Docstoc

Internet Safety

Document Sample
Internet Safety Powered By Docstoc
					INTERNET SAFETY
SAFETY BY AGE
                Age 4 - 7
• Greatest risk is seeing inappropriate
  content online
• Use child safe search engines
• Allow them to access sites
  you have screened and
  approved
               Age 7 - 10
• Beginning to look outside of the family for
  social validation
• Beginning to be affected by peer pressure
• Want to begin exploration on their own
• Important to stay nearby
• Keep the computer in a central place
  (kitchen, family room)
• They are still monitored but feel
  independent
               Age 10 - 12
• Key is not just what they see and do on
  the internet, but how much time
• Be sure they are involved in other
  activities
• Starting to form their own values
• Credibility is a key issue
• Not everything they see on
  the internet is true or valuable
              Age 12 - 14
• Very social at this age
• Chat is the big online activity
• Important to go over basic privacy rules
• Sexual curiosity is beginning
• Internet filters
• Playing games and
  downloading games
• Monitoring software
• Important to create a climate of trust and
  openness
• Continual reinforcement of family values
              Age 14 - 17
• Very anxious to experience independence
  away from parents
• there is always the possibility that he will
  meet someone online who makes him feel
  good and makes him want to strike up an
  in-person relationship. It is extremely
  important that teens understand that
  people they meet online are not
  necessarily who they seem to be.
KINDS OF RISKS
KINDS OF RISKS
1.   Meeting Someone Online
2.   Loss of Privacy
3.   Getting Into Online "Fights"
4.   File-Sharing/Peer-to-Peer Programs
5.   Making Threats/Law Breaking
6.   Inappropriate Material
7.   If I read it online is it true?
8.   Putting People In Jeopardy
9.   Drugs and Other Substances
MEETING SOMEONE ONLINE
• Dateline Video
• almost all young people who have left home on
  their own volition, usually after "meeting"
  someone online
• "luring"
• The vast majority of them are over 15 and
  female.
• luring is illegal, and if your child meets someone
  online whom you perceive to be a threat to her
  physical safety, contact law enforcement.
• Parents should take an interest in a child's "e-
  pals" just as they do with friends that kids bring
  home.
• Talk with your child about the dangers of getting
  together with someone they "meet" online.
• Restrict or monitor your child's use of chat
  functions.
• Monitor your child's e-mail and use of Internet
  newsgroups.
• Install a filter that restricts your child from giving
  out his or her name, address, and phone
  number.
• Video “Amy’s Choice”
         LOSS OF PRIVACY
• Dateline Video
• Disclosing your address, telephone number, or
  even your name to a stranger can put you or
  family members in danger.
• Children should also be instructed not to give
  out personal information to Web sites of
  companies and organizations, even if they have
  heard of them or have good feelings about them.
  (contests)
• Video “Tracking Theresa”
                       ONLINE FIGHTS

• The trouble with expressing anger on the
  Internet is that it's sometimes difficult to
  resolve disputes.
• you don't have the normal clues
• Emoticons can be helpful

• http://www.computeruser.com/resources/dictionary/emoticons.html
             FILE SHARING
• Video: GetNetWise | File-sharing Risks
• Peer-to-peer or file-sharing programs
  allow you to share your files with others
  on the Internet -- and vice versa.
• Sharing files with people you don't trust
  is a matter of hygiene -- and you should
  keep your computer as clean as possible.
• Many file-sharing programs allow children to
  access inappropriate audio and video clips --
  most of a sexually explicit nature.
• Many things available on file-sharing
  networks, including many movies, songs,
  and video games, are copyrighted by the
  owner.
• could put you in serious legal trouble.
• some file-sharing programs may expose
  your entire hard drive to all other users of
  the file-sharing software.
  – Tax information
  – Bank account information
            BULLYING/THREATS
• Video “Angela’s Experience”
• Kids should remember that anything they
  say about anyone can be viewed by
  people all over the world and can have a
  damaging effect on the person being
  talked about.
• If you or your child receive serious and
  frightening threats online, contact law
  enforcement.
INAPPROPRIATE MATERIAL
     •   Sexual content
     •   Violence
     •   Weapons
     •   Prejudice/hate
     •   Drugs/alcohol
• Set rules about where kids can go online and what to do
  if they stumble upon inappropriate sites.
• Keep any connected computer in a public area of the
  house (not a child's bedroom), and make sure that other
  family members walk in the room periodically.
• Consider not allowing children and teens to use the
  Internet if parents aren't home. You may wish to consider
  using time-limiting software to make sure that kids can
  go online only when you're around.
• Consider checking the browser history to see where kids
  have been and having a "talk" if they are visiting
  inappropriate sites.
• Consider installing monitoring software that tracks where
  kids have been.
• Consider installing filtering software that blocks kids from
  visiting sites that you feel are in appropriate.
 IF I READ IT ONLINE, IT’S TRUE
• make sense of the material they uncover and distinguish
  between fact, opinion, rumors, and lies.
• Learn how to use search engines and how to limit results
  of searches. You may wish to make use of some of the
  great kids' sites listed here on GetNetWise, or some of
  the safe search engines.
• Understand the difference between reliable and
  unreliable sources. Get to know the reliable sources on
  the Internet.
• Have kids cite all of their sources so that teachers and
  parents can help distinguish between reliable and
  unreliable sources.
What are the signs your child might
  be at risk for online danger?
 • Your child spends large amounts of
   time on-line, especially at night.
 • You find pornography on your child's
   computer.
 • Your child receives phone calls from
   men you don't know or is making calls,
   sometimes long distance, to numbers
   you don't recognize.
• Your child receives mail, gifts, or
  packages from someone you don't
  know.
• Your child turns the computer monitor
  off or quickly changes the screen on
  the monitor when you come into the
  room.
• Your child becomes withdrawn from
  the family.
• Your child is using an on-line account
  belonging to someone else.
  GetNetWise:




Tools for Families
        Browsers for Kids
• Ask Jeeves (http://www.ask.com/)
• Yahooligans
  (http://yahooligans.yahoo.com/)
• Kid’s Search Tools
  (http://www.rcls.org/ksearch.htm)
• Awesome Library for Kids
  (http://www.awesomelibrary.org/student.ht
  ml)
     REPORTING TROUBLE
      (http://kids.getnetwise.org/trouble/#contact)



             Identify the problem.
     Who should you contact for help?

Teach your child how to avoid trouble in the
                  future.
                        PLEDGES
•   http://www.netsmartz.org/resources/pledge.htm
•   http://www.girlscouts.org/internet_safety_pledge.asp
•   http://www.safekids.com/contract_kid.htm
•   http://yahooligans.yahoo.com/parents/familypledge.html
•   http://www.mcgruff.org/files/InternetSafetyPledge.pdf
•   http://www.girlscouts.org/internet_safety_pledge.asp
                       Resources
• http://www.animationusa.com/picts/hbpi
  ct/3_Microstone.jpg
• http://kids.getnetwise.org/
• http://www.netsmartz.org/
• http://www.fbi.gov/publications/pguide/p
  guidee.htm
• http://www.girlscouts.org/internet_safety
  _pledge.asp
• http://www.safekids.com/contract_kid.ht
  m
• http://www.mcgruff.org/files/InternetSaf
  etyPledge.pdf

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:21
posted:12/4/2011
language:English
pages:28