MA_Journalism_Studies_handbook

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					           Course Handbook
      MA Journalism Studies
           2011/2012

School of Journalism, Media and Communication
      We value and practise equality of opportunity, transparency and tolerance.
      We strive for excellence in all we do: locally regionally, nationally and
       internationally.
      We work in partnership with business, the community and other educators.
      We encourage and promote research innovation and creativity.


UCLan recognises and values individual difference and has a public duty to promote equality
and remove discrimination in relation to race, gender, disability, religion or belief, sexual
orientation and age. During your time at UCLan we expect you to be able to
     experience "an integrated community based on mutual respect and tolerance where all
        staff and students can feel safe, valued and supported."
     contribute to creating a positive environment where discriminatory practices and
        discrimination no longer happen.

Please review the UCLan Equality and Diversity Policy for further information.
UCLan Mission statement.......................................................................................................... 3
   We promote access to excellence enabling you to develop your potential ............................ 3
   Supporting Diversity at UCLan.............................................................................................. 3
Contents page ............................................................................................................................. 4
1. Introduction to the course ...................................................................................................... 1
   1.1 Welcome to the course ..................................................................................................... 1
   1.2 Rationale, aims and learning outcomes of the course ...................................................... 2
   1.3 Course Team .................................................................................................................... 4
   1.4 Personal Tutor .................................................................................................................. 6
   1.5 School office administration details ................................................................................. 6
   1.6 Communication ................................................................................................................ 6
   1.7 Induction information ....................................................................................................... 6
2. Structure of the course ........................................................................................................... 8
   2.1 Indicative programme ...................................................................................................... 8
   2.2 Modules available ............................................................................................................ 9
   2.3 Study Time ..................................................................................................................... 12
   2.4 Data Protection ............................................................................................................... 13
3. Approaches to teaching and learning ................................................................................... 14
   3.1 Expertise of staff ............................................................................................................ 14
   3.2 Learning and teaching methods...................................................................................... 17
   3.3 Study skills ..................................................................................................................... 18
   3.4 Learning resources ......................................................................................................... 18
   3.5 Personal development planning ..................................................................................... 18
   3.6 Career opportunities ....................................................................................................... 19
4. Student support, guidance and conduct .............................................................................. 19
   4.1 Personal Tutors ............................................................................................................... 20
   4.2 Student Support .............................................................................................................. 20
   Students with disabilities...................................................................................................... 20
   4.4 Health and Safety ........................................................................................................... 20
   4.5 Conduct .......................................................................................................................... 20
   4.6 Students’ Union .............................................................................................................. 21
5. Assessment ........................................................................................................................... 22
   5.1 Types of assignments ..................................................................................................... 22
   5.2 Assessment arrangements for students with a disability ................................................ 23
   5.3 Notification of assignments and examination arrangements.......................................... 23
   5.4 Referencing .................................................................................................................... 23
   5.5 Dealing with difficulties in meeting assessment deadlines ............................................ 23
   5.6 Feedback Following Assessments .................................................................................. 25
   5.7 Cheating, plagiarism or collusion................................................................................... 25
   5.8 Appeals against assessment board decisions .................................................................. 26
6. Course regulations ............................................................................................................... 27
   6.1 Course requirements ....................................................................................................... 27
   6.2 Classification of Awards ................................................................................................ 27
7. Student voice........................................................................................................................ 28
   7.1 Course representatives.................................................................................................... 28
   7.2 Student Staff Liaison Committee Meetings (SSLC) ...................................................... 28
   7.3 Module Evaluation Questionnaires ................................................................................ 29
   7.4 Complaints ..................................................................................................................... 29
Appendix .................................................................................................................................. 30
   Grading scheme .................................................................................................................... 30
MA Journalism Studies                                                         Course Handbook




Welcome to the School of Journalism, Media and Communication of the University of
Central Lancashire. We hope you will enjoy and benefit from this exciting and challenging
MA Journalism Studies programme of studies.
You are joining the School at an exciting time in its history. In 2012, we are celebrating 50
years of teaching journalism at Preston. The University has an unsurpassed reputation for its
journalism courses, and a growing reputation in research, especially in the field of new
media. Across the school we have expertise in journalism studies, film studies, photography,
linguistics, rhetoric, communications and cultural studies, as well as practical journalism,
photography, media production and filmmaking. It is this unique mix of theory and practice
that places us in the best possible position to teach insight and understanding into the theory
and practice of journalism, and to best equip you to understand these areas.
This MA Journalism Studies programme has been designed to enable you to develop your
own interests and insights, and to pursue research into an area that interests you specifically.
Your learning starts with this handbook. You are setting out into unknown territory and this is
the map that will guide your progress. It is a journey with many twists and turns and,
probably, some unexpected difficulties. Thorough study of the handbook will ensure that you
have a clear picture of where you are going and where you are at any particular time.
You will see that as the course progresses there are opportunities for you to pursue options
and other avenues that enable to direct your own learning. We hope you will take full
advantage of these to enhance and extend your learning and opportunities for the future.


Julie Freer
Journalism Division Leader.
Tel 01772 894750
Email: JEFreer@uclan.ac.uk




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Course aims
      To equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the field of journalism
       theory, and with the ability to contribute to the development of knowledge in the field.
      To develop students’ understanding of a wide range of research methods appropriate
       to the study of journalism and media practices
      To enable students to undertake a sustained and systematic research-based study that
       reviews, synthesises and extends knowledge in journalism studies
      To develop further graduate skills of initiative, self-management, conceptualisation
       and project design, synthesis, evaluation and presentation in the field of journalism
       studies
      To develop advanced transferable skills alongside the acquisition of subject-specific
       knowledge
      To enhance students’ potential for a career utilising the skills of acquisition, analysis
       and communication of information

Learning outcomes
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

      Demonstrate knowledge and critical appraisal of a substantial body of academic
       research at, or near, the forefront of study in the discipline
      Demonstrate understanding of relationships between journalism practices and
       underpinning theories and concepts
      Relate news practices in to underpinning social determinants and establish
       correlations and tensions with normative and ethical perspectives on the roles of
       journalism
      Demonstrate advanced understanding of the substantive ideas in the corpus of media
       theory, including critical theory, structuralism, sociological theories of the media,
       postmodernism, feminist and diversity theory and new media theory
      Demonstrate advanced understanding of the main research methods used in media and
       journalism studies, including sociological methods, content analysis, semiotic and
       discourse analysis.
      Review and evaluate research processes in relation to knowledge and analysis of
       appropriate methods.
      Critically evaluate, synthesise and apply a wide range of theories, concepts and
       perspectives on journalism study
      Engage with, and critically assess, a substantial and complex body of work at, or near,
       the forefront of academic study.
      Formulate a question and design and implement a research strategy to answer that
       question.
      Demonstrate initiative and critical evaluation in identifying a significant topic of
       study that shows strong elements of originality.
      Communicate ideas clearly and fluently in both oral and written form


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      Demonstrate an ability to manage time and work to deadlines
      Make discriminating and effective use of IT to carry out research and present work in
       oral and written form




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Peter Anderson
Reader in News Media and its Political Context
Tel: 01772 89474
Email: pjanderson1@uclan.ac.uk

Robert Beers
Senior lecturer
Tel: 01772 894754
Email: RSBeers@uclan.ac,uk

Amy Binns
Senior lecturer
Tel: 01772 895684
Email: ABinns@uclan.ac.uk

Clare Cook
Course Leader Media Management
Tel:: 01772 894737,
Email: cecook@uclan.ac.uk


Cathy Darby
Senior lecturer
Tel 01772 894751
Email: CMDarby@uclan.ac.uk

Andy Dickinson
Senior lecturer
Tel 01772 894752
Email: ASDickinson@uclan.ac.uk

Paul Egglestone
Senior Lecturer
Tel: 01772 894733
Email: PEgglestone@uclan.ac.uk

Julie Freer
Subject Team Leader - Journalism
Tel: +44 (0)1772 894750
Email: jefreer@uclan.ac.uk

Michael Green
Senior Lecturer
Tel: 01772 894755
Email: MTGreen@uclan.ac.uk




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Caroline Hawtin
Senior Lecturer
Tel: 01772 895692
Email: CHawtin@uclan.ac.uk

Paul Humble
Senior Lecturer, Course Leader MA Film and Media
Tel: +44 (0)1772 893044
Email: phumble@uclan.ac.uk

Dr Helen Jones
Tel +44 (0)1772 893051
Email: hljones@uclan.ac.uk

Megan Knight
Senior lecturer
Tel: 01772 894513
Email: MAKnight@uclan.ac.uk

William McCoid
Course Leader, Screenwriting, Film and Television
Tel: +44 (0)1772 895991
Email: WMcCoid@uclan.ac.uk

Dr Dinusha Mendis
Senior Lecturer (Law)
Email: DKMendis@uclan.ac.uk
Tel: 01772 893682

Dr Stephen Meredith
Principal Lecturer (Public Admin)
Email: SCMeredith@uclan.ac.uk
Tel: 01772 892864

Francois Nel
Course Leader MA Journalism Leadership
Tel: +44 (0)1772 894758
Email: fpnel@uclan.ac.uk

George Ogola
Senior Lecturer
Tel: +44 (0)1772 894829
Email: googola@uclan.ac.uk

Anandi Ramamurthy
Senior Lecturer
Tel: +44 (0)1772 893059
Email: aramamurthy@uclan.ac.uk



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Julia Shaw
Senior Lecturer
Tel: 01772 894738
Email: JShaw4@uclan.ac.uk

Johan Siebers
Senior Lecturer
Tel: 01772 894835
Email: Jisiebers@uclan.ac.uk

Delwyn Swingewood
Senior lecturer
Tel 01772 894729
Email: DSwingewood@uclan.ac.uk
Debbie Williams

Michael Williams
Senior lecturer
Tel 01772 894775
Email MJWilliams@uclan.ac.uk

Brian Moss
Technician
Tel: 01772 894631
Email: BMoss@uclan.ac.uk




You will be allocated a personal tutor during induction week.


Greenbank Building, Second Floor, Room 228B
Tel: 01772 893058


The University expects you to use your UCLan e.mail address and check regularly for
messages from staff. If you send us email messages from other addresses they risk being
filtered out as potential spam and discarded unread.


The first week of the term is Induction Week where the entire year of study will be explained,
Module Information Packs will be distributed and you will have ample time for questions and
discussions.
Through the course, especially in the first term, there will be help available from your tutors
and the university as you transition into your academic life at UCLan.
The International Student Support Team is based in The ‘i’ which is in the entrance to Foster
Building. You can make an appointment to see an adviser by emailing


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internationalstudentadviceteam@uclan.ac.uk or phoning 01772 895034. When making your
appointment you can ask to be seen privately.




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JN4090: Journalism theory    JN4091: Journalism             JN4099: MA Journalism
Compulsory Module            Research Methods               Studies dissertation
20 credits                   Compulsory Module              Compulsory Module
                             20 credits                     60 credits

Optional module              Optional module
20 credits                   20 credits

Optional module              Optional module
20 credits                   20 credits

The remaining four modules are made up of options in the following groups:

Newsroom practice and functions
   JN4043 International News and Media (20 credits)
   JN4100 The Modern Journalist (20 credits)
   JN4070 Practical Journalism (20 credits)
   JN4913 Law for Journalists (20 credits)
   PA3101 Investigating Public Administration

Research method and epistemology
    JN4092 Journalism Research Practice (20 credits)
    FI4001 Researching audio-visual media (20 credits)
    FI4002 Texts and contexts (20 credits)

Media and communications theory
   PH4021 Photography critical studies (20 credits)
   JN3050 The Future of Journalism (20 credits)
   RH4001 History and Theory of Rhetoric 1 (20 credits)
   RH4002 History and Theory of Rhetoric 2 (20 credits)
   RH4004 Rhetoric in Politics (20 credits)

Industry and professional practice
    JN4054 Journalism and the Market (20 credits)
    PV4015 Enterprise and professional practice (20 credits)
    EN4406 Publishing Project (20 credits)
    EN4401 The Digital Publishing Landscape (20 credits)

Students are expected to select their four options from at most two of these areas, giving
depth and scope to their studies in the core module, and in their dissertation. You will meet
with your personal tutor in the first two weeks of the academic year and a plan of study will
be agreed for you, ensuring that the work you undertake will cohere into a synthesised and
logical whole.



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Compulsory modules

JN4090: Journalism theory
This is a single weight module that will introduce you to the body of theory and ideas that
already exist around the practice and impact of journalism. Drawing on key ideas from
western thought, including Marxism, sociology, structuralism cultural studies and post-
modernism; and incorporating more contemporary ideas such as globalization theory,
development studies and new media theory, this module aims to expose you to the scope of
ideas and concepts underpinning the modern practice of journalism.

JN4091: Journalism Research Methods
Taking from the material covered in JN7020 Journalism Theory, this module aims to
introduce the range of research methods used by scholars in the field of journalism studies.
Working from published research, and from standard textbooks, students will develop and
understanding of key methods such as content and discourse analysis, sociological research,
textual and semiotic analysis and functional analysis of journalism practice. This module will
prepare students to write the dissertation.

JN4099: MA Journalism Studies dissertation
The dissertation is the culmination of your year’s study and is a large piece of original,
independent research on a question of your own devising. Working independently, but under
the supervision of a qualified member of staff you will develop a question and a research
strategy to answer it, implement that strategy and write up your results.

Optional modules

Newsroom practice and functions
JN4043 International News and Media
This varied module further develops core journalism skills through practical journalism
assignments while enhancing an understanding of international news and media through
research and analysis. The central part of the module is a research-based analysis where
students evaluate an aspect of multi-national media ownership and activities. This analysis is
supported by learning about news media in various countries and regions as well as
journalism projects that enable students to further consider and advance practical skills.

JN4100 The Modern Journalist
This single module will examine the impact that the changing relationships between
journalists and their audience has on their practice and to develop practical and personal
management strategies that can be applied to models of business practice, commissioning and
production in a multi-platform environment. You will study budgeting, business practice and
legislation, developing entrepreneurial skills, building a personal brand, identifying,
developing and pitching an idea for a multi platform project, building, the editorial, legal and
ethical challenges of developing and managing user generated content, managing a complex
multiplatform production.



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JN4070 Practical Journalism
This is a single module that is designed to introduce you to the basics of practical journalism.
You will be taught how to find, research and write a story. You will also be asked to reflect
on what it means to be a journalist and what are the roles and responsibilities of a journalist in
a democratic society. You will also be introduced to the ethical constraints journalists face.
This module will be taught for the first eight weeks of semester one.

LA4913 Law for Journalists
This single module introduces you to the legal constraints that journalists operate under. You
will study the law in relation to defamation, contempt of court, reporting restrictions, privacy
and copyright. You will also examine the regulatory constraints of the Press Complaints
Commission and OfCom. This module runs all year.

PA3101 Investigating public administration
This single module is taught by our colleagues in the politics division and examines the
organisation and structure of local and central government. It is designed to meet the
requirements of the National Council for the Training of Journalists’ PA syllabus.

Research method and epistemology
JN4022 Journalism Research Practice
This module aims to give you practical experience of the process of academic research.
Working closely with experienced researchers, you will work to develop and implement a
research strategy on a question determined by the module tutor(s). Once the process is
complete, you will critically analyse both the outcomes of the research and the process itself.

FI4001 Researching audio-visual media
Taught by colleagues in the Film and Media Studies division, this module will ask students to
investigate and interrogate different approaches and methodologies in studying and researching Film
Studies through their understanding and application of relevant research methods and approaches.
These aspects will include: In addition, students will be encouraged, through their engagement with
the issues and approaches outlined above, to practise research and writing skills which reflect their
understanding of the importance of observing accepted academic conventions, including the ability to
cite reference material correctly and to construct bibliographies in an appropriate manner.

FI4002 Texts and contexts
This module looks at a range of films over time, and aims to encourage critical engagement
with a range of specific film texts understood through their context. The actual choice of film
and screen material will vary from year to year. However, the content will always reflect the
intention of examining a range of films and other material with reference to the context of
their production and reception.

Media and communications theory
PH4021 Photography critical studies
This module introduces students to a range of issues and ideas being addressed by
contemporary photographers. The module will involve a series of seminars and tutorials
debating critical issues in photography and will cover issues such as ethics, the everyday,



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representation, the politics of aesthetics and realism. The seminars will cover topics such as
how photographers deal with their own subjectivity in relation to ethical and representational
issues, the critique of realism in photography, the currency of photographs used to effect
social change or the relationship between photography, empowerment and the everyday.
Students must have some experience of photography or visual media production in order to
take this module.

JN3050 The Future of Journalism
This module examines the technological developments, convergence, citizen journalism,
demographic changes, changes in the social and ethnic profile of readerships and audiences,
cultural changes, influences of economic changes, the impact of regulation and deregulation
on journalism, as well as competing models of journalism and democracy and the ways in
which one impacts on another

RH4001 History and Theory of Rhetoric 1
To introduce students to the history and theory of rhetoric and enable them to evaluate and
apply rhetorical techniques and concepts in the analysis of the functioning of discourse

RH4002 History and Theory of Rhetoric 2
To introduce students to the history and theory of rhetoric and enable them to evaluate and
apply rhetorical techniques and concepts in the analysis of the functioning of discourse

RH4004 Rhetoric in Politics
This module gives students the opportunity to study the rhetorical dimensions of polical
communication. The module aims 1) to explore the analytical potential of rhetorical ideas and
concepts in understanding political communication and action and 2) to offer students the
opportunity to practice speech writing and speech delivery.

Industry and professional practice
JN4054 Journalism and the Market
This modules aims to sensitise participants to a marketing orientation to media activities and
to demonstrate how marketing can be used to identify and capitalise on opportunities to
engage new and existing users. Working within a business framework, students will examine
the market for news products and discuss various business strategies for media businesses.
PV4015 Enterprise and Professional Practice
This single module is delivered by our colleagues in the media practice division It introduces
you to contemporary issues and debates and professional contexts in ar subject and allows
you to examine significant examples of the creative industries and professional practice. The
assessment involves developing a case study or placement in a professional context.

EN4401 The Digital Publishing Landscape
This single module will enable you to understand the fast changing and complex nature of
digital publishing. You will also learn how to identify new niche markets for publishing in
the digital age and how to take advantage of partnership and project opportunities with
digital publishers. The module also features Web 2.0 technologies. The module will enable


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you to reassess your assumptions about what publishing is, particularly through creating,
sharing, and publishing peer-assessed course-related digital content.

EN4406 Publishing Project
In this single module, you will select a project set by a publisher and work with the publisher
to meet the project brief. The module will begin with tutorials on project planning and
professional working practices. You will then work independently (supported by tutorials) to
implement the project plan. Each project will be different and tailored to the real world needs
of the publisher. However, all projects will be subject to approval in advance by the course
team to ensure that they are appropriate for the module and present you with a brief that is
achievable within the parameters of the module.




2.3.1 Weekly timetable
You will be given a detailed timetable for each semester. Each week you will typically have
3-4 hours of lectures and 8 hours of seminars/workshops – but it will vary throughout the
year.

2.3.2 Expected hours of study
You are expected to spend about 200 hours of total study time in undertaking a single
module. You should expect to spend the following amount of time each week studying a
single module in one semester:
Lecture:               1 hour.
Private study:         8 hours.
Seminars/workshops: 2 - 4 hours.
Research and project based modules (such as the dissertation) will demand more private
study and formal contact time with staff may be limited to tutorials and supervision sessions.

2.3.3 Attendance Requirements
You are required to attend all timetabled learning activities for each module. Notification of
illness or exceptional requests for leave of absence must be made to your course leader.

If you are not an EU student under the UK Border Agency (UKBA), Points Based System
(PBS) - you MUST attend your course of study regularly; under PBS, UCLan is obliged to
tell UKBA if you withdraw from a course, defer or suspend your studies, or if you fail to
attend the course regularly.

If you have not gained the required authorisation for leave of absence, do not respond to
communications from the University and if you are absent for four weeks or more, you may
be deemed to have withdrawn from the course. If this is the case, then the date of withdrawal
will be recorded as the last day of attendance.




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All of the personal information obtained from you and other sources in connection with your
studies at the University will be held securely and will be used by the University both during
your course and after you leave the University for a variety of purposes. These are all
explained during the enrolment process at the commencement of your studies. If you would
like a more detailed explanation of the University’s policy on the use and disclosure of
personal information, please contact the Data Protection Liaison Officer, Strategic
Development Service, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE.
All course materials, including lecture notes and other additional materials related to your
course and provided to you, whether electronically or in hard copy, as part of your study, are
the property of (or licensed to) UCLan and MUST not be distributed, sold, published, made
available to others or copied other than for your personal study us unless you have gained
written permission to do so from the Head of School. This applies to the materials in their
entirety and to any part of the material.




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Robert Beers
Robert teaches students on our new international programmes. Robert has a wealth of
international print and broadcast journalism experience. His CV includes several years as a
broadcasting manager at US news giant CBS.
Direct line: 01772 894754 e-mail rsbeers@uclan.ac.uk

Amy Binns
Amy teaches magazine journalism and is also involved in online teaching. Amy has
previously taught at the University of Huddersfield. She has worked as a senior reporter on
the Yorkshire Post and the Lancashire Evening Telegraph.
Direct line: 01772 895694, email abinns@uclan.ac.uk

Clare Cook
Clare is an award-winning investigative journalist with ten years' industry experience. She
moved into lecturing following a successful career at regional and national press level before
turning to magazines as a chief sub editor. Being bilingual has also allowed her to pursue a
journalism career in France.
Direct line: 01772 894737, cecook@uclan.ac.uk

Cathy Darby
Cathy is Course Leader of the MA in Magazine Journalism and Leader of the BA Hons
Journalism magazine route. She has previously worked on the Lancashire Evening Post, the
Daily Mail, the Financial Times, Country Life and women’s magazines.
Direct line: 01772 894751, e-mail cmdarby@uclan.ac.uk

Andy Dickinson
Andy is a Senior Lecturer in print and teaches online production techniques and he is also
involved in the department’s industry digital training programme. Prior to joining the
department Andy worked in the university’s media technology centre.
Direct line: 01772 894752, e-mail asdickinson@uclan.ac.uk

Paul Egglestone
Paul is regarded as one of the country’s top innovators in digital journalism, developing and
leading several research projects. Paul is an experienced TV producer/director and also
teaches television production and documentary-making.
Direct line: 01772 894733, e-mail pegglestone@uclan.ac.uk

Mike Green


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Mike is an award-winning journalism lecturer. He was presented with the BBC’s Connect
and Create Partnership’s 2010 Achievement award. He has a wealth of experience with the
BBC and independent local radio. His alumni are among the industry’s leading names. They
include BBC North West’s Ranvir Singh, BBC TV’s North of England correspondent Danny
Savage, BBC Radio 5 Live’s Victoria Derbyshire and the BBC’s Southern Africa
correspondent Karen Allen. Direct line: 01772 894755, e-mail MTGreen@uclan.ac.uk

Caroline Hawtin
Caroline is an experienced radio journalist, having worked for BBC Radio Lancashire for a
number of years producing and reporting news and features. Caroline Leads the UK
Journalism module and also teaches on the BA Hons International Journalism, course.
Direct line: 01772 895692, email chawtin@uclan.ac.uk

Helen Jones

Helen is currently researching into contemporary documentary filmmaking with an interest in
war and film, but also in film and philosophy of communication. She currently teaches at
undergraduate and taught postgraduate level in Film & Media Studies. I also teach on the
Communication & Popular Culture and Television Studies degree programmes. She
specialises in film theory, silent cinema, global communications (broadcasting) and
documentary film.

Direct line: 01772 893051 hljones@uclan.ac.uk

Megan Knight
Megan leads the school’s BA Hons International Journalism programme. A former
journalist, she teaches print and online, magazine production and research methods. Among
her previous posts, Megan wasDirector of the New Media Lab and Johnnic Lecturer in New
Media at Rhodes University in South Africa. Her research interests include new and social
media and professional practice.
Direct line: 01772 894513, email maknight@uclan.ac.uk.

Bill McCoid
Bill's plays include, 'Mourning TV' (nominated 'Best New Play') by the Manchester Evening
News. At the age of 23 he wrote and directed 'Speech Therapy' winner 'Most Original Play',
in the Liverpool Centenary Festival. His TV credits include: Panorama, East, Secret Lives,
Up Front, Granada News, The Time The Place, Lennon - Just Imagine, World In Action, The
Curious Case of Alex (Open Eye), Dispatches, Black Bag, The Antiques Hunter and
Interference. Bill was a founder member of Channel M.
Direct line: 01772 895991, email wmcoid@uclan.ac.uk

Dinusha Mendis
Dinusha s a qualified barrister who specialises in teaching media law. Her interests are
intellectual property.

Stephen Meredith


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Stephen is based in our politics division and leads the public administration module. His
research interests include Labour Party revisionism, social democracy and the origins of
‘New’ Labour.

Julia Shaw
Julia had more than 20 years experience at the BBC as a senior producer specialising in
documentaries/features and live current affairs for Radio 4. Later she moved into the
independent sector, where she specialised in high-end documentaries for UK and
international television.
Direct line: 01772 894738 email: jshaw4@uclan.ac.uk

Delwyn Swingewood
Delwyn has a wealth of experience working as a journalist in national newspapers,
magazines, TV and radio. Among the titles he has worked for are the Sun, Daily Mirror, The
Guardian, The Independent, Independent on Sunday, Mail on Sunday, New Society and
Channel 4 news.
Direct line 01772 894729 email: dswingewood@uclan.ac.uk

Michael Williams
Michael has enjoyed an illustrious career in national newspapers and he is still a working
journalist. He is former deputy editor of the Independent on Sunday and head of news and
features at the Sunday Times. He still contributes to a range of publications including the
Daily Mail, The Tablet and the News Statesman He is also a railway enthusiast and has just
published “On the Slow Train: Railway journeys into Hidden Britain”. Michael organises the
division’s prestigious Harris Lectures series.
Direct line 01772 894738 email mjwilliams@uclan.ac.uk




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It is vital for you to understand that on this course you are expected to develop as an
independent learner. This means that your tutors cannot and will not teach you everything
you are expected to know. Instead, they will introduce you to new topics and ideas and then
give you the structure and opportunities for you to learn more. It is like making a journey.
Lectures give you a starting point and indicate where you should finish. You must then set
out on this journey, gathering information and knowledge as you go and making plans to
reach your destination. Seminars and workshops are like brief stops on your independent
journey where you can get help and advice.
This is a process that gives you the main responsibility for your learning. To do this you will
have to:

       Know what is expected of you.
       Reflect on what you are learning and how you are learning, identify what else you
        need to know and make plans to gain this extra knowledge.
     Develop skills to find more information (from texts, through research, at seminars).
     Manage your time to study effectively and complete assignments by the deadline.
You will learn more about independent study in a special session during the induction period
before the course starts. Also, your work in the early part of semester one has been designed
to support the development of independent learning and other study skills. Additionally,
Personal Development Planning (see later section) will help you to further enhance your
learning skills.
A vital first step as an independent learner is to read this handbook and understand the course
aims and outcomes and how the different modules contribute to your overall learning. To
help you do this descriptions of all the modules you will study are in Appendix1.
Also, before each module starts you will receive a Module Information Pack (MIP). This is
an important and very useful document that gives full details of:

      What you will learn and how you will learn.
      Your timetable for each week.
      When assessments will take place, what they are, additional advice and guidance and
       any specific extra marking criteria.
      Contact details for the module team.
      Extra learning material (ie; online resources) that may be available.
      The books and other material you need to buy.
      A reading list that points you towards the main texts that may help in your studies.


Most modules follow a similar pattern. Generally, in each week in each module you will be
expected to:

      Attend a lecture. These are usually one hour long and are used to introduce new topics
       and learning. You should make notes of what is being said but, more importantly, you
       should think about the material and identify significant themes and extra information
       you need.
      Undertake private study. This enables you to reflect on the lecture and to start learning
       more about the topic, through reading, research or practice. You will often be directed



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        towards activities you should carry out but you must also work independently to find
        answers to problems.
     Contribute to seminars and/or workshops. This is your opportunity to further extend
        your learning by discussing and testing out ideas, new knowledge and practical
        exercises with your tutor and other students. Many of these sessions will be
        structured, with your tutor asking you to prepare specific practical work to enable you
        to receive further feedback, or to prepare an individual or group presentation on an
        aspect of your learning. Seminars and workshops are also used to prepare you for
        assignments by giving you opportunities to do similar work and receive feedback.
This course is both practical and theoretical. Although some modules emphasise one of these
elements more than the other you should constantly strive to establish linkages between them.
Equally, some practical learning will draw on UK practices but you will be expected to show
awareness and apply key skills in a manner suitable for other national and international
settings.


UCLan offers extensive support for research and study skills, including academic writing,
through the WISER programe in the Fylde building. Students will be given more information
regarding specific workshops and tutorials available through this service during orientation,
and are encouraged to use the service throughout their degree.



3.4.1 Learning Information Services (LIS)
Extensive Resources are available to support your studies provided by LIS – library and IT
staff. Take advantage of the free training sessions designed to enable you to gain all the skills
you need for your research and study.

3.4.2 Electronic Resources
LIS provide access to a huge range of electronic resources – e-journals and databases, e-
books, images and texts.
An international news area is in the lobby of the main library with TV newscasts from around
the world on flat screens with personal headphones.


To help you with your learning you will carry out a process of Personal Development
Planning (PDP).
Personal Development Planning is a supported and structured process to help you understand
more about how you learn and what you learn. It encourages you to review, plan and take
responsibility for your own learning to improve your personal, educational and career
development.
Personal Development Planning provides you with opportunities to reflect on what you are
learning on the course and during your time at university, identify your strengths and
weaknesses and to develop your own strategies to further improve your performance. It gives
you a framework to record your activities and actions and forms the basis for your career
development by providing evidence of the development of a wide range of skills and




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experiences that are sought by employers and which will aid your advancement in the
workplace.
Personal Development Planning is a process that only you can fully undertake as it calls upon
you to constantly reflect on what you do and how you do it. It is a process that is similar to,
and often linked with, your subject specific learning. On this course you are required to carry
out practical journalism tasks and to reflect on how and why these are done, what the
consequences are and ways they could be better done. Personal Development Planning is the
same process, but in relation to yourself – you are required to carry out learning tasks and to
reflect on what you learned and how, what the consequences are and ways they could be
better done.
At the start of the course there will be an explanation of Personal Development Planning.
You will be expected to start and maintain your progress file which will contain transcripts
and assignment and other feedback It is important that you should record your activities as a
learner and make notes that reflect on your experiences and the actions you took to resolve
problems and achieve success.
You should bring this file to meetings with your personal tutor, who will ask you to talk
about your learning and how you are developing plans to improve it.
In individual modules seminars will be included that will ask you to reflect on your
approaches to subject learning (for instance, how you have related practical journalism
experiences to communication theory) and how you reacted to different learning techniques
(for instance, working in groups, making presentations, compiling portfolios).


Your University experience is not only about achieving your chosen award, it is also about
developing as a person and realising your potential. We want you to gain the skills and
attitudes that will help you to achieve your goals and aspirations.


Futures offers a range of support for you including:-
     career and employability advice and guidance
     access to work placements, internships, voluntary opportunities, part-time
        employment and live projects
     workshops, seminars, modules, certificates and events to develop your skills
     business start-up, freelance and self-employment advice
     the Futures Award, a University Certificate which formally recognises your
        employability and enterprise achievements whilst at UCLan.
For more information visit the Futures Hub (next to the Library) or access them via
www.uclan.ac.uk/futures. Additionally, there will be specific sessions on international career
paths in journalism and internships while you are in the UK,




The School Office is in Greenbank 228b and they can help with general support and advice.
The School student liaison office is in Harris Building 124 and also can be reached at
SLOAHSS@uclan@ac.uk. Your course and module leaders can also offer support and
guidance during posted hours and by appointment.


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Your course leader functioning as your personal tutor will have periodic individual meetings
where your PDP programme is progressing, how your goals are being reached, your progress
in the course and any problems you may have occurred.


There is a centralised Student and Academic Support Service which has The 'i' Student
Information Centre as its first point of contact. You can obtain information on a wide range
of topics including student administration such as Council Tax and letters to verify your
status plus Scholarships, Counselling, Student Finance, Mentoring, Studying Abroad,
Disability Advice, Independent Academic Advice, International Advice, Multi Faith Centre,
Pre School Centre, Medical Centre and general life in Preston/Burnley.
The ‘i’ also produces a Student Organiser and ‘i book’ which contain useful guidance for
you. These are distributed by your School in the School office.


If you have a disability that may affect your studies, please either contact the Disability
Advisory Service - disability@uclan.ac.uk - or let one of the course team know as soon as
possible. With your agreement information will be passed on to the Disability Advisory
Service. The University will make reasonable adjustments to accommodate your needs and to
provide appropriate support for you to complete your study successfully. Where necessary,
you will be asked for evidence to help identify appropriate adjustments. Helen Jones is the
contact in the School of Journalism, Communication and Media for students with disabilities:
hljones@uclan.ac.uk


As a student of the University you are responsible for the safety of yourself and for that of
others around you. You must understand and follow all the regulations and safety codes
necessary for a safe campus environment. Please help to keep it safe by reporting any
incidents, accidents or potentially unsafe situations to a member of staff as soon as possible.
Safety assessments have been undertaken for each module of your course and you will be
advised of all applicable safety codes and any specific safety issues during the induction to
your course and modules. You must ensure that you understand and apply all necessary
safety codes. These form an essential element of your personal development and contribute
to the safety of others.


You will be expected to abide by the Regulations for the Conduct of Students in the
University Student Guide to Regulations. UCLan expects you to behave in a respectful
manner demonstrated by using appropriate language in class, and switching mobile phones /
other devices off prior to attending classes.
If your behaviour is considered to be unacceptable, any member of academic staff is able to
issue an informal oral warning and the University will support staff by invoking formal
procedures where necessary. You can read more about UCLan expectations in the regulations
for the Conduct of Students.



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The Students’ Union is a student-led, democratic organisation and exists to make life better
for you and wants every UCLan student to have a great experience at University.
The Union is all about you taking the opportunities that are offered and making the most of
them. The SU offers you the chance to play the sport you love, share your passion or hobby
with like-minded people, report on the hot stories on campus or represent your peers as a
Course Representative.
We hope your time at UCLan is trouble free, but we know that sometimes you might come up
against problems ranging from academic situations or finding a job, to dealing with debt and
claiming the benefits you’re entitled to. Check SU Advice on-line for impartial advice on a
whole range of issues, or e.mail suadvice@uclan.ac.uk. Call in at the Student’s Union, or
visit the website at www.uclansu.co.uk for more information. Also for the latest listing of
part-time jobs through visiting The Bridge:




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Please note that all modules will be assessed. You are expected to attempt all required
assessments for each module for which you are registered, and to do so at the times scheduled
unless authorised extensions, special arrangements for disability, or extenuating
circumstances allow you to defer your assessment.
You will undertake a range of assignments that use a variety of methods to assess your
performance in different elements of your learning. Some of these assessment methods will
be new to you, especially if you have not studied before in the UK. During your induction
week there will be an important session explaining assessment requirements. The modules in
semester one will also include detailed guidance on undertaking each of the assignments
before you start on them. Usually, there is more than one assignment in each module. The
early assignments are due about half way through the module. These will be marked
promptly and you will receive written feedback on your work, which will indicate any
weaknesses that you may need to address before doing the next assignment.
Your reflections on your learning, how this was used to tackle assignments and issues raised
by feedback from your tutor form a central part of your Personal Development Planning.
After each round of assignments you should write an action plan which sets out how you plan
to further improve your performance. Each assignment will be marked out of 100 and will
contribute to your overall mark in the module in proportion to the ‘weighting’ percentage
outlined in the MIP.
The pass mark is 40%. A mark such as this indicates that you have only just reached the level
of performance described in the Learning Outcomes for each module and there are
weaknesses you will need to address. The steps from 40% to 70% and more are outlined in
the marking criteria on the following pages.
If you fail to achieve 40% you will normally be ‘referred’. This means you will be offered
another chance to do assignments. If you then pass you can only get a mark of 40%, no
matter how good your second piece of work was.
In many modules you must pass each assignment. This means that even if all your marks in
the module add up to an overall mark of more than 40% you will still be required to retake
and pass any assignment in which you got less than 40%.
Students new to university, and especially those studying in the UK for the first time, are
sometimes surprised by what appears to be the low level of marks. This is a result of the
marking scale we use and does not necessarily mean you are doing badly. You should note
that the middle of the scale (ie; the mark for generally adequate or average work) is 55%.
Marks above this indicate quite good to excellent progress. Marks below this show that there
are some weaknesses you need to address and correct.
A guide to marking is at the end of this handbook.


This is an academic degree with a high level of focus on traditional methods of assessment.
You will be assessed by presentations, essays, and other forms of written work (analyses,
literature reviews, proposals and the like). You will be given detailed instructions on how to
undertake these kinds of assessments as and when it is necessary.


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Some modules, however, will have more practical assessments that take the form of
journalistic output – these generally follow one of two types below.

      Classroom based practical journalism work. These involve producing stories from
       material supplied to you. You will receive feedback on this coursework and be
       expected to improve your work in the light of this. This sort of work is often assessed
       in a portfolio, that requires you to present your original work, the feedback and your
       improved version, along with a learning log that explains your reflections on learning
       and the actions you took.

      Practical journalism projects. As your journalism skills develop you will be asked to
       initiate ‘real’ international news stories, research them and write them, with support
       and guidance from your tutors. These may be assessed individually or as part of a
       portfolio. Again, you may be asked to produce a learning log that reflects on your
       activities, actions and the lessons you have learned.


Arrangements are made for students who have a disability/learning difficulty for which valid
supporting evidence can be made available. Contact the Disability Adviser for advice and
information, disability@uclan.ac.uk.
Helen Jones is the contact in the School of Journalism, Communication and Media for
students with disabilities: hljones@uclan.ac.uk


Deadlines for assignments are in both the Module Information Packs handed out at the start
of the term and on assignment sheets in seminars. Assignments will normally be submitted in
printed form to the tutor’s assignment box, and electronically using the university’s WebCT
service. However, specific assignments and tutors may make different arrangements.
Dissertations are to be submitted bound in the correct university method (see the module
information pack for JN4099 to the journalism student office.


The referencing styles used are Harvard for most journalism and media studies modules and
MLA for literature and linguistics modules. Guides to both forms of referencing are available
in the university bookshop, and on WebCT. In addition, the university’s study support
facility, WISER, can assist with guidance on referencing.


Assignments must be submitted no later than the date on your assignment instructions / brief.
If you anticipate that you will have difficulty in meeting assessment deadlines or you have
missed or are likely to miss in-semester tests you must report this at the earliest possible
opportunity to the School Office and your tutor.
Authorisation of the late submission of work requires written permission. The School with
responsibility for your module will be authorised to give permission for one extension period
of between 1 and 10 working days where evidence of circumstances has been accepted and
where submission within this timescale would be reasonable taking into account those
circumstances (Academic Regulation: G6.2).



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Extensions must be applied for at the central desk in the School Office.
We aim to inform you of a decision about granting an extension within 2 days of the receipt
of the request.
If you are unable to submit work within 5 working days after the submission date due to
verifiable extenuating circumstances, you may submit a case for consideration in
accordance with the University’s Extenuating Circumstances Procedure (Academic
Regulations: Appendix 8).

5.5.1 Extenuating circumstances
"Extenuating Circumstances" is a phrase which refers to exceptional factors outside of your
control which have adversely affected your performance within your course. These factors
may prevent you from attending examinations or other timed assessments or caused you to
miss assessment submission dates. Examples are illness, accidents or serious family
problems.
Normally extenuating circumstances will relate to a change in your circumstances since you
commenced your course, which have had a significant, adverse effect on your studies.
Everyday occurrences such as colds or known conditions such as hay-fever will not qualify
unless the effects are unusually severe and this is corroborated by a medical note. The
University does not look sympathetically on absences or delays caused by holiday
commitments or by work commitments in the case of full-time students. The normal work
commitments of part-time students would not constitute an extenuating circumstance. A
disability or learning difficulty does not constitute an extenuating circumstance (Academic
Regulations: G8.1 - G8.3).
You can apply for extenuating circumstances online via myUCLan (this can be accessed as a
Useful Tool link on the Student Portal home page of the UCLan website) or use the paper
based system if your circumstances are such that you cannot access myUCLan. You must
submit claims within specified deadlines and submit corroborating evidence to the School
office. More information about deadlines and gaining access to envelopes is available from
the ‘i’ website.
You will be expected to re-submit claims for extenuating circumstances for each assessment
period. In determining assessment recommendations, Assessment Boards will consider
properly submitted claims from students who believe their performance has been adversely
affected by extenuating circumstances. N.B. Assessment Boards are not permitted to alter
individual assessment marks to take account of extenuating circumstances (Academic
Regulations: G12 and Appendix 8).

5.5.2 Late submissions
If you submit work late and unauthorised, a universal penalty will be applied in relation to
your work:

      If you submit work within 5 working days following the published submission date
       you will obtain a maximum mark of 40% for that element of assessment.
      Work submitted later than 5 working days after the published submission date will be
       awarded a mark of 0%.
      Unauthorised late submission at resubmission will automatically be awarded a mark
       of 0%.



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UCLan is committed to giving you clear, legible and informative feedback for all your
assessments (Academic Regulations: G3.7). You are expected to review and reflect on your
feedback and learn from each experience to improve your performance as you progress
though the course. You will be provided with generic feedback for in-module formative and
summative elements of assessment which contribute to a module within 15 working days of
the scheduled submission or examination date. Generic feedback on end of module
assessment and dissertations will be made available within 15 days of publication of results.
Feedback will be oral and written.


You are required to sign a declaration indicating that individual work submitted for an
assessment is your own.
If you attempt to influence the standard of the award you obtain through cheating, plagiarism
or collusion, it will be considered as a serious academic and disciplinary offence as described
within the Academic Regulations: G10 and Appendix 9 -
Unfair Means to Enhance Performance:

Cheating is any deliberate attempt to deceive and covers a range of offences described in
Appendix 9.
    Plagiarism describes copying from the works of another person without suitably
       attributing the published or unpublished works of others. This means that all quotes,
       ideas, opinions, music and images should be acknowledged and referenced within
       your assignments.
    Collusion is an attempt to deceive the examiners by disguising the true authorship of
       an assignment by copying, or imitating in close detail another student’s work - this
       includes with the other student’s consent and also when 2 or more students divide the
       elements of an assignment amongst themselves and copy one another’s answers. It
       does not include the normal situation in which you learn from your peers and share
       ideas, as this generates the knowledge and understanding necessary for each
       individual to independently undertake an assignment; nor should it be confused with
       group work on an assignment which is specifically authorised in the assignment brief.

The process of investigation and penalties which will be applied can be reviewed in the
Academic Regulations: Appendix 9. If an allegation is found to be proven then the
appropriate penalty will be implemented:
In the case of a single offence of cheating, plagiarism or collusion:

      the penalty will be 0% for the element of assessment, and an overall fail for the
       module.
      the plagiarised element of assessment must be resubmitted to the required standard
      and the mark for the module following resubmission will be restricted to a maximum
       of 40%.
      when it is detected for the first time on a resubmission for an already failed module,
       no further resubmission for the module will be permitted, and the appropriate fail
       grade will be awarded.



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In the event of a repeat offence of cheating, plagiarism or collusion (irrespective of whether
the repeat offence involves the same form of unfair means) on the same or any other module
within the course:The appropriate penalty will be 0% for the module with no opportunity for
re-assessment. This penalty does not preclude you being able to retake the module in a
subsequent year.
The penalties will apply if you transfer from one UCLan course to another during your period
of study and module credits gained on the former course are transferred to the current course.




If you consider that you have a reason to appeal against an assessment board decision, please
bear in mind that your reasons must fall within the grounds specified in the University
Academic Regulations: Section J. You cannot appeal simply because you disagree with the
mark given. The specified grounds for appeal are:

       that an Assessment Board has given insufficient weight to extenuating circumstances;
       that the student’s academic performance has been adversely affected by extenuating
        circumstances which the student has, for good reason, been unable to make known to
        the Assessment Board;
     that there has been a material administrative error at a stage of the examining process,
        or that some material irregularities have occurred;
     that the assessment procedure and/or examinations have not been conducted in
        accordance with the approved regulations.
If you want to appeal, then you must do so within 7 days of your results being published. The
onus is on you to find out your results and submit your appeal on time. Contact the Students'
Union Advice Centre suadvice@uclan.ac.uk for support and advice.
For the publishing of results please refer to the UCLan academic calendar.




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This course requires a passing mark on all modules. For marks details please the appendix.


The University publishes the principles underpinning the way in which awards and results are
decided in Academic Regulation I 3. Decisions about the overall classification of awards are
made by Assessment Boards through the application of the academic and relevant course
regulations. It is based on the Average Percentage Mark (APM) or, at the discretion of the
Course Assessment Board, on the basis of your overall profile and performance subject to the
minimum requirements detailed in I3.9.1:
‘at the discretion of the Assessment Board, students may be classified according to the
academic judgement of the Assessment Board taking into account their overall profile and
performance with the minimum requirement that:

   1. Half or more of the counting modules for APM purposes must be in the classification
      awarded (or above) and
   2. The APM is no lower than 2 percentage points below that required for the higher
      classification.’

In operating discretion for profiling Course Assessment Boards will use academic judgement
and may refer to performance in core modules; the placement component, the
dissertation/project or other factors which have been published to students.




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You can play an important part in the process of improving the quality of this course through
the feedback you give. In addition to the ongoing discussion with the course team throughout
the year, there are a range of mechanisms for you to feedback about your experience of
teaching and learning. We aim to respond to your feedback and let you know of our plans for
improvement.
Student feedback has resulted in changing the nature of some of the practical assignments in
this course and brought about a variety of guest speakers to visit the School.
The SLO and the Students Union can support you in voicing your opinion, provide ongoing
advice and support, and encourage your involvement in all feedback opportunities. They will
be requesting that you complete the National Student Survey (during semester 2 for students
in their final year of study) or the UCLan Student Survey (all other students).


The course team will make arrangements for you to elect a course representative who can
represent any issues you may have to the course team within Student Staff Liaison
Committee meetings. If you are interested in becoming a course representative yourself and
wish to find out more about the role you can visit the Student Union and Student Liaison
Officer sites for more information and volunteer for the role when the opportunity arises.


The purpose of a SSLC meeting is to provide the opportunity for course representatives to
feedback to staff about the course, the overall student experience and to inform developments
which will improve future courses. These meetings are normally scheduled once per
semester. Your Course Leader will facilitate the meetings using Guidelines for SSLCs and
provide a record of the meeting with any decisions and / or responses made and / or actions
taken as a result of the discussions held. The meetings include discussion of items forwarded
by course representatives, normally related to the following agenda items (dependent on time
of year). Your Student Liaison Officer will be invited to attend and support the resolution of
any issues. The course team encourage student feedback in all areas and recognise that
additional items for discussion may also be raised at the meeting.
     Update on actions completed since the last meeting
     Feedback about the previous year – discussion of external examiner’s report;
        outcomes of - National /UCLan student surveys.
     Review of enrolment / induction experience;
     Course organisation and management (from each individual year group, and the
        course overall);
     Experience of modules - teaching, assessment, feedback;
     Experience of academic support which may include e.g. Personal Development
        Planning, personal tutoring arrangements and The Card;
     Other aspects of University life relevant to student experience e.g. resources, IT,
        library;
     Any other issues raised by students or staff.




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Course representative are selected in student-only class sessions. The class representative
then establishes a group webpage to communicate various meeting dates and other class
business and activities.


Module evaluation questionnaires provide one of the most important means for you to
express your opinion about your teaching and learning experience. They capture feedback on
your experience within each module and inform staff about where improvements could be
made. Your module leaders will ensure that you receive the forms for completion either paper
based or on-line, please complete and return these to ensure your voice is heard - all
responses are anonymous. You are likely to see the module team responses to previous
student feedback in your module handbooks / information packs.


The University recognises that there may be occasions when you have cause for complaint
about the service you have received, when this happens, the complaints procedure is intended
to provide an accessible, fair and straightforward system which ensures as effective, prompt
and appropriate response. Click on this link for more information:
http://www.uclan.ac.uk/information/services/sss/quality/ss_comps.php




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The modified table (shown below) reflects the exact information provided to students when
they receive their transcripts and takes account of the grade descriptors used at Assessment
Boards.

Section 4.8    Pass and Fail Grades

In line with University Regulations, the pass mark for all assessments is 40%. If you do not
achieve this grade the Assessment Board will recommend referral. You will either be offered
a resit examination or a piece of referral coursework to be submitted by a certain date. On
completion of referral work the maximum mark available is 40%. A student who fails to pass
such a referral may be offered the opportunity to re-take the module or take a different
module in the next academic year. This will enable you to keep on track accumulating the
correct number of modules at the appropriate stages of your programme. In some cases the
Assessment Board will use its discretion to condone a module.

The table below outlines the University’s current grading scheme.

       Grade        Percentage         Description                   Honours Degree
                    Mark                                             Equivalent

                    85 - 100           Outstanding

                    75 - 84            Excellent                     First

                    70 - 74            Very Good



                    67 - 69            Good +

                    64 - 66            Good                          Upper Second

                    60 - 63            Good -



                    57 -59             Average +

                    54 - 56            Average                       Lower Second

                    50 - 53            Average -




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                    45 - 49             Satisfactory +

                    41 -44              Satisfactory -               Third

                    40                  Bare Minimal Pass



                    0 -39*              Fail                         Fail




The above table is provided as a general guide to performance. In arriving at a final degree
classification decision, Assessment Boards will consider a student’s overall profile and
performance in core elements of the course of study.

* Marks in this band may be accompanied by the grade descriptor R, X or C.

Key to Grades/Grade Descriptors

Grade                    Description

D                        Distinction in placement

M                        Merit in placement

P                        Pass

S                        Satisfactory

U                        Unsatisfactory

F                        Fail (where aggregate module mark is 40% or above but a
                         compulsory element is failed or none submission in one of the
                         components)

I                        Decision deferred

IR                       Decision deferred at reassessment

NG                       Not graded

Z                        Associate/Exchange student: not assessed



Grade Descriptor         Description




University of Central Lancashire               2010                                            31
MA Journalism Studies                                                     Course Handbook


C                       Condoned failed module

R                       Fail: reassessment recommended

X                       Fail: reassessment not taken up




Recommendation          Description

Deferred                Insufficient information was available to the Assessment
                        Board to come to a decision.

Referred                An overall pass has not been achieved and reassessment is
                        required in one or more modules.




University of Central Lancashire           2010                                       32

				
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