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SuperVision

VIEWS: 49 PAGES: 14

  • pg 1
									SuperVision



     The Glue of Curriculum
     Leadership
SuperVision



  Supervision   is
   Leadership
  Leadership is
   supervision
School Types

   Conventional School – dependence, hierarchy,
    professional isolation
   Congenial School – friendly social interaction and
    professional isolation
   Collegial School – purposeful adult interaction about
    school-wide teaching and learning
           Which type of school is yours?
           What type of supervision do you have?
               - administrators? - department chairs?
Paradigm Shift in Supervision

   Collegial rather than hierarchical relationship
    between teachers and supervisor.
   Supervision is province of teachers and supervisors.
   Focus on teacher growth rather than teacher
    compliance.
   Teacher collaboration in instructional improvement
    efforts is facilitated by supervisor
   Teacher is engaged in ongoing reflective inquire,
    best practices implementation, and action research.

                     Why should we shift gears?
SuperVision

 “ common vision of what teaching and
 learning can and should be, developed
 collaboratively by formally designated
 supervisors, teachers, and other members of
 the school community.” (Glickman, 2009)

          How would this work?
          What are the pitfalls?
          How do we monitor success?
Supervision as Glue

 “the process by which some person or group
 is responsible for providing a link between
 individual teacher needs and organizational
 goals so that individuals in school can work
 in harmony toward their vision of what the
 school should be.” (Bernstein 2004)
    Who is the glue in your school?
    What impediments do your see to
    making the glue stick?
                    SuperVision for Successful Schools

Prerequisites        Functions         Tasks           Unification         Product


                                           Direct
                                         Assistance

    Knowledge                                             Organizational
                                                             Goals
                                           Group
                                        Development

                                                                           Improved
                                                                            Student
    Interpersonal                       Professional
                                                                            Learning
        Skills                          Development
                         SuperVision
                             as                              Teacher
                         Development                          Needs
                                          Curriculum
     Technical                           Development
       Skills



                                            Action
                                           Research




                                                        (Glickman,2009)



Which elements are currently in place in your school?
Why are schools the way they are?
    (One room schoolhouse is still present)

   Teacher isolation –physical & psychological
   Incessant psychological encounters
   Routine of teaching day – factory-like
   Inadequate new teacher induction – unstaged careers
   Unclear expectations
   Reality shock
   Environmental difficulties – survival mentality
   Inequity among schools
   Lack of shared technical culture – planning & performance
    standards
   Conservatism
Effective Schools Research

           Edmonds (1979)                   Austin & Reynolds (1990)
   Strong leadership                    Leadership, site management,
   Climate of expectations               staff stability & development
   Orderly but not rigid                Maximized learning time
    atmosphere                           Recognition of academic
   Communicate to students               success
    priority of learning the basics      Parental involvement & support
   Use of school resources to           Collaborative planning &
    maintain priorities                   collegial relationships
   Means of monitoring student &        Sense of community
    teachers achievement                 Clear, commonly shared goals
                                         Order & discipline
Effective Supervision

                                   Is developmental
It took five                       Sets priority on
                                    teambuilding
  years for                        Creates professional
                                    togetherness

   it to gel!                      Shares a common
                                    purpose
(Local high school principal)      Believes collective action
                                    will make a difference
Six Types of Teachers


Irreplaceables
   - most talented, little chance of replacing,
     parent seek out, 5-10% of staff
        Wows – leads building-wide, positive, respected,
                positive effect on students, teacher of
                teachers
        Impacters – impact limited to students, loved by
                parents, willing to do extracurricular
                activities, staff jealous
Six Types of Teachers – cont.

The Solids
  - largest group of teachers, “yeomen” of staff,
    dependable, hardworking, good job most of the
    time, can be led to be better teachers , 80%
       Stabilizers – what you see is what you get,
                      consistent in class or on field
       Dow Jonesers – variable performance, talent
                          varies with task, peaks and
                          valleys, run out of steam
Six Types of Teachers – cont.

The Replacement Level
  - bottom 5-10% of staff, barely in major leagues, easily replaced
  with better
        Harmless – not very good but not awful, few
                  parent complaints, contributed little,
                  audience for negative leaders
        Negative Force – “addition by subtraction”, school better
                  without them, negative with kids, lots of griping,
                  leavers a trace wherever they go (slug), draws
                  others in.
Six Types of Teachers

Are there other categories of teachers?
How do you determine which type of teachers you have
  in your building?
What percentage of each type do you have –
  realistically?
What do you do with each type to improve student
  achievement?
When hiring, how do you identify the teacher type?
With the Solids, what can you do to improve them?

								
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