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Microsoft Certified Professional Course

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									How Remote Installation Services Work

Updated: March 28, 2003


How Remote Installation Services Works

In this section

           Remote Installation Services Architecture
           Remote Installation Services Physical Structures
           Remote Installation Services Dependencies
           Remote Boot and Installation Setup Processes
           Network Ports Used by Remote Installation Services
           Related Information
Remote Installation Services (RIS) is a Windows component that you can install with Windows
Server 2003 or add at any time after the operating system is installed. RIS is an automated
installation technology that you can use to create installation images of operating systems or of
complete computer configurations, including desktop settings and applications. These
installation images can then be made available to users at client computers. RIS is typically
used during large-scale deployments when it would be too slow and costly to have
administrators or end users interactively install the operating system on individual computers.

These sections provide a detailed view of how RIS works in an optimal environment. You can
create an optimal environment for RIS by doing the following:

           RIS requires a significant amount of disk space. You should dedicate an entire
            partition or preferably an entire physical disk to store the RIS installation images.
           Use the appropriate number of Remote Installation Services (RIS) servers on your
            network.
           Use RIS with computers that use the Pre-Boot eXecution Environment (PXE)
            architecture. PXE is a remote-boot technology that allows the client computer to
            begin a boot sequence from the network adapter. When a PXE-enabled client
            computer starts for the first time, it uses the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
            (DHCP) to request an Internet Protocol (IP) address and the IP address of an active
            RIS server. As part of the initial request, the client computer sends out its globally
            unique identifier (GUID), which identifies the client computer within Active Directory.
              Dedicate an entire partition to the RIS folder tree. RIS requires a significant amount
               of disk space.


Remote Installation Services Architecture

RIS consists of several components that facilitate the remote installation of client operating
systems. The Remote Installation service (Binlsvc) is the boot service that interacts with
directory services to remotely boot a client computer. Trivial File Transfer Protocol Daemon
(TFTPD) is a service protocol used to transfer the files needed to remotely boot, maintain, and
troubleshoot a client computer. These and other RIS components are described in detail in this
section.

The Setup program in Windows Server 2003 provides the basis for creating installation images
using RIS. For background information about how Setup works, see Setup Technical
Reference.

The following figure shows how a client that requests an installation image interacts with the RIS
server to verify the client account and server settings, and then finally receives the downloaded
Client Installation Wizard.

Remote Installation Services Architecture




Remote Installation Service (Binlsvc)
This service is part of the Remote Installation Services component. It detects PXE-initiated
DHCP requests from RIS clients and facilitates a response to those requests. The Remote
Installation service also directs clients to files on the RIS server that initiate the installation
process and then responds to Client Installation Wizard requests. In addition, the Remote
Installation service checks Active Directory to verify client credentials, determines if a client can
be serviced, and confirms whether to create a new computer account object or reset an existing
account on behalf of the client. Also, if a client that is prestaged in Active Directory has settings
specifying that a particular RIS server must answer the client, then the Remote Installation
service facilitates the response to that client from the specified RIS server.

The Remote Installation service was formerly known as the Boot Information Negotiation Layer
(BINL) service in Windows 2000 and Windows XP Professional.

Trivial File Transfer Protocol Daemon (TFTPD)
This service is used by a RIS server to download the Client Installation Wizard and the initial
files that are required to start the remote installation process on the client computer.

On a RIS server, TFTP is called a daemon or service (TFTPD), while on the client, it is referred
to as a protocol (TFTP).

The first file that downloads is Startrom.com, which is a small startup program that displays the
Press F12 for Network Boot prompt to the client. If the user presses F12 within 3 seconds, the
Client Installation Wizard downloads to the client so the installation process can begin. The file
Startrom.com is located on your RIS server in the directory path
\\ServerName\RemoteInstall\OSChooser\i386\.

Note

           For installations of Windows XP 64-Bit Edition Version 2003, the first file
            downloaded is Oschoice.efi. It is not necessary to press F12 for these installations.
Single Instance Store Service
This service consists of an NTFS file-system filter driver and a groveler agent that interacts with
RIS images. The Single Instance Store (SIS) service reduces the hard-disk storage
requirements for RIS images. The SIS service does this by monitoring the RIS server partition
for duplicate files. To reduce the amount of disk space used by the installation folders, SIS
“grovels” through the partition containing the RIS installation directory using the groveler agent.
Whenever the groveler agent finds a duplicate file, the SIS service copies the original file into a
directory and copies an NTFS reparse point that contains the current location, size, and
attributes of the original file. (Reparse points are NTFS file system objects that have a definable
attribute containing user-controlled data and that are used to extend functionality in the
input/output (I/O) subsystem.) By doing this, the SIS service retains only a single instance of the
file, while replacing duplicate files with links to the single instance. The SIS service then can
store the duplicate files it finds in RIS images and reduce the amount of disk space that is used
on your RIS server.

RIS Components
With the following RIS components, you can install, configure, and implement RIS in your
organization.

Remote Installation Services
RIS is a Windows component that you can install with Windows Server 2003 or add at any time
after the operating system is installed. Services that install with RIS include the Remote
Installation service, TFTPD, and the SIS service.

Remote Installation Services Setup (Risetup.exe)
You can use Risetup.exe to initially set up the RIS server and create at least one CD-based
operating system image. You can initiate the setup process from the Start menu of your RIS
server. If you click Remote Installation Services Setup from the Administrative Tools menu, the
Remote Installation Services Setup Wizard starts. The wizard performs the following actions:

           Requests preliminary information, including the installation folder name and the path
            to the operating system installation files.
           Copies Windows installation files.
           Updates the Client Installation Wizard screens.
           Creates a default answer file (Ristndrd.sif).
           Starts the RIS services, which include the Remote Installation service, TFTPD, and
            the SIS service.
           Authorizes the DHCP server.
           Risetup is also used to create any additional CD-based operating system images
            after the initial installation is created.
Remote Installation Preparation Wizard (Riprep.exe)
You can use Riprep.exe to create a customized image of an operating system such as
Windows XP Professional. To create an image means that you create a replica of a hard disk
that you can install on other computers in your organization. You use Riprep to create an image
of an existing operating system installation on a master computer and then replicate that image
onto an available RIS server on your network. The image can include the operating system with
default parameters applied by the administrator, or the operating system with a preconfigured
desktop, locally-installed applications, and drivers.

A 64-bit version of the Remote Installation Preparation (RIPrep) Wizard is included with the 64-
bit versions of Windows Server 2003. For more information about using the RIPrep Wizard to
create an installation image of a 64-bit operating system, see article 891128, "Updated Remote
Installation Service (RIS) functionality in Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1," in the Microsoft
Knowledge Base.

Remote Boot Floppy Generator (Rbfg.exe)
You can use Rbfg.exe to create remote-boot floppy disks for RIS client computers that are not
PXE-enabled, so that these clients can emulate the remote boot process and install an
operating system over the network using RIS. However, for RIS clients that are not PXE-
enabled to use the remote-boot floppy disk, they must each have a supported Peripheral
Component Interconnect (PCI)–based network adapter supported by the Rbfg.exe utility. PC
Card adapters, CardBus adapters, and adapters that are not PCI-based are not supported. You
can view the list of supported network adapters by starting the Rbfg.exe utility and clicking
Adapter List. The client computer’s basic input/output system (BIOS) must be configured to use
the network adapter as its primary boot device.

Client Installation Wizard (OSChooser)
OSChooser is a service of the Client Installation Wizard that is run by the client computer. It is a
text-based program downloaded by the RIS server to the client that allows the client to
communicate with the RIS server during the installation process. Remote Installation service is
the server component that sends a default set of Client Installation Wizard screens to guide the
client through the remote installation process. Clients that can remote boot use this wizard to log
on and select from operating system installation options. You can customize these setup
screens to meet the needs of your organization.

Active Directory Users and Computers Extension for RIS (Dsa.msc)
When you create the RIS server, the Active Directory Users and Computers extension installs
on the RIS server. The extension provides a Remote Install tab within the computer account
Properties dialog box of each RIS server that you can use to manage the RIS server. You can
start this extension by specifying the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in Dsa.msc
in the Run dialog box or you can start it from the command line.
You can use the Active Directory Users and Computers extension to manage RIS locally or
through a Terminal Services session on another network computer. You can also administer
RIS from a computer running Windows XP Professional if you install the Adminpak.msi on that
computer.


Remote Installation Services Physical Structures

The physical structure of RIS depends on whether you are using a CD-based or an image-
based installation and whether you are also using an answer file.

CD-based RIS installations
Using Risetup.exe, you can create a CD-type image, also called a flat image, to be used with
RIS installations on client computers. Using a flat image is similar to setting up a client directly
from the installation CD, except that the operating system image source files reside on an
available RIS server.

Use an installation image created by Risetup if you want to distribute the network equivalent of
CD-based installation functionality. A Risetup image is a replica of an operating system CD file
structure, located across the network on a remote server using RIS.

You create Risetup images by running the Risetup Wizard on a RIS server, while using an
operating system CD to create the image. When using Risetup images, you cannot provide a
fully-configured clone of an operating system with applications and desktop customizations, as
you can with Riprep images. However, you can add applications and drivers to the distribution
folder where the Risetup images are located and use answer files to install the applications and
specify the location of drivers.

Installing a Risetup image is similar to setting up a workstation directly from a CD. However, the
source files are located across the network on a RIS server. The following figure shows the
directory structure of your RIS server under the RemoteInstall folder where Risetup images are
stored. You can define the name of the folder <imagename> where the images are located.

Directory Structure of a RIS Server
When you install remote installation services on your RIS server, it automatically creates one
Risetup image of the server operating system and stores it under the Images folder within the
RIS directory structure, as shown in the figure. This image is available to remote boot–enabled
clients. Clients that request installation of an operating system can access Risetup images on a
remote RIS server, if you configure them to do so.

You can make additional Risetup images using operating system CDs for Windows 2000
Professional, Windows 2000 Server, and Windows 2000 Advanced Server, in addition to
Windows XP Professional and Windows Server 2003. To create a Risetup image, place the CD
in the CD drive of your RIS server and run the Risetup Wizard from the Images tab of RIS
server Properties. You can also specify the following command string at the command-line
interface to start the Risetup Wizard:

 Copy Code
risetup -add
You can create and associate multiple answer files with Risetup images, which allows you to
customize the applications and drivers that you want to install with each image. However, you
cannot include preconfigured application or desktop configurations with a Risetup image. Also,
Risetup images take longer to install than an equivalent size Riprep image.

Image-based RIS installations
Use an image created by Riprep if you want to distribute an image of a fully-configured
workstation complete with applications. A Riprep image is essentially a file system image that is
located on a remote RIS server. It is similar to the hard disk-images you create using a non-
Microsoft disk-imaging tool and the Windows System Preparation tool (Sysprep).
You create Riprep images by running the Riprep Wizard (Riprep.exe) on a master computer
which has the operating system configuration, applications and settings, and desktop
customizations that you want to deploy to client computers in your organization.

Riprep images are most useful for cloning a standard operating system configuration to clients.
Riprep images generally require more disk space on your RIS server than Risetup images
because they usually include preconfigured applications and tools. However, they install faster
than equivalent size Risetup images.

To create a Riprep-based installation, you must first set up a master installation. This is the
reference computer that contains the operating system, software applications, and configuration
settings you plan to install on destination computers in your organization. After you configure the
master installation, you run Riprep.exe, which is on the server at the following location:
\\servername\reminst\admin\i386\riprep. This converts the master installation into a remote
installation image, which is a functionally identical replica of the master computer disk that you
can install on multiple destination computers. Riprep also replicates the image to a RIS server
where it is available for installation on remote boot–enabled client computers. Clients who
request installation of an operating system can access Riprep-based images on a remote RIS
server if you configure them to do so.

The best way to install the operating system on your master computer is to use RIS with an
unattended installation. However, you can also install the operating system locally using the
appropriate operating system CD. If you do this, use the disk-partitioning utility on the Windows
Server 2003 installation CD and use the text-mode Setup to clear the disk partition and ensure a
clean installation.

Riprep configures various operating system settings on the master computer to ensure that
every copy of the master computer’s disk image is unique when you install it on destination
computers. This includes resetting the security identifiers (SIDs) and access control lists (ACLs).
Riprep also configures the master installation image so that, after the initial installation of the
image, every destination computer starts in a special setup mode known as Mini-Setup.

RIS Client HAL Types
If you want to create an image-based RIS installation using the tool Riprep.exe, you first need to
determine if your RIS clients have a Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) that is compatible with
the master computer from which you create your image. For example, if the master computer
where you run Riprep.exe has an Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) HAL,
then the client computers you designate to receive operating system images that are generated
from that master computer must also have an ACPI HAL. The HAL type is indicated by the
original file name of the file Hal.dll.

You need to verify how many different HAL types exist in your organization. This determines
how many different master installations you will need with HALs that are compatible with the
client HALs in your organization. To verify the type of HAL on your client computers, you can do
one of the following:

            Use a management tool such as Systems Management Server (SMS) to obtain your
             client inventory, from which you can determine the HAL types.
            View the properties of Hal.dll to determine the HAL types.
You can install RIS-based operating system images if any of the following conditions are true
regarding HALs:

            The master and destination computer HALs are identical.
            The master and destination computers both have either uniprocessor or
             multiprocessor Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller (APIC) HALs.
            The master and destination computers both have either uniprocessor or
             multiprocessor Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) HALs.
Using answer files with a RIS installation
Using answer files with a RIS installation is similar to using an unattended answer file with RIS-
specific sections and values. For a CD-based installation, the default answer file is Ristndrd.sif,
and for an image-based installation, the default answer file is Riprep.sif. Multiple answer files
can be associated with an installation. You can create the answer files by using Setup Manager
(Setupmgr.exe) or you can create it manually by using a text editor, such as Notepad.

As with most answer files, Ristndrd.sif and Riprep.sif contain multiple predefined sections that
you can modify. Section names are always enclosed in square brackets (for example,
[Unattended]).

RIS-Specific Sections in an Answer File




 Section             Description
 [RemoteInstall]   Contains entries Repartition and UseWholeDisk.


 [Oschooser]       Contains entries for values which are displayed after the operating system
                   is selected. For example, the image type and start file.


For additional information about unattended installation, see Unattended Installation Technical
Reference.


Remote Installation Services Dependencies

Remote Installation Services (RIS) uses or depends upon a variety of technologies and
components.

Network infrastructure
RIS depends on a network infrastructure that can identify computers on the network. RIS
therefore requires that DHCP, DNS, and Active Directory be available on the network.

Remote-boot technology
RIS uses remote-boot technology to enable a computer with no operating system to begin a
boot sequence from the network adapter, after which an operating system can be installed
across the network. This remote-boot technology is called the Pre-Boot eXecution Environment
(PXE). For client computers that are not PXE-enabled—that is, pre–Net PC/PC98 computers—
you can use a special remote-boot disk, Rbfg.exe, if the client computer has a supported
network adapter. Most computers that conform to the Net PC or PC98 specifications have a
PXE remote boot–enabled network adapter and remote boot–enabled BIOS. A computer on
which you use the remote boot disk must have a Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI)–
based network adapter supported by the Rbfg.exe utility. PC Card adapters, CardBus adapters,
and adapters that are not PCI–based are not supported. You can view the list of supported
network adapters by starting the Rbfg.exe utility and clicking Adapter List.

Technology to create an installation image
RIS includes a technology that you can use to create an image of an operating system that will
be installed on client computers. You can create the image in one of two formats: a flat image or
a Remote Installation Preparation Wizard (RIPrep) image format. Use the flat image option to
create an image directly from a set of operating system files, for example, the files on a CD. Use
the RIPrep image format to create an image that includes an operating system with specific
settings and applications, such as an image that complies with a corporate desktop standard.
Technologies for communication between RIS client and server
RIS includes technologies that establish communication between a client computer that has
begun a PXE boot sequence and the RIS server that contains installation images that are
available to that client. For this process, RIS uses DHCP to provide the client with an Internet
Protocol (IP) address. RIS then downloads the Client Installation Wizard, which prompts the
user to log on and provides a menu of installation options that are customized for that user. You
can control these images through Group Policy.

PXE architecture
Remote Installation Services (RIS) uses the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) that
follows the Pre-Boot eXecution Environment (PXE) architecture to start a client computer.

When a new PXE remote boot–enabled client computer starts for the first time, it uses DHCP to
request an Internet Protocol (IP) address and the IP address of an active RIS server. As part of
the initial request, the client computer sends out its globally unique identifier (GUID), which
identifies the client computer within Active Directory.

After the client computer receives an IP address from the DHCP server, it then requests service
from a RIS server. The request to the RIS server is a broadcast, which means all of the RIS
servers on the network will receive the request. If the RIS server can answer, it queries its
preferred domain controller for the client computer’s GUID. If the server fails to find the GUID, it
queries the global catalog for the forest. If the GUID is found in either location, the client
computer is considered “known”. If the GUID is not found, it is considered “unknown”. In this
case —that is, the query by the RIS server found no computer account object in Active Directory
with this computer’s GUID —only RIS servers that are configured to answer unknown clients will
do so.

If the client is known, all the available RIS servers query the domain to determine whether the
client computer account has been prestaged with settings that specify that the client computer is
to be answered by a particular server. If so, only the designated server answers the service
request. The other servers respond by telling the client which server will answer it. This is called
a referral. If the client computer account settings do not require the client computer to be
answered by a particular server, all RIS servers answer it if they are aware of this client and
configured to answer it. Each RIS server then offers its own files to download.

After the client computer receives a reply to its service request, it initiates a Trivial File Transfer
Protocol (TFTP) download of the boot program. The Remote Installation Services
implementation of this program is called Startrom.com (located at
\\RIS_server_name\REMINST\oschooser\i386\startrom.com).

After Startrom.com has been downloaded, the client computer runs it. The default version of
Startrom.com then prompts the user to press F12 to initiate a network installation. If the user
fails to press F12 within three seconds, the network boot is stopped, and the client computer
attempts to start up from the next available boot device. When the user presses F12, the client
computer uses TFTP to download the Client Installation Wizard. The wizard then requests the
user to log on to the network.

Remote Installation Services directory service planning
The Remote Installation Services (RIS) environment relies on a well-designed and well-planned
Active Directory architecture. Normally, determining the physical location of a server can be a
challenge. This can become even more difficult when you must find and configure several
servers that are located in different buildings, different offices, or on different floors. Using Active
Directory, however, can simplify this process.

In a given domain, Active Directory provides organizational units or containers that you can use
to organize users and resources into logical administrative groups. This makes it easier to
locate and configure servers at multiple locations.


Remote Boot and Installation Setup Processes

RIS uses PXE technology to enable RIS client computers without an operating system to initiate
the boot sequence from their network adapters, thus facilitating operating system installations
from remote network locations. To initiate the remote boot process and set up a RIS-based
operating system installation, PXE interacts with the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
(DHCP), the Remote Installation services, and TFTPD, as shown in the following figure:

How RIS Works
When you start a new PXE-enabled RIS client computer, the following sequence of events
occurs:

     1. The client computer initiates the communication by sending a DHCP Discover broadcast
          on its subnet. A DHCP server with an active scope for that subnet will issue an IP
          address to the client.
     2. All Remote Installation servers that receive the client’s DHCP Discover broadcast extract
          (from the PXE data portion of the packet) the universally unique identifier (UUID) of the
          client that is requesting service. The RIS server then queries its preferred domain
          controller to search for this UUID in all prestaged computer accounts in Active
          Directory.
          If the domain controller does not find the UUID in the local domain, the RIS server
          queries the global catalog to locate the client computer account. If the UUID is found in
          either location, the client computer is recognized as a known client; otherwise, it is
          considered an unknown client. If the client is unknown, it will only receive an answer
          from a RIS server that is configured to answer unknown clients, provided that one
          exists on the network.
     3. If the client is known, all available RIS servers query the domain to determine whether
          the prestaged client computer account has a setting that specifies that only a particular
          RIS server can answer the client.
          If this is the case, then only the designated RIS server answers the service request,
          and other RIS servers simply notify the client of the particular RIS server that is
             configured to answer it. If the client computer account does not have a setting that
             requires it to be answered by a particular server, any RIS server can answer the
             request. However, the client only receives service from the first RIS server it contacts.
       4. The user receives a prompt to press the F12 key to initiate a network service boot
             request from the RIS server.
       5. Using TFTPD, the contacted RIS server downloads the Client Installation Wizard to the
             RIS client, along with all client dialog boxes contained within the wizard.
       6. The Client Installation Wizard prompts the user to log on with a valid user name,
             password, and domain name.
       7. The user receives a selection of operating system images that are hosted on the RIS
             server for installation on the client computer.
             The list of operating system images that are offered to the user is based on the user’s
             credentials or security group membership.
PXE Specification
The published PXE specification defines the remote-boot process and also establishes the PXE
compliance standards for hardware manufacturers and other vendors. RIS uses PXE
environment extensions to DHCP, an industry-supported technology, to allow workstations to do
the following:

              Boot remotely using their network adapters to access boot code from a network
               location.
              Install an operating system from a remote source to a client’s local hard disk.
The PXE environment is built upon Internet protocols and services that are widely used in the
computer industry. This includes TCP/IP, DHCP, and TFTP. The PXE extensions to the DHCP
protocol enable information to be sent to systems that support remote network booting and also
allow these systems to locate remote installation services.

Note

              Network adapters that meet the PXE .99n specification will work correctly with RIS.
RIS Technology Limitations
You can use RIS technology to install operating systems, with or without software applications,
to portable and desktop computers in your organization, which include member servers, stand-
alone servers, and domain controllers. However, limitations to the scope of RIS-based operating
system installations include the following:
Clean Installs
You can only use RIS to provide a clean version of an operating system, with or without
software applications. You cannot use RIS to upgrade an operating system or software
configuration.

Server Components
If you use RIS to install a server operating system, you might not be able to include all the
server components that you want to provide with the RIS image. For example, some server
components require that you install and configure them only after the RIS-based installation is
complete. This can include components such as Certificate Services, Cluster service, or
software that is dependent on Active Directory.

Domain controllers
You cannot install a preconfigured domain controller using a RIS image. However, you can use
RIS to install a stand-alone server and then configure the server as a domain controller by
running the Active Directory Installation Wizard.

Encryption and security settings
You cannot use RIS to deploy files that are encrypted with a system such as the Encrypting File
System (EFS). Also, you cannot use RIS to deploy systems with preconfigured user-level
security settings such as file and folder permissions. To configure these settings, you can run a
script after completing your RIS-based installation.

Wireless networks
Wireless networks do not support remotely booting computers using PXE technology.

Multihomed computers
Multihomed RIS servers are supported if the network adapters use multiple separate subnets or
if all network adapters service the same subnet. In both cases the RIS server must also be the
DHCP server. The DHCP server must have active scopes for each subnet serviced and must be
authorized for each IP address on the network adapters being serviced.

Supported operating systems
RIS has certain limitations depending on the operating system that you are installing. For more
information about operating systems supported by RIS, see “Operating Systems Supported by
Remote Installation Services” in Help and Support Center for Windows Server 2003.
Network Ports Used by Remote Installation Services

The following table lists the ports that are used by RIS.

Port Assignments for Remote Installation Services




 Service Name                                               UDP    TCP

 Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)                 67     N/A


 Boot Information Negotiation Layer (BINL)                  4011   N/A


 Trivial File Transfer Protocol Daemon (TFTPD)
In order to install Windows XP Professional using the Remote Installation Service, you must
install the RIS on a Windows 2000 server (either Server, Advanced Server or Datacenter) using
the Remote Installation Services Setup Wizard. The server can be a member server or a
domain controller, it doesn't make a difference, however, what must be present on the network
in order to use RIS are the following services:


               RIS relies on the DNS service for locating both the directory service and client
DNS
               computer accounts.

               The DHCP service is required so that client computers that can receive an IP
DHCP
               address.

Active
               RIS relies on the Active Directory service in for locating the RIS servers.
Directory


The shared volume where the RIS data is installed cannot be on the same drive that is running
Windows 2000 Server. The volume must be large enough to hold the RIS software and the
various Windows XP Professional images that are installed and that volume must be formatted
with the NTFS 5 file system.

You begin the RIS server setup by logging on to the server with an account that has
administrative permissions, and go to the Control Panel and select Add/Remove Programs.
From here you will need to choose Add/Remove Windows Components and make sure that you
have either the Windows I386 directory available for the installation or the Windows 2000 Server
CDROM.

In the Add/Remove Windows Components window, select Remote Installation Services.
From this point, the remainder of the installation is automatic. (If the I386 source files cannot be
found the system will prompt you to locate them.)

When the installation is completed, you'll need to restart your server to configure your RIS
services.

You need to go back into the Control Panel and choose Add/Remove Windows Components
again in order to start the configuration. (You can also type RIsetup from the run line or a
command prompt as well.)




Click on Configure to begin. This will launch the Welcome to the Remote Installation Services
Setup Wizard, as shown below. (The window below is the first thing you will see if you choose to
type RIsetup from the run line or a command prompt.)




Once you continue you will be prompted with the default Remote Installation folder location of
D:\RemoteIstall. You can elect to keep the default path or browse to a new location.
The volume you opt to use must be large enough to hold the RIS software and the various
Windows XP Professional images that will be installed and the volume must be formatted with
the NTFS 5 file system.




By default, Remote Installation Services servers do not respond to requests for service from
client computers. There are two settings available to use on the server.

If you select the Respond to clients requesting service option, Remote Installation Services is
enabled and will respond to client computers requesting service.

Additionally, if you select the Do not respond to unknown client computers option, Remote
Installation Services will respond only to known (prestaged) client computers.
You will also need to provide a name for the Windows installation image folder, as well as a
friendly description for each image you install on the RIS server.
The last step the wizard performs is actually a series of events, as outlined in the image above.
Once the final step is completed, the setup wizard starts the required services for RIS to run.
The server is complete at this point and will service client requests for CD-based installs.

Additional details of RIS configuration and administration from this point forward actually goes
beyond the scope of what is required for installing Windows XP Professional CD-based installs
via RIS. For additional information on RIS for Windows XP Professional, you can visit the
Microsoft Website

Client computers that support remote installation must either meet the Net PC specification
(which is, effectively, a system which can perform a network boot) or have a network adapter
card with a PXE boot ROM and BIOS support for starting from the PXE boot ROM.

Some client computers that have certain supported PCI network adapter cards can use the
remote installation boot disk as well.

This support is somewhat limited and can only be used with certain motherboards, as the BIOS
settings for booting the system from the network needs to be configurable.

The RIS service provides the Windows 2000 Remote Boot Disk Generator if your system does
support starting from the PXE boot ROM. You can create a Remote Boot Disk by typing
<DRIVE LETTER> RemoteInst\Admin\i386\rbfg in the RUN box or at a command prompt. (The
drive letter is the drive where you installed the RIS services and will vary from server to server).

The boot disk simulates the PXE boot process on your system when your network card does not
have the required PXE boot ROM for a RIS installation. (Again, only a small number of PCI
network cards currently support using the Remote Boot Disk. This includes mainly 3COM and a
small cross section of other major vendors.)




The user account used to perform a RIS installation must be assigned the user right of Log On
as a Batch Job. The users must also be assigned permission to create computer accounts in
the domain they are joining if this has not been done ahead of time. There are other factors as
well, such as prestaging a client. For the purposes of this overview, we will go through a "plain
vanilla" RIS installation from a boot floppy.

When the client system starts from the boot floppy you would press F12 when prompted to boot
from the network.

The Client Installation Wizard will start and you will need to supply a valid user name and
password for the domain you're joining as well as the DNS name of the domain. Once this is
done you can press Enter to continue.

You are then given the option of performing an Automatic Setup, Custom Setup, or to Restart a
Previous Setup Attempt, or use the Maintenance and Troubleshooting Tools installed on the
RIS server. You would choose one of the options and then press Enter.

The next screen will show a number of RIS images (including the default CD-based image) that
you can use. (The number will depend on what has been placed on the server by the
administrator and whether or not you have the proper access permission to read them.) Choose
an image and then press Enter.

You will be presented with one last opportunity to verify that the settings are correct. Once
you're sure that they are, you would press Enter to begin the RIS installation. When it is
complete, Windows XP Professional will be deployed to the client system and available for use
upon restart
computers.

You can use RIS to remotely set up new Microsoft Windows Server 2003-based computers by
using a RIS network shared folder as the source of the Windows Server 2003 files. You can
install operating systems on remote boot-enabled client computers. Client computers are
connected to the network, and are then started by using a Pre-Boot eXecution Environment
(PXE)-capable network adapter or remote boot disk. The client then logs on with a valid user
account.

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RIS Hardware Requirements
The following is the minimum hardware that is required for the RIS server:

  • The server must meet the minimum hardware requirements for the version of Windows
    Server 2003 that is installed.

  • A four gigabyte (GB) drive that is dedicated to the RIS directory tree on the RIS server.

  • A 10 or 100 megabit per second (Mbps) network adapter that supports TCP/IP. 100 Mbps
    is preferred.

    NOTE: Dedicate a whole hard disk or partition specifically to the RIS directory tree. SCSI-
    based disk controllers and disks are preferred.

    The drive on the server on which you will install RIS must be formatted with the NTFS file
    system. RIS requires a lot of disk space, and you cannot install it on the same drive or
    partition on which Windows Server 2003 is installed. Make sure that the chosen drive
    contains enough free disk space for at least one full set of the installation files for the
    operating system you plan to remotely install.

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Client Hardware Requirements
The following list describes the minimum hardware that is required for RIS client computers:

  • Meet the minimum operating system hardware requirements.

  • PXE DHCP-based boot ROM version 1.00 or later network adapter, or a network adaptor
    that is supported by the RIS boot disk.

    NOTE: Always contact the manufacturer of your network adapter to obtain the latest
    version of the PXE DHCP-based boot ROM.

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Software Requirements
Several network services must be active and available for RIS. You can install the following
services either on the RIS server or on other servers that are available on the network:

  • Domain Name System (DNS Service)

  • Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)

  • Active Directory "Directory" service

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Prerequisites for Client Installations
Make sure that the client computer's network adapter has been set as the primary boot device
in the computer BIOS. If the network adapter is configured as the primary boot device, the client
requests a network service boot from the RIS server on the network when the client starts. After
the client contacts the RIS, the client is prompted to press the F12 key to download the Client
Installation Wizard. Do not press F12 unless you need a new operating system installation or
access to maintenance and troubleshooting tools.

After the client operating system has been installed by using RIS, you can ignore the prompt to
press F12 during future client computer startups. You can also reset the client BIOS so that the
primary boot device is the floppy disk drive, the hard disk, or the CD-ROM drive.

To use the remote boot disk to start the installation, insert the boot disk into the floppy disk
drive, and then start the client computer. The floppy disk drive must be set as the primary boot
device in the client BIOS. After the computer starts from the disk, you are prompted to press
F12 to start the network service boot process. You must remove the boot disk after you press
F12 and before the text-mode portion of the operating system installation completes.

NOTE: You may have to press F12 on some Compaq computers during startup. In this case,
you must press F12 on the Compaq startup screen, and then press F12 again when you are
prompted by the RIS server.

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Install Windows Server 2003 RIS

  1. Click Start, point to Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.

  2. Click Add/Remove Windows Components.

  3. Click to select the Remote Installation Services check box, and then click Next.
       NOTE: If you are prompted for the Windows Server 2003 installation files, put the
       Windows Server 2003 CD-ROM in the CD-ROM drive, and then click OK. After you do
       so, you may receive a message with options for upgrading the operating system. Click
       No.

  4. Click Finish, and then click Yes to restart your computer.

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Set Up RIS

  1.    Log on as a user with administrative privileges.

        Click Start, click Run, type risetup.exe, and then click OK to start the RIS Setup Wizard.
  2.

  3.    When the "Welcome" screen appears, click Next.
  4.    Type the drive letter and folder in which the RIS files are stored, and then click Next.
        For example, you might type E:\RemoteInstall, and then click Next.
  5.    After the RIS Setup Wizard copies the files, you are be prompted to enable or disable
        the RIS service, and the options are:

         • Respond to client computers requesting service. If you select this option, RIS is
           enabled, and it will respond to client computers that are requesting service.

         • Do not respond to unknown client computers. If you select this option, RIS only
           responds to known client computers.

  6.    Click Respond to client computers requesting service, and then click Next.
  7.    You are then prompted for the location of the client operating system installation files.
        Put the client operating system CD-ROM in the server CD-ROM drive, and then click
        Next.

      NOTE: Microsoft only supports the use of Microsoft media when creating a client
      operating system image. The use of non-Microsoft media is not supported.
  8. Type the folder name for the client operating system installation files on the RIS server,
      and then click Next.
  9. Type a friendly description for the operating system image. This is displayed to users
      after they start a remote client and run the Client Installation Wizard.
  10. Click Next, click Finish, and then click Done.
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Authorize RIS in Active Directory
After you install RIS, the RIS server must be authorized in Active Directory. Authorization
determines control of which RIS servers can serve client computers on the network. If the RIS
server is not authorized in Active Directory, client computers that request service cannot contact
the RIS server.
NOTE: To authorize a RIS server in Active Directory, you must be logged on as an enterprise
administrator or a domain administrator of the root domain.

  1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click DHCP.

  2. In the left pane, right-click DHCP, and then click Manage Authorized Servers.

  3. If your server is not listed, click Authorize, type the name or the IP address of the RIS
     server, and then click OK.

      NOTE: If you are prompted to confirm the RIS server, verify the name and IP address,
      and then click OK.

  4. Click Close, and then quit the DHCP console.

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Set User Permissions
With RIS, clients can install their own client operating system. The users must also be granted
permissions for creating computer accounts in the domain. To make it possible for users to
create computer accounts anywhere in the domain:

  1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Active Directory Users and
     Computers.

  2. In the left pane, right-click your domain name, and then click Delegate Control.

  3. In the Delegation of Control Wizard, click Next.

  4. Click Add.

  5. Type the name of the group that requires permission to add computer accounts to the
     domain, and then click OK.

  6. Click Next.

  7. Click to select the Join a computer to the domain check box, and then click Next.

  8. Click Finish.

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Install Clients By Using RIS
This section describes how to install a client operating system on a computer that contains a
network adapter that supports PXE DHCP-based boot ROM. To install a client operating
system:

  1. Make sure that the network adapter is set as the primary boot device in the computer
     BIOS.

  2. Restart the client computer from the network adapter.

  3. When you are prompted to do so, press F12 to start the download of the Client
     Installation Wizard.

  4. At the "Welcome" screen, press ENTER.

  5. Type a user name that has permissions to add computer accounts to the domain, and
     then type the domain name and password for this user.

  6. Press ENTER.

  7. When you receive a warning message that states that all data on the client computer
     hard disk will be deleted, press ENTER.

  8. A computer account and a global unique ID for this workstation are displayed. Press
     ENTER to start Setup.

  9. If you are prompted to do so, follow the instructions on the screen to complete the client
     operating system installation.

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Remote Installation Boot Disk Option
You can use the remote installation boot disk with computers that do not contain a network
adapter that supports PXE DHCP-based boot ROM. The boot disk is designed to simulate the
PXE startup process.

Rbfg.exe is a utility for creating network installation disks, and it is located in the
RemoteInstall\Admin folder on every RIS server.

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Creating a Boot Disk By Using the Windows Remote Boot Disk Generator
To create a remote installation boot disk:
  1. Locate the drive:\RemoteInstall\Admin\I386 folder on the RIS server, where drive is the
     drive on which RIS is installed.

  2. Double-click the Rbfg.exe file.

  3. Put a floppy disk in the floppy disk drive, and then click Create Disk.

  4. When you prompted to create another disk, click No, and then click Close.

NOTE: To view a list of supported network adapters, click Adapter List. You cannot add network
adapters to this list.

								
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