safe and secure construction site for the ‘big build’.

delivered:
– Vacant possession gained, giving London 2012 access to the vast majority of the site. – Three of five temporary bridges to aid logistics in place. – First temporary road being constructed.

The Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) took vacant possession of the Olympic Park site in summer 2007, enabling it to close the majority of public roads within the site. Seven kilometres of hoardings have gone up around the perimeter, with two main works entrances due to be established by April 2008. A series of temporary roads and bridges is being constructed inside the site to enable works access and reduce the volume of construction traffic using public roads around the perimeter. The first temporary bridge was put in place in September 2007. This spans the River Lea between the sites of the Hockey Arena and VeloPark. Two more bridges followed during the autumn, spanning the waterways to the east and west of the Olympic Stadium island site. The foundations for a second bridge across the River Lea in the north of the Park began in November 2007, and the construction of a fifth bridge is due to start by the time of the Beijing 2008 Games.

Temporary roads are also being built inside the site. Where possible, these will be constructed along the route of the eventual Olympic Park Loop Road, the main route for vehicles within the Park during the London 2012 Games. Most of this road will remain after the Games. One road is already being constructed in the north of the Park to aid earth moving and enabling works early in 2008. Another two are being built to support the Olympic Stadium construction, which will start before Beijing 2008. By summer 2008 the site will also be accessible by river and rail. Water and rail freight compounds are both on track to be established inside the site by summer 2008, so that construction materials can be brought on or off site by rail and barge during the ‘big build’.

Working on hoisting cabl bridge lift es for the

ove the es used to m Hoisting cabl idges into position temporary br

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Number of temporary bridges being built to aid logistics

9,000

Estimated construction workforce on the Olympic Park site at its peak in 2010

Three temporary bridges are already in place to aid logistics

Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority 1

Milestone 04

Making connections
By Beijing 2008: The installation of new water and energy systems that will serve the Olympic Park during and after the London 2012 Games will have started.

delivered:
– Preferred bidder appointed for Olympic Park Energy Centre and networks. – Planning permission granted for wind turbine at Eton Manor. – Planning application submitted for primary substation.

An entirely new utilities infrastructure is being commissioned and installed to meet the long-term needs of the Lower Lea Valley communities and the demands of the London 2012 Games. In October 2007 a preferred bidder was appointed for the Energy Centre and networks, which will provide efficient power, heating and cooling systems for the Games and the local communities in the area after 2012. The Energy Centre will include biomass boilers and a Combined Cooling Heat and Power (CCHP) plant, in line with the commitment to use renewable and efficient energy technology in the Olympic Park. The Energy Centre will be located at Kings Yard in the west of the Park. This site has now been cleared

ready for construction. While some of the industrial buildings have been demolished, during this process some of the bricks and features with historic value have been salvaged. One building of historical interest along the waterway is being retained to house part of the Energy Centre. Elsewhere across the Park, existing pipes, cables and other infrastructure are being removed, disconnected or diverted, with the majority of work on target to be complete by the time of the Beijing 2008 Games. For example, 19 out of 2 electrical substations have been removed from the Park and the majority of local gas supplies within the Park have been disconnected. Work has now begun to remove or divert ,200m of existing gas main in the south of the Park. >

Initial design concept for the Energy Centre in 2012 and beyond

14 Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority

,200m

Length of existing gas main in the south of the Park being removed or diverted – the equivalent of eight laps of an Athletics track

A building of historical interest in Kings Yard is being retained to house part of the Energy Centre Delivery Authority Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic

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Work has also begun on upgrading the 12KV electrical network outside the Park that will transfer power into the Park to the primary substation, which is sited alongside the Energy Centre. From here the voltage will be ‘stepped down’ further to 11KV so it can be distributed efficiently to the venues across the Park during the Games, and afterwards to homes, offices and leisure facilities. The area of the site required for the development of the primary substation has been handed over to the infrastructure team. Designs for the substation have progressed and a planning application has been made. Work is on schedule to start on site early in 2008.

Planning consent has now been granted for a wind turbine at Eton Manor in the north of the Park. The tender process to appoint a contractor will begin during winter 2007–2008 with the appointment made by Beijing 2008.

s lfast wooden trusse Nine complete Be g demolition rin were salvaged du

Primary substation in 2012 and beyond

16 Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority

Demolition in Kings Yard

Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority 17

Milestone 05

Setting the scenery
By Beijing 2008: The regeneration of the waterways in the Olympic Park will have started, improving the environment and access for the ‘big build’.

delivered:
– 450m of new river wall installed on site of Aquatics Centre, widening the river by eight metres. – Widening of channels at Prescott Lock completed.

The waterways around the Olympic Park are being revitalised to enhance the physical environment, create new green corridors for wildlife and allow materials to be transported to and from the site by barge. Although the waterways have suffered from years of neglect, they are a great asset that can be renewed. Around 800m of the River Lea is being widened at the site of the Aquatics Centre. To do this 18m-high, 11-tonne steel piles are being vibrated into the ground along 550m of the eastern bank to replace the existing dilapidated concrete river walls from the 1930s; so far 450m has been installed. Elsewhere on the site the waterways are being analysed to establish where they need repairing. This restoration is on schedule to be well underway by the time of the Beijing 2008 Games. The remodelling of the waterways will help to shape the landscape. It will extend and widen wetland areas, including submerged, floating and emergent aquatic vegetation and reed beds.

This major new inner-city wetland habitat will also play an important function in managing flood risk around the Park. Access around the waterways will be increased, encouraging local communities to enjoy and use the river for recreational activities after 2012. The Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) is also contributing £5 million to reinstate a lock and water control system at Prescott Channel, to the south of the Park, which will change the River Lea from a tidal to non-tidal environment and stabilise the water level at just over two metres. This will enable 350-tonne barges to access the construction site and help the ODA meet its aspiration of transporting at least 50 per cent of material by weight to the Park by rail or water during construction. Piling work at Prescott Channel is progressing well – the channels have been widened and work is now underway to create the lock island. British Waterways is continuing to manage the project to meet the timescales for tidal exclusion by February 2008, with the lock programmed to be fully operational by Beijing 2008.

ing surveyed to Waterways are be restoring y need see where the

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0%

Proportion of construction materials by weight expected to be transported by rail and water

8.km

Total length of waterways within or adjacent to the Olympic Park, much of which is being restored – equal to 167 laps of a 0m swimming pool

River piling is widening the river on the site of the Aquatics Centre by eight metres Design – Olympic Delivery Authority Demolish, Dig,

19

Milestone 06

Green light for transport
By Beijing 2008: The transport enhancements that will open up east London and support the London 2012 Games will have started, with many complete.

delivered:
– High Speed 1 rail link in operation between St. Pancras International and mainland Europe. – First additional DLR car delivered and two new DLR platforms built at Stratford Regional Station. – Two tunnels for DLR extension under River Thames completed in July 2007, ahead of schedule.

Numerous improvements to the transport infrastructure in east London have started, with many completed well in advance of 2012, so that Londoners enjoy the benefit before, during and after the Games. The Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) is working in partnership with transport providers, including Docklands Light Railway (DLR), Network Rail and Transport for London (TfL) on the coordinated development of the necessary transport infrastructure. Schemes that were already happening have been integrated into the plan for the Games. Others have been accelerated with funding from the ODA while some have been solely funded by the ODA. These were all detailed in the first edition of the ‘Transport Plan for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games’, which was published by the ODA in October 2007 after consultation with partners and stakeholders.

Even before the Transport Plan was published, developments to enhance public transport during and after the Games had been completed. The DLR has been extended to serve London City Airport, providing Games competitors, officials and spectators arriving at the airport with a direct link to Stratford and other venues around London. The new western ticket hall at King’s Cross St. Pancras Underground Station has opened, doubling the Underground Station’s capacity and providing step-free access at this vital transport hub for the Games. Also on the Underground, the capacity of the Jubilee Line has been increased by 17 per cent by adding a seventh carriage to each train. A new signalling system is on track to be introduced by the end of 2009 to increase capacity on the Jubilee Line by a further 2 per cent. >

Trains now run from St. Pancras International to mainland Europe

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800,000

Number of people expected to use public transport to travel to the Games on the busiest day – more than the entire population of Leeds

Two tunnels under the River Thames that extend the DLR to Woolwich Arsenal have been completed Delivery Authority Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic

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The Javelin® service Eleven lines, most of which are being upgraded, currently serve the Olympic Park area. A 12th – the High Speed 1 rail link from the Channel Tunnel – began operating between St. Pancras International and mainland Europe in November 2007. The first batch of the new Class 9 trains that will use this line by 2009 were delivered for testing in August 2007. During the Olympic Games, these 22kmph trains will operate the Javelin® rail service, shuttling spectators from St. Pancras International to Stratford International Station in just seven minutes.

Docklands Light Railway To accommodate demand on the DLR network during the Games and meet a predicted increase in ongoing usage  additional rail cars are being purchased by DLR, 22 of which are being co-funded by the ODA. This will enable the DLR to operate three-car trains on most of its existing network, increasing capacity by 0 per cent. The first car was delivered in December 2007. The contracts have also been let for the extension of the platforms at 12 stations on the Bank–Lewisham line to accommodate these longer trains. The length of the DLR is being extended by more than 2 per cent. A 2.6km extension under the River Thames from King George V to Woolwich Arsenal is well underway. This will link the Olympic Park and River Zone venues north of the river, to the Shooting events venue and south London. After the Games it will deliver massive social and economic benefits to the Woolwich area. The two tunnels needed underneath the river were both completed by July 2007, ahead of schedule. In addition, a 6km extension to Stratford International from Canning Town began in 2007. This will be one of the 12 lines to serve Stratford during the Games. Four new stations will also be built, serving the communities in the Lower Lea Valley long after the Games.

Stratford Regional Station A £100 million upgrade began in summer 2007 to treble the capacity of Stratford Regional Station from 7,000 to 118,000 passengers during morning peak periods. During the Games around 60 per cent of all spectators travelling by rail and around 4 per cent of all spectators visiting the Games will arrive and depart through this station. Already, two new DLR platforms have been built, to increase capacity on services and improve passenger facilities. A new bridge will connect these platforms with the existing Central Line platform to improve the interchange. A 100m stretch of platform has been widened by up to m to provide more room for passengers and prevent overcrowding. Platform signals have been modified, and the track and overhead lines realigned to fit the platform’s extension. Further improvements by the Games will include the re-opening of a disused subway, a new Central Line platform and nine new lifts to improve accessibility.

e DLR is being The length of th e than 2 per cent or extended by m

Work has begu n capacity of Stra to treble the tford Regional St ation

22 Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority

The first batch of 22kmph trains were delivered for testing in August 2007

1.87

Average gap in seconds of trains arriving at stations serving the Olympic Park during the Olympic Games

Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority 2

Milestone 07

Route to the Olympic Stadium
By Beijing 2008: Construction will have started on the bridge that will take people over the Aquatics Centre to the Olympic Stadium. Building work on the Stadium will be about to begin.

delivered:
– Designs for Olympic Stadium revealed. – 100 per cent of buildings on site of Stadium demolished. – Work expected to start on site of Stadium ahead of schedule.

The innovative designs for the Olympic Stadium were unveiled in November by London 2012 and Team Stadium, the design and construction consortium working on the project. The design features a ‘stadium bowl’ with 2,000 permanent seats, surrounded by ,000 demountable seats that will be taken away after the Games. An Olympic Stadium with such a large demountable element and mix of temporary and permanent seating has never been attempted before. The Stadium will be at the heart of the Olympic Park, on an island site surrounded by waterways. During the Games it will accommodate 80,000 spectators and be the theatre for the London 2012 Opening and Closing Ceremonies and Athletics events. Over a million people are expected to visit the Stadium during the course of the Games.

After the Games, it will be transformed into a 2,000 capacity Athletics stadium that will host a variety of sporting, educational, cultural and community events. A town planning application is now being submitted in two parts: the first, relating to the work that will form foundations for the Stadium, was submitted in November 2007; the second, concerning the design of the Stadium during the Games, will be submitted in spring 2008. Part of the site was handed over to Team Stadium in December 2007 for set up and logistics, with the site platform ready for construction in early summer. By then, the site of the Stadium will be cleared and cleaned, with the ’stadium bowl’ excavated, ready for construction. In fact all of the buildings on the site have already been demolished, including warehouses and chemical and galvanising works. >

site of the Aerial view of the April 2007 – Olympic Stadium

Aerial view Olympic S of the site of the tadium – N ovember 2 007

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12,000

Amount of steel in tonnes contained in the Olympic Stadium – the same weight as 1,8 double-decker buses

420,000
All the buildings on the site of the Olympic Stadium have been demolished Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority
2

Amount of soil in cubic metres being removed from the Stadium site – enough to fill two Wembley Stadiums. The majority will be reused elsewhere on site

Earthworks are also well underway. The ground is being levelled to form part of the construction platform, and work began in September to remove 420,000 cubic metres of soil, the majority of which will be reused elsewhere on the site. This will reduce the ground level on one side of the site to accommodate the ‘stadium bowl’ design. This bowl, partly built into the ground, will contain the field of play and lower tier of permanent seating. A cable-supported roof will cover around two thirds of the spectators.

During the Games visitors coming from Stratford Regional and Stratford International Stations will reach the Olympic Stadium over a vast bridge. This bridge spans the Olympic Park Loop Road, part of the Aquatics Centre, a river and a railway line. Construction began on the first bridge support in 2007, with work on the remaining parts of the bridge due to be underway by the Beijing 2008 Games.

Architect’s drawing showing the different components of the Olympic Stadium

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Aerial view of the Olympic Stadium during the Games

Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority 27

Milestone 08

Beds for athletes, homes for Londoners
By Beijing 2008: Construction on the Olympic Village will have started.
The Olympic Village is being designed and built close to the venues and is within the Olympic Park to enhance the experience of athletes during the London 2012 Games. It will also form a major part of the regeneration of the area after the Games. The Village will provide around 17,000 beds for athletes and officials during the Olympic Games and 6,00 during the Paralympic Games. Along with this accommodation, it will comprise shops, restaurants, medical and leisure facilities, and large areas of open space. After the Games, the Village will remain and form part of the overall Stratford City regeneration scheme, including a new regional shopping centre with additional leisure, office and residential areas. The Village will provide approximately 4,000 homes, with a mix of affordable tenures, shared equity and housing for sale and rent. Various planning applications for the Village itself and a logistics site to facilitate its development have been submitted and are due to be approved early in 2008. Lend Lease, the preferred developer for the Olympic Village, has proposed initial plans for how the Village will be transformed after the Games, and confirmed the six architectural practices that will produce detailed designs for the Village. The site itself is being prepared for construction. All the buildings on the Village site have been demolished, including the two tallest buildings on the Olympic Park site – the long disused University of East London towers. The temporary diversion of powerlines has also been completed. This will allow two overhead pylons in the middle of the Olympic Village site to be removed ahead of the other pylons on the Park, enabling remediation to begin in February 2008 and construction work to start on target before the Beijing 2008 Games.

delivered:
– Demolition completed on Olympic Village site. – Temporary diversion of powerlines completed, to enable early construction work to begin. – Architectural panel appointed for design of Village.

How the area of the Olympic Village might look after the Games

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17,000 100%

Approximate number of beds for athletes and officials in the Olympic Village during the Olympic Games

Proportion of buildings demolished on the site of the Olympic Village

The two University of East London towers – the tallest buildings on the siteDemolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority – have been demolished

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Milestone 09

Grand designs
By Beijing 2008: Contracts will have been let and designs agreed for the ‘Big 4’ venues in the Olympic Park – and at venues outside London work on site will have started.

delivered:
– Demolition completed on sites of the ‘Big 4’ venues: the Aquatics Centre, VeloPark, Olympic Stadium and International Broadcast Centre/Main Press Centre. – 40m of river walls created on site of Aquatics Centre, widening the river by eight metres. – Designs published for the Olympic Stadium, VeloPark and Aquatics Centre.

Aquatics Centre The Aquatics Centre will be a landmark building, acting as the gateway to the Olympic Park. After the Games it will be a facility for elite and community use. The design has evolved to make it more compact and easier to maintain after the Games. It also leaves more space for landscaping and complementary uses around the venue, such as amenities along the waterfront. The Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) is in negotiations with the main contractor that will construct the Centre. Preparatory works for construction have been taking place throughout 2007. The demolition of all the buildings on the site was completed in September and over the autumn soil has been cleaned and sorted for reuse on the Park site. Additional soil has been imported from the site of the International Broadcast Centre/ Main Press Centre. Around 40m of new walls have been created to widen the river to the south west of the Centre. A planning application is due to be submitted in early 2008, with construction due to begin in the summer of 2008. The interior of the Aquatics Centre in 2012

VeloPark During the Games, there will be a 6,000-seat Velodrome and a BMX Circuit with 6,000 temporary seats. After the Games a VeloPark, with facilities for Road Cycling and off-road Cycling, will be left for community and elite use. In September 2007 a shortlist of construction companies to build the venue was announced. The chosen contractor will be confirmed early in 2008. It will then work with the team which won the design contract in July 2007 and has since begun designing the Games-time venue and options for the VeloPark after the Games. Throughout the autumn schools across the UK were invited to take part in VeloDream, a competition to generate ideas for a dream future VeloPark. The winning school will have the chance to work with the designers and see how the venue for 2012 will be designed. On site a -tonne recycling machine has begun sorting rubbish from a 100-year-old tip under the site of the VeloPark. It separates up to 00 tonnes of industrial and domestic waste a day into piles of glass, metals, concrete and soil, to be reused elsewhere on site or recycled off site. Earthworks are well underway to create the platform for the start of construction work, which is on track to begin in 2009. > The interior of the Velodrome in 2012

0 Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority

Decontaminating soil on the Olympic Park site

00

Amount of rubbish in tonnes a day being sorted by the recycling machine on the VeloPark site – the same weight as 62. double-decker buses

Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority 1

International Broadcast Centre/ Main Press Centre The International Broadcast Centre/ Main Press Centre (IBC/MPC) will host 20,000 of the world’s media in state-of-the-art facilities during the London 2012 Games. After the Games the buildings will offer high-quality, mixed use office and commercial space that is much-needed for employment in Hackney. The shortlist of developers has been announced for the IBC/MPC, with whom the ODA is in negotiation to determine the design and use of the buildings after the Games. An outline design will be complete by the time of the Beijing 2008 Games and construction is on target to start in 2009. The soil level on the site of the IBC/MPC is being lowered, with up to 7,000 cubic metres being exported every week to the location for Wheelchair Tennis and Paralympic Archery, which is also an athletes’ training area during the Olympic Games. Demolition and site clearance, including breaking up the concrete slabs that line the ground, are complete, while earthworks and enabling works are more than halfway through and expected to finish in spring 2008.

Broxbourne The original site for the Canoe/ Kayak Slalom course has been found to be very contaminated, so an alternative site six miles away is being investigated as a replacement. A decision on which site will be used will be taken in January 2008, so that a planning application can be submitted in the spring. The design team is in place and, along with the venue designs, will be transferred to work on the alternative site, if necessary. Two courses will be created from scratch: a 00m competition course and a second shorter warm-up course. Both will remain after the Games, leaving behind a world-class facility for elite athletes and beginner/intermediate level canoeists alike. The majority of design and site investigation work is expected to be complete by the Beijing 2008 Games. The procurement process for a contractor will take place in the first half of 2008, with an appointment expected in early 2009. Due to feasibility studies on the alternative site, work on site has been delayed until spring 2009. The venue is still due to be completed well in advance of the London 2012 Games.

Weymouth and Portland A new slipway, 70 moorings and associated facilities are being developed at the Weymouth & Portland National Sailing Academy to provide a venue suitable for hosting the Olympic and Paralympic Sailing. A new commercial 600-berth marina is also being built nearby with 20 of these berths to be used during the Games. All these developments will remain after the Games, greatly enhancing the area’s facilities and contributing to the wider regeneration of the area. Planning permission has been granted and a construction contractor will be appointed in December 2007. Preparatory works will start on site in January 2008, but due to sea birds that spend the winter in the area the start of construction will not begin until spring 2008. By the Closing Ceremony of the Beijing 2008 Games, work will be nearing completion. Olympic Stadium The innovative design was revealed in November 2007. Designed to be different, the Olympic Stadium features a ‘bowl’ holding 2,000 permanent seats, surrounded by ,000 demountable seats that will taken away after the Games. For more details see milestone 07 – ‘Route to the Olympic Stadium’.

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Up to

7,000

Weekly volume of soil in cubic metres being exported from the site of the media centres – almost 8,000 average wheelbarrows full

Excavating contaminated soil on the site of the Aquatics Centre

Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority 

Milestone 10

Thinking of tomorrow today
By Beijing 2008: The development of the Legacy Masterplan Framework for the Olympic Park will be well advanced.

delivered:
– Olympic Delivery Authority, London Development Agency, local boroughs, Mayor of London and central government working in partnership. – Plans moving forward to agree the vision for regeneration after the Games.

The London 2012 Games and their legacy have been planned together from the outset. Design briefs, specifications and business plans are meeting the requirements of venues and infrastructure after 2012, as well as during the Games. For example, a footbridge in the heart of the Park will give pedestrians easy access between the Olympic Stadium and Aquatics Centre during the Games. It is designed so that temporary sections to support increased numbers of pedestrians during the Games can be taken away afterwards to leave two bridges spanning either side of Carpenters Lock. This principal will be applied to other pedestrian bridges within the Park: they will be temporarily oversized to accommodate crowds during the Games, and then scaled back after the Games. The temporary bridges will be constructed using materials that will be reused on other projects. Straight after the Games, the permanent venues, some in reduced form, the Olympic Park Loop Road and the Park itself will be transformed for future use. Temporary venues and structures will be dismantled or relocated, while transport services, utilities and infrastructure will remain. The transformation will leave a new park and a platform for the subsequent development of the area in the years after 2012. The Legacy Masterplan Framework (LMF) will set out a clear vision for the future pattern of this development and form the basis for deciding subsequent planning applications.

The Olympic Delivery Authority and London Development Agency (LDA) are working together jointly to develop the LMF. They are also working very closely with other public sector partners including the five Host Boroughs, the London Thames Gateway Development Corporation, Lee Valley Regional Park Authority, the Greater London Authority and the UK Government. The partners took the first step towards developing the LMF at an event in September 2007. This was followed by three partner workshops in the autumn on delivery, engaging people and placemaking (gaining a greater understanding of the type of places that should be developed after the Games). This process will culminate in a document, due to be published early in 2008, which outlines an agreed vision for the regeneration of the area. The document will also form part of the brief for an LMF masterplanning team, which will be appointed by the LDA early in 2008. This team will take forward the vision and ensure it underpins future design, planning and regeneration work. The LMF will also inform and support an outline planning application, which is expected to be submitted in 2008–2009. The footbridge in the heart of the Olympic Park during the Games

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After the Games parts of the footbridge will be taken away to leave two separate bridges spanning either side of Carpenters Lock

100

Number of hectares of the Olympic Park that will be capable of designation as metropolitan open land – the same size as Kensington Gardens

Demolish, Dig, Design – Olympic Delivery Authority 

Priority themes
The delivery of the 10 milestones to the Beijing 2008 Games on time and within budget will be underpinned by five priority themes.
Design and accessibility Our goal is to deliver design for the London 2012 Games that combines excellence with innovation. We want to create exciting, well designed venues that are an appropriate stage for the greatest sporting and cultural event on Earth. We are designing for the Games and legacy together. The venue designs must obviously meet the requirements of the Olympic and Paralympic Games, but we are looking beyond 2012. We are only building permanent venues if there is a long-term use. We will not leave ‘white elephants’ and are being creative in the use of temporary venues and seating. We also want the design of the venues within the Olympic Park to deliver a striking visual statement that reflects the importance of the Games, while ensuring they are balanced with the urban architecture and landscape that define the area. After the Games the venues must seamlessly connect with the parklands and urban neighbourhoods that surround them. Inclusive design is at the heart of our design process, and has been since the project began. The Olympic Village, the sporting venues, new transport services, supporting facilities and the Park itself will be accessible to people with a wide range of disabilities both during and after the Games. We want to set an excellent standard of accessibility for disabled people, older people and families with children, which will set a benchmark and act as an inspiration to others. Equality and inclusion We recognise that the momentum provided by the Games and the substantial investment in the Lower Lea Valley can have a significant impact on reducing historic and long-standing inequalities. Working alongside our partners, we will seek to ensure that the economic and social benefits arising from the regeneration associated with the design and build of the Olympic Park and venues reach local communities and different parts of the UK. We are ensuring that the ways we recruit and manage employees, including those working within the supply chain, are demonstrably fair and offer equal opportunities to all. We are working with partner organisations to encourage women, black, Asian and minority ethnic people, and disabled people to train and apply for jobs in construction and other areas where they have traditionally been under-represented. We are also working to combat workplace discrimination. Similarly we are aiming to ensure our procurement process is transparent, fair and open to diverse suppliers. We will aim to ensure that what we build for 2012 and beyond will be inclusive for people of all cultures, faiths and ages, and fully accessible to disabled people with a wide range of impairments. We will also provide an accessible transport network that will ensure everyone can enjoy the Games, and leave a lasting legacy for equality. We recognise the diversity of the population of the UK, London and the five Host Boroughs. We are committed to realising the advantages of this diversity in delivering our programme, and are already engaging with and involving the local communities.

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Health and safety The health and safety of everyone involved in our work or affected by it is vital. We want to be a best-practice organisation, fully compliant with applicable UK and European legislation and standards, and continually improving. We are committed to integrating health and safety considerations into every London 2012 Games planning, design and construction operation. Our aim is to provide a safe and secure environment during construction and decommissioning works. We are designing venues, facilities, infrastructure and transport to help eliminate health and safety hazards during construction, operation and maintenance, and to meet the needs of operational security during the Games. We want to go beyond simply eliminating as far as possible preventable illnesses, injuries, business losses and environmental harm due to unplanned events in our premises and on our sites. We want to enhance the wellbeing of all involved in the project work, which is why we will be providing occupational health facilities for the workforce. A healthy workforce is a productive workforce and we want to work in partnership with the unions as we move forward. We are working with all our staff, partners, suppliers and their workforces to embed this culture and give the highest priority to health, safety and security issues.

Legacy The London 2012 Games offer a unique opportunity to revitalise the Lower Lea Valley, transforming one of the most underdeveloped areas of London into a benchmark 21st century urban environment that reflects the diverse and vibrant population of the area. Our job is to harness this potential and create one of the largest new urban parks in Europe for 10 years, with a lasting legacy of world-class sports facilities, homes for the local community, and green spaces in and around the Olympic Park. To make sure this happens, we are incorporating legacy requirements into design briefs, specifications and business plans from the outset. We are ‘locking in’ legacy many years before the Games themselves. By clearing, cleaning and landscaping the site we will provide the platform for the development of new housing in and around the Park. After the Games the local community and elite athletes alike will benefit from state-of-the-art venues for disciplines including athletics, cycling, hockey, swimming, tennis and indoor sports. We are transforming the physical environment in and around the Park by improving the waterways, burying the overhead powerlines, enhancing the ecology of the area and creating green, open spaces. Infrastructure in the area will be enhanced, especially public transport networks and disabled access. By planning the Games and their legacy together now, we can ensure that they are remembered, not only as a summer of fantastic sport, but also as the catalyst for the regeneration of one of the most underdeveloped areas of the UK.

Sustainability We are committed to creating venues, facilities and infrastructure for the London 2012 Games that leave a lasting social, economic and environmental legacy for London and the UK, while minimising any other adverse impacts during the design and construction of the Olympic Park, venues, infrastructure and housing. Key sustainability gains will be realised through the location of the site and nature of the development. The remediation of the site will bring existing land back into public use and create significant improvements in the quantity and quality of green space in east London. The creation of new infrastructure, sporting facilities and housing in an area currently experiencing high levels of deprivation will help to create neighbourhoods and vibrant places after the Games are over, where people will want to live, work and play. Addressing the challenge of climate change through minimising the carbon emissions associated with the development, and optimising the opportunities for efficient water use are key to our approach. Working with the construction products industry to use socially and environmentally responsible materials presents new exciting opportunities. Our focus on legacy will help deliver sustainable communities that prioritise walking, cycling and the use of public transport, and provide for healthy lifestyles after the Games. Our approach is unprecedented for a development of this nature. We hope it will raise the bar for industry and provide a challenging step change for urban development in the UK.

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The construction of the venues and infrastructure for the London 2012 Games is funded by the National Lottery through the Olympic Lottery Distributor, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, the Mayor of London and the London Development Agency. © Olympic Delivery Authority The official Emblems of the London 2012 Games are © London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Limited (LOCOG) 2007. All rights reserved. The emblems of the National Lottery, the London Development Agency, the Department of Culture, Media and Sport, and the Mayor of London are reproduced with the permission of the Crown and the other copyright holders respectively. All rights reserved.

This publication is available on request in other languages and formats. To obtain these please: Phone 0808 100 2012 Email enquiries@london2012.com Quoting reference number ODA 2007/01 This document can be found in the publications section of www.london2012.com
Published December 2007. Printed at an environmentally aware ISO4001-certified printer on recycled paper.

Olympic Delivery Authority 2rd floor, One Churchill Place Canary Wharf, London E14 LN Reception +44 (0) 20 2012 000 Fax +44 (0) 20 2012 001 www.london2012.com

One of the largest wrecking machines in Europe has demolished the disused University of East London buildings


				
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