OKI FY 2010 UNIFIED PLANNING WORK PROGRAM

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					   OKI FY 2010
UNIFIED PLANNING
 WORK PROGRAM
         OKI FY 2010
      UNIFIED PLANNING
       WORK PROGRAM



          The preparation of this document was financed cooperatively by the Federal Highway
        Administration and the Federal Transit Administration of the United States Department of
     Transportation, the Ohio Department of Transportation, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet,
and local units of government within the OKI region. The opinions, findings, and conclusions expressed
 in this document are those of the author and are not necessarily those of the United States Department
        of Transportation. This report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation.




              Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments
                        720 East Pete Rose Way, Suite 420
                              Cincinnati, Ohio 45202

                                         www.oki.org
                                    Phone: (513) 621-6300
                                     Fax: (513) 621-9325
                                     TTY: (513) 621-6300

                                            April 9, 2009
                                                           CONTENTS


INTRODUCTION AND ORGANIZATION ..........................................................................I-1

PROSPECTUS .................................................................................................................. P-1

WORK PROGRAM

      600 TRANSPORTATION

              601      Short Range Planning ............................................................................. W-7
              602      Transportation Improvement Program ....................................................W-11
              605      Surveillance ..........................................................................................W-13
              610      Transportation Planning .........................................................................W-18
              625      Transportation Services .........................................................................W-26
              665      Special Studies ......................................................................................W-27
              667      Rideshare Activities ...............................................................................W-31
              674      JARC/Mass Transit Exclusive ..................................................................W-32
              684      Ohio Exclusive .......................................................................................W-38
              685      Indiana Exclusive ..................................................................................W-39
              686      Kentucky Exclusive ................................................................................W-41
              695      Unified Planning Work Program ..............................................................W-42
              697      Transportation Program Reporting ..........................................................W-43


      700 ENVIRONMENTAL

              710      Local Water Quality Activities ................................................................. W-44
              720      Mobile Source Emissions Planning .......................................................... W-50

      800 REGIONAL PLANNING ACTIVITIES ........................................................... W-51

TITLE VI PROGRAM COMPLIANCE ................................................................................ A-1

BUDGET

      Rationale for Funding.................................................................................................. B-1

      Budget Table .............................................................................................................. B-2

COST ALLOCATION PLAN ............................................................................................... C-1
Introduction
                                         INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION
The Fiscal Year 2010 Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP) outlines the scope of work to be
undertaken by OKI for the period beginning July 1, 2009 and ending June 30, 2010. This document
illustrates the relationship between adopted goals, objectives and program activities. It outlines the
general nature of these program elements, which are summarized by general categories, and are
referenced to specific projects by project number. Funding for development of this document is spread
among the various programs. Also included in this document is the agency prospectus which provides
the framework for the remainder of the document and consolidates key interagency agreements
according to OKI by-laws.
Primarily a management tool for planning and coordination, the UPWP provides the basis for
cataloging and integrating OKI's activities into general categories. It delineates the programmatic and
fiscal relationships essential for internal planning and programming.
STUDY AREA
The OKI region embraces an area of 2,636 square miles, with a population of 1,886,650 (Census
2000) in Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren counties in the State of Ohio; Boone, Campbell and
Kenton counties in the Commonwealth of Kentucky; and Dearborn County in the State of Indiana. The
OKI region is part of the 15-county Cincinnati-Middletown, OH-KY-IN Metropolitan Statistical Area
(June 2003 definition) with a population of 2,009,632 (Census 2000).




                                                  I-1
                                     PLANNING PRIORITIES

There are three key documents produced by the metropolitan planning process: the Unified Planning
Work Program, The Regional Transportation Plan and the Transportation Improvement Program.
These and other important activities are discussed below.

Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP) (Update Schedule: Yearly; Next Update: May 2010)
This document, prepared annually by OKI in cooperation with local and state officials, transit agencies
and others, documents all planning activities anticipated during the fiscal year regardless of funding
sources, while incorporating the comprehensive intermodal planning process. This continuous
planning process is responsive to the needs of the local area and to the changes occurring in the
region for which current data concerning land use, travel and transportation facilities must be
continuously maintained.

OKI Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) (Update Schedule: every four years; Next Update: June 2012)
The OKI Board of Directors adopted the OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan on June 12, 2008.
The Plan is amended as necessary. The Plan meets all the requirements of the Safe Accountable
Flexible Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) planning regulations. A
region that has adopted a Plan that is SAFETEA-LU compliant plan is permitted by the regulations to
switch from a three year Plan update cycle to a four year cycle. OKI has moved to a four year cycle.
The Plan serves as a blueprint for transportation projects in the region through the year 2030. It
addresses future needs created by growth and development. At the same time, it responds to
SAFETEA-LU and Clean Air Act requirements that call for mitigating congestion, addressing air quality
and other environmental, social and financial issues.
This Plan meets federal regulations in that it is constrained fiscally and with regard to mobile source
emissions (air quality). An expanded section related to community impacts and environmental justice
is included. As in the previous Plan, this Plan provides the framework for corridor studies and other
initiatives.

Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) (Update Schedule: every two years; Next Update: May 2011)
This document is developed every two years and reviewed periodically in cooperation with state and
local officials, regional and local transit operators and other affected transportation, regional planning
and implementing agencies. The TIP consists of improvements recommended from the short-range
planning process, elements of the long range plan and the transit development programs of the
various transit systems. Specifically, the TIP: 1) identifies transportation improvements recommended
for advancement during the four year program period; 2) indicates the area's priorities; 3) groups
improvements of similar urgency and anticipated staging into appropriate staging periods; 4) includes
realistic estimates of total costs and revenues for the program period, including year of expenditure
cost estimates; and 5) is financially constrained. The entire TIP is tested to establish its conformity
with the State Implementation Plan for air quality.
The TIP includes project-by-project listings which are modified periodically and contain: 1) sufficient
descriptive material of work, termini and length to identify the project; 2) estimated total cost and the
amount of federal funds proposed to be obligated during the program year; 3) proposed source of
federal and non-federal funds; and 4) identification of the recipient and state and local agencies
responsible for carrying out the project.

                                                   I-2
Mobile Source Emissions Analysis
Pursuant to provisions of the CAAA of 1990, U.S. EPA designated a nine county area in the Cincinnati
area as a basic nonattainment area for ozone under the eight-hour ozone standard in April 2004. In
December 2004, U.S. EPA designated an eight county Cincinnati area as nonattainment under the
annual fine particulate matter (PM2.5) standard. The Cincinnati ozone nonattainment area includes
Lawrenceburg Township in Dearborn County Indiana, the Kentucky counties of Boone, Campbell and
Kenton, and the Ohio counties of Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Hamilton and Warren (Figure 1). The
PM2.5 nonattainment area is identical except for the exclusion of Clinton County. The OKI Regional
Council of Governments, as the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), consists of Dearborn,
Boone, Campbell, Kenton, Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren counties. OKI’s Regional
Transportation Plan and Transportation Improvement Program address the MPO area only. The cities
of Franklin and Carlisle in Warren County are part of the Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission
(MVRPC) planning area. Projects within this portion of Warren County are included in OKI's conformity
analysis. Clinton County is outside of the OKI region, but is part of the nonattainment area. The Ohio
Department of Transportation (ODOT) is the lead planning agency for Clinton County and prepares the
emissions analysis for the Clinton County portion of the air quality conformity determination.

In 2004, OKI established a Clean Air Consortium of local business and government leaders to prioritize
emission reduction strategies and provide these recommendations to the state air agencies. The
Consortium recommendations for compliance with the ozone standard were completed in 2005.
Recommendations for attaining the PM2.5 standard were developed in early 2007. Several of these
recommendations were incorporated into revised State Implementation Plans (SIPs), demonstrating
future compliance with both the ozone and PM2.5 standards.




                                                 I-3
Corridor Studies
OKI has been a leader both regionally and nationally in initiating and managing corridor studies. Since
1997, 14 corridor studies have been completed by OKI. The I-471 Corridor Study, completed in
FY2008 was the most recent. These studies, a major component of the Long Range Plan, permit
detailed evaluation of problems and potential. In addition, OKI has overseen county transportation
plans or studies for Boone, Campbell, Kenton and Dearborn counties.

Transportation System Management (TSM)
The TSM element is included as part of the OKI Transportation Improvement Program. Inclusion of the
TSM activities in the TIP and specific reference to both the TIP and TSM in one resolution of adoption
indicates the close relationship between these two activities. In addition, TSM is addressed in OKI’s
transportation plan.

Congestion Management Process (CMP)
For the purpose of monitoring system performance, OKI has identified a regional Congestion
Management Network. It includes the roadways for which data are collected for identifying congestion
problems and needed improvements, and for assessing the effectiveness of implemented actions. The
congestion management network includes about 1,600 road miles that carry nearly 75% of the total
regional traffic.

Ongoing system monitoring is accomplished through various data acquisition techniques including: 1)
data-base management of traffic count data performed by OKI and its partners; (2) travel time
surveys on the congestion management network beginning with the National Highway System (NHS)
(this UPWP commits to year one of the third cycle); (3) real-time travel data from ARTIMIS; (4)
acquisition of transit ridership data from transit operators; (5) transit operational data from transit
operators; (6) periodic inventory of freight operations in the region; (7) periodic field review of the
region’s highway system attributes; (8) detailed travel data in ongoing transportation corridor study
areas; and (9) a framework for evaluating the effects of system improvements 10) integration of
household travel and transit on-board survey data to be collected in 2009 and 2010.

Transit Planning Assistance
OKI has provides ongoing transit planning assistance to all federally-funded of public transit systems in
the region: Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (SORTA), Transit Authority of Northern
Kentucky (TANK), the Middletown Transit System, Clermont Transportation Connection, Warren
County Transit Service and the Butler County Regional Transit Authority (BCRTA).

Specialized Transportation
OKI is actively involved in the review of Specialized Transportation Program applications from private,
nonprofit agencies in Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren counties. Each year, the OKI Intermodal
Coordinating Committee establishes a subcommittee which hears and scores oral presentations from
qualified applicants. The Job Access Reverse Commute/New Freedom planning coordination efforts
commenced in FY2006 and staff will complete the first JARC/New Freedom Plan as outlined in this
UPWP. The Plan will produce a coordinated approach to transit/paratransit investments for the region.



                                                   I-4
Transportation Enhancements (TE)
The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) annually allocates a portion of the state’s
Transportation Enhancement (TE) funding to OKI for distribution within the region. During the period
from 2000 through early 2008, a total of 31 projects in OKI’s four Ohio counties, utilizing $12.5 million
in TE funding, had been completed, three more are scheduled for sale in calendar year 2008 and two
more are programmed for CY 2009. In addition, about a dozen more projects are considered to be in
active stages of development, and many of these should be ready for funding during the coming
years. Please refer to Appendix A of the 2030 Regional Transportation Plan for details and a project
listing.

Technical Services
OKI has for many years allocated a portion of its resources to the provision of technical assistance to
units of local government in the areas of transportation planning, traffic engineering and process
consultation. While this does not constitute a major element of the agency’s overall mission, it is a
service which is greatly appreciated by local governments, many of which do not have either the
staffing or the financial resources to have access to these types of services on their own. Specifically,
OKI has provided technical services and acted in an umbrella capacity for three multi-jurisdictional trail
system development efforts in recent years.

RideShare
OKI’s RideShare service has been operational for 30 years. RideShare is a voluntary,
employer-oriented activity to increase vehicle occupancy, decrease miles of travel and improve air
quality. A full-time staff person is devoted to promoting and operating RideShare. The strategies
include direct marketing to major employers, their employees, the general public, and community
groups. Promotional tools include freeway and arterial signing bearing the 241-RIDE telephone
number, brochures, radio advertising including drive time reports, and bus signs.

Participation Plan, Title VI, ADA and Section 504
For many years OKI planning activities have had an active public outreach component. In 2007, the
agency adopted an updated Participation Plan (formerly known as a Public Involvement Plan and
Environmental Justice Program). A minor amendment was adopted in 2008. OKI is dedicated to
ensuring a fair and equitable planning process and business practice. The OKI Participation Plan
outlines processes for consultations practices related to the Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBE),
Title IV and Section 504 of Rehabilitation Act of 1973 requirements. OKI has dedicated staff to ensure
compliance with and support of the Council’s responsibilities and practices related to these issues.




                                                   I-5
Strategic Policy Plan

Pursuant to its charge of maintaining a comprehensive, cooperative and continuing transportation
planning process, OKI adopted a strategic regional policy plan in 2005. In addition to addressing
federal transportation planning mandates, the plan was conceived to save limited tax dollars through
better coordination of local land use planning and regional transportation planning. Specifically, the
plan encourages land use patterns that promote multimodal travel and the efficient use of land,
natural resources, and public facilities.

The strategic plan is direction-setting for the tri-state region, not just for the OKI COG/MPO. It
promotes cooperative planning and decision-making throughout the tri-state region, and involves OKI,
local governments, special districts, state and federal agencies, and the private and civic sectors. The
strategic plan also verifies and emphasizes that people live at the scale of the region, moving through
multiple jurisdictions several times a day to work, shop, or seek entertainment. It also emphasizes
that taxpayers finance the pattern of land development and infrastructure.

Implementation of the strategic plan is taking place pursuant to an action plan and timeline
established in FY 06. Implementation is being accomplished by various jurisdictions and organizations
on a voluntary basis and by OKI.

General Coordination Efforts Between OKI, State DOTs, FHWA, FTA, RTAs

OKI has worked closely with the ODOT, KYTC, INDOT, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA),
Federal Transit Administration (FTA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), SORTA, TANK,
Middletown Transit Service, Clermont Transportation Connection, Warren County Transit and BCRTA in
developing the multimodal approach to planning for the region. OKI has also coordinated with and
been a participant in the development of many studies including each of the state-wide transportation
plans. OKI shares data with the various planning partners and agencies and provides technical
assistance whenever possible.

Work Performance Responsibility
All work is performed by staff except where indicated. OKI may contract with consulting firms using
OKI’s procurement procedures which are consistent with federal Circular A-87. Consultants provide
access to additional resources and expertise. Elements utilizing consultants are identified in the text of
each element. The budgeted amounts are identified within the Budget tables (Section B).




                                                   I-6
FY 2010 Unified Planning Work Program Highlights

1) 601- Short Range Planning: Assistance to local jurisdictions in development of pedestrian and
    bike planning activities including Safe Routes to School programs, access management plans and
    the continuation of an active transportation enhancement (TE) program.
2) 602 - Transportation Improvement Program: Staff will continue an active program
    oversight. On-line mapping tools for the TIP projects will continue to be refined.
3) 605 - Surveillance: Continued enhancement of GIS system capabilities. Staff will continue to
    work with ODOT to assist with the GPS-based household travel survey. The data will be integrated
    into the OKI Travel Demand Model. On-going collection of travel data will continue. OKI will assist
    the Census Bureau in providing data, processing census data, reviewing census products, and
    promoting census programs as needed and appropriate. Partnering with Hamilton County
    Emergency Management to develop datasets useful for both agencies.
4) 610 - Transportation Planning: Continue an aggressive congestion management (CMP)
    program. Continue to implement a strategic regional policy plan for growth and development.
    Application and maintenance of a fiscal impact model for application in the OKI region. Local
    comprehensive plan guidance, sample ordinances, and collateral materials. Coordination with
    federal, state, regional, and local agencies to advance the transportation goals for the region.
5) 625.2 - Transportation Services - Participation Plan: Implementation of the updated
    participation plan. Formerly known as the Environmental Justice Policy, OKI's policy for public
    involvement is now titled Participation Plan. On-going support of area studies will be conducted.

6) 665.1 – OKI Freight Study - The major undertaking and cost of this study will be acquiring
    sufficient freight data to understand current and future freight movements within the OKI region.
    In addition, OKI will actively engage the freight community, specifically private freight businesses.

7) 665.4 - Regional Clean Air Program: Protecting public health and the local economy while
    working towards the attainment of the national ozone and particulate matter standards is the aim
    of this program. Surveying residents of the region to gauge awareness will allow for effective
    decision making as well as efficient expenditure of funds.
8) 665.6 - GPS Travel Survey: This work element includes the Kentucky portion of the regional
    travel survey being conducted by ODOT. The funds will be used as payment for consultant
    services for the Kentucky portion of regional household surveys. This survey updates data last
    collected in 1995.
9) 667.1 – RideShare Activities: Continue to provide transportation alternatives to commuters
    within the Tri-State area, thereby providing energy conservation, traffic and pollution reduction
    and preserving the quality of life in the OKI region.
10) 674.1/674.2 - Job Access Reverse Commute/New Freedom: The governors of Ohio and
    Kentucky and have identified OKI as the designated recipient for federal funds for job access and
    reverse commute (Section 5316) and the New Freedom Program (Section 5317). OKI completed
    development of the Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan. OKI will
    assist in the implementation and funding of Plan elements.
11) 674.4 – New Freedom Pass Through: OKI, as the designated recipient for New Freedom
    funds, is responsible for managing the projects operated by two entities in the region providing
    services but not identified as “designated recipients” under FTA regulations. OKI serves as the

                                                  I-7
     oversight agency to ensure all federal requirements are met for Community Cab and Wesley
     Community Services. OKI will collect monthly or quarterly progress reports from each program.
12) 684.9 - Ohio Exclusive: Eastern Corridor Study – Part B: SR-32 Corridor in Hamilton and
     Clermont Counties Preliminary Development Phase. Project managed by Hamilton County TID.
13) 685.1 - Indiana Exclusive: Dearborn County Transportation Planning: Continue elements
     of the 3C planning process for Dearborn County.
14) 685.2 - Indiana Exclusive: Dearborn County Transportation Planning: This work element
     will supplement the activities listed in 685.1 as necessary.
15) 686.3 - Kentucky Exclusive – Safety and Operations Studies: Studies to be identified
     based on resources and needs of KYTC-D6.
16) 695.1 - Unified Planning Work Program – Develop produce and disseminate a FY2010 UPWP
     that responds to transportation planning requirements.
17) 697.1 - Transportation Program Reporting – A transportation report summarizing the major
     findings and activities of the OKI transportation planning process.
18) 710.1 - Local Water Quality Activities: Provide technical support for local agencies as time
     and resources permit.
19) 710.4 – St. Clair Township Zoning Code Update: Assist St. Clair Township (Butler
     County) in updating the Township Zoning Ordinance to reflect recommendations of the
     recently adopted Comprehensive Plan related to source water protection.
20) 710.6 - Water Quality Program: Continue to refine the base information and
     recommendations in the Regional Water Quality Management (“208”) Plan. As part of those
     activities, OKI is heightening awareness of water quality issues through public education and
     participation in groundwater projects and watershed initiatives.
21) 710.7 - Water Quality Program (Recovery Act Funds): OKI was allocated a portion of
     money from Ohio EPA to enhance and update the Regional Water Quality Management plan for its
     Ohio communities. Staff will develop an updated electronic 208 Plan for Butler, Clermont,
     Hamilton and Warren counties in Ohio based on available datasets such as US Census, existing
     studies and plans, and available GIS data.
22) 710.8 – Dearborn County Water Quality Management Plan Update: Staff will conduct
     water quality planning and technical analysis that will include information on point and non-point
     sources and management, growth areas, and consultation with stakeholders and the public. The
     current water quality management plan for Dearborn County, Indiana will be updated.
23) 710.9 – Water Quality Program/Ohio General Assembly: OKI staff will produce an
     electronically available updated map of Facility Planning Areas (FPA) boundaries and table of
     updated designated management agencies by FPA as part of a complete version of the 208 Plan
     for Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren counties in Ohio using Ohio General Assembly funds.
24) 720.1 – Mobile Source Emissions Planning: Conformity analysis for the transportation plan
     and TIP amendments. Continue coordination with state and federal agencies regarding air quality
     planning issues.
25) 800.1 – Regional Planning Activities: Conduct analyses of economic development trends
     and issues.



                                                  I-8
Prospectus
                                             MISSION

The Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments (OKI) is a council of local governments,
business organizations and community groups committed to developing collaborative strategies, plans
and programs which will improve the quality of life and the economic development potential of the Tri-
state.


                                         PLANNING AREA
The OKI region embraces an area of 2,636 square miles, with a population of 1,886,650 (Census 2000)
in Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren counties in the State of Ohio; Boone, Campbell and Kenton
counties in the Commonwealth of Kentucky; and Dearborn County in the State of Indiana. The OKI
region is part of the 15-county Cincinnati-Middletown, OH-KY-IN Metropolitan Statistical Area (June
2003 definition) with a population of 2,009,632 (Census 2000).




4/24/2009                                        P-1
                                  ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

OKI is governed by a Board of Director’s and an Executive Committee. The Board of Director’s is
empowered to control all activities of the Council of Governments. The Executive Committee has all the
powers necessary to act in the name of the director’s. The Board of Director’s elects a President, First
Vice-President, Second Vice-President and Treasurer. The OKI Executive Director serves as Secretary.
The term of office for the members of the Board of Director’s, Executive Committee and elected
officers is one year or until successors have been selected and qualified. The President serves as the
Chairperson of the Executive Committee.
The Board of Director’s consists of:
•   One official elected by the governing body of each member county;
•   One elected official from each municipal corporation having a population over 5,000 (if any state in
    the region does not have a municipal corporation of this size, this member will be selected from the
    elected officials of the largest municipal corporation in the region within the state);
•   One elected public official of each township located in each Member county located in Ohio, which
    township has a population of 40,000 or more persons according to the Approved Census, such
    person to be selected by the governing body of the township concerned, plus
•   One elected public official of a township located in each member county located in Ohio, which
    township has a population of less than 40,000 persons according to the approved census, such
    elected public official to be selected by the Association(s) of Township Directors and Clerks, or its
    equivalent, in those counties where such a body or bodies exists. If there is no selection by an
    appropriate Association of Township Directors and Clerks or if more than one Association could
    select such an elected public official, the COUNCIL may elect such an elected public official, plus
•   One elected public official of each Member county located in Indiana and Kentucky or of a
    municipal corporation within such Member county, such public official to be selected by the
    respective Member county.
•   One person selected by each area or county planning agency within the region;
•   One person selected from each municipal planning agency of any municipal corporation having a
    population of over 40,000;
•   Not more than 20 non-elected residents of the OKI region;
•   Not more than ten (10) other elected public officials of general purpose local government from
    counties, municipal corporations, townships, special districts or other political subdivisions within
    the OKI Region, or persons responsible to such officials, as the Board of Directors may select.
•   One person selected by each of the Departments or Cabinets of Transportation of Ohio, Kentucky
    and Indiana.
•   One person selected by each of the Boards of Trustees of the Southwest Ohio Regional Transit
    Authority, the Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky and the Butler County Regional Transit
    Authority.

The constituency of the elected public officials of the Board must represent 75 percent of the
aggregate population of the OKI region, and at least two-thirds of the director’s must be officials
elected by the residents of the region.
The Executive Committee consists of:
•   The President, First Vice-President, Second Vice-President and Treasurer of the Board of Director’s;
•   Each Director selected pursuant to Article III, Paragraph B, Section 1.a., that is, an elected public
    official from each member county;
•   Each Director selected from each municipal corporation having a population exceeding 40,000;


4/24/2009                                          P-2
•   Three Directors (one from each state within the OKI Region), selected pursuant to Article III,
    Paragraph B, Section 1b, each of whom was elected by a municipal corporation having a population
    less than 40,000. The Board of Directors shall select which of its members so qualifying shall serve
    on the Executive Committee.
•   Four Directors selected pursuant to Article III, Paragraph B, Section 1.c (ii) or (iii). The Board of
    Directors shall select which of its members so qualifying shall serve on the Executive Committee;
    provided that if possible, the Board of Directors shall select at least one Director who represents a
    township in Ohio having a population of less than 40,000 pursuant to Article III, Paragraph B,
    Section 1.c (ii).
•   Each Director selected by each legally constituted area or regional planning agency;
•   Three additional Director’s selected by the Board;
•   One representative each from the Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky Board of Directors, the
    Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority Board of Trustees; and Butler County Regional Transit
    Authority.
•   Representatives from the State Departments of Transportation.
Each member of the Executive Committee, may nominate one alternate to represent and to take the
place of that member for all purposes including voting, at any meeting of the Executive Committee
from which that member is absent. The constituency requirements and length of term for the
Executive Committee are identical to that of the Board of Director’s. The Board and/or the Executive
Committee may create any committees they deem appropriate and necessary. Current standing
committees include the Budget Committee (a subgroup of the Executive Committee), Intermodal
Coordinating Committee (ICC), Groundwater Committee, ARTIMIS Advisory Committee, Regional
Incident Management Task Force, OKI Land Use Commission, and the Environmental Justice Advisory
Committee.
The Executive Director is the administrator of OKI, responsible for carrying out the policies and
programs of the Board of Director’s and its Executive Committee and applicable federal and state laws
and regulations. The Executive Director has the authority to employ, assign, supervise and release all
employees of OKI, within the framework and general limitations and policies established by the Board
of Director’s and its Executive Committee.

                                           2009 OFFICERS

                     President                                    Steve Pendery
                     First Vice President                       Edwin Humphrey
                     Second Vice President                   Michael F. Juengling
                     Treasurer                                  Kenneth F. Reed
                     Past President                          Christine L. Matacic
                     Secretary                                  Mark R. Policinski

                                      EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

                    Ken Bogard             Gregory Jolivette     Roxanne Qualls
                    William Brayshaw       Michael Juengling     Ken Rechtin
                    Keith Corman           Kimberly Lapensee     Kenneth F. Reed
                    William Cunningham     David Linnenberg      Peggy Reis
                    Ralph A. Drees         Christine Matacic     Elmo Rose
                    Elizabeth Fennell      Larry Maxey           Mike Snyder
                    Cathy Flaig            Robert McGee          Steve Stevens

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                  Dale Furtwengler        Steve Megerle     Catherine Stoker
                  Ralph B. Grieme, Jr.    Gary W. Moore     Jim Ude
                  Robert Hans             Larry Mulligan    Brad Williams
                  Jeff L. Hughes          Jim O’Reilly      Joseph Wolterman
                  Edwin Humphrey          Dave Okum         David G. Young
                  Hans Jindal             Steve Pendery
                  Archie Johnson          Todd B. Portune


                                  2009 OKI BOARD OF DIRECTORS

MEMBER COUNTIES

Gary W. Moore, Boone County Fiscal Court
Gregory Jolivette, Butler County Board of Commissioners
Steve Pendery, Campbell County Fiscal Court
Edwin Humphrey, Clermont County Board of Commissioners
Jeff L. Hughes, Dearborn County Board of Commissioners
Todd B. Portune, Hamilton County Board of Commissioners
Ralph A. Drees, Kenton County Fiscal Court
David G. Young, Warren County Board of Commissioners

MUNICIPALITIES WITH POPULATION OVER 5,000

W. David Hart, Alexandria, KY
Steve Brun, Bellevue, KY
James W. Sumner, Blue Ash, OH
James Babey, Cheviot, OH
Roxanne Qualls, Cincinnati, OH
Steve Megerle, Covington, KY
Robert Allen, Dayton, KY
Andy Diehm, Deer Park, OH
Steven Jaeger, Edgewood, KY
G. Aaron Huff, Elsmere, KY
Thomas Cahill, Erlanger, KY
Michael D. Snyder, Fairfield, OH
Diane Whalen, Florence, KY
Wynndel Burn, Forest Park, OH
Thomas E. Holocher, Ft. Mitchell, KY
Mary H. Brown, Ft. Thomas, KY
Joseph Nienaber, Jr., Ft. Wright, KY
Archie Johnson, Hamilton, OH
Randy Shank, Harrison, OH
Gregory V. Meyers, Highland Heights, KY
Mary Pat Behler, Independence, KY
Joseph Beech, III, Indian Hill, OH
William Cunningham, Lawrenceburg, IN
Jeffrey D. Monroe, Ph.D., Lebanon, OH
Mark Fitzgerald, Loveland, OH
Richard Staunbach, Madeira, OH

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Tony Bradburn, Mason, OH
Lawrence Mulligan, Middletown, OH
David Hunter, Milford, OH
Steven Tannreuther, Monroe, OH
Lynda Roesch, Montgomery, OH
William DeBruler, Mt. Healthy, OH
Beth Fennell, Newport, KY
Thomas H. Graves, Sr., North College Hill, OH
Victor Schneider, Norwood, OH
Kenneth H. Bogard, Oxford, OH
Robert Ashbrock, Reading, OH
Virgil G. Lovitt, II, Sharonville, OH
Mark Quarry, Silverton, OH
Kathy McNear, Springdale, OH
Cindi Bedinghaus, St. Bernard, OH
Dan Bell, Taylor Mill, KY
Rhonda Freeze, Trenton, OH
Mike Sadouskas, Villa Hills, KY
James T. O’Reilly, Wyoming, OH

BOARDS OF TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES 40,000 OR MORE POPULATION
Peggy D. Reis, Anderson Township
Joseph Wolterman, Colerain Township
David Linnenberg, Green Township
Bob McGee, Union Township
Catherine Stoker, West Chester

BOARDS OF TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES UNDER 40,000 OR MORE POPULATION
Christine Matacic, Butler County Association of Townships Trustee & Clerks
T.J. Corcoran, Clermont County Township Association
Thomas Weidman, Hamilton County Township Association
Elmo Rose, Warren County Association of Township Trustee & Clerks

PUBLIC OFFICIALS FROM KENTUCKY AND INDIANA
Ken Rechtin, Campbell County Fiscal Court
Cathy Flaig, Boone County Fiscal Court
Kris Knochelmann, Kenton County Commissioner
Donnie Hastings, Aurora, Indiana

PLANNING COMMISSIONS
Greg Breetz, Boone County Planning Commission
Michael F. Juengling, Butler County Planning Commission
Mike Williams, Campbell County Planning & Zoning Commission
Andy Johns - Clermont County Planning Commission
Mark McCormack, Dearborn County Planning Commission
David Okum, Hamilton County Regional Planning Commission


4/24/2009                                        P-5
John R. Wells, Kenton County Planning Commission
Ralph B. Grieme, Jr., Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission
Warren County Regional Planning Commission

MUNICIPAL PLANNING COMMISSIONS 40,000 OR MORE POPULATION

Charles Graves, Councilmember, Cincinnati (City) Planning Commission
Timothy Bachman, Fairfield (City) Planning Commission
Teri A. Whitmore, Hamilton (City) Planning Commission
Martin D. Kohler, Middletown (City) Planning Commission

RESIDENTS

Craig Beckley, Dearborn County Association of TT&C
Shannon H. Barrow, Citizens for Civic Renewal
Keith N. Corman, Citizen
Scott Croswell, Clermont County Board of Commissioners
Don Dixon, Butler County Board of Commissioners
Greg Hartmann, Hamilton County Board of Commissioners
Joyce Kinley, The Amos Project
Larry Maxey, Citizen
Pamela Mullins, Cincinnati Public Schools
David Pepper, Hamilton County Board of Commissioners
Bob Proud, Clermont County Board of Commissioners
Kenneth F. Reed, Citizen
James N. Ritter, Citizen
Mike Rozow, Dearborn County Chamber of Commerce
Sean Rugless, Greater Cincinnati & N. Kentucky African American Chamber of Commerce
V. Anthony Simms-Howell, Ohio Commission on Hispanic/Latino Affairs
Steve Stevens, N. Kentucky Area Chamber of Commerce
Pat Arnold South, Warren County Board of Commissioners
Ellen van der Horst, Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber

OTHER ELECTED OFFICIALS

William Brayshaw, Hamilton County Engineer’s Office
Courtney Combs, Ohio State Representative
Eric H. Kearney, Ohio State Senator
Pat Manger, Clermont County Engineer’s Office
Sal Santoro, Kentucky State Representative
Neil Tunison, Warren County Engineer’s Office
Gregory Wilkens, Butler County Engineer’s Office

PERSONS RESPONSIBLE TO ELECTED OFFICIALS OR FROM
SPECIAL PURPOSE DISTRICTS

H. Lawson Walker, Kenton County Airport Board
Dennis Andrew Gordon, Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission
MaryLynn Lodor, Mill Creek Watershed Council of Communities



4/24/2009                                       P-6
VOTING EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS

Jim Ude, Indiana Department of Transportation
Robert Hans, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet
Hans Jindal, Ohio Department of Transportation
Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority
Dale Furtwengler, Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky
Brad W. Williams, Butler County Regional Transit Authority


                                  OKI LAND USE COMMISSION
                            (Entire Board serves – Mel Martin, Chairman)



                          INTERMODAL COORDINATING COMMITTEE
                                  Peter J. Klear, Chairman
        Marsha Ball                   Valerie Griffin              Emmanuel Nsonwu
        Tim Bender                    Jerry Haddix                 Jim O’Reilly
        Mike Bezold                   James (J.R.) Ham             Janice Osadczuk
        John Braun                    Ted Hubbard                  Ronald Porter
        Peggy Brickweg                Helen Hunter                 Ralph Reigelsperger
        Scott Brunka                  Andy Johns                   Cheri Rekow
        Benjamin Capelle              Michael F. Juengling         Timothy J. Reynolds
        Cory Chadwick                 James P. Jurgensen           Roger Rolfes
        Jun-Han Chen                  Martha Kelly                 Kim Satzger
        Kevin Chesar                  Larry Klein                  Steve Sievers
        Kevin Costello                Carla Lakatos                Greg Sketch
        John Creech                   Catalina Landivar            Craig Stephenson
        Ronald Davis                  J. Todd Listerman            Reginald Victor
        Steve DeHart                  Keith Logsdon                Joe Vogel
        Erin Donovan                  Mark McCormack               Thomas Voss
        David Duckworth               Sam McKinley                 Robert Ware
        Bernadette Dupont             Charles Meyers               Josh Wice
        Tom Ewing                     David Mick                   Gregory Wilkens
        Andy Fluegemann               Stephen Murphy               Cory Wright
        Timothy Gilday                Robert Nicolls               Robert Yoder
        Adam Goetzman                 John Niehaus


                 CORRIDOR STUDY/SPECIAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE CHAIRS

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE – Allen C. Harris, Chair
GROUNDWATER COMMITTEE – Dave Weihrauch, Chair
REGIONAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TASK FORCE - Captain Daniel Gerard, Chair




4/24/2009                                        P-7
                    OKI ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE

                                       Allen C. Harris, Chairman


Gina Douthat, TANK (Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky)
Bernadette Dupont, Federal Highway Administration – KY Division
Adam Goetzman, Green Township
Casey Grady, N. KY Area Development District
Tracy Gragston, Jr. NAACP Cincinnati Unit
Allan C. Harris, Cincinnati NAACP Branch
Linda L. Huff, N. KY Community Action Commission
Hans Jindal, Ohio Department of Transportation
Joyce Kinley, The AMOS Project
Lin Laing, Center for Independent Living Options
Gregory Mason, Cincinnati State Technical & Community College
Hon. Gary W. Moore, Boone County Fiscal Court
Hon. Steve Pendery, Campbell County Fiscal Court
Kenneth F. Reed, City of Trenton, Resident
Sharmili Sampath, N. KY Area Planning Commission
Shirley Scott, Federal Highway Administration – KY Division
Maureen Sullivan, Urban Appalachian Council
Mayor Raymond Terrell, Village of Woodlawn
Greg Tulley, City of Newport Planning & Development




4/24/2009                                          P-8
                                       COMMITTEE BY-LAWS


The following pages contain copies of by-laws for the:

•   OKI Board of Directors
•   Intermodal Coordinating Committee (ICC)
•   Environmental Justice (EJ) Committee




4/24/2009                                         P-9
        Certification Review
                 of the
Metropolitan Transportation Planning
               Process
                for the
          Cincinnati, Ohio
 Transportation Management Area




BY:
Federal Highway Administration

Federal Transit Administration



February 2009
                     Table of Contents




Executive Summary……………………………………………………………………3



Introduction……………………………………………………………………………...3



Review Process…………………………………………………………………………4

    Desk Audit……………………………………………………………………….4

    Site Visit………………………………………………………………………….6

         Progress Addressing Recommendations…………………………….6

         Other Topics……………………………………………………………..9

    Public Meeting………………………………………………………………….18



Conclusion/Summary of Findings………………………………………………...….19

    Commendations………………………………………………………………..19

    Recommendations…………………………………………………………….19



U.S. DOT Certification and Follow-Up…………………………………………..…..21




                             2
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
On December 3rd and 4th, 2008, the formal certification review of the transportation
planning process was conducted for the Cincinnati, Ohio TMA. The Review Team
consisted of representatives from Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Region V, and
the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Ohio Division, Indiana Division, and
Kentucky Division.

The overall 3-C planning process for the Cincinnati Urbanized Area was found to meet
federal requirements. The Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana Regional Council of Governments
(OKI) has demonstrated its understanding of the SAFETEA-LU requirements, and
applied them in furtherance of the region’s transportation needs. Opportunities for
improvement of the 3-C planning process were identified during the review process;
these opportunities are reflected in the section of this report.

Based on this certification review, the OKI transportation planning process is found to
meet the requirements of the metropolitan planning regulations as proscribed in 23 CFR
450. As such, the Certification Review Team certifies the planning process for the
Cincinnati, Ohio TMA without conditions.

The following sections of this report contain a discussion of the documents reviewed, the
issues discussed, and the recommendations made for enhancing the process where
appropriate.


                                 INTRODUCTION
The Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for
Users (SAFETEA-LU) continues the stewardship role of the Federal Transit
Administration (FTA) and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) in
implementing the changes mandates in the metropolitan planning process. The
SAFETEA-LU provisions are codified in 23 U.S.C. 134 and 49 U.S.C. 1607.

The applicable regulation to the Metropolitan Planning Process, 23 CFR 450 et seq,
requires that the metropolitan planning area have “a continuing, cooperative, and
comprehensive (3-C) transportation planning process that results in plans and programs
that consider all transportation modes and supports metropolitan community development
and social goals.” Through preparation of a Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP),
Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP), Transportation Improvement Program (TIP),
and other required documents, the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) is able to
develop this “3-C process; through these documents, FTA and FHWA are able to monitor
the progress of the MPO in accomplishing the goals promoted in these documents. In
addition, FHWA Division offices regularly attend MPO technical and policy board
meetings to provide assistance and to monitor the planning process.




                                            3
An additional oversight requirement to the “3-C” planning process, 23 CFR 450.334 calls
for FTA and FHWA to jointly review and evaluate the metropolitan planning process in
Transportation Management Areas (TMAs, Urbanized Areas of greater than 200,000
population) to ensure compliance with the SAFETEA-LU requirements. This
certification review, coupled with the routine oversight mechanisms described above,
provides an opportunity to assess the progress being made towards these goals.

As a result of these activities, FTA and FHWA may take one of four actions at the
completion of the review, as appropriate:

   1) Jointly certify the transportation planning process;
   2) Jointly certify the transportation planning process, subject to certain specified
      corrective actions;
   3) Jointly certify the transportation planning process as the basis for approval of
      certain categories of programs or projects; or,
   4) Non-certification of the transportation planning process.


                                REVIEW PROCESS
The review process consisted of three major components: a desk audit, a site visit, and a
meeting with the public. A discussion of these activities follows.

                                    DESK AUDIT
Due to numerous scheduling conflicts and the multi-jurisdictional nature of the review
team, a “virtual” desk audit for the Cincinnati review was conducted in preparation for
the site visit. The virtual audit consisted of independent review by the FTA and FHWA
team members of planning documents, e-mail coordination of preliminary issues, and a
teleconference to discuss the agenda for the site visit. The following individuals
participated in the desk audit:

       Federal Transit Administration Region V Office

       Vanessa Adams – Community Planner

       Federal Highway Administration

       Frank Burkett - Senior Planning Specialist, Ohio Division
       Noel Mehlo, Planning Specialist, Ohio Division
       Janice Osadczuk – Planning Specialist, Indiana Division
       Bernadette DuPont – Planning Specialist, Kentucky Division


The desk audit included review of the MTP, TIP, UPWP, and other materials provided by
the MPO to demonstrate its compliance with 23 CFR 450. Review of these documents,


                                            4
combined with knowledge of the transportation planning issues in the area, enabled the
Review Team to identify the issues requiring further discussion during the site visit.
findings from FTA Certification Review of the Cincinnati TMA.
The desk audit focused on a review of material provided by OKI relating to the following
issues:

                      Progress in Addressing Findings of 2004 Certification
                      Status of freight and safety Planning
                      Congestion Management Process (CMP) and ITS
                      Fiscal Constraint in the TIP and LRTP
                      Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation
                      Plan and other transit issues
                      2030 Plan Update
                      Public Participation Plan
                      Demographic Data Development
                      Travel Forecasting Model
                      Air Quality/CMAQ
                      Rideshare and Ozone Programs
                      Strategic Regional Policy Plan
                      Fiscal Impact Assessment Model
                      TIP Prioritization Process



This desk audit was used to develop the Certification Review agenda for the Cincinnati 3-
C review. The FHWA Ohio Division mailed this agenda to OKI, and other review
participants, on November 25, 2008. A copy of the letter notifying OKI of the
certification and agenda are attached to the file copy of this report.



                                     SITE VISIT
The site visit portion of the review took place on December 3rd and 4th, 2007, at the OKI
offices. The Federal review team included the following:

       Federal Transit Administration Region V office

       Vanessa Adams – Community Planner

       Federal Highway Administration

       Frank Burkett – Senior Planning Specialist, Ohio Division
       Noel Mehlo – Planning Specialist, Ohio Division
       Leigh Oesterling - Air Quality Specialist, Ohio Division



                                            5
       Janice Osadczuk – Planning Specialist, Indiana Division (via telephone)
       Bernadette DuPont – Planning Specialist, Kentucky Division


OKI staff, led by Executive Director Mark Policinski and Transportation Director Robert
Koehler, was present during the review, and were outstanding resources in providing and
compiling the information needed by the review team to assess the MPO’s compliance
with federal regulations.


PROGRESS IN ADDRESSING RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE 2004
CERTIFICATION REVIEW

The April 2005 report listed three commendations, five recommendations for improving
the regional transportation planning process, and a corrective action. Below are the
findings of the previous review and a discussion of the actions taken to address them.

2004 Recommendation 1. When the next Bicycle Plan is updated, due by the next TP
update, it should better recognize bicycles as a transportation mode. OKI should also
establish a system to more fully access the entire Region for work as well as recreational
travel.

2008 Response - The OKI 2008 Regional Bicycle Plan update includes, for the first time,
an inventory of the on-street bicycle facilities in the region. These include signed bike
routes, wide curb lanes, striped bike lanes and sidepaths. While such facilities will benefit
cyclists for whatever their trip purpose, they are primarily intended to encourage more
utilitarian trips by bicycle. The regional trail system inventory is included and was
updated and supplemented with the addition of national routes that pass through the OKI
region. The bike plan consolidates specific recommendations for bicycle facilities from
previous corridor studies prepared by OKI. As recommended in the 2003 plan, OKI
now reimburses staff for use of their bicycles for official business at the rate of 10
cents/mile. To better integrate transit and bicycling, OKI assisted the two major transit
providers with providing bike racks on all their buses. OKI also assisted with providing
bicycle parking racks at fifteen locations. A recommendation of the previous plan was to
provide communication to the regional cycling community about local cycling issues and
activities. This is being implemented with the monthly OKI Bicycle E-Info Newsletter
that now reaches around 300 people. OKI continues to distribute county bike route guides
with cycling suitability ratings for most roads. The maps for the four Ohio counties in the
region were updated in 2005. While all streets are acknowledged as bicycle facilities, the
2008 plan defined a "Primary Shared Road Network" of priority roads based on public
input from the Cincinnati Cycle Club, the Regional Bicycle Plan Advisory Committee,
and those attending the 2030 Regional Transportation Plan workshops. The 2008 regional
Bicycle Plan recommends a “complete streets” approach of better accommodating
bicycle, pedestrian and transit travel in all roadway projects funded through the Regional
Transportation Improvement Program.




                                             6
2004 Recommendation 2. The next update of the “Planning Factors for All Projects”
should include a point system for Freight Corridors. This will give additional weight to
corridors with a high volume of truck traffic.

2008 Response - The OKI TIP and Plan project prioritization processes have been
modified to include consideration for freight corridors. The TIP process has a separate
category for Non Highway Freight projects that considers volume to capacity ratio,
impact on roadway congestion, safety, project development status and facility type
(primary, secondary or local).


2004 Recommendation 3. The Title VI rating system for projects should be
reconstructed to incorporate not only the burdens but also the benefits of a project into
the point system by the next TP update.

2008 Response – The OKI project application process requires an applicant for OKI
funds to identify which Environmental Justice (EJ) communities will be impacted by the
proposed project and to describe the positive and negative impacts. The applicant is
required to identify measures to avoid or mitigate negative impacts. The scoring process
awards points for overall benefits the project provides to EJ populations.


2004 Recommendation 4. All agreements should be reviewed and revised accordingly to
include the newly designated planning area within Dearborn County, IN. The prospectus
should also be revised to include a section describing all current and applicable
agreements. These activities should be accomplished by the 2008 - 2011 TP update.

2008 Response - The Introduction and Prospectus in the UPWP both integrate Dearborn
County, Indiana which became a member of the MPO in January 2005. All UPWP’s and
LRTP’s since that time have integrated Dearborn into the MPO planning process. Based
on the suggestion of the FHWA Indiana Division the current UPWP contains copies of
the key agreements and MOU’s.

 2004 Recommendation 5. Expand the financial plan section of the 2030 TP to describe
in more detail the source of all proposed funding revenues by the next TP update.

2008 Response - The financing section of the OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan is
presented at a level of detail appropriate for a long range planning document. It is a
simple yet logical approach that estimates the amount of available funds for projects in
the OKI region. These figures are presented in Figure 15-1 of the Plan for the planning
period from 2008 to 2030. Revenues expected to be available are estimated using
expenditures in the region over the last several years as a proxy. Average annual
expenditures by funding source (local, state and federal) type (major new, bridge and
Operations & Maintenance (O&M), mode (highway or non-highway) and capacity
enhancing (uses the federal conformity guidance of analyzed or not analyzed) are
compiled using the OKI TIP. OKI TIP data for the federal fiscal years 2004 through


                                           7
2011 was used in the analysis. These funding levels are not guaranteed but are assumed
to be the best available information.
The analysis includes all federal funding used for transportation projects as well as non-
federal funding for projects that are regionally significant or those used to match federal
funds. Non-federal funds include those from state, local or private sources. Using the
eight years in this analysis period, OKI is able to estimate an annual revenue stream that
is then extrapolated over the 23 years of the planning period (2008 to 2030). The Plan
presents the funds that can reasonably be expected to be available. OKI assumes that
funding levels will remain approximately equal to the actual funding levels identified
over the 2004 to 2011 period based on guidance from ODOT’s 2008 Business Plan.
Revenues are adjusted upwards one percent per year.
It is assumed that the relative proportion for expenditures, such as the proportion of
O&M funds versus capital, will remain the same through the planning period. Once the
regional revenues were identified for each state, the dollars available for new projects
were determined by subtracting the funds required for currently programmed TIP projects
and O&M.


2004 Corrective Action KYTC shall officially request OKI to determine how the
Dedicated STP funds will be spent beginning July 1, 2005. The request will also provide
the avenue to commence communications between the local community, OKI, and
KYTC concerning the need to provide matching funds for projects funded with Dedicated
STP funds.

2008 Response – OKI Staff met with KYTC in early 2005 to work out the details of a
suballocation approach. KYTC began suballocating surface transportation program funds
(SNK) to OKI as part of the FY2006-2009 TIP program. OKI conducts a call for projects
every two years and utilizes a board-approved prioritization process to evaluate and select
projects.



OTHER TOPICS DISCUSSED DURING THE SITE VISIT

Because this was the first certification review following the passage of SAFETEA-LU,
the discussion focused largely on issues relating to the new legislation and regulations.

Congestion Management Process (CMP)

Requirement: Requirements for Congestion Management Process (CMP) are found in
23 CFR 450.320. The purpose of a CMP, as defined in 23 CFR 450.320, is to develop a
systematic process that provides information on transportation system performance and
alternative strategies to alleviate congestion and enhance the mobility of persons and goods.
In TMAs the CMP shall include methods to monitor and evaluate performance, identify
alternative actions, assess and implement cost-effective actions, and evaluate the



                                             8
effectiveness of implemented actions. The CMP should be a major tool in addressing
transportation problems in the planning process.

       The CMP shall include the following:
             • Methods to monitor and evaluate the performance of the multimodal
                transportation system;
             • Definition of parameters for measuring the extent of congestion;
             • Establishment of a program for data collection and system
                performance monitoring;
             • Identification and evaluation of the anticipated performance and
                expected benefits of appropriate traditional and nontraditional
                congestion management strategies;
             • Identification of an implementation schedule; and
             • Implementation of a process for periodic assessment of the efficiency
                and effectiveness of implemented strategies, in terms of the area’s
                established performance measures. The results of this evaluation shall
                be provided to decision makers to provide guidance on selection of
                effective strategies for future implementation.

Status: OKI developed its latest version of the CMP as of September, 2007. The MPO
has fully integrated the CMP into the overall metropolitan planning process in part by
devising and enacting a scoring system intended to assist selection of worthy capacity
related highway and transit projects for the 2030 Regional Transportation Plan. OKI has
established an evaluation matrix of CMP strategies to help screen alternatives. The CMP
is currently re-evaluated every four years.

       The following performance measures are part of OKI’s current CMP:

           1.   Level of Service (LOS)
           2.   Volume/capacity ratio (V/C)
           3.   Speed
           4.   Delay
           5.   Travel time between major destinations
           6.   VMT under congested conditions

The MPO interacts with the local transit, freight and traffic control operators through
participation in the regional freight working group, and has communicated with other
similar groups in Toledo and Columbus. Additionally, OKI coordinates with Norfolk-
Southern, CSX, the barge industry, the City of Cincinnati, and U.S. Customs to name a
few. As a result of the desk review and the field visit, the federal team identified that
methods to monitor and evaluate the performance of the multimodal transportation
system should be identified and included in the continuing evolution of the CMP.

Findings: It is the finding of the federal review team that OKI CMP meets the
requirements of 23 CFR 450.320.



                                           9
Recommendation: OKI needs to expand efforts to address freight and transit modes
effectively in the CMP.


Financial Planning

Requirement: Requirements for financial planning are found in 23 CFR 450.322(f)(10),
whereas, a financial plan is required that demonstrates how the adopted transportation
plan can be implemented. The financial plan shall contain system-level estimates of costs
and revenue sources that are reasonably expected to be available to adequately operate
and maintain Federal-aid highways {as defined by 23 U.S.C. 101(a)(5)} and public
transportation (as defined by title 49 U.S.C. Chapter 53).

Status: The financial plan of the 2030 Transportation Plan includes a breakdown of the
categories of federal, state and local sources. OKI has an established approach for
collecting and analyzing the varying funding from the multiple state and local sources
within the MPO area. OKI reported that they decided on an approach for clear,
transparent, reproducible and easy to understand assumptions for financial planning. The
financial plan does contain system-level estimates of costs and revenue sources that are
reasonably expected to be available to adequately operate and maintain Federal-aid
highways (as defined by 23 U.S.C. 101(a)(5)) and public transportation (as defined by
title 49 U.S.C. Chapter 53). It was identified by the federal review team that FTA transit
type funding available to OKI was included in the plan in a table located in the
appendices, but was not organized in the same location or manner as those funds
attributed to highway funds in the format provided to the MPO by ODOT. Although not
a recommendation due to the fact that all required information was in the plan, it was
suggested to the MPO to try to more consistently organize and align these types of tables
in the plan in order to avoid the possibility of confusion.

Findings: It is the finding of the federal review team that OKI meets the fiscal planning
requirements of 23 CFR 450.322(f)(10).


Environmental Mitigation and Consultation

Requirement: Requirements for environmental mitigation and consultation were
established in SAFETEA-LU, under Title VI, Section 6001 and are found in 23 CFR
450.322(g) and 23 CFR 450.322(f)(7).

Consultation means that one or more parties confer with other identified parties in
accordance with an established process and, prior to taking action(s), considers the views
of the other parties and periodically informs them about action(s) taken. This definition
does not apply to the ‘‘consultation’’ performed by the States and the MPOs in
comparing the long range statewide transportation plan and the metropolitan
transportation plan, respectively, to State and Tribal conservation plans or maps or
inventories of natural or historic resources (see § 450.214(i) and § 450.322(g)(1) and



                                           10
(g)(2)). Environmental mitigation activities means strategies, policies, programs, actions,
and activities that, over time, will serve to avoid, minimize, or compensate for (by
replacing or providing substitute resources) the impacts to or disruption of elements of
the human and natural environment associated with the implementation of a long-range
statewide transportation plan or metropolitan transportation plan. The human and natural
environment includes, for example, neighborhoods and communities, homes and
businesses, cultural resources, parks and recreation areas, wetlands and water sources,
forested and other natural areas, agricultural areas, endangered and threatened species,
and the ambient air. The environmental mitigation strategies and activities are intended to
be regional in scope, and may not necessarily address potential project-level impacts.
The MPO shall consult, as appropriate, with State and local agencies responsible for land
use management, natural resources, environmental protection, conservation, and historic
preservation concerning the development of the transportation plan. The consultation
shall involve, as appropriate: endangered and threatened species, and the ambient air. The
environmental mitigation strategies and activities are intended to be regional in scope,
and may not necessarily address potential project-level impacts. A discussion of types of
potential environmental mitigation activities and potential areas to carry out these
activities, including activities that may have the greatest potential to restore and maintain
the environmental functions affected by the metropolitan transportation plan. The
discussion may focus on policies, programs, or strategies, rather than at the project level.
The discussion shall be developed in consultation with Federal, State, and Tribal land
management, wildlife, and regulatory agencies. The MPO may establish reasonable
timeframes for performing this consultation;

Status: OKI indicated that environmental resource agencies are also invited to review and
comment on the Regional Transportation Plan and other major documents. Coordination and
consultation occurs as necessary in formal and informal settings, on long- and short-term
basis, and in individual contacts and group discussions. OKI’s Environmental Mitigation and
Consultation was reviewed as part of the SAFETEA-LU GAP Analysis Review performed by
the Division Office on June 29, 2007. The MPO has included a section for this in their LRTP
and has established a comprehensive list of stakeholders/consulting agencies, and has
developed a strategy for carrying out their required consultations. They have also
incorporated environmental mitigation resources as part of their GIS resources, consistent
with the practices of the other MPOs around the State of Ohio. OKI reported that through the
efforts conducted to date, they believe that they have complied with ODOT and with
SAFETEA-LU and federal requirements; however, they want to go further in their
consultation efforts without interfering with the NEPA process. OKI identified that these
efforts have enhanced other activities performed by the MPO regarding the environment
outside of the transportation realm. The federal review team and OKI identified a need to
develop performance measures and apply them to the environmental mitigation and
consultation process; however, this was deemed to be a suggestion, rather than a formal
recommendation. The reason to develop such measures would assist in the future in
evaluating the effectiveness of these efforts, and of the responsiveness of the partners to the
efforts.




                                              11
Findings: It is the finding of the federal review team that OKI meets the environmental
mitigation and consultation requirements of 23 CFR 450.322(g) and 23 CFR
450.322(f)(7).


Coordinated Human Services Transportation Plan

Requirement: SAFETEA-LU requires that proposed projects funded under the 5310 –
Elderly Individuals & Individuals with Disabilities, 5316- Job Access & Reverse
Commute (JARC), and 5317 – New Freedom programs must be derived from a locally
developed coordinated public transit- human services transportation plan (CHSTP). This
plan must be developed through a process that includes representatives of public, private,
and non-profit transportation and human services providers, as well as the general public.
Local officials are to determine the appropriate lead for developing the plan which can
be, but is not required to be the MPO. The Ohio Kentucky Indiana Regional Council of
Governments (OKI) is the lead agency for development of the CHSTP and the designated
recipient of the JARC and New Freedom funds for the Cincinnati urbanized area.

Status: Development of this plan began with a process for stakeholder and public
involvement. OKI hosted meetings with representatives of the Ohio Department of
Transportation and transit agencies to review and gain an understanding of the federal
requirements and to discuss the issues involved with servicing the mobility needs of the
area and the gaps in service. From these initial meetings OKI assembled a team for
overseeing the public participation process and the development of the plan. The
Oversight Team developed the Transportation Survey as a means of assisting them in
gathering information and identifying gaps in service. Under the direction of the team,
OKI hosted a facilitated roundtable meeting to gather information from transportation
providers, human social service agencies and the public. More than 35 people from a
variety of organizations attended the roundtable to identify problems, discuss needs,
improvements, funding and next steps. With information derived from this process, a
draft plan was prepared and presented to the public for comment before submitting it to
the Executive Board for approval.

Commendation: OKI staff and the Oversight Team are to be commended for conducting
an effective coordination process with the service agencies and for demonstrating an
exemplary working relationship between the MPO, the State and public transit providers.
In addition to satisfying the requirements of the CHSTP, this plan was the first to be
approved in the Midwest region and has been used as a model template by other MPOs.


Transit & the 3C Process

Representatives of the Southwestern Regional Transit Authority (SORTA), Middletown
Transit, & The Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky (TANK) were in attendance at
the site review. Each provided an update on significant projects they’re undertaking and
offered favorable comments regarding coordination with OKI.



                                           12
Middletown Transit will be initiating a new route at the beginning of the year. The
Middletown Connector will connect the Cities of Middletown and Hamilton Ohio thereby
filling a gap in transit service. They are working with OKI getting this project
programmed in the TIP and subsequent STIP in time to apply for the funds needed in this
grant cycle. SORTA continues with the implementation of the Uptown Crossings &,
Eastern Neighborhoods projects and TANK with its transit hub projects. In addition, the
transit providers continue to be participants in the 3C process by serving on various
committees at OKI including the freight committee and the Coordinated Human Service
Transportation Plan committee.


Public Participation Process

Requirement: Requirements for public involvement are found in 23 CFR 450.316(a).
The MPO shall develop and use a documented participation plan that defines a process
for providing citizens, affected public agencies, representatives of public transportation
employees, freight shippers, providers of freight transportation services, private
providers of transportation, representatives of users of public transportation,
representatives of users of pedestrian walkways and bicycle transportation facilities,
representatives of the disabled, and other interested parties with reasonable opportunities
to be involved in the metropolitan transportation planning process.

Status: OKI developed its latest Public Participation Plan (PPP) June 14, 2007. In
February, 2008 it was modified.               It is posted on their website at:
http://www.oki.org/transportation/participation.html.

The PPP clarified the outreach process to be undertaken for the various planning
processes and plans such as the Long Range Transportation Plan, the Transportation
Improvement Program (TIP), or Corridor and Special Studies. Access to theses materials
and a calendar of activities can be found at OKI’s website, http://www.oki.org/. The
Participation Plan highlights the General Provisions for a Public Meeting and Public
Hearings. The times and agendas of committee meetings are made available in advance
by notification placed on OKI’s web site. All meetings are open to the public.

Maps were developed for the PPP defining target groups and areas - Environmental
Justice, as well as Elderly, Disabled and Zero-Car Households. These maps show the
locations of the heaviest concentration of these population groups.

The plan addresses OKI’s efforts to involve the public in transportation decision-making
and the provisions for assessing the equity of transportation investments, as well as
provides for inter-agency coordination and consultation with local governments.

OKI’s arrangements for public meetings provide for the following:
  • timing so that public comment can be considered as part of the planning process
       prior to final decision-making;



                                            13
   •   advertising to reach a broad and diverse public;
   •   facility locations that are:
           o accessible to people with physical disabilities and in compliance with the
                Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
           o facility locations that are accessible to public transit, if available and
                appropriate to the particular study or project;
           o geographically convenient and accessible to the majority of potentially
                impacted and interested stakeholders; and
   •   format designs that promote attendance and facilitates discussion by providing
       relevant information for public review and a viable opportunity for public
       comment and discussion.


In addition to their website, and regular public involvement, the MPO utilizes networking
(OKI staff presenting information and seeking opportunities for discussion to groups with a
special interest in transportation planning) and other outreach methods such as press releases,
public service announcements, media briefings, and newspaper advertisements.

Environmental resource agencies are also invited to review and comment on the Regional
Transportation Plan and other major documents. Coordination and consultation occurs as
necessary in formal and informal settings, on long- and short-term bases, and in individual
contacts and group discussions.

Although the PPP does not specifically mention visualization techniques, they include
various methodologies for the TP and TIP such as traffic simulations, mapping, graphics,
and GIS.

Findings: It is the finding of the federal review team that NIRCC PPP meets the
requirements of 23 CFR 450.316.

Recommendation: OKI needs to identify where legal notices need to be placed for more
inclusive public involvement. The PPP needs to be located more prominently on their
web site. The web site could be used as a site to post comments and responses to the
public participation process.



MTP Project Selection

Requirement: Requirements for Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP) project
selection can be found in 23 CFR 450.322. This section requires that the MTP clearly
identify transportation investments and services to determine projects for inclusion in the
MTP, allow for financial analysis, and ensure that the public can clearly understand the
investments, services, and policies proposed for the region.

Status: The Cincinnati Area MPO uses FHWA’s Surface Transportation Efficiency
Analysis Model (STEAM) to conduct system-wide analysis. STEAM uses information


                                              14
from the Travel Demand Forecasting (TDF) model to compute the net value of mobility
and safety benefits attributable to regionally important transportation projects. The MPO
uses this benefit-cost analysis to compare alternatives. This allows the MPO to determine
whether the benefits outweigh the cost of building a project. STEAM was most recently
used to evaluate alternatives for the proposed Brent Spence Bridge project. OKI uses a
robust project scoring process to evaluate projects from all modes. The scoring
procedures are documented in Appendix B of the OKI MTP.

Findings: The MPO MTP project selection process meets the requirements of 23 CFR
450.322.

Commendation: The Cincinnati Area MPO was one of the first in the nation to utilize
the FHWA software package STEAM, or Surface Transportation Efficiency Analysis
Model. The MPO’s staff worked with FHWA-HQ for over 1 ½ years to research and
refine STEAM. Their work on this model and subsequent use of this model allows the
MPO staff to provide useful comparative information to the Policy Board with regard to
proposed alternative transportation solutions for the area.


Air Quality and the CMAQ Process

Requirements: The Clean Air Act of 1990 set very specific requirements for non-
attainment and maintenance areas.

An agreement is required between the MPO and the designated agency responsible for air
quality planning describing their respective roles and responsibilities.

In TMAs designated as nonattainment areas:

   Federal funds may not be programmed for any project that will result in a significant
   increase in carrying capacity for SOVs, unless the project results from a Congestion
   Management Process (CMP) meeting the requirements of 23 CFR 450.320 (d) and
   (e).

   The TIP shall include all regionally significant transportation projects proposed to be
   funded with Federal and non-Federal funds (23 CFR 450.324 (d)).

   A new conformity determination is required for any new or amended TIP and/or MTP
   [(23 CFR 450.326 (a) and 23 CFR 450.322(l)]

   There must be an opportunity for at least one formal public meeting during the TIP
   development process [23 CFR 450.324 (b)]

Final CMAQ Guidance was distributed on November 17, 2008.

Status:



                                           15
The Cincinnati Area MPO complies with all the rules and regulations of the Clean Air
Act. For this particular MPO this is a daunting task as separate Ozone Motor Vehicle
Emission Budgets (MVEB) exist for both KY and OH. This tri-state area requires
extension coordination with all federal, state, and local agencies in order to meet the
regulatory requirements.

The CMAQ program is set up differently in Ohio and Kentucky. While the CMAQ
application process is similar for both states, the distribution method is quite different.

CMAQ applications are solicited by the MPO. The MPO assists project sponsors in
developing quantified emission reductions and transportation benefits, so that all
applications can be ranked on an even basis. In Ohio, the MPOs disburse CMAQ funds.
In Kentucky, the State requests a prioritized list of CMAQ projects from the MPO and
the State determines which projects will be funded.

Findings: The process used to meet conformity requirements in nonattainment and
maintenance areas ensures conformity of MTPs and TIPs. All selected CMAQ projects
meet the guidance criteria and are eligible for funding.

Commendation: The MPO assists project sponsors in developing quantified emission
reductions and transportation benefits, so that all applications can be ranked on an even
basis. The MPO technical committee and the Policy Board voted to accept the ranking
without modification as the ranking was based purely on what is better for the air quality
in the MPO area.


TIP Prioritization Process

Requirement: Requirements for a TIP prioritization process can be found in 23 CFR
450.324 (l) (1). This section specifically requires that the TIP should “identify the
criteria and process for prioritizing implementation of transportation plan elements
(including multimodal trade-offs) for inclusion in the TIP and any changes in priorities
from previous TIPs.”

Status: The Cincinnati Area MPO has a very extensive and well developed TIP
prioritization process. However, during the 2005 Certification review it was
recommended that the Title VI rating system for proposed projects be reconstructed to
incorporate not only the burdens but also the benefits of a project. However, the updated
point system used in the prioritization process no longer identifies the burdens. Projects
with no burden can receive the same number of points as projects with a burden.

The point system used for prioritizing non-highway freight projects uses “high, medium,
and low” as the measurement for the “existing safety conditions and impact of project”
factor. This system forces subjective decision-making.




                                              16
Findings: The TIP prioritization process meets the requirements of 23 CFR 450.324 (l)
(1).

Recommendation: It is recommended that the MPO further refine specific elements of
their TIP prioritization process, specifically the environmental justice factor in the
prioritization process for all projects, and the safety factor in the prioritization process for
non-highway projects.


Integrating Freight into the Transportation Planning Process

Requirement: SAFETEA-LU legislations specifically calls for the need to address freight
movement as part of the transportation planning process (23 U.S.C. §134 and 23 CFR
450.306).

Status: The Cincinnati Area MPO created a freight advisory committee called the
“Freight Working Group” in 2007. As a result of this group’s formulation, the current
MTP now lists three freight specific projects. The Freight Working Group selected these
projects as “low-hanging fruit” which were relatively easy to fix, deficiencies.

The PPP provides reasonable opportunities for freight providers and shippers to give their
input into the development of the MTP and TIP.

The MPO has defined the term “freight corridor” for transportation planning purposes
and uses that information in the TIP prioritization process. The TIP prioritization process
and MTP prioritization process includes a freight factor and extra points are given to
projects in freight corridors.

The Congestion Management Process (CMP) provides delay times and monitors system
performance. This data is being reviewed to further develop freight-related performance
measures.

The Ohio Department of Transportation used CMAQ funds to create a “Diesel Emission
Reduction Grant” program. This program directly impacts freight transportation and
provides another avenue to elevate freight projects in the planning process. OKI has
assisted project sponsors in developing quantified emission reductions and transportation
benefits of the potential freight improvement projects.

Findings: The PPP, UPWP, TIP and MTP meet the requirements of SAFETEA-LU.

Recommendation: It is recommended that the MPO staff receive additional freight-
related training and attend the upcoming 2009 Kentucky Regional Freight Conference to
be held Mary 5-6, 2008 in Jefferstown, KY. Another excellent source of baseline freight
planning information is the NHI web-based course number 139006, “Integrating Freight
into the Transportation Planning Process”.




                                              17
Recommendation: It is recommended that the MPO further develop freight-related data
(locations of NHS intermodal connectors, etc.) and performance measures in the MPO
area. Mapping of recurring congestion areas impacting major freight movements could
be developed to highlight system and freight mobility needs in major congested corridors.
Development of these elements and performance measures to address them should be
included in the next UPWP, MTP and TIP.




PUBLIC MEETING

The public was offered the opportunity to address issues pertaining to the regional
transportation planning process at an open-house type meeting held in the OKI offices on
the evening of Wednesday, December 3, 2008 from 5:00 PM to 6:00 PM. This
opportunity was advertised in the local newspaper. A copy of the advertisement is
attached to the file copy of this report in Appendix A.

Seven residents of the City of Cincinnati attended the meeting. The sign-in sheet for the
meeting is included in Appendix B of this report. Eight individuals submitted written
comments that are included in Appendix C. The Sierra Club Miami Group also
submitted a packet of information at the public information meeting. This packet is on
file with the original copy of this report in FHWA Ohio Division. A transcript of the
public meeting is included in the file copy of this report as Appendix D.




                                            18
                                 CONCLUSION of
It is the conclusion of the Federal Review Team that the Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana
Regional Council (OKI,) the area transit providers, and the Ohio Department of
Transportation have made an outstanding effort to implement the requirements of
SAFETEA-LU as reflected in the MPO’s “3-C” planning process. Based on the findings
of this review, the Cincinnati TMA planning process is found to substantially meet the
Metropolitan Planning requirements as detailed in 23 CFR 450. Commendations for
outstanding aspects of the planning process, and Recommendations for improvement in
the process, are listed below.



COMMENDATIONS
Commendation 1: OKI staff and the Oversight Team are to be commended for
conducting an effective coordination process with the service agencies and for
demonstrating an exemplary working relationship between the MPO, the State and public
transit providers. In addition to satisfying the requirements of the CHSTP, this plan was
the first to be approved in the region and has been used as a model template by other
MPOs.

Commendation 2: The Cincinnati Area MPO was one of the first in the nation to utilize
the FHWA software package STEAM, or Surface Transportation Efficiency Analysis
Model. The MPO’s staff worked with FHWA-HQ for over 1 ½ years to research and
refine STEAM. Their work on this model and subsequent use of this model allows the
MPO staff to provide useful comparative information to the Policy Board with regard to
proposed alternative transportation solutions for the area.

Commendation 3: The MPO assists project sponsors in developing quantified emission
reductions and transportation benefits, so that all applications can be ranked on an even
basis. The MPO technical committee and the Policy Board voted to accept the ranking
without modification as the ranking was based purely on what is better for the air quality
in the MPO area.




RECOMMENDATIONS
Recommendation 1: OKI needs to expand efforts to address freight and transit modes
effectively in the CMP.

Recommendation 2: OKI needs to identify where legal notices need to be placed for
more inclusive public involvement. The PPP needs to be located more prominently on



                                            19
their web site. The web site could be used as a site to post comments and responses to
the public participation process

Recommendation 3: It is recommended that the MPO further refine specific elements of
their TIP prioritization process, specifically the environmental justice factor in the
prioritization process for all projects, and the safety factor in the prioritization process for
non-highway projects.

Recommendation 4: It is recommended that the MPO staff receive additional freight-
related training and attend the upcoming 2009 Kentucky Regional Freight Conference to
be held Mary 5-6, 2008 in Jefferstown, KY. Another excellent source of baseline freight
planning information is the NHI web-based course number 139006, “Integrating Freight
into the Transportation Planning Process”.

Recommendation 5: It is recommended that the MPO further develop freight-related
data (locations of NHS intermodal connectors, etc.) and performance measures in the
MPO area. Mapping of recurring congestion areas impacting major freight movements
could be developed to highlight system and freight mobility needs in major congested
corridors. Development of these elements and performance measures to address them
should be included in the next UPWP, MTP and TIP.




                                              20
                 U.S. DOT Certification and Follow-Up

This USDOT certification action remains in effect for four years from the date of this
report, unless a new certification determination is made sooner. Joint FHWA/FTA
actions on future products of the TMA’s planning process (e.g., approvals of UPWPs,
reviews of future MTP Updates, issuing “3-C” findings on TIPs, and conformity
determinations on the MTP and TIPs...) will be partially based on the progress made
by the TMA’s planning process partners in addressing these Certification Review
findings.




                                        21
                                  Appendices



Appendix A: OKI Notification Letter, Agenda, and Notice of Public Meeting

Appendix B: Sign-In sheets for the Certification and Public Meeting

Appendix C: Public Comments Submitted in Writing

Appendix D: Transcript of the Public Meeting




         Appendices Are Included in the Federal File Copies of this Report




                                      22
                                      TRANSPORTATION ISSUES

A wide range of issues must be dealt with in transportation planning -- cost and other economic issues,
operating authority, levels of service to be provided, and how to allocate limited fiscal resources
among competing priorities and objectives.
In addition, transportation planning is just one area of comprehensive functional planning, which also
includes land use, housing and environmental planning. All functional plans are integrated into a
comprehensive plan designed to promote the general well-being of the entire region.

The important or major urban transportation issues and opportunities facing the OKI region include:
•   Addressing the requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA).
•   Taking advantage of the provisions of the Safe Accountable Flexible Efficient Transportation Equity
    Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) in reorienting the transportation planning process to address
    air quality issues.

•   Continuing to address the many challenges facing our transportation system today as described in
    the Safe Accountable Flexible Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU)
    and its successor transportation legislation, such as improving safety, reducing traffic congestion,
    improving efficiency in freight movement, increasing intermodal connectivity and protecting the
    environment.

•   Continuing an aggressive congestion management system (CMS).
•   Continuing the development of an aggressive Transportation Systems Management (TSM) process
    and project prioritization to assure efficient use of the existing system.
•   Continuing efforts to improve public awareness, including environmental justice requirements, and
    input to all stages of the transportation planning process.
•   Pursuing the recommendations of the OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan to provide a truly
    multimodal and intermodal transportation system for the region.

•   Coordinating OKI's regional transportation planning with statewide transportation planning.

•   Refining the travel model to generate usable project level travel information.

•   Increasing awareness of the need for transportation energy efficiency.




4/24/2009                                          P-11
                           TRANSPORTATION PLANNING ACTIVITIES


Transportation planning is broadly defined as all of the activities that precede implementation of
transportation projects or policies. Specifically, it is the process that leads to decisions on
transportation policies and programs. This process can be broad, dealing with questions such as how
to raise and allocate transportation revenues, or can be quite specific, such as providing forecasts of
traffic volumes that can be used in designing a particular facility. The planning elements involved can
be generally grouped and defined as follows:


Short-Range Planning – The process whereby roadway, transit, bike and pedestrian projects
developed under planning activities become integrated into one coordinated, fundable and
implementable program of transportation improvements. The Transportation Improvement Program
(TIP) serves as the short range element of the region’s transportation plan. This document is a
programming instrument for projects identified for funding. Short-range planning also includes
technical assistance to local units of government and management of the transportation enhancement
(TE) program.


Surveillance – The maintenance of basic data files essential to the monitoring of transportation
assumptions underlying the basic planning process. This activity includes the maintenance of current
data files and geographic information systems (GIS) used in the preparation of the short-range and
long-range plans for the OKI region as well as development and refinement of the OKI Travel Model.


Transportation Planning – The systematic sequence of activities that continuously evaluate and
update the current long range transportation plans. A review of the adopted transportation plan is
conducted in order to account for development changes and/or forecasts and policies identified
through the surveillance element. Every three years the transportation plans are subjected to a major
review and/or reevaluation. A minimum 20-year horizon year is maintained. The congestion
management program (CMS) is an integral part of long range planning activities.


Services – OKI plays a key role in providing planning data and services to member governments,
private sectors and the business community. Public outreach efforts are integral parts of planning
process.


Air Quality Planning – The purpose of air quality planning is to ensure that OKI’s Regional
Transportation Plan and Programs contribute to the region’s attainment and maintenance of national
air quality standards. The integration of OKI's air quality and transportation planning activities in a
single planning process to permit air quality analysis of transportation plan alternatives assures this.




4/24/2009                                        P-12
                        600 - TRANSPORTATION PLANNING

ISSUES AND GOALS
The FY 2010 transportation planning program emphasizes the implementation and
documentation of the transportation planning activities which will advance the region’s
ability to meet the future travel needs of the OKI region. To that end, the goals and
objectives of the OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan outline the focus of this
Unified Planning Work Program and detail the specific work elements for the year.
Work element schedules will vary throughout the fiscal year. Unless otherwise stated
work will commence on July 1, 2009 and end June 30, 2010.
Within this context, measures to address the transportation planning issues confronting
the OKI region include:
•   Continue to implement the recommendations of the OKI 2030 Regional
    Transportation Plan (a.k.a. long range transportation plan)
•   Responding to the planning requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA)
    of 1990, new eight-hour clean air standards and the Safe Accountable Flexible
    Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) of 2005, and
    its successor due in September 2009, including land use and congestion
    management.
•   Continuation of the planning and implementation requirements of the Americans
    with Disabilities Act (ADA).
•   Continuation of transportation system management (TSM) activities, and focus on
    travel demand management (TDM) activities, to improve system efficiency, and to
    help realize reductions in vehicle miles of travel, congestion, air pollution, and fuel
    consumption.
•   Access management and right-of-way preservation along major roadways in growth
    areas, and development of access management plans and policies within local
    jurisdictions.
•   Transit planning and coordination of transit services.
•   Continuation of planning and deployment of integrated intelligent transportation
    infrastructure. Maintain the regional ITS Architecture.
•   Avocation of smart growth concepts, tools and techniques, and enhanced
    coordination of local and regional planning, to legitimize and strengthen the
    linkages between land use planning and the transportation infrastructure.
•   Investigation of innovative financing mechanisms, both public and private, to
    improve the ability of local governments to implement needed transportation
    improvements.
•   Identification and implementation of safety and/or capacity-enhancing measures
    through traffic operations improvements at problem locations.
•   Continuation of freight planning and improvement in the efficiency of intermodal
    freight operations.
•   Monitoring and surveillance of socioeconomic data and transportation-related data.
•   Update and enhancement of the travel demand/air quality model and other analysis
    tools.


4/28/2009                                    W-1
•    Promotion of bicycle and pedestrian planning and facility development to enhance
     mode choice for urban travel needs.
•    Provision of educational seminars, workshops, and other training opportunities for
     representatives of local governments, especially in the areas of transportation
     planning, traffic engineering, and public process consultation.
•    Development and extension of linkages between transportation, tourism, recreation,
     and economic development to improve the vitality and competitive advantage of the
     region.
•    Development and promotion of scenic byways in the region, in accord with federal,
     state, and local initiatives.
PROGRAM GOAL
The overall goal for transportation planning is the implementation of balanced and
efficient intermodal and multimodal transportation services for the OKI region. More
specifically it is the intent of the program to address the goals of the OKI 2030 Regional
Transportation Plan:

1)        Improve safety and security
2)        Improve accessibility and mobility options
3)        Protect and enhance the environment
4)        Enhance the integration and connectivity of the transportation system
5)        Promote efficient system management and operation
6)        Emphasize the preservation of the existing transportation system
7)        Support economic vitality
8)        Involve a broad spectrum of agencies and the public in all aspects of
          transportation planning
These goals are consistent with the metropolitan planning factors outlined in the Safe
Accountable Flexible Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-
LU). Within the context of these goals, and in consideration of perceived local area
needs and OKI's overall role in transportation planning, efforts will be directed toward
the following types of activities.

1)    Maintain a long range transportation plan to serve as a guide for transportation
      investment and service decisions.
      •    Maintain, refine, and update the OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan,
           including the travel demand model upon which it is based, in conformance
           with the requirements of the CAAA and SAFETEA-LU and/or its successor
           legislation.
      •    Consideration of non-motorized modes of travel to increase the number of
           trips for utilitarian vs. recreation purposes made by bicycling and walking, and
           to improve the safety and convenience for these modes in the region.
      •    Improve the interaction between regional and local planning activities, and
           strengthen the relationship between land use planning and transportation
           planning at all levels.
2)     Maintain current socioeconomic and transportation system inventories and
       projections.
      •      Maintain up-to-date estimates and forecasts of demographic and land use
             activity for input to transportation planning activities.


4/28/2009                                      W-2
     •   Maintain current transportation system inventory and usage data.
3)    Evaluate local area transportation problems and develop recommended solutions.
     •    Assist units of local government in analyzing the impact of traffic generated by
          proposed developments and preparing recommendations for street access and
          traffic control to serve the needs of the proposed development, while
          preserving the capacity and safety of the public roadways.
     •    Assist and encourage units of local government in the development of access
          management policies and corridor plans, to preserve and protect the functional
          integrity of the roadway system.
     •    Inventory and evaluate traffic operations at problem intersections and
          formulate recommendations for improvements regarding striping, signage,
          channelization, signalization and other traffic controls.
     •    Inventory and evaluate traffic operations on key segments of existing
          roadways and develop traffic flow improvement recommendations.
     •    Provide technical assistance for the preparation of basic pedestrian, vehicular
          and/or bicycle circulation plans for small to medium size areas.
4)    Prioritize transportation projects to assure project funding and full utilization of
      federal and state funds.
     •   Develop and maintain a biennial Transportation Improvement Program.
     •   Conduct a TIP and Plan conformity analysis consistent with the State
         Implementation Plan for Air Quality as required.
5)   Assist in implementation of specific transportation projects.
     •    Evaluate local social service agency applications for vehicle purchase under
          FTA's Specialized Transportation Program (Section 5310).
     •    Develop a coordinated transit plan for the region consistent with JARC/New
          Freedom programs.
     •    Assist local communities and other agencies in establishing park-and-ride lots
          for carpooling, vanpooling, and transit.
     •    Assist in the development, implementation, and coordination of bicycle and
          pedestrian facilities and programs throughout the region.
     •    Assist in the planning, programming, and implementation of projects funded
          by the states under the TEA-21 Transportation Enhancement program.
     •    Assist local communities in the planning and development of scenic byways
          throughout the region.
     •    Promote the deployment of an intelligent transportation system (ITS) to
          improve the transportation system efficiency and management.
6)    Provide traffic engineering and transportation planning information and technical
      assistance in support of development and implementation programs.
     •   Arrange and conduct seminars and/or develop educational materials for
         county, township and municipal staff and officials. Topics would include access
         management, smart growth, roadway financing, right-of-way preservation, site
         impact studies, traffic control and regulation, bicycle/pedestrian planning and
         design, and others.
     •   Provide transit planning assistance to urban and rural transit systems.




4/28/2009                                   W-3
     •   Provide travel demand forecasts with turning movement projections for KYTC
         projects.
     •   Provide process-related assistance in arranging and conducting public
         meetings, and in promoting issue identification and understanding,
         goal-setting and prioritization, and community outreach activities.
     •   Provide technical data and assistance to individual transportation corridor and
         facility studies.
7)     Improve the efficiency by which goods are transported, transferred among
       modes, and distributed within and beyond the region.
8)       Involve a broad spectrum of agencies and the public in all aspects of
         transportation planning. OKI has a formal public involvement policy.

PRODUCT RESPONSIBILITY
All work will be performed by OKI staff except as noted. Consulting firms are used to
supplement staff resources as needed and as noted in the individual work elements and
also in the budget tables. Transit section 674 is the responsibility of the respective
transit agencies.

SUPPORT AND ASSISTANCE FROM THE STATES
The Ohio Department of Transportation, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, and the
Indiana Department of Transportation support and assist OKI in many ways, including
provision of a district representative, traffic count data, and TIP programming
information, all of which are essential to the ongoing planning process.




4/28/2009                                  W-4
Transportation Planning Subcategories of this UPWP:
601 Short Range Planning
602 Transportation Improvement Program
605 Surveillance
      .1 Surveillance
      .5 Homeland Security
610 Transportation Planning
      .1 System Management
      .4 Land Use
      .5 Fiscal Impact
625 Transportation Services
      .2 Participation Plan
665   Special Studies
      x Transit On-Board Survey
      .1 Regional Freight Study (currently unfunded)
      .4 Regional Clean Air Program
      .6 GPS Travel Survey
667   .1 RideShare Activities
674 Mass Transit Exclusive
      .1 JARC
      .2 New Freedom
      .4 New Freedom Pass Through
      .5 Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (SORTA)
      .6 Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky (TANK)
      .7 Middletown Transit System
      .8 Clermont Transportation Connection
684 Ohio Exclusive
      .9 Eastern Corridor Study Part B
685 Indiana Exclusive
      .1 Dearborn County Transportation Planning (CPG)
      .2 Dearborn County Transportation Planning (STP)
686 Kentucky Exclusive
      .3 Safety and Operational Studies
695 Unified Planning Work Program
697 .1 Transportation Program Reporting
710 Environmental
      .1 Local Water Quality Activities
      .4 St. Clair Township Zoning
      .6 Water Quality Program
      .7 Water Quality Program (Ohio ARRA Funding)
      .8 Water Quality Program (Indiana ARRA Funding)
      .9 Water Quality Program (Ohio General Assembly)

4/28/2009                               W-5
720  .1 Mobile Source Emissions Planning
800 Regional Planning Activities




4/28/2009                              W-6
                         601 – SHORT RANGE PLANNING
OBJECTIVES
To address short-term problems and needs relating to transportation of persons and
goods in the OKI region, and to identify actions that present a systematic approach to
solving these problems.

To coordinate with units of local government regarding the development and adoption
of land use plans, access management plans, thoroughfare plans, zoning ordinances,
subdivision regulations, and other governmental controls addressing the relationship
between land use planning and transportation planning.

To utilize the transportation planning expertise and resources of the OKI Technical
Services staff in providing data, technical assistance and planning services to those
responsible, within the public and private sectors, for community development and
implementation programs. A major part of this element will be the development and
implementation of transportation enhancement projects in the four Ohio counties.

To provide interaction between OKI staff and community planning or citizen
organizations, relative to area wide or sub-area level transportation matters.

To provide, through workshop and conference sponsorships, training and support to
public and private non-profit agencies to enhance and improve transportation
capabilities and resources.

PREVIOUS WORK
Recent examples of short range planning activities include the following:
  • Promotion of access management concepts and guidelines as a means of
      preserving the traffic carrying capacity of major streets and roadways. Based on
      2002 revisions to the Ohio Revised Code, accomplished largely through the
      efforts of OKI staff, three of the four Ohio counties in the OKI Region have now
      adopted county-wide access management regulations.
  • Traffic operations and area circulation studies for intersections, interchanges,
      roadway segments, small municipalities and proposed new developments. Staff
      participation on the US 42 traffic study in Kenton County.
  • Co-sponsor of the 28th annual Traffic Engineering Workshop in FY09.
  • Host of four webinars presented by the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information
      Center                               related to bicycle and pedestrian safety and
      planning.
  • Assistance to local governmental entities regarding the implementation of the
      Transportation Enhancement program, including the administration of OKI’s Ohio
      Urban Area TE Program under SAFETEA-LU.
  • Technical assistance to the Clermont Transit Connection, the Middletown Transit
       System, Butler County Regional Transit Authority, Southwest Ohio Regional
      Transit Authority, and Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky, regarding
      provision of transit service and related transit items.
  • Review and prioritization of FTA Specialized Transportation Program applications
      as well as applicant assistance for agencies located in Butler, Clermont and
      Hamilton Counties.



4/28/2009                                  W-7
  •    Tracking the implementation of the federal Safe Routes To School program and
       disseminated information to the region with newsletters, presentations, a session
       at the Traffic Engineering Workshop and participating on the Kentucky Safe
       Routes to School Network Project advisory committee.
   •   Technical assistance and support for bicycle policies, plans, programs, and
       projects for counties, local communities, and bicycling interests. Recent activity
       in this area includes continued work with the Ohio River Trail Planning
       Committee, the Miami-2-Miami Coalition, the Williamsburg to Batavia Hike/Bike
       Trail, the Oxford O-Loop Trail and bike route plan, the Cincinnati-Northern
       Kentucky Airport Loop Trail, the Little Miami Scenic Trail and the West Fork Mill
       Creek and Dearborn Trails, all of which have specific projects under active
       development.
   •   Participation in Cincinnati Bicycle/Pedestrian Advisory Committee meetings for
       several years.
   •   Participation in the Cincinnati/Hamilton County Bicycle Friendly Community
       steering committee to apply for recognition under the League of American
       Bicyclists program.
   •   Updated the “Wanna Bike?” brochure which describes popular bicycling facilities
       and publications, and the Cincinnati Bike Route Guide used for commuter route
       selection.
   •   Continued publication and distribution of the OKI Bicycle E-Info News providing
       regionally relevant information about bicycling issues, projects and programs to a
       list of over 250 recipients.
   •   Other major planning for bicycle and pedestrian travel include:
   •   The OKI Regional Bicycle Plan updated in 2008, includes new guidelines for
       Complete Streets.
   •   The OKI Regional Pedestrian Plan updated in 2004.
   •   The OKI county Bike Route Guides updated in 2003 (KY) and 2005 (OH).

METHODOLOGIES
1) Traffic Operations Analyses - Work activities will be directed toward efforts to
    evaluate specific problem intersections and short roadway segments using such
    standard references as the Highway Capacity Manual, the Manual on Uniform
    Traffic Control Devices, the AASHTO Green Book, the AASHTO Guide for the
    Development of Bicycle Facilities, the FHWA Selecting Roadway Design Treatments
    to Accommodate Bicycles, or the AASHTO Guide for the Planning, Design and
    Operation of Pedestrian Facilities, as appropriate. Multimodal or mode specific
    recommendations will be developed for improvements such as signage, striping,
    signalization and channelization.
2) Access Management - Activities will be directed toward the continued promotion of
    access management and right-of-way preservation, including assistance to local
    governments in developing and implementing access management plans and
    Policies.
3) Bicycle/Pedestrian Planning - Activities will include regional bike/ped planning,
    facilitating improvements for cyclist and pedestrian travel and safety, and
    programming financial resources. Staff will continue to monitor and provide
    technical assistance regarding bicycle and pedestrian travel to enhance the multi-
    modal transportation system of the region. Special emphasis areas include
    providing bike/ped opportunities through the recently adopted complete streets
    approach as applied to TIP project selection, corridor studies and trails and
    greenways planning. Bikeway and sidewalk opportunities will be identified for

4/28/2009                                   W-8
      projects proposed for the TIP to pursue the protection and improvement of roads
      for bicycling and walking. Staff will investigate a procedure for evaluating the level
      of service for bicycling on area roads including identifying physical criteria and
      specifications, adapting a digital model to calculate ratings and applying it to
      selected roads in the region. The Kentucky Bike Route Guides, prepared in 2002,
      will be updated in FY10, possibly including Dearborn County, Indiana. Data
      collection efforts to support bike/ped planning will continue and will be performed
      consistent with industry standards.
4)   Transportation Enhancements - The SAFETEA-LU legislation provides that 10% of
      each state's Surface Transportation Program funds must be set aside for
      Transportation Enhancement projects. Under ODOT policy guidelines, OKI
      administers an Urban Area TE Program for the four Ohio counties. OKI will continue
      to actively seek projects with merit, and will work to achieve clear definition of
      these projects, as well as evidence of strong local support, before funding
      commitments are made. OKI will also assist applicants through the implementation
      process.
5)   Safe Routes To School – Activities will include monitoring the federal SAFETEA-LU
      Safe Routes to School program and its implementation. Staff will also monitor the
      guidelines developed by the Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana departments of
      transportation for funding, administration and their application to local projects in
      communities around the OKI region. Information regarding the program will be
      disseminated to local governments, and technical assistance will be provided on
      request. Staff will continue as a member of the advisory committee for the
      Kentucky Safe Routes to School State Network Project.
6)   Educational Outreach - OKI will arrange and conduct one or more educational
      seminars designed specifically to meet the needs of local implementing agencies.
      This element includes a Traffic Engineering Workshop. Continue distribution of
      bicycle and pedestrian planning, facility and safety information through the
      electronic E-Bike Newsletter.
7)     Miscellaneous Technical Assistance - Provide assistance to citizens, local
      governments, and other organizations by performing services such as dissemination
      of socio-economic, land use, transportation planning and traffic data; and staff
      participation as a professional technical resource in meetings and hearings.
8)   Transit Planning Assistance - Over the years, OKI has provided assistance to the
      public transit systems for planning activities. Specific efforts will be directed toward
      the provision of planning services including financial planning, privatization, route
      analysis, service changes and coordination, and human services transportation
      coordination as required under SAFETEA-LU. Staff will present transit TIP
      amendments as needed to the OKI Board of Directors/Executive Committee.
9)   Specialized Transportation Service Planning - Planning for transportation elderly and
      disabled services will continue. First, assistance will be provided to local non-profit
      agencies in developing applications for vehicles under FTA’S Specialized
      Transportation Program (Section 5310), including a workshop to review application
      procedures. This effort will also include evaluating the applications using ODOT and
      locally-developed criteria and presenting the findings to OKI’s Intermodal
      Coordinating Committee for concurrence. Second, coordination efforts will continue
      as appropriate with the elderly and disabled community, transit operators, social
      service agencies, local units of government, and taxi and paratransit operators to
      improve, expand and coordinate the provision of specialized transportation services,
      including compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Staff also conducts



4/28/2009                                      W-9
   annual inspections of vehicles awarded through past programs to agencies in the
   region.

PRODUCTS
1) Documentation supporting traffic operations improvement recommendations on
   problem intersections and roadway segments, or relating to analyses and
   recommendations involving other travel modes or conditions. (as appropriate)
2) Assistance to local governments in the development and implementation of access
   management plans and programs. (as appropriate)
3) Assistance in development and implementation of local and multi-jurisdictional
   bicycle/pedestrian plans. Includes guidance of work on feasibility studies and
   analyses for active trail projects and on-street facilities. Also includes assessment of
   funding opportunities and constraints for bicycle and pedestrian facilities, and
   inclusion of appropriate bike/ped treatments in projects added to the TIP in
   accordance with the OKI complete streets approach. An updated OKI Bike Route
   Guide for the three northern Kentucky counties and, optionally, Dearborn County,
   Indiana. Maintenance of a traffic count database for selected locations of cyclist and
   pedestrian travel will be continued. Application of a model for assessing roadway
   level of service for bicyclists with tested applications and evaluation for selected
   roads. (6/10)
4) Administration of OKI’s Urban Area Transportation Enhancement Program. (6/10)
5) Assistance to local governments and advocacy organizations in developing Safe
   Routes to School programs (as appropriate).
6) Participation in the annual transportation planning/traffic engineering seminar.
   Publication of the periodic electronic newsletter on regional bicycle and pedestrian
   issues. Presentation of related professional webinar sessions for practitioners and
   local officials. (as appropriate)
7) Distribution of miscellaneous data products, census materials, bike, mapping, safety
   products including OKI’s “Wanna Bike?” brochure to citizens and public and private
   organizations. (6/10)
8) Transit planning assistance to any of the transit systems in the OKI Region
   consistent with identified needs, including Human Services Transportation
   Coordination as required under SAFETEA-LU. (as appropriate)
9) Evaluated Specialized Transportation Program applications and annual inspections
   of vehicles sponsored by the program. (6/10)




4/28/2009                                    W-10
              602 - TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM

OBJECTIVE
To develop an effective, staged multi-year program that identifies and prioritizes
transportation improvements. Projects are to be consistent with transportation plans
and studies emanating from the urban transportation planning process, and the
program is fiscally and air quality constrained.
PREVIOUS WORK
The OKI Board of Directors adopted the FY 2008 - 2011 Transportation Improvement
Program (TIP) in April 2007. The Funding Application and Instructions for OKI Sub-
allocated STP, CMAQ and SNK Federal Funds, was revised in January 2008 to add or
revise several factors used in ranking projects for Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana projects.
The Prioritization Subcommittee reviews the applications and makes recommendations
to the Intermodal Coordinating Committee (technical advisory committee), which
makes recommendations to the OKI Board of Directors/Executive Committee.

METHODOLOGIES
1) The TIP is a planning document that provides a complete listing of all intended
   federally funded or regionally significant transportation projects for a four-year
   period. The TIP is normally prepared once every two years, in conjunction with
   requests from ODOT, KYTC and INDOT. The FY 2010 – 2013 TIP was anticipated to
   be developed during fiscal year 2009; however, in the fall of 2008 ODOT informed
   the MPO’s that the development of the next TIP would be delayed at least a year.
   Staff continues to monitor projects in the TIP and attends highway review meetings
   conducted by ODOT, KYTC and INDOT. Staff works with ODOT-District 8 to lock-
   down projects for the upcoming fiscal year and INDOT-Seymour District for Early
   Consultation of highway projects planned for Dearborn County. (INDOT work
   conducted under 685.1,2)
2) The TIP is a dynamic document that requires several amendments during a fiscal
   year. Staff remains responsive to the needs of the program and prepares
   amendments and administrative modifications to the TIP as needed. The OKI
   Intermodal Coordinating Committee (ICC) reviews TIP amendments and made
   recommendations to the OKI Executive Committee or the Board of Directors. The
   ICC approves TIP Administrative Modifications as outlined in OKI Resolution 2008-
   15 adopted by the Board of Directors on April 10, 2008.
3) Continue to refine the web-based tools that allow the public to search the OKI TIP
   in an interactive manner. The online TIP (TIP on demand) was maintained and
   improved to be more user-friendly.
4) Staff, as requested by TRAC, will provide a regional prioritization for projects in the
   OKI region.
5) Staff continues to prepare an annual list of obligated highway, transit and planning
   projects funded with federal funds in accordance with 450.332 of 23 U.S.C.
6) The annual Self Certification of OKI’s transportation planning process will be
   performed.

PRODUCTS
1) To monitor and expedite projects in Ohio using STP, TE and CMAQ federal funds; in
   Kentucky using SNK federal funds allocated to OKI with the state departments of




4/28/2009                                   W-11
     transportation and local sponsors; and, to work with ODOT District 8 to lock-down
     projects for fiscal year 2011. (as necessary)
2)   TIP Amendments and TIP Administrative Modifications and associated notices to be
     published on the OKI website (as necessary)
3)   Continued refinement of the TIP on Demand on the OKI website.
4)   Regional prioritization of TRAC applicant projects. (as necessary)
5)   An annual listing of obligated highway, transit and planning projects funded with
     federal funds will be published within 90 days of the end of the fiscal year.
     (10/1/09)
6)   Self Certification (03/10)




4/28/2009                                  W-12
                                605 - SURVEILLANCE

OBJECTIVE
One of the objectives is to develop and maintain, on the appropriate update cycle, the
basic data essential to transportation planning activities. Such a database represents
current conditions within the region and permits comparison to previous as well as
forecast periods to determine the impact of changing development and travel patterns.
Types of data to be maintained include trends in demographic and land use activity;
the transportation system level of service and utilization; impacts on the natural
resource base, including air quality and energy; and travel data. Another objective is to
maintain the validity and operation of a travel demand model.

The travel demand model should be able to simulate the current trip making behavior
and travel patterns. The travel demand model should be able to assess the impacts of
proposed changes in land uses, transportation system, travel demand management
strategies, and transportation control measures. The majority of the basic data now
resides in GIS format, therefore maintaining existing datasets and building new GIS
datasets to support transportation planning activities is a vital part of this work plan.

PREVIOUS WORK
Transportation system characteristics have been identified, inventoried, and updated
continuously. Those characteristics of the roadway system associated with the level of
service and capacity of the system include: the roadway configuration, posted speed,
pavement width, number of lanes, intersection control, and turning lanes or
prohibitions. The data is maintained in a street centerline based file and updated as
needed. For transit systems the characteristics include the location and frequency of
bus service that permit the definition of system capacity. The transit routing, schedule
and ridership information were collected from the transit operators in the region.
Measures of system utilization including traffic counts, travel time and bus ridership
counts have also been maintained. In addition, model input parameters such as fuel
consumption rates, parking costs, auto operation costs, bus fare, emission rates,
accident rates, and trip generation characteristics were updated as necessary.
The travel pattern data was collected in 1995. The data was collected for 3,000
households in the region. The data was used for travel demand model calibration in
1998 and 2002.
The travel demand model was developed initially in the mid-1970s. Over the years,
using newly acquired travel data, new elements were added and methodologies were
enhanced to make the model more accurate and easier to use. In 2002 the model was
expanded to cover OKI and MVRPC (Dayton) areas. Model elements for trip distribution
and modal choice phases were re-calibrated and a new truck trip model was
introduced. In 2003-2005 enhancements were made in response to peer review of the
travel mode. In 2006/2007 the model was converted to the CUBE/VOYAGER platform
and was validated against year 2005 conditions.
The highway networks were consolidated and conflated to be consistent with street
centerlines to allow for true shape display in 2005.        In addition, with these
integrated/conflated networks, the transfer of data between street centerline file and


4/28/2009                                   W-13
highway network files can be performed properly. This is the first step toward the
ability to create the highway networks automatically using street centerline file.

OKI continues to enhance its traffic simulation capability as an extension of its existing
travel demand model. The enhancement of this capability is in response to the
increasing demand for the evaluation of local transportation improvement projects that
are too small to properly evaluate with the traditional regional travel demand model.
Traffic simulation allows the visualization of these important projects, such as additional
turn lanes, access management, and the integration of pedestrian movement and
transit. Simulation has been integrated with the travel demand model, allowing for the
benefit of seeing traffic forecasts in the simulation environment. Staff is utilizing the
CUBE Dynasim software by Citilabs and has incorporated sub-area modeling, signalized
intersections and 3D rendering into the simulation process.

An operational GIS has been developed, the necessary hardware and software have
been purchased and initial datasets have been acquired or developed. An enterprise
geodatabase has been implemented with the use of Microsoft SQL Server and ArcSDE.

Geographic datasets have been developed and used to generate base maps for
analysis, presentation and documentation. The geographic data include street
centerlines, rail lines, bike trails, hydrology features, analysis area boundaries, and
political/administrative boundaries.

An interactive online web mapping application for the TIP has been developed.

METHODOLOGIES
1) Maintain and update transportation system characteristics data. The regional
   database includes transportation supply and demand characteristics (capacity and
   utilization. Computer software will be developed or acquired to facilitate this task.
   Additional transportation system characteristics data will be generated as needed to
   support OKI's transportation/air quality planning and traffic engineering technical
   assistance program to units of local government. Update travel data. Trip making
   data will be collected for the households in the region. The data will include
   household characteristics, trips made and their characteristics (trip purpose, mode,
   time, etc.). The data will be analyzed and used for travel demand model
   design/calibration. Consulting firms have been contracted to collect this data, as
   part of FY09 task 665.6.
2) Collect traffic count information for model validation purposes. Consulting firms
   have been contracted to collect some of this data, as part of FY2009 task 684.3.
   OKI will collect traffic count data from all jurisdictions and set traffic counters where
   needed.
3) Maintain, refine and enhance OKI travel demand and air quality models to represent
   state-of-the-practice capabilities. The activities involved include incorporating EPA’s
   MOVES,        streamlining     model     operation,      improving      data     summary
   tabulation/plotting/reporting capability, evaluating and improving model
   methodologies, updating/refining the model equations based on the trip origin-
   destination data collected from previous surveys and updating model documents. In
   addition, new modules/procedures will be added to the model to enable it to assess
   the impacts of TDM/TSM strategies and to perform financial analysis. An effort will
   be made to incorporate ODOT’s capacity calculation methodologies into the model.
   In addition, work to research the type/structure of the next generation of models


4/28/2009                                    W-14
    and the data needed to develop a selected model structure will be continued. A
    strategy for developing the next travel demand model will be undertaken. An effort
    will be made to integrate a land use model in the travel demand model flow.
 4) Track zonal level residential and commercial development activity to identify areas
    of growth and/or change in land use. Residential building permits issued by
    counties, cities and townships will be collected and processed to derive annual
    changes in households.
 5) OKI will continue enhancement of traffic simulation capabilities including its
    application to selected sub-areas as appropriate. Explore methods to improve
    accuracy of simulations as compared to observed conditions. Purchase additional
    software and hardware to incorporate technological advancements into the
    simulation process. Maintain technical expertise in the latest advancements in
    travel modeling and traffic simulation by participating in user conferences and other
    training as appropriate.
 6) Assist U.S. Census Bureau on census work. OKI will assist the Census Bureau in
    providing data, processing census data and reviewing census products. Promote
    census programs as needed and appropriate, particularly those related to the 2010
    decennial census. Continue to assist the Census Bureau in the Participant Statistical
    Areas Program (PSAP) as needed. OKI will respond to census related data requests
    from local government, business, academia and the public.
 7) Maintain existing GIS databases. Continue adding and enhancing attribute data
    where needed by the OKI travel model and related transportation planning
    activities.
 8) Maintain licensing and technical support for GIS software. Attend annual ESRI user
    conference, state GIS conferences, local GIS user group meetings, and other GIS
    training as needed. Replace GIS hardware as required.
 9)    Continue development of environmental databases and maps to support
    transportation and greenspace planning, especially as they relate to SAFETEA-LU
    and its successor transportation authorization law.
10) Continue development of an integrated workflow between the travel demand model
    and OKI’s GIS.
11) Collaborate with the Model Application Coordinator on traffic simulation efforts.
12) Develop additional internet and/or intranet web mapping applications to display OKI
    GIS database information. Maintain the ESRI Developers Network subscription for
    the purpose of testing and developing online mapping applications.
13) The OKI GIS is the primary data warehouse for many regional datasets related to
    transportation. As such OKI is a valuable resource within the regional community as
    it relates to safety and security for transportation infrastructure. OKI staff will
    explore ways to expand its role as a regional data source for such critical datasets.
14) Develop GIS layers and applications, as outlined in the OKI/Hamilton County EMA
    Memorandum of Understanding, to support the implementation of a regional GIS
    capable of supporting Homeland Security and transportation planning efforts in and
    across the Greater Cincinnati Region.

PRODUCTS
 1) Updated transportation system characteristics data files, and travel data files.
    (6/10)
 2) Traffic counts for roadways that are included in the OKI Model Network (6/10)
 3) An updated/refined/enhanced travel demand/air quality model. (6/10)
 4) Revised zonal socioeconomic files for 2005, 2010, 2020 and 2030. (as needed)


4/28/2009                                   W-15
 5) OKI will provide traffic simulation products in support of transportation planning
    studies in the revision. (as appropriate)
 6) Services to Census Bureau and processing of data requests from local government,
    citizens and others. (as appropriate)
 7) Updated geographic databases. (on-going)
 8) Up-to-date GIS software. (6/10)
 9) Environmental spatial databases and maps. (as appropriate)
10) Streamlined internal workflow for presenting Travel Demand Model data. (on-
    going)
11) Enhanced 3-D visualization presentations and techniques. (6/10)
12) New online web mapping applications. (6/10)
13) Participation in regional homeland security efforts such as the Emergency
    Preparedness Collaborative. Improved GIS data sharing and collaboration within
    the regional homeland security community. (on-going)
14) New GIS layers used to support cooperative transportation planning and Homeland
    Security efforts.




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              605.5 – TRANSPORTATION & HOMELAND SECURITY

OBJECTIVE
Develop and implement a regional Geographic Information System (GIS) which is
capable of supporting Homeland Security and Transportation planning efforts in and
across the Greater Cincinnati Region.

PREVIOUS WORK

OKI has developed a regional GIS capable of supporting its many programs. In
cooperation with each of the eight counties that make up the OKI region, a base map
of GIS data has been assembled which acts as a framework of regional GIS layers.
These framework data include layers such as political boundaries, land ownership or
parcels, hydrography or water bodies, transportation, orthoimagery and digital
elevation data and are the foundation for many agencies’ daily business that should be
collected once, and made accessible for use by multiple governmental agencies.

The Hamilton County Emergency Management Agency (HCEMA) working on behalf of
regional emergency management agencies, known as Southwest Ohio Southeast
Indiana Northern Kentucky (SOSINK), has identified a need for GIS layers to support
situational awareness as it relates to homeland security, across the Greater Cincinnati
Region. Many of the GIS layers (Multi-purpose layers) required to provide situational
awareness for the region also serve as a valuable input for the transportation planning
process.     Therefore, by HCEMA and OKI working jointly to develop these critical
information layers, each agency can realize a cost and time savings. Ultimately, the
Greater Cincinnati Region benefits from this cooperation and coordination by being
better prepared to respond to emergency situations.

METHODOLOGIES
1) Develop new GIS layers, as outlined in the OKI/Hamilton County EMA Memorandum
   of Understanding, to support the implementation of a regional GIS capable of
   supporting Homeland Security and transportation planning efforts in and across the
   Greater Cincinnati Region.
2) Develop online mapping application to support the use and dissemination of the
   newly developed GIS layers.

PRODUCTS
1) New GIS layers used to support cooperative transportation planning and Homeland
   Security efforts. (ongoing)
2) Online mapping viewer capable of presenting a Common Operating Picture for the
   Region. (6/10)




4/28/2009                                  W-17
                       610 – TRANSPORTATION PLANNING

OBJECTIVE
To update and refine the adopted long range transportation plan and carry out its
recommendations to 1) provide consistency with the requirements of the Safe
Accountable Flexible Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-
LU) Metropolitan Planning Regulations and with the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA)
of 1990, 2) maintain a 20-year planning horizon, 3) further integrate a congestion
management process into transportation planning and operations, 4) provide traffic
projections and other plan information required by implementing agencies, 5) convene
the necessary regional bodies to further ITS goals of the region, and 6) assist agencies
in the analysis of transportation safety issues, 7) consider all modes as options for
addressing the travel needs of the region.
To provide fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people, regardless of race,
color, national origin or income, with respect to the use of public-source transportation
funding.
To identify linkages between land use and development and transportation policy and
identify the fundamental reciprocal impacts between the transportation system and
land use activity.
To implement the Strategic Regional Policy Plan which will guide communities’
preferred development patterns and transportation system to fulfill desired future
conditions. This policy plan was produced by the OKI Board of Directors (formerly
Trustees) sitting as the Land Use Commission.
To support land use patterns that would promote multimodal travel alternatives and
reduced trips, enhanced air quality and the efficient movement of people and goods
(freight).
To identify and evaluate opportunities for non single occupant vehicle travel, including
transit, pedestrian and bicycle.
To assist local governments in drafting standards and criteria which recognize the
relationship between land use, transportation, air quality and other infrastructure.
To provide project management resources for various transportation studies as
identified in this work program.
Identify and engage stakeholders in all aspects of transportation planning activities.
To develop technologies that advance local governments and the public’s ability to
understand the impacts of proposed improvements through visualization techniques.
To provide project level traffic forecasts and turning movements.

PREVIOUS WORK
OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan – 2004 Update (6/04)
Amendment 1 – OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan -2004 Update (4/05)
Amendment 2 – OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan -2004 Update (2/06)
Amendment 3 – OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan -2004 Update (10/06)



4/28/2009                                   W-18
Amendment 4 – OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan -2004 Update (4/07)
OKI 2030 Regional          Transportation    Plan    –   “Setting   Your    Transportation
Landscape”(6/08)
Amendment 1 - OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan (3/09) Amended to include the
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act projects.
The Congestion Management Process (CMP) for the OKI region as described in Mobility
Management Program, (10/95) outlines OKI’s process for carrying out congestion
mitigation activities. Corridor study analysis contributes substantially to this effort.
Travel time surveys (cycle 1, groups 1, 2 and 3) were conducted in 2002 and 2003.
Cycle 2, groups 1, 2 and 3 were completed in 2004, 2005 and 2006. The Congestion
Management Process final report was completed in September, 2007. The data
collection process has moved to a four year cycle. Cycle 3, groups 1 and 2 were
completed in 2007 and 2008 and the following report was produced: OKI Congestion
Management Process Interim Report: Cycle 3 Group 2 Data Collection This report
documents the methodology and results of the third cycle of collected travel-times for
group 2 facilities. Data collection was completed in December 2008. Group 2 consists of
non-interstate roadways within eastern Butler, Clermont, eastern Hamilton and Warren
counties. Data is compared to the second cycle of data collected in 2005.

At the conclusion of analyzing data related to six broad topics, establishing a regional
vision, producing 28 strategic regional issues and associated trends and conditions
statements, refining goals, objectives and policies related to the regional issues, and
two rounds of public meetings, the OKI Board of Directors (formerly Board of Trustees)
adopted the Strategic Regional Policy Plan on April 14, 2005.

Implementation of the Strategic Regional Policy Plan is taking place pursuant to an
action plan and timeline established in FY 06 and updated in FY 09. To date,
implementation activities have included: ongoing discussions with various audiences on
regional land use and infrastructure trends; guidance documents for effective local
government comprehensive plans; consultations with local officials on how to write
better comprehensive plans; several model ordinances for use by local governments at
their discretion; “land use criteria” for inclusion in OKI’s long range plan and TIP
prioritization processes; contributions to OKI’s long range transportation plan update;
environmental data collection for use in SAFETEA-LU-related consultations and
mitigation planning; a survey of local school districts; and the creation of a fiscal impact
analysis model.
In response to local governmental units or state transportation agencies, OKI prepares
project-level traffic projections.
Participation in the activities of the Butler, Clermont and Hamilton County
Transportation Improvement District Board (ongoing).
OKI was a major participant in KYTC’s update to its Unscheduled Projects List, which
produced a prioritized list of potential highway projects for Kentucky’s Six Year Plan.
OKI prioritized the unscheduled projects list during FY2008.
OKI’s involvement in the intelligent transportation systems (ITS) deployment process
began in 1989. The region’s ITS system, known as ARTIMIS, was implemented in 1997.
In 2007, the Regional ITS Plan and Architecture originally developed in 2001 was
updated.


4/28/2009                                    W-19
In FY2005 OKI completed safety studies for two intersections and one roadway
segment (three locations) to assist ODOT. In FY2006 OKI completed safety studies for
six locations to assist ODOT. In FY2009, OKI identified locations of safety interest on
the off-system roadways in the OKI planning area for ODOT. In 2008 the Brent Spence
Bridge Truck Ban Analysis was performed at the request of the Mayor of Covington.
OKI continues participation in a variety of safety related location analyses.
OKI has received national recognition for its work with benefit-cost analysis tools. Staff
worked with FHWA to update and implement the Surface Transportation Efficiency
Analysis Model (STEAM). The programs have been successfully implemented for in
depth program level applications.




4/28/2009                                   W-20
        610.1 - TRANSPORTATION PLANNING: SYSTEM MANAGEMENT

OBJECTIVE
A main theme advanced by SAFETEA-LU is the need to invest transportation resources
in improving the management and operation of the transportation system and expand
on consultation and ways to improve interagency and public involvement. This concept
embraces not only the notion of improving the system’s efficiency by mitigating
congestion and expanding its carrying capacity, but also of improving the delivery of
existing and planned or desired services. OKI will continue and/or undertake initiatives
to improve system management and operation, which will include, but not necessarily
be limited to, the following tasks:

METHODOLOGIES
1) The OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan was updated in 2008. In FY 2010 the
   Plan will be amended as necessary.
2) Under SAFETEA-LU, metropolitan planning organizations like OKI must maintain a
   focus on managing the existing infrastructure. OKI will work with all levels of
   agencies and the public to discuss how the existing system can be managed and
   operated more efficiently. OKI will continue to participate in regional, state and
   national forums to identify procedures for addressing federal and state planning
   requirements. OKI will begin to implement new regulations that may be required
   under the new transportation authorization legislation.
3) For measuring system performance and providing data for the congestion
   management process (CMP), OKI will continue to evaluate traffic quality information
   of roadways in the 2,298 mile CMP network using a combination of information
   from OKI’s travel demand model and collected travel time information. Travel time
   information will continue to be collected for 1,168 miles of the CMS network. The
   past three year cycles have migrated to a four year cycle consistent with the long
   range plan update cycle. Approximately 300 miles of travel time data have been
   collected in each year since 2002, with a complete cycle of travel time data
   collection completed every four years. The database will be maintained and will be
   utilized to evaluate the effects of improvements on the system. Performance
   measures and strategies to address deficient locations will continue to be integrated
   into the TIP and long range transportation planning processes.
4) In order to fully evaluate the impacts of transportation projects and programs on
   the OKI community, benefit/cost analysis will be applied as appropriate.
5) OKI staff is active in planning studies in the region. This element provides for start-
   up activities for new corridor studies managed by OKI or studies not managed by
   OKI but where staff participation is appropriate.
6) Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) are electronics, communications, and
   information processing used singly or integrated to improve the efficiency or safety
   of surface transportation. An ITS Architecture defines how systems functionally
   operate and the interconnection of information exchanges that must take place
   between these systems to accomplish transportation services. All federally-funded
   ITS projects must conform to a Regional ITS Architecture that meets all
   requirements of the federal ITS Architecture and Standards rule. OKI updated the
   ITS Plan in March 2008. OKI will host and maintain the region’s web-based
   architecture.
7) OKI will maintain and update crash data on the transportation system to monitor
   existing conditions. The GIS-based database includes recent crash records on state


4/28/2009                                   W-21
    and federal highways in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana. Coordination with each DOT
    will continue. Database and GIS software will be utilized to locate high crash
    concentrations and segments of roadway with high crash rates. Performance of a
    limited number of safety studies for ODOT and other agencies will be conducted as
    resources permit. Support the newly initiated Highway Safety Improvement
    Program (HSIP) by coordinating efforts with KYTC, ODOT and INDOT in executing
    their State Strategic Highway Safety Plans (SHSP).
 8) OKI will coordinate the long range transportation planning process with KYTC,
    through the ongoing revisions to the Cabinet’s Project Identification Forms (PIFs)
    and Unscheduled Projects List (UPL).
 9) OKI will provide project level traffic forecasts and turning movements as requested
    utilizing the regional travel model and other software as appropriate.
10) Staff will continue to engage the freight community and explore opportunities to
    partner as appropriate for the benefit of the traveling public.

PRODUCTS
  1) OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan Amendments (as needed). Self Certification
     (03/10)
  2) Coordination with ODOT, KYTC, INDOT, local governments and major transit
     agencies on options for improving the management and operation of the existing
     system. Participation in regional, state and national forums on transportation
     planning issues. Participation in interagency consultation activities. (ongoing)
  3) Travel time surveys in FY 2010 will focus on Butler County and Western Hamilton
     County, non freeway portions of the Congestion Management Process network.
     (05/10)
  4) Benefit/cost analysis of proposed transportation improvements (as appropriate)
  5) Project development activities for future corridor or special studies as identified.
  6) Hosting and maintaining the region’s web-based ITS architecture and ITS Plan.
     Support of the Regional Incident Management Task Force. (ongoing)
  7) Identification of high crash concentrations and segments in the OKI region.
     Performance of a limited number of safety studies for ODOT and other agencies as
     requested. Cooperation with ODOT, KYTC and INDOT in the review of their SHSPs.
     (as needed)
  8) OKI will maintain current Project Identification Forms (PIFs) for all Kentucky
     projects recommended in the OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan. PIFs will be
     maintained and revised per guidelines established by KYTC. OKI will maintain and
     revise the Unscheduled Projects List (UPL), for Kentucky projects identified through
     OKI’s planning process. (6/10)
 9) Project level traffic forecasts and turning movements as requested utilizing the
     regional travel model and other software as appropriate.
10) Coordinated planning and consideration of freight related projects for the region.
     (on-going)




 4/28/2009                                   W-22
                610.4 – TRANSPORTATION PLANNING: LAND USE

PREVIOUS WORK
The OKI Board of Trustees adopted a Strategic Regional Policy Plan in April 2005.
Implementation of this plan for growth and development is taking place pursuant to an
action plan and timeline established in FY 06 and updated in FY 09. Implementation is
being accomplished by various jurisdictions and organizations on a voluntary basis and
by OKI.

The plan recognizes that the optimal place for the integration of transportation, land
use, capital budgeting, and economic development planning and policies is the local
government comprehensive plan. In FY06 staff created a guidance document for
comprehensive plans entitled “Effective Elements of a Comprehensive Plan” as a first
step toward implementing the Strategic Regional Policy Plan. Many of the plan’s
policies call for implementation tools that supplement this guidance document and to
work toward bringing about more consistency between local land use planning and
regional transportation planning.

In FY 08 a consultant team was hired to create a fiscal impact analysis model for use in
the OKI Region using a mix of federal funds including Ohio STP, Kentucky PL/FTA and
Indiana STP. Non-federal share was from participating agencies/communities. The
work of the consultant team resulted in both an excel version and a web based version
of a fiscal impact model. This model is available for use by additional partner
communities once the appropriate data specific to that community has been gathered
and analyzed.

OKI will also further and implement new SAFETEA-LU mandates for environmental
protection and for new consultations with federal, state and local officials.

METHODOLOGIES
1)   Continue education efforts about regional land use trends on traffic congestion, air
     quality, travel times, and energy consumption. Target audiences will include local
     elected and appointed officials, planners, developers, and government decision-
     makers. Consultation with state and local land use agencies responsible for land
     use management, natural resources, environmental protection, conservation, and
     historic preservation will occur as appropriate.
2)   Continue distribution of local comprehensive plan guidance, sample ordinances and
     collateral materials, such as surveys and research products about neighborhood
     redevelopment and economic vitality. Provide technical assistance and encourage
     the use of these resources in order to promote land use patterns that support
     multimodal travel alternatives, reduced trips, and use of available roadway capacity
     in urban areas.
3)   Manage the process of incorporating additional user data into OKI’s Fiscal Impact
     Analysis Model and promote the use of the model to communities throughout the
     region.
4) Continue discussions with appropriate federal, state and local environment- based
    agencies and initiate discussions with historic- based agencies, comparing the long-
    range transportation plan with environmental and historic information, and
    identifying potential mitigation strategies and locations that are regional in scope.



4/28/2009                                   W-23
PRODUCTS
1)   Documentation of presentations and consultations about the land
     use/transportation relationship, trends and distributed materials. (ongoing)
2)   Surveys and research materials to supplement the comprehensive plan guidance
     document about neighborhood redevelopment and economic vitality in the region.
     Documentation of distribution of local comprehensive plan guidance, sample
     ordinances, and collateral materials to local planners, administrators and officials
     and of technical assistance provided (6/10).
3)   Additional data and analysis for new partners using the fiscal impact analysis model
     and documentation of model promotion. (ongoing)
4)   On-going coordination with federal, state and local historic- and environment-
     based agencies, comparing the recommended long-range transportation plan with
     historic and environmental information, and identifying potential mitigation
     strategies and locations that are regional in scope. (6/10)




4/28/2009                                   W-24
                    610.5 – FISCAL IMPACT ANALYSIS MODEL

OBJECTIVE
Transportation investment stimulates economic development and land use change. A
fiscal impact analysis model will implement OKI’s Strategic Regional Policy Plan by
increasing local governments’ understanding of the costs and benefits of development.
A fiscal impact analysis model helps local governments to capitalize on the potential
land use changes related to these transportation investments by analyzing the costs
and benefits of alternative land use scenarios. A fiscal impact analysis model uses local
government budgetary, land use, population and employment trends to project costs
and revenues of development on current and future local government budgets.
The use of this model also furthers the objectives of SAFETEA-LU. The use of this fiscal
impact analysis model will facilitate better coordination and planning between the MPO
and local officials. Partnering with local governments to provide a tool for measuring
development impacts will promote consistency between transportation improvements
and local planned growth and economic development patterns.
As communities begin to understand the associated costs and revenues of development
through the fiscal impact analysis model, they will be better able to plan for needed
increases in transportation investment to serve new development or to remedy existing
deficiencies. This can impact the regional transportation funding process and make
more efficient use of tax dollars at the local, state and federal levels.

PREVIOUS WORK
Implementation of OKI’s Strategic Regional Policy Plan is taking place pursuant to an
action plan and timeline established in FY 06. Several implementation tools have been
produced by OKI staff for use at the discretion of local governments, including Transit
Friendly Development; Infill Development; Corridor Overlay Zones; Mixed Use
Development; Large Scale Retail Development; Street Connectivity; and Bicycle and
Pedestrian Facility Standards.
OKI staff researched and documented fiscal impact analysis models in use around the
United States and concluded that it was feasible to produce such a model for the
Greater Cincinnati OKI region. Consultant services were sought to help OKI develop
and establish a fiscal impact analysis model for use at the discretion of local
jurisdictions.
A consultant team was hired to create the model using a mix of federal funds including
Ohio STP, Kentucky PL/FTA and Indiana STP. Non-federal share was from participating
agencies/communities. The work of the consultant team resulted in a fiscal impact
model that is now being used by these participating communities.
METHODOLOGIES
Manage the refinement of the fiscal impact analysis model for participating local
governments and provide technical assistance to existing users.

PRODUCTS
Documentation of refinements to and technical assistance for an operational fiscal
impact analysis model that is used to compare alternative land use scenarios and
analyze development and redevelopment. (ongoing)



4/28/2009                                   W-25
         625.2 – TRANSPORTATION SERVICES: PARTICIPATION PLAN

OBJECTIVE
To incorporate Title VI and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, along with
other environmental justice (EJ) concerns, into OKI’s planning process. OKI will
continue to implement a Participation Plan (PP) utilizing traditional methodologies as
well as exploring new methodologies relative to the fair treatment and meaningful
involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, age, disability or
income.

PREVIOUS WORK
OKI has developed a comprehensive Title VI based policy relative to environmental
justice concerns and established an Environmental Justice Advisory Committee (EJAC)
to assist staff with the implementation of its Participation Plan in all corridor and long
range transportation planning projects. The OKI Participation Plan was adopted by the
OKI Board of Directors in June 2007 and revised February 2008.

METHODOLOGIES
1) Create and execute participation strategies and plans for OKI studies and
   programs. The effectiveness of the procedures and strategies contained in the
   Participation Plan will be periodically reviewed.
2) Develop a Title VI Plan that includes the standard Title VI Assurances, DBE
   program and goals, transportation planning, environmental justice elements and
   contracting procedures.
3) Enhance the participation process; strengthen community-based partnerships, and
   provide the environmental justice populations recognized by OKI with opportunities
   to learn about and improve the quality and usefulness of various transportation
   modes in their lives.
4) Work with the Intermodal Coordinating Committee (ICC) to develop criteria and
   measurement tools for the environmental justice components when awarding
   Surface Transportation Program (STP) and CMAQ funds and evaluating projects to
   be advanced through the planning process.
5) Continue to identify and develop collateral public outreach materials to enhance
   and support OKI’s transportation planning processes.

PRODUCTS:
1)   Updated Participation Plans (PP) as needed. Customized outreach plans for major
     OKI studies and projects. (as needed)
2)   Title VI Plan (06/10)
3)   Annual program compliance review will be conducted. (06/10)
4)   Input to the TIP and Long-Range Plan project evaluation process. Assurance that
     proper consideration is being given to underserved communities. (as needed)
5)   Public outreach and collateral materials. (06/10)




4/28/2009                                   W-26
                  665.1 SPECIAL STUDIES: OKI FREIGHT STUDY

OBJECTIVE
To complete a Freight Study for the OKI Region.

PREVIOUS WORK
The OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan recommends that OKI plan for efficient
multimodal freight movement that enhances the Region’s environmental and economic
conditions.
In the past, OKI has inventoried the region’s freight system and highlighted the
movement of goods in two reports, Freight Transportation Study (1997) and Urban
Goods Movement (1987). Both reports serve as an adequate baseline of freight
information but a more comprehensive, detailed and interdisciplinary analysis must be
performed to effectively understand the impact of freight on and within the OKI region.

METHODOLOGIES
The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA), Transportation
Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21) of 1998 and the subsequent SAFETEA-LU call
for an increased emphasis on freight initiatives. OKI will perform the Freight Study
which meets the needs of the region while adhering to past and present federal
legislation. The main objectives of the study will be to:

1)   Determine the volume and nature of freight movements, to, from, through and
     within the OKI region including associated impacts on the region.
2)   Gather information on impediments to efficient freight movement within the OKI
     region.
3)   Actively utilize the existing Regional Freight Working Group to serve as the freight
     study’s advisory committee.
4)   Forecast future freight growth and freight infrastructure needs.
5)   Estimate environmental and economic impacts of an improved freight delivery
     system.
6)   Develop a freight improvement plan that promotes short- and long-term solutions
     consistent with goals for making freight movements more effective and efficient.
7)   Establish a strategic plan to implement short- and long-term solutions.

OKI will competitively select a consultant and engage their services to assist with this
study and produce a final freight study report including a freight improvement plan
within 12 months after the study begins.

The major undertaking and cost of this study will be acquiring sufficient freight data to
understand current and future freight movements within the OKI region. In addition,
OKI will actively engage the freight community, specifically private freight businesses.

PRODUCT
1)   Final Freight Study Report including a Freight Improvement Plan. (6/10)




4/28/2009                                   W-27
          665.4 – SPECIAL STUDIES: REGIONAL CLEAN AIR PROGRAM

OBJECTIVE
To continue the Regional Clean Air Program designed to raise public and business
awareness therefore reducing pollution levels in order to protect public health, the local
economy and attain the national ozone and particulate matter standards.
PREVIOUS WORK
OKI’s Regional Clean Air Program educates the general public, media, businesses and
local governments about ground level ozone and particulate matter pollution. This
program, which emphasizes voluntary actions, is focused on Butler, Clermont, Hamilton
and Warren counties in Ohio; Boone, Kenton and Campbell counties in Kentucky and
Dearborn County in Indiana.
Various activities of the program have included:
     •   aggressive media relations and advertising efforts to keep the smog issue at the
         forefront of local radio, television and newspaper reporting and
     •   strategic event marketing activities aimed at educating a vast portion of the
         public.
METHODOLOGIES
1)   OKI will continue outreach and education efforts within the region. Although smog
     season is primarily from May to September, the program will work throughout the
     year to develop its “do your share for cleaner air” message as well as educate
     audiences on particulate matter issues. Since smog reduction can be achieved
     through a variety of actions, several audiences will be targeted including the local
     media, government and businesses, citizens and employers. Event marketing
     activities include county fairs and festivals, as well as a variety of other special
     events throughout the region. Commercials, painted buses, street flags and other
     avenues of creating awareness will be used.
PRODUCTS
1)   An outreach program geared toward the reduction of pollutants in the eight county
     urban airshed. (ongoing)




4/28/2009                                    W-28
                665.6 - SPECIAL STUDIES: GPS TRAVEL SURVEY

OBJECTIVE
To participate in a GPS-based travel survey for the OKI Region.

PREVIOUS WORK

The travel pattern data used in the current OKI Travel Demand Forecasting Model was
collected in 1995. The data was collected for 3,000 households in the region.

METHODOLOGIES
This work element includes the Kentucky portion of the regional travel survey. The total
project cost for the survey to be conducted by ODOT is $1.2 million.

The Ohio component to be paid for by ODOT with SPR (research) funds. ODOT will bill
OKI for the Kentucky portion.

The Kentucky part of the region represents about 18% of the regional population.
Therefore the total Kentucky portion of the cost is approximately $200,000. KYTC is
providing $160,000 and OKI is providing $40,000. The funds will be used as payment
for consultant services for the Kentucky portion of regional household surveys.

OKI staff work will include review of travel data methods and travel survey data as well
participation on advisory committee and consultant review board. OKI staff time will be
performed under 605.1 Surveillance.

PRODUCT
   1) Updated travel pattern data for use in the OKI Travel Demand Forecasting
      Model. (10/11)




4/28/2009                                  W-29
            665.X - SPECIAL STUDIES: TRANSIT ON-BOARD SURVEY

OBJECTIVE
To conduct a transit on board survey for the OKI Region.

PREVIOUS WORK

Transit on-board travel surveys were last conducted in 1995. This data is used to
estimate transit mode choice and travel patterns in the OKI Travel Demand Forecasting
Model.

METHODOLOGIES
Updated surveys are essential to improve the OKI Travel Model’s ability to predict
transit usage. FTA’s New Starts program requires current survey data be part of the
regional travel model in order to be eligible for federal funding of major transit fixed
guideway projects.

This work will require the agency to engage professional services for conduct of a
survey which involves trained personnel surveying transit patrons during travel.
Processing of the collected data and incorporation into the travel model will be part of
project. It is anticipated that the survey will also permit special questions of interest to
the transit providers.

OKI will be the primary project manager but will rely on the transit partners to be
active parts of the process. During project planning and preparation, OKI will hold
meetings that include representatives from Metro, TANK, Middletown, and Clermont. If
needed, OKI will consult ODOT Tech Services, KYTC Division of Planning, the Federal
Transit Administration, and/or other MPOs for guidance.

Among the elements of the work to be conducted include: Questionnaire design,
sampling plan, survey plan, pilot survey, evaluation of pilot survey, survey data
processing and travel model updates.

Funding for this product is undetermined at this time.

PRODUCT
1)   Updated transit travel pattern data for use in the OKI Travel Demand Forecasting
     Model. (10/10)
2)   Updated travel model elements. (12/10)




4/28/2009                                    W-30
                         667.1 – RIDESHARE ACTIVITIES

OBJECTIVE
To provide transportation alternatives to commuters within the Tri-state area; thereby
promoting energy conservation, reducing traffic and pollution, saving money and
helping to preserve the quality of life for those who live in the OKI region.

PREVIOUS WORK
Since 1980, the RideShare program has been reducing traffic congestion, improving air
quality and ensuring mobility by encouraging the region’s commuters to carpool,
vanpool or use public transit. The major components of the RideShare program are the
ride-matching database, vanpooling, marketing and public awareness.

The ride-matching database is continually updated and accepts applications from
commuters in the OKI region and surrounding counties. Commuters can either call
241-RIDE or fill out an online application at www.rideshareonline.org.

OKI has marketed the RideShare program through a variety of means including radio,
print advertisements, employer campaigns and special events.

METHODOLOGIES
1) RideShare will maintain a current, accurate database of participants, their origin
   and destination points, work hours and other key information. Match-lists will be
   provided to applicants by the following business day.
2) The OKI RideShare program promotes alternative transportation such as
   carpooling, vanpooling and public transportation.         This is accomplished by
   providing information and financial incentives to individuals and companies.
3) The Guaranteed Ride Home (GRH) program provides registered carpoolers,
   vanpoolers and transit customers with a ride home in emergency situations at a
   minimal cost.
4) The marketing of the program will be evaluated based on cost, effectiveness and
   feasibility. Public awareness of the program will be raised through community and
   special events and employer presentations.

PRODUCTS
1) A detailed report of database activities such as additions, deletions, and counts of
   applicants provided with match-lists.
2) Retain existing vanpools through rider recruitment and form new vanpools to
   reduce single-occupant vehicles from Tri-state roads.
3) An accurate GRH database and an efficient reimbursement program.
4) Execution of an annual marketing plan outlining the most effective approaches to
   increase awareness and participation in all aspects of the OKI RideShare program.




4/28/2009                                  W-31
674.1/674.2– JARC/NEW FREEDOM COORDINATED TRANSPORTATION PLAN
PREVIOUS WORK
The adoption of SAFETEA-LU included changes to several transit programs. Requests
for federal funds for elderly individuals and individuals with disabilities (Section 5310),
job access and reverse commute (Section 5316) and the New Freedom Program
(Section 5317) required that the project be included in a locally developed Coordinated
Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan (Coordinated Plan). In addition, a
designated recipient is required for each urbanized area to manage the Coordinated
Plan and develop a prioritization process to review and rank applications for the 5316
and 5317 programs. OKI was named the designated recipient for the Cincinnati
urbanized area during FY2007 by the Governors of Ohio and Kentucky.
During FY2007, OKI developed the Coordinated Plan for the OKI Region which was
adopted by the Board of Directors on August 9, 2007. In addition, a competitive
selection process was adopted that provides guidelines for reviewing and ranking
applications for Sections 5316 and 5317 capital, operating and planning funds from
qualified applicants in the Cincinnati urbanized area. OKI solicited applications for these
funds in the fall of 2007. The OKI Board of Directors awarded projects in January 2008.
A JARC/New Freedom Oversight Team was established during FY 2009 that provides
guidance in managing existing JARC and New Freedom programs and review of
applications. It is anticipated the next round of applications will be during FY 2010.
METHODOLOGIES
1)    Hold quarterly meetings of the JARC/New Freedom Oversight Team to provide
      guidance in managing existing JARC and New Freedom Programs.
2)    Ongoing review and update of the existing Coordinated Plan.
3)    Prepare for the next round of JARC and New Freedom applications including
      holding a workshop for potential applicants and announcing the solicitation of
      projects as required by the OKI Participation Plan.
PRODUCTS
1)   Quarterly progress reports to FTA on projects directly administered by OKI.
     (quarterly)
2)   Amendments to the existing Coordinated Plan, if needed. (as necessary)
3)   Solicit next round of JARC/New Freedom applications including sponsoring a
     workshop for potential applicants. (12/09)




4/28/2009                                    W-32
                      674.4 – NEW FREEDOM PASS THROUGH
PREVIOUS WORK
The adoption of SAFETEA-LU included changes to several transit programs. Requests
for federal funds for elderly individuals and individuals with disabilities (Section 5310),
job access and reverse commute (Section 5316) and the New Freedom Program
(Section 5317) required that the project be included in a locally developed Coordinated
Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan (Coordinated Plan). In addition, a
designated recipient is required for each urbanized area to manage the Coordinated
Plan and develop a prioritization process to review and rank applications for the 5316
and 5317 programs. OKI was named the designated recipient for the Cincinnati
urbanized area during FY2007 by the Governors of Ohio and Kentucky.
During FY2007, OKI, with the assistance of a JARC/New Freedom Oversight Team,
developed the prioritization process to review applications for JARC and New Freedom
federal funds. All the JARC applications that were approved went to current Section
5307 Designated Recipients. This designation allows these applicants to be direct
recipients of JARC federal funds and report directly to FTA. However, there were two
applicants approved for New Freedom federal funds that are not designated recipients
for these federal funds—Community Cab and Wesley Community Services.
OKI, as the designated recipient for New Freedom funds, is responsible for managing
the projects operated by Community Cab and Wesley Community Services and acting
as a pass through for these federal funds. OKI will collect monthly or quarterly progress
reports from each program and post them into TEAM with the agency’s quarterly
progress report and will also review invoice requests and draw down federal funds for
these programs.
METHODOLOGIES
1) OKI will work with Community Cab and Wesley Community Services to insure all
   federal requirements for their New Freedom programs are met.
2) OKI will review invoice requests and pass through federal funds in a timely manner
   as required by federal law.
PRODUCTS
1) Monthly or quarterly progress reports providing detailed information on the New
   Freedom programs. Per the reporting requirements of FTA Circular 9045.1, the
   progress reports will specifically provide information on: 1) Services provided that
   impact availability of transportation for individuals with disabilities as a result of the
   New Freedom program, i.e. geographic coverage, service quality and/or service
   times, 2) Additions or changes to environmental infrastructure, technology or
   vehicles that impact availability of transportation services, and 3) Actual or
   estimated number of rides provided for individuals with disabilities as a result of the
   New Freedom project.
2) Reviewing and processing of invoices from Community Cab or Wesley Community
   Services in a timely fashion as required by federal law.




4/28/2009                                     W-33
       674.5 - MASS TRANSIT EXCLUSIVE: SORTA PLANNING STUDIES

PRODUCTS
1) Westside Hub- Undertake final design and construction of Westside Hub to
   accommodate layovers of 8 bus routes, 50+ park and ride spaces, and related
   operational needs. Anticipated opening: early 2010.
2) Mini-Hub Program- On-going development of mini-hub passenger waiting facilities.
   Current projects include the development of facilities in the Xavier/Evanston area;
   potential projects include the University area, Walnut Hills and Northside.
3) Passenger Amenities Improvements- Replacement of bus stop signs throughout the
   service area with a new design, design and installation of new park & ride lot
   directional signage, enhanced shelter placement including participation in
   streetscape upgrades on Dana Avenue in Evanston, Madison Road in Oakley,
   Glenway Avenue in West Price Hill, Mt. Lookout Square, Over-the- Rhine and
   Findlay Market.
4) Shuttle Development- Planning for potential upgrade of Route 1 to shuttle status
   including new buses, stops and related amenities.
5) Corridor and Transportation Study Participation and Assistance—Continued
   participation in corridor studies and other major regional transportation initiatives
   including the Eastern Corridor, I-75 Corridor, Uptown, and Brent Spence Bridge.
6) Upgrades to trip planning capabilities—Secure agreement for Google Transit
   application.




4/28/2009                                  W-34
          674.6 MASS TRANSIT EXCLUSIVE: TANK PLANNING STUDIES

OBJECTIVES
TANK planning will focus on two objectives in fiscal year 2010. The first is to complete
a draft update of the Transit Network Study (TNS). The TNS was completed in 2007
and many of the recommendations of the study have been successfully implemented.
Fiscal year 2010 will provide a good opportunity to revisit the TNS, assess any
outstanding recommendations and add new recommendations where applicable.
Secondly, TANK will continue to administer ongoing planning practices such as the
Substandard Route Review, Service Request Process, and the maintenance of TANK
GIS/GPS data.

PREVIOUS WORK
At the end of FY 2009 TANK completed, with local funding, the multiple internal
planning initiatives listed below.

     Calendar year 2008 Substandard Route Review
     Service Request Process Recommendations
     Participation in regional planning studies

METHODOLOGIES
Locally funded planning activities that will be conducted by TANK in FY 2010 include:

1)   Completion of Calendar Year 2009 Substandard Route Review.
2)   Administration of ongoing Service Request Process.
3)   Maintenance of applications for GIS/GPS data
4)   Participation in Regional Studies—TANK staff will continue to participate in regional
     studies in FY 2010 including: the Brent Spence Bridge Replacement Project, the I-
     471 Corridor Study, and several NKAPC small area studies.

Federally funded planning activities that will be conducted by TANK in FY 2010 include:

1) Begin process of updating the draft Transit Network study.

PRODUCTS
1) Draft Transit Network Study update
2) Updated Substandard Route Review and Service Request Information




4/28/2009                                    W-35
     674.7 - MASS TRANSIT EXCLUSIVE: MIDDLETOWN TRANSIT PLANNING
                             STUDIES (MTS)

OBJECTIVE
Perform the outlined planning activities so that the collected data and updated
procedural plans results in a guide for MTS’s direction. Work performed by MTS.

PREVIOUS WORK
MTS will have completed the following work by the end of FY 2009.

     •   Passenger mile survey to meet NTD requirement
     •   Comprehensive operational analysis for agency reports
     •   Updated website with improved accessibility
     •   Participation in regional coordination efforts
     •   Annual service request and satisfaction survey

METHODOLOGIES
Planning activities to be conducted by MTS in FY 2010 include:

1)   Hamilton-Middletown Connector study.
2)   Facilities maintenance plan update
3)   Comprehensive operational analysis
4)   Paratransit service provision evaluation
5)   Vehicle maintenance plan update
6)   Participation in regional studies and coordination efforts at OKI and the Transit
         Alliance of Butler County.

PRODUCTS
1) Evaluation of new service provision and continuing service refinement (ongoing)
2) Updated and implemented facilities plan (12/09)
3) Operational indicators for benchmarking, MTS performance management system
   and reports to funding agencies. (ongoing)
4) Evaluation of ADA service delivery efficiency and subsequent implementation of
   improvements (ongoing)
5) Update to vehicle maintenance plan to meet new equipment requirements (6/10)
6) Participation in regional public transportation efforts. (ongoing)




4/28/2009                                   W-36
      674.8 MASS TRANSIT EXCLUSIVE: CLERMONT TRANSPORTATION
                 CONNECTION (CTC) PLANNING STUDIES
OBJECTIVES
Clermont Transportation Connection (CTC) will continue plans during FY2010 to add
one shuttle route within Clermont County. This route will operate as a fixed route and
will be in addition to several other routes CTC started in 2008.
METHODOLOGIES
Locally funded planning activities that will be conducted by CTC in FY 2010 included:
1)   The route will be designed and planned by the Clermont Transportation
     Connection (CTC) with the assistance of local residents and other county and non-
     county departments. This route will be completely new to the area and will help
     persons with limited mobility get to jobs, shopping, etc. The route will serve the
     32 corridor area between Williamsburg, Batavia, and Eastgate. This area has a
     very high rate for CTC’s existing Dial-A-Ride service. An additional goal in the
     creation of these routes is to have all of them run into the Eastgate area so that
     in the future CTC would create some type of transfer center. This could be a joint
     project between CTC and SORTA. This idea has not been explored any further.
     No federally funded planning activities will be conducted by CTC in FY 2010.
PRODUCTS
1)   The primary product will be the planning and implementation of one shuttle route.
     As these routes develop, secondary products may be created.




4/28/2009                                  W-37
        684.9 – OHIO EXCLUSIVE: EASTERN CORRIDOR STUDY PART B

OBJECTIVE
To advance the implementation of the Locally Preferred Strategy for the Eastern
Corridor.

PREVIOUS WORK
A recommended plan for the Eastern Corridor was adopted by the OKI Board in
December of 1999 and subsequently incorporated into the Metropolitan Transportation
Plan. In December 2000, funding was made available for the Preliminary Engineering
phase, which will be conducted under the auspices of the Hamilton County
Transportation Improvement District. The funding agencies for the PE/EIS phase have
formed an Eastern Corridor Implementation Group to oversee the PE/EIS and its
implementation, which includes representatives from OKI, ODOT, Hamilton and
Clermont County TID’s, the City of Cincinnati, and SORTA. The Eastern Corridor Task
Force that was formed to oversee the development of the recommended plan has been
re-constituted as the Eastern Corridor Partners to provide oversight to the PE/EIS work.

METHODOLOGIES
OKI will participate in the Eastern Corridor Partners and its bi-monthly meetings to
guide preliminary engineering and develop strategy to advance project implementation
in the Eastern Corridor. The work is being performed under ODOT PID 22970.

PRODUCT
Efforts to support local initiatives to advance transportation projects recommended for
the Eastern Corridor. (as appropriate)




4/28/2009                                  W-38
     685.1 - INDIANA EXCLUSIVE: DEARBORN COUNTY TRANSPORTATION
                            PLANNING (CPG)

OBJECTIVE
The objective of this work element is to continue implementation of elements of the 3C
planning process for Dearborn County.

PREVIOUS WORK
The Dearborn County components of UPWP, TIP and OKI 2030 Regional Transportation
Plan have all successfully been incorporated into OKI’s 3C planning process. OKI also
provided assistance and information to Dearborn County and INDOT for programming
improvements. The 2030 Regional Transportation Plan Update – 2008 was adopted by
the OKI Board I June 2008. In FY 2009 projects from the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act were amended into the Plan.

METHODOLOGIES
OKI will continue to actively integrate Dearborn County into the MPO Transportation
Improvement Program (TIP), the OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan (Plan) and
this Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP). OKI Staff will provide technical assistance
to Dearborn County and provide MPO functions to the county. Air quality conformity
determinations for Lawrenceburg Township are included in this element as needed. The
nonattainment portion of Dearborn County includes Lawrenceburg Township, the City
of Greendale and the City of Lawrenceburg. OKI will work cooperatively with INDOT
and Dearborn County in the project development process (PDP) and compliance with
ADA requirements. OKI will coordinate with INDOT regarding functional class
designation of roadways and highway performance monitoring system (HPMS) within
the urban boundary currently designated as a portion of Lawrenceburg Township. OKI
will maintain the Dearborn County portion of the regional travel demand model and GIS
data sets.

The Hamilton County Emergency Management Agency (HCEMA) working on behalf of
regional emergency management agencies, known as Southwest Ohio Southeast
Indiana Northern Kentucky (SOSINK), has identified a need for GIS layers to support
situational awareness as it relates to homeland security. Many of the GIS layers (Multi-
purpose layers) required to provide situational awareness for the region also serve as a
valuable input for the transportation planning process. HCEMA and OKI will work jointly
to develop these critical information layers and each will realize a cost and time
savings.

PRODUCTS
1)   Provide for Air Quality Conformity determinations for Lawrenceburg Township (as
     necessary)
2)   Incorporate Dearborn County projects in the OKI TIP (as necessary)
3)   Quarterly project tracking reports (on-going)
4)   Annual list of obligated projects (9/30/09)
5)   Development of Dearborn County portion of the OKI UPWP (4/10)
6)   Participate in the Indiana MPO Council (ongoing)
7)   Maintain the Dearborn Co. component of the OKI 2030 Regional Transportation
     Plan (6/10)


4/28/2009                                  W-39
8) Participate with INDOT and Dearborn County on the PDP (on-going)
9) Participation in functional class designation and HPMS efforts (as requested)
10) New GIS layers used to support planning and Homeland Security efforts.
    (ongoing)

     685.2 - INDIANA EXCLUSIVE: DEARBORN COUNTY TRANSPORTATION
                            PLANNING (STP)

OBJECTIVE
The objective of this work element is to supplement core elements of the 3C planning
process for Dearborn County. This element will supplement the activities listed in 685.1
and include special (nonrecurring) activities and studies.

PREVIOUS WORK
OKI provided considerable assistance and information to Dearborn County and INDOT
for programming improvements. Coordination and review of the INDOT US-50 Study
and the SR-48 to SR-1 Connector Study occurred under this element.

METHODOLOGIES
OKI will continue to actively assist the county in its transportation planning needs. This
element supplements the core planning activities undertaken as item 685.1. An area of
focus is assistance to Dearborn County and INDOT in the project development process
(PDP) and compliance with ADA requirements. This element will also provide for the
Dearborn County portion of staff project management of the development of a fiscal
impact assessment model.

PRODUCTS
1)   Participate with Dearborn County and INDOT on the PDP. (on-going)
2)   Participation in planning activities to advance specific proposed improvements or
     studies as appropriate. (on-going)
3)   Support services associated with the fiscal impact assessment model. (as needed)
4)   New GIS layers used to support planning and Homeland Security efforts.
     (ongoing)




4/28/2009                                   W-40
      686.3 – KENTUCKY EXCLUSIVE: SAFETY & OPERATIONAL STUDIES

OBJECTIVE
This project will identify alternatives for improving operations and safety for locations
as determined by interagency consultation between OKI and KYTC.

PREVIOUS WORK
This project responds to needs identified by KYTC staff and the individual county
transportation plans completed by OKI in cooperation with the counties and KYTC.
Previous studies included operational and safety studies of US-27 in Campbell County,
Turkeyfoot Road in Kenton County and US-42 in Boone County. County transportation
plans were completed for Kenton, Campbell and Boone counties in April 2003,
September 2003 and November 2005 respectively. All were performed using Kentucky
Exclusive PL funds (686). In FY 2009 OKI staff developed traffic simulation for the KY-8
corridor through a portion of Bellevue and Dayton. The US-42 corridor in Florence was
also analyzed in FY 2009. The findings were presented to KYTC District 6.

METHODOLOGIES
The studies will utilize existing data and field review to document existing conditions
including safety, geometrics and operational characteristics and will develop
improvement strategies. Locations to be studied will be determined in cooperation with
KYTC District personnel.

PRODUCT
Prepare a plan that outlines potential solutions that address safety and operational
needs. (6/10).




4/28/2009                                   W-41
                   695 – UNIFIED PLANNING WORK PROGRAM

OBJECTIVE
Development of the Fiscal Year 2011 Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP).

PREVIOUS WORK
The Fiscal Year 2010 Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP) outlined the scope of
work to be undertaken by OKI for the period beginning July 1, 2009 and ending June
30, 2010. The document illustrates the relationship between adopted goals, objectives
and program activities. It outlines the general nature of these program elements, which
are summarized by general categories, and are referenced to specific projects by
project number. Also included in this document is the agency prospectus which
provides the framework for the remainder of the document and consolidates key
interagency agreements according to OKI by-laws.

METHODOLOGIES
Primarily a management tool for planning and coordination, the UPWP provides the
basis for cataloging and integrating OKI's activities into general categories. It delineates
the programmatic and fiscal relationships essential for internal planning and
programming. Activities associated with creating the program descriptions,
reproduction and dissemination are provided for under this work element. Draft UPWP
will be submitted

PRODUCTS
1)   Draft FY2011 UPWP (3/10).
2)   An up to date Memorandum of Understanding among the applicable entities
     identifying their mutual responsibilities per 23 CFR 450.314. (as necessary)
3)   Monthly progress, annual and semi-annual performance and expenditure reports.
     (as required)
4)   FY2011 Unified Planning Work Program (05/10)




4/28/2009                                    W-42
               697.1 – TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM REPORTING
OBJECTIVE
To provide to the public a transportation report summarizing the major activities of the
transportation planning process.
PREVIOUS WORK
OKI prepared a transportation summary in FY09 as part of the agency’s annual
summary.
PRODUCT
Transportation Summary (6/10)




4/28/2009                                  W-43
                   710.1 - LOCAL WATER QUALITY ACTIVITIES

OBJECTIVE
To undertake water quality planning activities in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana, as
appropriate and as resources permit.

METHODOLOGIES
1)   Continue to support watershed activities in Ohio, Northern Kentucky, and Dearborn
     County as requested and as resources permit. These activities may include
     participating in technical advisory groups, facilitating meetings, arranging for
     presentations, tours, and canoe outings, participating in public involvement efforts;
     and identifying technical and fiscal resources to implement various improvement
     projects.
2)   Continue to provide support for the OKI Groundwater Committee, a forum for
     groundwater management of sole source aquifer systems that provide more than
     two-thirds of a million people with drinking water and water for commercial,
     industrial, agricultural and recreational purposes, and to help local governments
     meet state and federal groundwater mandates.
3)   OKI will continue to refine the base information and recommendations in the OKI
     Regional Water Quality Management Plan for non-Ohio portions of the region, as
     appropriate.

PRODUCTS
1)   Collateral materials for Ohio, Northern Kentucky, and Dearborn County watershed
     management activities, which may include education and outreach materials, fact
     sheets, and articles in stakeholder newsletters. (as appropriate)
2)   Meeting notices, agendas, summaries, and related correspondence. (as
     appropriate)
3)   Updated base information and recommendations for the OKI Regional Water
     Quality Management Plan. (as appropriate)




4/28/2009                                   W-44
             710.4 – ST. CLAIR TOWNSHIP ZONING CODE UPDATE

OBJECTIVE
To assist St. Clair Township (Butler County) in updating the Township Zoning Ordinance
to reflect recommendations of the recently adopted Comprehensive Plan related to
source water protection.

METHODOLOGIES
OKI, working with the township, the Butler County Planning Commission, the Hamilton
to New Baltimore Groundwater Consortium and the Miami Conservancy District, will -
coordinate updating the Township Zoning Ordinance to reflect recommendations of the
adopted Comprehensive Plan related to source water protection. The zoning ordinance
update will address land use activities that may adversely impact water resources such
as floodplains, prime aquifer recharge areas and public supply wells, including
industries or transportation facilities that may use or transfer hazardous materials.

PRODUCTS
Interim and final zoning ordinance products, per scope of work accepted by St. Clair
Township and Miami Conservancy District (the funding agency). (12/10)




4/28/2009                                 W-45
                       710.6 - WATER QUALITY PROGRAM

OBJECTIVE
To assess, manage, and protect surface water and groundwater resources in view of
regional growth and development and the resultant increased demand.

PREVIOUS WORK
OKI published the Regional Water Quality Management Plan in 1977 in accordance with
federal and state requirements. Since then, OKI has published numerous supplemental
reports, collected additional information, and refined plan recommendations. OKI's
Board or Executive Committee has adopted several resolutions amending the plan
where local needs have warranted a change in facility planning boundaries or
management agency designations. OKI has provided local governments and their
consultants with data and information including population and land use information,
reviewed grant applications for consistency with the plan, informed the public of major
activities and assisted local implementation of plan recommendations. Since 1983, OKI
has executed several contracts with the Ohio EPA, one contract with the Kentucky
Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet (KNREPC), and four contracts
with the Indiana Department of Environment Management (IDEM) as part of its water
quality management (WQM) planning program, using funds provided by Section
205(j)/604b of the Clean Water Act. The numerous projects completed through FY
2009 have contributed to a long-term comprehensive data base for the region's water
resources. Recent initiatives have been related to watershed management, water
service areas, non-point source pollution, and public education on water quality issues.

METHODOLOGIES
1)   OKI will continue to refine the base information and recommendations in the OKI
     Regional Water Quality Management Plan.
2)   OKI will respond to requests for permit consistency reviews from Ohio EPA, local
     jurisdictions and other local constituents, and will pursue associated needs for
     amendments to the Regional Water Quality Management Plan.
3)   OKI’s current contract with OEPA extends through CY 09.

PRODUCTS
Permit consistency reviews, associated plan amendments as appropriate and public
information products as detailed in OKI’s contract with Ohio EPA.




4/28/2009                                  W-46
         710.7 - WATER QUALITY PROGRAM (RECOVERY ACT FUNDS)

OBJECTIVE
To assess, manage, and protect surface water and groundwater resources in view of
regional growth and development and the resultant increased demand.

PREVIOUS WORK
OKI published the Regional Water Quality Management Plan in 1977 in accordance with
federal and state requirements. Since then, OKI has published numerous supplemental
reports, collected additional information, and refined plan recommendations. OKI's
Board or Executive Committee has adopted several resolutions amending the plan
where local needs have warranted a change in facility planning boundaries or
management agency designations. OKI has provided local governments and their
consultants with data and information including population and land use information,
reviewed grant applications for consistency with the plan, informed the public of major
activities and assisted local implementation of plan recommendations. Since 1983, OKI
has executed several contracts with the Ohio EPA using funds provided by Section 604b
of the Clean Water Act. The numerous projects completed through FY 2009 have
contributed to a long-term comprehensive data base for the region's water resources.
Recent initiatives have been related to watershed management, water service areas,
non-point source pollution, and public education on water quality issues. Through
recent funding opportunities from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of
2009, OKI was allocated a portion of money from Ohio EPA to enhance and update the
Regional Water Quality Management plan for its Ohio communities.

METHODOLOGIES
1)   Using US Census estimates, existing studies and plans, and available GIS data,
     conduct water quality planning and technical analysis. This planning and analysis
     will include information related to water resources, growth and development
     patterns, on-site wastewater treatment systems, wastewater facilities, non-point
     source pollution, and watersheds.
2)   Based on data analysis, identify areas where amendments to the Regional Water
     Quality Management Plan may be necessary.
3)   Consult with stakeholders and the public as appropriate.

PRODUCTS
Updated electronically accessible 208 Plan for Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren
counties in Ohio. (6/11)




4/28/2009                                  W-47
      710.8 - Dearborn County Water Quality Management Plan Update

OBJECTIVE
To assess, manage, and protect surface water and groundwater resources in view of
regional growth and development and the resultant increased demand.

PREVIOUS WORK
OKI published the Regional Water Quality Management Plan in 1977 in accordance with
federal and state requirements. Since then, OKI has published numerous supplemental
reports, collected additional information, and refined plan recommendations. OKI's
Board or Executive Committee has adopted several resolutions amending the plan
where local needs have warranted a change in facility planning boundaries or
management agency designations. OKI has provided local governments and their
consultants with data and information including population and land use information,
reviewed grant applications for consistency with the plan, informed the public of major
activities and assisted local implementation of plan recommendations. Since 1983, OKI
has executed four contracts with the Indiana Department of Environment Management
(IDEM) as part of its water quality management (WQM) planning program, using funds
provided by Section 205(j) of the Clean Water Act. OKI applied for and received Section
205(j) Water Quality Planning Grant funds that were available through IDEM from the
Recovery Act of 2009 to update the water quality management plan for Dearborn
County, Indiana.

METHODOLOGIES
Conduct water quality planning and technical analysis that will include information on
point and non-point sources and management, growth areas, and consultation with
stakeholders and the public.
PRODUCTS
A current water quality management plan for Dearborn County, Indiana. (12/10)




4/28/2009                                  W-48
       710.9 - WATER QUALITY PROGRAM (OHIO GENERAL ASSEMBLY)

OBJECTIVE
To assess, manage, and protect surface water and groundwater resources in view of
regional growth and development and the resultant increased demand.

PREVIOUS WORK
OKI published the Regional Water Quality Management Plan in 1977 in accordance with
federal and state requirements. Since then, OKI has published numerous supplemental
reports, collected additional information, and refined plan recommendations. OKI's
Board or Executive Committee has adopted several resolutions amending the plan
where local needs have warranted a change in facility planning boundaries or
management agency designations. OKI has provided local governments and their
consultants with data and information including population and land use information,
reviewed grant applications for consistency with the plan, informed the public of major
activities and assisted local implementation of plan recommendations. Since 1983, OKI
has executed several contracts with the Ohio EPA using funds provided by Section 604b
of the Clean Water Act. The numerous projects completed through FY 2009 have
contributed to a long-term comprehensive data base for the region's water resources.
Recent initiatives have been related to watershed management, water service areas,
non-point source pollution, and public education on water quality issues. This fiscal
year additional funding became available through a state budget item that provides
support to areawide agencies (OKI) for water management and planning services.

METHODOLOGIES
1)   Enhance base data on growth and development and on-site wastewater treatment
     systems with data based on local indicators.
2)   Consult with management agencies to get consensus on updates and changes
     based on identified areas where amendments to the Regional Water Quality
     Management Plan may be necessary.
3)   Prepare and present proposed plan amendments for public input and approval by
     OKI’s Board of Directors.

PRODUCTS
Electronically available updated map of Facility Planning Areas (FPA) boundaries and
table of updated designated management agencies by FPA as part of a complete
version of the 208 Plan for Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren counties in Ohio.
(6/11)




4/28/2009                                  W-49
                720.1 – MOBILE SOURCE EMISSIONS PLANNING

OBJECTIVE
To ensure that OKI’s Long Range Transportation Plan and Transportation Improvement
Program contribute to the region’s attainment and maintenance of national air quality
standards.
PREVIOUS WORK
OKI’s three Kentucky counties, four Ohio counties and a portion of Dearborn County
Indiana have been designated as a nonattainment area for ozone and fine particulates.
OKI has coordinated the process of developing local strategies to reduce transportation
emissions in support of revisions to the air quality State Implementation Plans (SIPs).
OKI has provided the state agencies with mobile source emissions data for use in the
development of SIP revisions. OKI has performed the regional conformity analysis for
the region’s transportation plans and programs, most recently for the FY2008-11 TIP
and the OKI 2030 Regional Transportation Plan Update in June 2008. OKI has analyzed
the air quality and energy benefits of candidate projects as part of the OKI’s project
prioritization process.
METHODOLOGIES
1)   OKI will continue to coordinate with federal, state and local air quality and
     transportation agencies on SIP revisions and air quality planning issues including
     but not limited to conformity determinations. As appropriate, OKI will review
     current state and federal legislation and regulations and will provide technical
     information, current data and implementation status information. OKI will perform
     and document conformity analyses as required under the CAAA and based upon
     criteria outlined in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA)
     Transportation Conformity Rule (40 CFR Part 93). OKI’s Travel Demand Model and
     the USEPA’s latest emissions software will be used to generate the necessary traffic
     volumes, speed and emission factors. OKI’s model will be modified, as needed, to
     utilize the latest EPA emissions program and to incorporate the latest planning
     assumptions.
2)   Staff will evaluate the expected air quality and energy benefits of potential CMAQ,
     STP and SNK funded projects utilizing the OKI travel demand model and FHWA
     and EPA accepted off-model methodologies.
PRODUCTS
1)   Ongoing coordination and consultation with OKI’s Board of Directors, OKI
     Intermodal Coordinating Committee, federal, state and local agencies regarding air
     quality issues. Preparation of appropriate documentation of Long Range
     Transportation Plan and TIP conformity. Provision of travel and mobile source
     emission data to support SIP revisions prompted by changes in local emission
     control programs and federal standards for ozone and particulate matter.
2)   Quantification of the expected air quality and energy benefits of candidate projects
     for STP, SNK or CMAQ funding as required.




4/28/2009                                   W-50
                     800 - REGIONAL PLANNING ACTIVITIES

OBJECTIVE
To provide for sustainable development through planning services, data resources, and
other information useful to the government, business, and civic sectors.

PREVIOUS WORK
OKI’s numerous data resources and planning services continues to support local
government and business research needs. As it implements the Strategic Regional
Policy Plan, OKI promotes a unified approach to economic vitality and land
development by addressing: 1) the degree of coordination among local governments
and special districts; 2) shared goals or development tools; 3) the connection between
land use and transportation systems; and 4) the cost of sprawl. Accordingly, OKI
provides technical assistance on issues related to land use, zoning, economic
development, housing, water and sewer infrastructure, intergovernmental coordination,
capital budgeting, and natural systems.

METHODOLOGIES
1)  Assist local governments, businesses, citizens and other parties, by providing
    information about the region, including maps, census data, traffic information and
    OKI reports for nominal reproduction and handling fees.
2) Address development issues through research and technical assistance strategies,
   including working with the public, private, and civic sectors. The beneficiaries of
   this effort will be government agencies, taxpayers, and local businesses as each
   improves its capacity to evaluate and direct sustainable growth and development.

PRODUCTS
1)   Provision of various products and information. (as appropriate)
2)   Analyses of national and regional land development trends, conditions, and issues;
     and technical assistance on issues including land use, zoning, economic
     development, housing, water and sewer infrastructure, intergovernmental
     coordination, capital budgeting, and natural systems. (Ongoing)




4/28/2009                                  W-51
                                  OHIO KENTUCKY INDIANA REGIONAL COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS
                                     STATEMENT OF DIRECT LABOR, FRINGE BENEFITS & GENERAL OVERHEAD
                                                        (July 1, 2009 - June 30, 2010)

                                                            Estimated         Actual          Difference            ODOT               Estimated
                                                             FY 2008         FY 2008         (Over Bdgt.)        Adjustments            FY 2010
                                                                                             Under Bdgt.

Wages paid for time worked:
   Direct Labor                                        $     1,512,513   $   1,405,716   $        106,797    $                 -   $     1,484,516
   Indirect Labor                                      $       547,432   $     601,402   $        (53,970)   $                 -   $       572,694
Total Labor - base for fringe allocation               $     2,059,945   $   2,007,118   $         52,827    $                 -   $     2,057,210

Fringe Benefits
  Holidays (Net of Liability Adjustment)               $        89,028   $      87,544   $          1,484    $                 -   $        89,388
  Sick Leave (Net of Liability Adjustment)             $        72,770   $      59,956   $         12,814    $                 -   $        77,413
  Vacation (Net of Entitlement & Liability Adjust.)    $       173,516   $     170,544   $          2,972    $                 -   $       174,504
  Administrative                                       $        11,986   $       8,840   $          3,146    $                 -   $        11,940
  Other                                                $             -   $           -   $              -    $                 -   $             -
  Other                                                $             -   $           -   $              -    $                 -   $             -
Subtotal Fringe Benefit Wages                          $       347,300   $     326,884   $         20,416    $                 -   $       353,245

Other Fringe Benefits
 Retirement                                            $       197,233   $     189,864   $          7,369    $                 -   $       356,121
 Group Health (includes HSA contributions)             $       414,050   $     351,112   $         62,938    $                 -   $       421,882
 FICA                                                  $       172,117   $     163,765   $          8,352    $                 -   $       174,732
 Workers Comp                                          $         4,500   $       6,773   $         (2,273)   $                 -   $         6,100
 Unemployment                                          $         3,000   $         647   $          2,353    $                 -   $         3,900
 Employee Incentives                                   $         8,280   $       7,611   $            670    $                 -   $         9,840
 Other                                                 $             -   $           -   $              -    $                 -   $             -
 Prior Period Audit Adjustments                        $             -   $           -   $              -    $                 -   $             -
 Other                                                 $             -   $           -   $              -    $                 -   $             -
 Other                                                 $             -   $           -   $              -    $                 -   $             -
 Other                                                 $             -   $           -   $              -    $                 -   $             -
 Prior Year Rate Adjustment (use only with fixed rate)                                                                             $             -
Subtotal Other Fringe Benefits                         $       799,180   $     719,772   $         79,408    $                 -   $       972,575

TOTAL FRINGE BENEFITS                                  $     1,146,480   $   1,046,656   $         99,824    $                 -   $     1,325,820

Indirect Costs
  Salaries - Indirect Only                              $      547,432   $     601,402   $        (53,970)   $                 -   $       572,694
  Fringe Benefits for Indirect Salaries                 $      304,678   $     313,614   $         (8,937)   $                 -   $       369,087
    Auto Allowance paid as Indirect Salary              $        6,300   $       6,300   $              -    $                 -   $         6,300
    Travel and Professional Development                 $       19,903   $      21,030   $         (1,127)   $                 -   $        26,002
    Memberships                                         $       16,125   $      15,670   $            455    $                 -   $        15,725
    Meetings                                            $            -   $         250   $           (250)   $                 -   $             -
    Printing                                            $        3,550   $         826   $          2,724    $                 -   $         1,925
    Repairs and Maintenance                             $       16,278   $      12,538   $          3,740    $                 -   $        16,145
    Equipment Lease                                     $            -   $           -   $              -    $                 -   $             -
    Office Supplies                                     $       66,000   $      38,621   $         27,379    $                 -   $        41,693
    Postage                                             $       10,000   $       3,325   $          6,675    $                 -   $         3,425
    Rent                                                $      467,067   $     489,166   $        (22,099)   $                 -   $       495,187
    Telephone - basic and Long Distance                 $        9,320   $       9,132   $            188    $                 -   $         9,152
    Subscriptions                                       $        1,041   $         429   $            612    $                 -   $           765
    Legal and Audit                                     $       63,850   $      59,251   $          4,599    $                 -   $        64,000
    Reproduction                                        $       11,604   $      10,787   $            817    $                 -   $         2,892
    Insurance                                           $       25,560   $      26,704   $         (1,144)   $                 -   $        24,962
    Professional Services                               $       48,000   $      34,594   $         13,406    $                 -   $        41,280
    Advertising                                         $        1,650   $       1,898   $           (248)   $                 -   $           980
    Depreciation & Loss on Disposal of Assets           $       43,000   $      37,609   $          5,391    $                 -   $        26,528
    Payroll processing                                  $        4,775   $       5,599   $           (824)   $                 -   $         5,645
    Internet                                            $        5,700   $      12,528   $         (6,828)   $                 -   $        12,528
    Web Site management                                 $        1,500   $           -   $          1,500    $                 -   $             -
    Retirement Plan Admin & Education Fees              $        2,750   $       2,475   $            275    $                 -   $         3,575
    Other                                               $        2,100   $       1,629   $            471    $                 -   $         1,800
    Interest - Capital Lease                            $          186   $         186   $             (0)   $                 -   $            79
    Prior Period Audit Adjustments                      $            -   $           -   $              -    $                 -   $             -
  Prior Year Rate Adjustment (use only with fixed rate)                                                                            $             -
TOTAL INDIRECT COSTS                                    $    1,678,369   $   1,705,564   $        (27,195)   $                 -   $     1,742,368




    OKI FY2010 Overhead Rate - provisional DL Method - revised April 22, 2009                                            Date Printed: 04/23/2009
                                                                 Page 1 of 2
                                                                       C-1
                                        OHIO KENTUCKY INDIANA REGIONAL COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS
                                           STATEMENT OF DIRECT LABOR, FRINGE BENEFITS & GENERAL OVERHEAD
                                                              (July 1, 2009 - June 30, 2010)

                                                                   Estimated          Actual             Difference            ODOT               Estimated
                                                                    FY 2008          FY 2008            (Over Bdgt.)        Adjustments            FY 2010
                                                                                                        Under Bdgt.

Direct Labor Costs by Department:
  FHWA/PL/FTA                                                  $     1,168,623   $    1,117,227     $         51,396    $                 -   $     1,122,774
  FTA - Trac                                                   $             -   $            -     $              -    $                 -   $             -
  CMAQ/STP                                                     $       248,182   $      199,226     $         48,956    $                 -   $       215,393
  Ohio EPA                                                     $        28,791   $       33,892     $         (5,101)   $                 -   $        55,540
  Regional Planning                                            $        28,289   $       18,539     $          9,750    $                 -   $        28,859
  Water Quality                                                $        17,361   $       27,752     $        (10,391)   $                 -   $        29,152
  Other Local                                                  $        21,267   $        9,080     $         12,187    $                 -   $        32,799
  Other Local Programs                                         $             -   $            -     $              -    $                 -   $             -
TOTAL DIRECT LABOR COSTS                                       $     1,512,513   $    1,405,716     $        106,797    $                 -   $     1,484,516

Fringe Benefit Cost Rate Computation
  TOTAL Fringe Benefit Costs /                                 $     1,146,480 $      1,046,656                                               $     1,325,820
 TOTAL Labor Costs (Direct & Indirect)                         $     2,059,945 $      2,007,118                                               $     2,057,210
= Fringe Benefit Cost Rate                                              55.66%           52.15%                                                        64.45%

FY 2008
Fringe Benefit Cost Recovery Comparison                        (Direct Labor Portion Only)
 Should have recovered in fiscal year
  (Actual Direct Labor * Actual Fringe Benefit Cost Rate)                        $     733,042                52.15%                          of Direct Labor
 Amount actually recovered in fiscal year
  (Actual Direct Labor x ESTIMATED Fringe Benefit Cost Rate)                     $     782,363              55.66%                            of Direct Labor
(Over)/Under Recovery of Fringe Benefits                                         $     (49,321)    A (over)/under

Indirect Cost Rate Computation
  TOTAL Indirect Costs /                                       $     1,678,369 $      1,705,564                                               $     1,742,368
  only DIRECT Labor Costs                                      $     1,512,513 $      1,405,716                                               $     1,484,516
 = Indirect Cost Rate                                                  110.97%          121.33%                                                       117.37%

FY 2008
Indirect Cost Recovery Comparison                              (All Indirect Costs, Indirect Labor & Indirect Labor Fringe Benefits)
 Should have recovered in fiscal year
  (Actual Direct Labor * Actual Indirect Cost Rate)                              $    1,705,564              121.33%                          of Direct Labor
 Amount actually recovered in fiscal year
  (Actual Direct Labor x ESTIMATED Indirect Cost Rate)                           $    1,559,861           110.97%                             of Direct Labor
(Over)/Under Recovery of Indirect Costs                                          $      145,703    B (over)/under

FY 2008
 Fringe Benefit Cost (Over)/Under Recovery                                       $      (49,321)   A (over)/under
 Indirect Cost (Over)/Under Recovery                                             $     145,703     B (over)/under
Net (Over)/Under Recovery                                                        $      96,382

                                                                   Estimated          Actual                                                      Estimated
                                                                    FY 2008          FY 2008                                                       FY 2010
Summary
 Fringe Benefit Rate                                                   55.66%           52.15%                                                         64.45%
 Indirect Cost Rate                                                   110.97%          121.33%                                                        117.37%
Total Overhead Cost Rate                                              166.62%          173.48%                                                        181.82%




    OKI FY2010 Overhead Rate - provisional DL Method - revised April 22, 2009                                                       Date Printed: 04/23/2009
                                                                 Page 2 of 2
                                                                       C-2

				
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