UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO

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UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO Powered By Docstoc
					                     SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
                      AND MANAGEMENT 
 
                 
                 
                 
    Department of Marketing, 
    Globalization & Strategy 
                  
                  
           Self‐Study 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
          February 2008 
 
                                                     Table of Contents


1. Overview, Mission, and Goals: Department of Marketing, Globalization, & Strategy
     (MGS) ............................................................................................................................2
2. Marketing Programs: Mission, Goals, and Curricula ....................................................5
     2.1.     Undergraduate Marketing Program .....................................................................6
     2.2.     Graduate Marketing Program ............................................................................10
3. The International Business (IB) Program: Mission, Goals, and Curriculum...............14
     3.1.     Undergraduate International Business Curriculum............................................15
     3.2.     Graduate International Business Curriculum.....................................................19
4. The Strategy Curriculum: Mission, Goals, and Curriculum ........................................23
5. Admission and Advising..............................................................................................24
6. Faculty..........................................................................................................................25
     6.1.     Demographic......................................................................................................25
     6.2.     Research.............................................................................................................27
     6.3.     Teaching.............................................................................................................30
     6.4.     Services and Diverse Experience.......................................................................31
7. Diverse Learning Environment of MGS......................................................................32
8. Departmental Governance ...........................................................................................33
9. Facilities and Technologies..........................................................................................34
10. Overall Evaluations......................................................................................................35
11. Action Plans .................................................................................................................36
12. Appendix I ...................................................................................................................38
13. Appendix II ..................................................................................................................40




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1. OVERVIEW, MISSION, AND GOALS: DEPARTMENT OF
   MARKETING, GLOBALIZATION, & STRATEGY (MGS)

Overview

The MGS department was created in May, 2007, with the Dean’s initiative to improve the
structure and governance of the School of Business and Management. Previously, faculty
was organized by the loosely structured teaching areas (e.g., marketing, finance).

The spirit of departmentalization at School of Business and Management is to encourage
greater faculty involvement in governance issues, to streamline day-to-day operations of
the school, and to establish clear accountability and responsibility at departmental level
for matters that are important to faculty and to School of Business and Management, such
as mentoring junior faculty, introducing new courses, and scheduling classes.

Currently, MGS is one of the largest departments at School of Business and Management
in terms of faculty size and number of students it serves. As of the beginning of 2008,
MGS has 12 full time faculty (FTE). The Department is responsible for two core courses
(Marketing and Strategic Management) for the entire School at both undergraduate and
MBA levels, and provides numerous elective courses to serve 183 Undergraduate
Marketing majors, 165 Undergraduate International Business majors, 69 MBA students
with Marketing emphasis, and 40 MBA students with International Business emphasis.
The following charts summarize the number of undergraduate marketing and
international business majors and graduate students with Marketing and International
Business emphases over the last five years.



Undergraduate Students                            Undergraduate Students with
with Marketing as First Majors                    International Business as First Majors

Semester   Males     Females     Total            Semester    Males     Females   Total
02F        66        109         175              02F         83        97        180
03S        59        100         159              03S         81        99        180
03F        71        99          170              03F         83        105       188
04S        70        106         176              04S         74        88        162
04F        77        112         189              04F         80        95        175
05S        67        115         182              05S         77        82        159
05F        80        113         193              05F         76        93        169
06S        77        109         186              06S         75        81        156
06F        83        109         192              06F         72        94        166
07S        82        110         192              07S         73        83        156
07F        76        107         183              07F         78        87        165




                                            2
MBA Students with                                   MBA Students with International
Marketing Emphasis                                  Business Emphasis

Semester   Males      Females    Total              Semester    Males     Females    Total
02F        30         61         91                 02F         29        23         52
03S        28         60         88                 03S         23        23         46
03F        34         65         99                 03F         30        21         51
04S        40         58         98                 04S         29        17         46
04F        35         49         84                 04F         32        20         52
05S        42         51         93                 05S         23        17         40
05F        36         40         76                 05F         19        12         31
06S        36         47         83                 06S         17        11         28
06F        30         35         65                 06F         25        14         39
07S        30         31         61                 07S         24        13         37
07F        28         41         69                 07F         26        14         40


USF Mission and Goals:
“Educating Minds and Hearts to Change the World”
Founded in 1855, the University of San Francisco has declared its commitment to the
highest standards of learning in the American, Catholic, and Jesuit tradition. Central to its
mission of preparing leaders in service, the University seeks to offer quality education. It
fosters close student-teacher relationships with a special concern for the entire life of the
student - intellectual, spiritual, moral, social, psychological, and physical. The University
seeks to promote high standards of academic excellence and prepares leaders who will
work for justice for all people.

USF Vision

The University of San Francisco will be internationally recognized as a premier Jesuit
Catholic, urban university with a global perspective that educates leaders who will
fashion a more humane and just world.

USF Mission

The core mission of the University is to promote learning in the Jesuit Catholic tradition.
The University offers undergraduate, graduate, and professional students the knowledge
and skills needed to succeed as persons and professionals, and the values and sensitivity
necessary to be men and women for others.

The University will distinguish itself as a diverse, socially responsible learning
community of high quality scholarship and academic rigor sustained by a faith that does
justice. The University will draw from the cultural, intellectual and economic resources



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of the San Francisco Bay Area and its location on the Pacific Rim to enrich and
strengthen its educational programs.

School of Business and Management Mission

The University of San Francisco School of Business and Management is a diverse,
socially responsible learning community of academic rigor that promotes development of
the knowledge, skills, confidence, and understanding necessary for principled men and
women to act with professional competence and moral courage for personal,
organizational and societal good.

Mission and Goals of the Department of Marketing, Globalization and
Strategy (MGS)

To support the USF mission and to achieve university goals in our context, the MGS
department has adopted the following mission and goals of its own.

MGS Departmental Mission

The Mission of MGS department is to impart students with the essential knowledge and
skills, in a culturally rich and diverse learning environment, to help them take on future
challenges in Marketing, International Business, and Strategic Management areas.

MGS Curricula and Program Goals

● Design comprehensive and practical curricula in the subject areas of Marketing,
  International Business, and Strategy
● Deliver high quality and effective teaching
● Maintain a culturally rich and diverse learning environment

How MGS’s Mission and Goals Support the USF Mission and Vision

● MGS offers our students “the knowledge and skills needed to succeed as
  professionals” in the marketing, international business, and strategic management
  areas. For example, the marketing program prepares students to analyze customer
  needs, segment markets, develop appropriate products, create promotional messages
  and media plans, design distribution systems, and make decisions on a whole host of
  other marketing activities.
● MGS aims to offer a culturally rich and diverse learning environment to promote a
  “diverse learning community.” For instance, MGS faculty members lead a variety of
  international study tours (Mexico, Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Japan, China, and South
  Korea), advise and support a number of student organizations (such as AMA and
  AIESEC) that enhance students’ connection with the professional world, and guide
  students to study local businesses and communities.
● In particular, MGS’s International Business program is designed to enhance “a global
  perspective” on students’ learning, student’s sensitivity to cultural differences, and


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  their understanding of the impact of these cultural differences on business and
  management practices. For example, the IB curriculum addresses a number of
  important issues such as the effects of globalization of multinational firms on
  consumer behaviors and on competition, and the impact of cultural differences on
  marketing practices and on global supply chain management.
● MGS’s comprehensive curricula in marketing and international business and its
  integrative courses in strategic management strive to maintain “academic rigor.” In
  the marketing program, we make Marketing Research, a quantitative-oriented
  methodology course many marketing majors do not naturally like, a required course.
  We believe rigorous training in quantitative analysis and critical thinking is the
  hallmark of USF education.

At present time, MGS offers the following programs and curricula:

•   Marketing Program: offering undergraduate Marketing Major and graduate Marketing
    Area of Emphasis
•   International Business (IB) Program: offering undergraduate IB Major and graduate
    IB Area of Emphasis
•   Strategy Curriculum: offering a single capstone course, Strategic Management, at
    both undergraduate and graduate levels. This course is required for some majors, and
    elective for all others, at the undergraduate level. At graduate level, however, this
    Strategic Management course is required for all MBAs.

Following, we will describe and evaluate each program/curriculum.

2. MARKETING PROGRAMS: MISSION, GOALS, AND CURRICULA

The mission of the Marketing Program is to provide students with essential marketing
knowledge and tools to address marketing challenges in their chosen careers.

Upon the completion of the Marketing Program, students are expected:

•   To understand the purpose and processes of marketing management and marketing
    strategy,
•   To develop capabilities to apply marketing concepts, knowledge, and tools,
•   To be able to identify and analyze marketing decisions,
•   To recognize the interplay of marketing with other business functions (e.g., finance,
    operations), and
•   To discriminate among the opportunities and risks marketing affords in a global
    environment.

Needless to say, the above goals are emphasized differently at undergraduate versus
graduate programs. The undergraduate marketing program primarily focuses on students’
conceptual understandings of the aforementioned five broad learning goals, while the
graduate marketing program, assuming MBA students’ greater maturity level and post-



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college worker experiences, emphasizes more on applications of these conceptual
understandings in identifying, analyzing, and addressing marketing decisions.

To achieve the above mission and learning goals of the Marketing Program, MGS offers
the following curricula at undergraduate and graduate levels.


2.1      Undergraduate Marketing Program

In the following sections, we will elaborate on the structure of Undergraduate Marketing
Program/Major, the descriptions of marketing courses, and the relationships between the
program learning goals and our course offerings.

Structure of Undergraduate Marketing Majors/Program:

Students of Marketing Majors are required to have 20 units of marketing electives
beyond the core BUS-302 class.

Core (4 units)

●     BUS - 302 Marketing Management

Required Electives (12 units)

•     BUS - 360 Marketing Research
•     BUS - 363 Consumer Behavior
•     BUS - 461 International Marketing Management

Free Electives (select 8 units from the following)

•     BUS - 361 Advertising and Promotion Strategy
•     BUS - 364 Retail Management
•     BUS - 366 Customer Satisfaction
•     BUS - 460 Sales Management
•     BUS - 464 Marketing Strategy and Planning
•     BUS - 465 E-Business Marketing
•     BUS - 369/469 Special Topics in Marketing

Undergraduate Marketing Course Descriptions

BUS-302. Marketing Management (4) (Core)

Prerequisites: ECON - 101, ECON - 102, MATH - 106, BUS - 201, BUS - 202 and
Junior standing. This course introduces fundamental marketing concepts and theories,
and demonstrates their applications and practices. Topics include market and competitive



                                             6
analysis, market segmentation and targeting, product positioning, brand and product
management, pricing issues, advertising and promotion campaigns, and channels of
distribution. Cases and projects are used to highlight these topics, illustrate marketing
concepts and theories in practices, and allow students to apply them in real company
situations.



BUS-360. Marketing Research (4) (Required Elective)

Prerequisites: MATH - 106, BUS – 302, and Junior standing. Introduction to the role of
marketing research in various marketing decisions. Identification of information needed,
types of research designs, methods of data collection, interpretation of findings,
evaluation of research, and relationship to marketing concerns and actions.

BUS-363. Consumer Behavior (4) (Required Elective)

Prerequisite: BUS - 302 and Junior standing. A study of individual and group buying
behavior with an emphasis on the consumer as the focal point of the economic system.
An interdisciplinary approach drawing on insight from the behavioral sciences. Includes
application to practical marketing situations.

BUS-361. Advertising and Promotion Strategy (4) (Elective)

Prerequisite: BUS - 302 and Junior standing. The fundamentals of advertising and
promotion from the marketing manager's perspective. Topics include: establishing
objectives, managing an advertising agency, understanding characteristics of various
media, developing an advertising and promotion plan for a product or service.

BUS-364. Retail Management (4) (Elective)

Prerequisite: BUS - 302 and Junior standing. Managerial perspectives in retailing
focusing on such topics as retailing strategies, merchandising, trade area analysis,
personnel management, financing, pricing, promotion, and the legal environment.

BUS-366. Customer Satisfaction (4) (Elective)

Prerequisite: BUS - 302 and Junior standing. This course explores the theoretical
underpinnings of customer satisfaction, its importance in the marketplace and the process
of delivering and maintaining desired levels of customer satisfaction. Particular attention
is given to understanding the close links among the operations, human resource, and
marketing functions and their effect on organization structure and customer satisfaction.




                                              7
BUS-460. Sales Management (4) (Elective)

Prerequisite: BUS - 302 and Junior standing. Practical study of the techniques of selling
including persuasive selling, face-to-face communications and personal presentation.
Sales management and the contribution it makes to marketing through selection, training,
motivation, and management by objectives (MBO).

BUS-461. International Marketing Management (4) (Required Elective)

Prerequisites: BUS - 302, Senior standing, and either BUS - 350 , BUS - 360 , or BUS -
363. Principles and applications of marketing in the international environment. Focus on
economic, socio-cultural, political, and ethical constraints on the marketing function in
the multinational firm. Development of product, promotion, pricing, and distribution
strategies appropriate for global markets.

BUS-464. Marketing Strategy and Planning (4) (Elective)

Prerequisite: BUS - 302 and Senior standing. This course focuses on the development
and implementation of marketing strategies that help firms achieve a sustainable
competitive advantage. A computer program is used to simulate a competitive, market-
driven environment. Students participate as marketing managers of firms which directly
compete with other firms for sales, market share, and profits. Decisions involve product
development and repositioning, pricing, channels of distribution, sales force, advertising,
and marketing research.

BUS-465. E-Business Marketing (4) (Elective)

Prerequisite: BUS - 302 and Senior standing. Impact of Internet technology on marketing
practice. New business models and their marketing components. Evaluation of online
marketing strategies and practices. Design of Internet-based marketing systems.

BUS-369/469. Special Topics in Marketing (4) (Elective)

Prerequisite: BUS - 302 and Junior standing. Topical areas will be developed including
service marketing and public policy in marketing. In-depth coverage of areas of special
concern which give the marketer a better insight into the understanding of the broad field
of marketing.

Evaluations of Undergraduate Marketing Program and Curriculum

The Undergraduate Marketing Program has attracted a lot of interest from students and
has been one of the top undergraduate majors in the School of Business and
Management.

The undergraduate marketing major curriculum has two characteristics. First, it attempts
to ensure that all of our graduates understand and grasp a set of core marketing concepts,


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and knowledge and skills about marketing processes and decisions. This is accomplished
by requiring students to take four common marketing courses: BUS-302 Marketing
Management, BUS-360 Marketing Research, BUS-363 Consumer Behavior, and BUS-
461 International Marketing Management. This aims to ensure that students have solid
understandings of various purposes and processes of marketing management and
marketing strategy.

BUS-302 is designed to introduce the fundamental concepts, knowledge, and processes
of Marketing, even though it does have elements of practical applications. BUS-363 is a
fundamental subject in Marketing to understand the needs and wants of consumers
throughout purchase and consumption cycles. BUS-360 focuses on various data
collection and data analysis tools to better understand the market and facilitate informed
marketing decision making. BUS-461 provides an international/global perspective on
marketing issues and offers opportunities for students to appreciate the opportunities and
risks marketing affords in a global environment. We make BUS-461 a required course to
highlight our commitment to the “global perspective” specified in the USF Vision.

In addition, the curriculum provides significant flexibility. To students who may be
interested in different marketing topics, we offer 7 free marketing electives, which cover
a variety of contemporary as well as classical marketing topics.

In terms of pedagogy, our marketing courses are taught with lectures, cases, projects,
term paper research, and/or simulations. In terms of breadth, our core course, offered to
non-marketing majors as well as marketing majors, explores the interface between the
marketing function and other functional areas so that all of School of Business and
Management students understand the role of marketing in a business or non-business
organization. In terms of depth, some of our elective courses are taught by leading-edge
researchers or professionals who expose students to the latest developments in their
respective fields.

Table 1 illustrates the linkage between Undergraduate Marketing Program’s Learning
Goals and its Current Curriculum.

Table 1: Linkage between Undergraduate Marketing Program’s
         Learning Goals and the Current Curriculum

Undergraduate Marketing Program Learning Goals:               Courses Delivered
Students are expected:
To understand the purpose and processes of marketing          302, 360, 361, 363, 364, 366,
management and marketing strategy                             460, 464, 465
To develop capabilities to apply marketing concepts, tools,   302, 360, 361, 363, 364, 366,
and knowledge                                                 460, 464, 465
To be able to identify and analyze marketing decisions        302, 360, 461, 464
To recognize the interplay of marketing with other business   302, 461, 464
functions (e.g., finance, operations)
To discriminate among the opportunities and risks marketing   461
affords in a global environment



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We understand that we could further fine-tune the learning goals of the undergraduate
marketing program, by delineating the goals in a more measurable fashion to facilitate
our assessment efforts. For example, we could spell out specific, key marketing
processes and strategies our students shall understand. Also, we could develop a series of
learning goals that are more relevant to undergraduate students and different from those
for graduate students. We will tackle this issue in the near future, when we revisit and
possibly redesign the undergraduate program for the School of Business and
Management.

One of our major concerns is that we are constrained in offering some electives that are
demanded by students and recommended by the Undergraduate Program Office (UPO).
For instance, the UPO has for years requested to offer more marketing electives for
undergraduate marketing majors to fulfill the demand of students. Additionally, MGS has
not offered courses in technology marketing and online marketing, which would be
consistent with the USF mission to connect with the San Francisco Bay Area. This
deficiency is partially due to the limited number of marketing faculty, who are tied up
teaching the courses we are offering now.

2.2 Graduate Marketing Program

In the following sections, we will elaborate on the structure of Graduate Marketing
Program/Area of Emphasis, the descriptions of marketing courses, and the relationships
between the program goals and our course offerings.

Structure of Graduate Marketing Area of Emphasis/Program

MBA students who wish to graduate with a designation of Marketing Area of Emphasis
are required to earn 9 units beyond the core marketing course of MBA 618.

Core (4 units)

•   MBA - 618 Marketing Management

Electives (select 9 units/three courses from the following)

•   MBA - 631 Marketing Research
•   MBA - 632 Sales & Marketing Channel Management
•   MBA - 633 International Marketing
•   MBA - 635 Advertising and Promotion Strategy
•   MBA - 638 Marketing Strategy
•   MBA - 639 Special Topics in Marketing
•   MBA - 642 Creativity and Innovation
•   MBA - 643 Entrepreneurial Management
•   MBA - 645 Small Business Adventures
•   MBA - 662 Global Product Management
•   MBA - 697 International Study Tour


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Graduate Marketing Course Descriptions

MBA-618. Marketing Management (4)

Prerequisites: MBA 601, MBA 602. Examination of the role of marketing in the
economic system, the evolution of markets, market structure, consumer behavior,
research, marketing functions and policy. Emphasis on identifying and meeting customer
needs, developing effective marketing strategies, ensuring quality of service, and
achieving and sustaining competitive advantage. Study of marketing management
concepts for products and services, profit and non-profit organizations, and consumer and
industrial markets. Prerequisite for electives in Marketing.

MBA-631. Marketing Research (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 618. The role of marketing research in marketing decision-making,
the research process of problem identification and analysis of data, research design, data
collection methods and evaluation, interpretation, research reporting.

MBA-632. Sales and Marketing Channel Management (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 618. Combines sales management and marketing channel
management, leading to an understanding of the many channels through which goods and
services reach end users and of how the different elements in the channels are managed.
Emphasis will be placed on the economic, structural and behavioral aspects of these
systems as well as on the critical elements of the sales management process.

MBA-633. International Marketing (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 618. The theory and practice of marketing in the multinational firm.
The case method is extensively used to analyze development of marketing strategy and
the marketing mix (product, price, promotion, and distribution) in the global context.

MBA-634. Consumer Behavior (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 618. The study of external and internal influences on the behavior of
the individual in the exchange situation including consumer information processing and
decision-making. The application of consumer behavior theory to the development of
marketing strategies.

MBA-635. Advertising and Promotion Strategy (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 618. An extensive look at the role of advertising, personal selling,
publicity, and sales promotion in effective marketing; the research and managerial
aspects of advertising and promotion; the interdisciplinary behavioral and communicative
elements in advertising and promotion.



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MBA-638. Marketing Strategy (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 618. Examination of the problems in formulating and implementing
marketing strategy; deciding what kind of business to be in and translating that decision
into marketing plans and a program for action.

MBA-639. Special Topics in Marketing (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 618. Coverage of topics of special and/or current interest. Examples
include Services Marketing, Marketing for Non-Profit Organizations, Public Relations,
Advanced Marketing Research, High-Tech Marketing, and Small Business Marketing.

MBA-642. Creativity and Innovation (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 614. Investigation of innovation in the corporate setting and the
personal creative process, with an emphasis on understanding the role innovation plays in
corporate success. Students practice methods for sharpening one's own innovative and
creative skills through lectures and personal exercises designed to build both information
content and a repertoire of specific techniques.

MBA-643. Entrepreneurial Management (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 614. Entrepreneurial leaders are often thought to possess special
talents, gifts, inspirations, or genius. In fact, entrepreneurial management is a purposeful
and disciplined way of recognizing, adapting and organizing around an opportunity, and
is a part of every executive's job. The purpose of this course is to present a set of tools for
opportunity-seeking for managers and executives - whether in an existing organization or
in a new enterprise. Students will receive a framework for organizing and managing such
tangibles as policies and decisions, uncertainty and risk, structures and strategies,

MBA-645. Small Business Ventures (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 614. The essentials of establishing small business ventures;
management techniques targeted to small business operations.

MBA-662. Global Product Development (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 618. In today's competitive world of business and technology, getting
the correct product(s) to market in time successfully has become a matter of survival. The
purpose of this course is to develop an understanding and working knowledge of the new
product development and management process. This course will focus on issues involved
in selecting, researching and developing, and positioning/marketing new products. Cases
of successful new products developed in the medical, biotech, IT, telecom, materials, and
consumer fields will be used to illustrate the management processes and issues discussed
in class.




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MBA-697. Overseas Study Tours (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate students only. Two weeks international study tour. Students visit
selected corporations and organizations, and complete research project studies with
emphasis in management, marketing, finance or international business.

Evaluations of Graduate Marketing Program and Curriculum

The core MBA 618 course is designed to introduce the fundamental concepts, skills,
processes, and decisions of marketing management. Through cases, lectures, and
projects, students are required to demonstrate and apply their understanding of the
“marketing fundamentals.” Various marketing electives allow students to develop deeper
understanding of key marketing decisions, such as advertising, marketing strategy, sales
and channels of distribution, and international markets.

For example, MBA 632, Sales and Marketing Channel Management, aims to acquaint
students with key decisions on sales force management and channel design and
implementation. MBA 634, Consumer Behavior, offers students with theoretical
explanations on many consumer behaviors, which provide critical input for marketing
strategy formulation. MBA 635, Advertising and Promotion Strategy, delineates the
complexity of key advertising and promotion issues.

MBA 638, Marketing Strategy, allows students to grasp the intricacies of formulating and
implementing marketing strategies, integrating various marketing elements into a
cohesive strategy and appreciating the interdependencies between marketing and other
business functions in planning and implementing marketing strategies. MBA 633,
International Marketing, broadens students’ perspectives on marketing by identifying
opportunities and challenges of marketing products and services in an international and
global context.

Table 2 illustrates the linkage between Graduate Marketing Program’s Learning Goals
and its Current Curriculum.

Table 2: Linkage between Graduate Marketing Program’s Learning Goals and Current
         Curriculum

Graduate Marketing Program Learning Goals:                    Courses Delivered
Students are expected:
To understand the purpose and processes of marketing          618, 632, 635, 638, 643, 645
management and marketing strategy
To develop capabilities to apply marketing concepts, tools,   618, 631, 632, 633, 635, 638
and knowledge
To be able to identify and analyze marketing decisions        618, 631, 634, 633, 638
To recognize the interplay of marketing with other business   618, 638, 642, 643, 645, 662
functions (e.g., finance, operations)
To discriminate among the opportunities and risks marketing   633, 662, 697
affords in a global environment


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We recognize that some aspects of the marketing program structure could be improved.
For instance, the rationale to include MBA 642 Creativity and Innovation, MBA 643
Entrepreneurial Management and MBA 645 Small Business Adventures, as marketing
electives, is not well-articulated, since the marketing content of each of those courses is
not entirely clear. Also, the current curriculum does not adequately ensure that graduates
of the marketing program possess a set of common, core skills and knowledge that are
applicable across industries and marketing contexts, and, it does not encourage students
to develop an integrative perspective of various marketing decisions and their
relationships.

Similar to the case of the undergraduate marketing program, we understand that we could
further fine-tune the learning goals of the graduate marketing program, by delineating the
goals in a more measurable fashion to facilitate our assessment efforts. For example, we
could spell out specific, key marketing processes and strategies that our graduate students
shall understand. Also, we could develop a series of learning goals that are more relevant
to graduate students and different from those for undergraduate students.

One significant issue facing the MGS department is that we only have one faculty
teaching marketing research and marketing strategy courses. Marketing Research is a
backbone course for any marketing graduates and will be one of the required electives for
graduate students with the Marketing emphasis. Marketing Strategy course is a main
vehicle to provide an integrative perspective that can tie various marketing decisions
together and will be the capstone course for the MBA Marketing Emphasis. Recruiting
adjunct faculty to provide complementary coverage on these two critical courses will not
allow us to control the quality and academic rigor of the Graduate Marketing Program.

3. THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (IB) PROGRAM: MISSION,
   GOALS, AND CURRICULUM

The mission of International Business (IB) Program is to provide students with the tools
and knowledge to address challenges in international business.

Upon the completion of the IB Program, students are expected:

•   To understand the implication of globalization on their organization's strategies,
    structure, and business functions,
•   To grasp fundamental concepts of key international business functional areas (e.g.,
    international marketing, international finance) as well as learn what it takes to
    become a global manager,
•   To develop capabilities to identify and analyze international business opportunities
    and problems and suggest solutions, and
•   For those undergraduate IB majors choosing to specialize in a given geographical
    area or a specific country, to achieve intermediate proficiency in the language spoken
    in that area/country.




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At the undergraduate level, the learning goals are more geared towards the introduction
and conceptual understandings of IB tools and knowledge. Undergraduate IB majors
may elect to obtain intermediate proficiency in one or more languages other than English
as part of the major requirement. Proficiency may be fulfilled by either demonstrating
prior proficiency in a second language or through completion of at least the third
semester of academic coursework in a foreign language. At the graduate level, the
learning goals are more geared towards the application of IB tools and knowledge in
identifying and analyzing IB decisions.

To achieve the above mission and goals of the IB Program, MGS offers the following
curricula at undergraduate and graduate levels.

3.1 Undergraduate International Business Curriculum

In the following sections, we will elaborate on the structure of Undergraduate IB
Program/Major, the descriptions of IB courses, and the relationships between the
program goals and our course offerings.

Structure of Undergraduate IB Majors/Program (20 units)

Required (8 units)

•   BUS - 350 International Business
•   BUS - 452 The Manager in the Global Economy

Select one course from the following (4 units):

•   BUS - 430 International Financial Management
•   BUS - 461 International Marketing Management

Electives (select 8 units from the following):

•   BUS - 345 Introduction to Sustainable Business
•   BUS - 351 Japanese Business, Economy and Society
•   BUS - 359/459 Special Topics - International Business
•   BUS - 397 International Study Tour
•   BUS - 430 International Financial Management
•   BUS - 431 Analysis of Global Business Conditions
•   BUS - 451 Import/Export Management
•   BUS - 461 International Marketing Management
•   ECON - 370 International Economics
•   ECON - 471 International Finance
•   ECON - 477 International Political Economy
•   Foreign Language, 3rd semester or higher




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•   Additional international courses offered by other departments, such as
    Entrepreneurship, Politics, History, Psychology, and Asian Studies, may also qualify,
    subject to advisor’s review and approval

Undergraduate International Business Course Descriptions

BUS-345. Introduction to Sustainable Business (2-4)

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Sustainable businesses set to balance the necessity of
economic achievement with environmental quality and social justice. Students will learn
the business strategies, management tolls, and systems of measurement that emerge when
companies embrace sustainable principles.

BUS-350. International Business (4) (required)

Prerequisites: BUS - 302 and BUS - 304 and Junior standing. The economic, political,
and legal environment of international business and how firms must adapt their strategies
and operations as they internationalize. Emphasis is on the financial, production, and
marketing challenges of multinational firms.

BUS-351. Japanese Business, Economy and Society (4)

Prerequisites: BUS - 304, and Junior standing. Students will understand the economic,
historical and sociological underpinnings of Japanese business. The cross-disciplinary
approach will provide a variety of insights into the world's second largest economy.
Students will learn about the differences between Western and Japanese business culture
and the impact it has on successful interaction with Japanese clients.

BUS-359/459. Special Topics - International Business (4)

Prerequisite: BUS - 350. Topical areas will be developed including international policy;
global alliances; specialization in geographic areas; international economic studies.

BUS-397. International Study Tour (4)

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Students visit selected corporations and
organizations, and complete research project studies with emphasis in management,
marketing, finance or international business. Students also complete coursework
requirements prior to, and upon completion of the tour.

BUS-430. International Financial Management (4)

Prerequisites: BUS 305, senior standing, and either BUS 330, BUS 331, BUS 332, or
BUS 350. The international financial markets and financial decision-making in
multinational firms. Study of capital budgeting and analysis of foreign investments,
international capital markets and instruments, international investment, foreign currency


                                            16
hedging, working capital management, accounting, tax, and financial control systems in
the multinational firm.

BUS-431. Analysis of Global Business Conditions (4)

Prerequisites: BUS 305 or BUS 395 and Senior standing. The primary objective is to
develop a framework for analyzing the international macroeconomic environment,
focusing on factors which influence fluctuations in GDP growth, interest rates,
unemployment, inflation, and foreign exchange valuation. Using this framework, an in-
depth analysis of current business conditions in selected regions of the global economy
will be performed.

BUS-451. Import/Export Management (4)

Prerequisite: BUS 350 and Junior standing. Basics of international trade and investment.
Identification and evaluation of markets; refinement or development of products or
services for international markets. Approaches to market entry including export, agents or
distributors, licensing and franchising, joint ventures and wholly owned operations.
Identification of overseas strategic partners. Financial aspects of international operations
and transactions.

BUS-452. The Manager in the Global Economy (4) (required)

Prerequisite: BUS 304 and Junior standing. Comparative analysis of business
environments and practices in different countries and regions of the world. Study of
socio-cultural, organization, communication and human resource systems and how these
affect business decisions with an emphasis on global firms.

BUS-461. International Marketing Management (4)

Prerequisites: BUS 302, Senior standing, and either BUS 350, BUS 360, or BUS 363.
Principles and applications of marketing in the international environment. Focus on
economic, socio-cultural, political, and ethical constraints on the marketing function in
the multinational firm. Development of product, promotion, pricing, and distribution
strategies appropriate for global markets.

ECON-370. International Economics (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 101 ECON 111 and ECON 102 ECON 112. Introduction to the
theory and policy of international trade and international economic relations. Course also
covers areas of migration, international corporations, and investment.

ECON-471. International Finance (4)




                                            17
Prerequisite: ECON 312. The world monetary system, international monetary policy,
foreign exchange markets and their uses in the fields of international investments and
finance.

ECON-477. International Political Economy (4)

Prerequisite: ECON - 312. Study of the economic, political and technological forces that
have shaped the post-war international economic system. Topics include the role of
multilateral financial institutions, economic regionalism, the North-South gap,
relationships between states and markets, economic globalization and its implications,
and challenges to sustainable development.

Evaluations of Undergraduate IB Program and Curriculum

The IB program has consistently attracted a lot of attention from students and has been
one of the top majors in the School of Business’s undergraduate program.

BUS 350 International Business is required for all IB students, and aims to provide an
overview of the effects of economic, political, and legal environments on international
business and how firms could adapt their strategies to respond to these “global” and
“international” situations. BUS 452 Manager in the Global Economy is also a required
course and designed to put students’ in a manager’s shoes and to appreciate the effects of
globalization and cultural differences on business decisions.

BUS 430 International Financial Management and BUS 461 International Marketing
Management are designed to advance students’ understandings of fundamental concepts
and issues of key international business functional areas and recognize further the effects
of globalization on the management and practices of key business functional areas.

BUS 397 International Study Tour has been very popular with students to experience first
hand country differences in cultures, economies, technologies, politics, and laws, to
understand how these differences influence business practices in different countries and
regions, and to appreciate how local and global firms operate in today’s global economy.

By requiring both BUS 350 and BUS 452, the IB program attempts to ensure a common
set of knowledge and perspectives for our graduates. At the same time, the Program
offers certain flexibility to students by allowing them to have 8 units of free electives.
The IB curriculum also allows students to go beyond the traditional business courses
emphasizing micro-perspectives, and to learn about globalization and international
business through non-business courses emphasizing macro perspectives, such as
International Economy, International Finance, and International Political Economy,
offered by the College of Arts and Science.

Table 3 illustrates the linkage between the Undergraduate IB Program’s Learning Goals
and its Current Curriculum.



                                            18
Table 3: Linkage between the Undergraduate IB Program’s Learning Goals and
         Current Curriculum

Undergraduate IB Program Learning Goals:                     Courses Delivered
Graduates are expected:
To understand the implication of globalization on their      350, 452
organization's strategies, structure, & business functions
To grasp fundamental concepts of key international           430, 461
business functional areas (e.g., international marketing,
international finance) as well as learn what it takes to
become a global manager
To develop capabilities to identify and analyze              345, 351, 431, 451, and all
international business opportunities and problems and        other electives
suggest solutions
To (voluntarily) obtain intermediate proficiency in a        IB language requirement,
foreign language                                             or with a separate language
                                                             minor


However, there are several issues that need to be addressed. For example, the structure of
the IB program could be loosened up a bit more to give students more room to select free
electives. This can be achieved by increasing the number of units required for IB majors
and/or offering some 2 unit free elective courses. We will look into these issues shortly.

A key IB faculty member will be retiring at the end of Spring 2008. He has been teaching
many critical IB courses throughout the years. More importantly, he has been actively
mentoring and advising IB majors. His upcoming retirement will leave only one full time
professor focusing on IB area and taking care of IB majors. Recruiting adjunct faculty to
teach some of the IB courses this faculty has been teaching is possible, but his caring,
mentoring, and advising of IB students could not be adequately replaced by adjunct
faculty.

3.2 Graduate International Business Curriculum

In the following sections, we will elaborate on the structure of Graduate IB
Program/Emphasis, the descriptions of IB courses, and the relationships between the
program goals and our course offerings.

Structure of Graduate International Business Program/Emphasis

Electives (select 9 units/three courses from following)

•   MBA - 623 International Finance (3 units)
•   MBA - 629 Special Topics in Finance: Investing in Southeast Asia (3 units)
•   MBA - 633 International Marketing (3 units)
•   MBA - 639 Special Topic: Doing Business in Latin America (3 units)


                                             19
•   MBA - 641 Managing Multinational Firms (3 units)
•   MBA - 649 Special Topics: Cross Cultural Management (3 units)
•   MBA - 653 International Telecommunications (3 units)
•   MBA - 670 Global Trends (3 units)
•   MBA - 673 Doing Business in Latin America (3 units)
•   MBA - 679 Special Topic in International Business (3 units)
•   MBA - 697 International Study Tours (3 units)

Descriptions of Graduate IB Courses

MBA-623. International Finance (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 617. The international financial markets and how the financial
activities of multinational firms must be adapted in the global context. Effects on
managerial decision-making in the areas of capital budgeting and investments, sourcing
of capital, exchange rate hedging, working capital management, accounting and control
systems, and tax issues.

MBA-629. Special Topics in Finance: Investing in Southeast Asia (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 617.

MBA-633. International Marketing (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 618. The theory and practice of marketing in the multinational firm.
The case method is extensively used to analyze development of marketing strategy and
the marketing mix (product, price, promotion, and distribution) in the global context.

MBA-639 Special Topic: Doing Business in Latin America

Prerequisite: MBA 618

MBA-641. Managing the Multinational Firm (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 614. Exploration of the special range of decisions facing the
managers of multinational corporations (MNC). The case method is used extensively to
examine strategic, marketing, operational, financial, and human resource decisions in the
MNC.

MBA-649 Special Topic: Cross-Cultural Management

Prerequisite: MBA 614




                                           20
MBA-653. International Telecommunications (3)

Prerequisites: MBA 616, MBA - 651 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of
instructor. Structure of the telecommunications sector in selected countries; trends in
privatization and deregulation; the new competitive international marketplace; role of
telecommunications in socio-economic development; issues in trade and technology
transfer.

MBA-670. Global Trends (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate students only. Identification of global events based on research;
combining the events into clusters utilizing group dynamics and scanning techniques;
selection of global firms and analysis of their strengths/weaknesses; integration of global
trends and international alliances to achieve strategic advantage; examination of how to
anticipate change in a global environment.

MBA - 673 Doing Business in Latin America (3)

Prerequisite: None

MBA-679. Special Topic: Import/Export Management (3)

Prerequisite: None

MBA-679. Special Topic: Investing Overseas (3)

Prerequisite: MBA 617

MBA-679. Special Topic: Pacific Rim Studies (3)

Prerequisite: None

MBA-679. Special topic: Asian Pacific Markets (3)

Prerequisite: None

MBA-679. Special Topic: Sustainable Business (3)

Prerequisite: None

MBA-697. International Study Tours (3)

Prerequisite: Graduate students only. Two week international study tour. Students visit
selected corporations and organizations, and complete research project studies with
emphasis in management, marketing, finance or international business.



                                            21
Evaluations of Graduate IB Program and Curriculum

The graduate IB curriculum has a number of advantageous characteristics.

First, the IB curriculum has built-in flexibility, allowing students to choose IB courses in
any sequence as they see fit to their interests and schedules, since no IB course is the
prerequisite for another.

Second, the IB curriculum encourages many diverse special topics in international
business. This is particularly important, given today’s rapid development in international
markets and global competition. In the past, IB special topics have covered such themes
as Doing Business in Latin America, Import/Export Management, Asian Crisis, Cross-
Cultural Management, Pacific Rim Studies, Asian Pacific Markets, and Sustainable
Business.

Third, the IB curriculum allows students to develop in-depth understanding of key
business function topics, such as International Marketing and International Finance. Such
offerings shall accommodate those students who want to develop expertise in these
business functional areas.

Fourth, the IB curriculum also provides students with broad and strategic considerations
of international operations, through offering MBA 641 Managing Multinational Firms.
This course examines strategic, marketing, operational, financial, and human resource
decisions facing international firms.

Fifth, MBA 697 International Study Tours permit students to gain first hand experience
to learn and appreciate the complexities of doing business internationally and globally.

Table 4 illustrates the linkage between Graduate IB Program’s Learning Goals and its
Current Curriculum.

Table 4: Linkage between Graduate IB Program’s Learning Goals and Current
         Curriculum

Graduate IB Program Learning Goals:                          Courses Delivered
Graduates are expected:
To understand the implication of globalization on their      641, 670
organization's strategies, structure, & business functions
To grasp fundamental concepts of key international           623, 633
business functional areas (e.g., international marketing,
international finance) as well as learn what it takes to
become a global manager
To develop capabilities to identify and analyze              629, 639, 641, 649, 653, 673,
international business opportunities and problems and        679, 697
suggest solutions



                                             22
However, we notice that some aspects of the IB curriculum need to be re-examined. The
importance of students’ developing a set of common core IB skills and knowledge,
applicable across industries and business contexts, is not addressed by the current
curriculum. The IB curriculum needs a redesign to respond to this deficiency. In terms of
electives, we allow many functional areas (finance, marketing, telecomm, etc) courses
and one-time experimental courses (course numbers ended with a 9), but not enough of
IB’s own courses. On top of that, the upcoming retirement of a key IB faculty,
mentioned earlier, will make it even more difficult to create and staff new IB courses.
Another minor problem is that the course numbers for various special topics seem
numerous and confusing. Even though it’s not a problem the MGS department can solve
alone, it’s the problem our IB students have complained about the most. We will re-visit
all these issues in the upcoming redesign of the IB curriculum.

4. THE STRATEGY CURRICULUM: MISSION, GOALS, AND
   CURRICULUM

The Strategy Curriculum is mainly to offer integrative courses on the subject of strategic
management for students in the School of Business and Management. More specifically,
the mission of the Strategy Curricula is to provide students with the essential tools and
knowledge to address strategic management challenges.

Upon the completion of the curriculum, students are expected:

•   To understand an organization’s strategic process: strategy formulation and
    implementation,
•   To grasp how different strategies attempt to build and maintain competitive
    advantages through matching the organization's strengths and weaknesses with
    opportunities and threats, and
•   To develop capabilities to integrate and apply knowledge acquired in previous
    courses (e.g., finance, marketing, organizational behaviors) to address strategic
    management issues.

At the undergraduate level, BUS 401 Strategic Management is offered as the capstone
course for all business majors, except that Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Finance,
Hospitality Management, and Marketing majors may elect to substitute with BUS 406
Entrepreneurship/Business Plan Development for BUS 401. At the graduate level, MBA
619 Strategy and Competitive Advantage is the capstone course for all MBAs.

Since MGS department does not offer major or area of emphasis in the strategy area, the
strategy curriculum does not constitute an academic program. Therefore, no program
evaluation is done in this report. Essentially, the above curriculum goals also function as
learning goals of undergraduate and graduate strategy courses.

Nonetheless, we offered the course descriptions here for references.




                                            23
Strategy Course Descriptions

BUS-401. Strategic Management (4)

Prerequisites: Permission of Department, BUS 301, BUS 302, BUS 304, BUS 305, RC
120 and Senior standing. Senior capstone course, which studies how organizations
analyze and respond to changing external environmental condition, challenges,
opportunities, and threats that are brought about by these changes. How organizations
change direction and modify their resources to compete effectively in a constantly
changing dynamic environment.

MBA-619. Strategy and Competitive Advantage (4)

Prerequisite: Permission of Department. Strategy formulation and implementation in a
global environment. An integrative course, drawing from the functional core courses.
Focuses on competitive strategy that defines an organization's position in its environment
and formulates strategies resulting in a favorable, sustainable position. Takes a broad
view of the external environment and matches it with the internal competencies of the
firm. Special focus on external threats and opportunities and the relationships to the
strengths and weaknesses of the enterprise.

5. ADMISSION AND ADVISING

The University Admission Office handles all applications and admissions for
undergraduate business students. It has a clear set of criteria for this process. However,
we do participate and support various recruiting and yield events organized by the
University. For example, we send faculty representatives to give talks on business
careers in front of large groups of prospective students and parents.

In terms of advising undergraduate students, each faculty is assigned on average 20
advisees, mainly to advise on their major-related academic decisions. To complement
faculty advising, School of Business and Management’s Undergraduate Program Office
also provides procedural advice and assistance to help students register for next
semester’s classes. Faculty also participate in major Orientation Days for incoming
freshmen and transfer students at the beginning of every semester. These advising
opportunities allow students and faculty to build close professional relationships and add
“personal” elements in their teaching and learning relationships.

Although the current advising approach has its merits, it is basically a broken system.
Faculty are not well aware of non-MGS offered curricula in School of Business and
Management, nor general university core requirements. So when students come to see a
faculty for course advising, the faculty usually is not able to offer valuable suggestions
other than courses related to the major. Students feel that they do not get what they
expect and thus feel frustrated about the educational experience at USF. However, when
students ask questions related to careers, faculty feel that they can offer better advice to



                                             24
students. So, we may need to revise the advising approach and separate course advising
from career advising.

The School of Business and Management has its own admission office for the MBA
program. While faculty has multiple channels (e.g., Skunkworks, faculty meetings) to
offer philosophical thinking on the application and admission processes, the MBA Office
sets up specific criteria for these processes. Nonetheless, our faculties are very active in
helping the MBA Office in recruiting events. For example, they contact individual
prospective students to answer their questions related to the curriculum and careers,
welcome prospective students into their classrooms to let them taste the USF MBA
experience, and attend Open Houses to meet and greet prospective students.

In terms of advising graduate students, students are assigned to faculty advisors. But,
students seldom utilize faculty for advising, perhaps because they are graduate students
and have pretty good ideas about what courses to take and what kind of careers they
would like to pursue. However, faculties are engaging students through informal
conversations, such as chats after classes and in the hallways, to provide advice on
curriculum and careers to graduate students. The MBA Office has a full time staff to
provide more procedural and detailed advising.

A number of faculty are actively involved in students’ clubs and activities. For example,
Professor Shenzhao Fu has been the faculty advisor for AMA marketing clubs at both
undergraduate and graduate levels. Professor Leslie Goldgehn has been the faculty
advisor for the MBA Consulting Club. And, Professor Peggy Takahashi has been an
active advisor to AIESEC for many years.

The University has a central Career Services Center to provide students with more
detailed and professional services in career-related matters, such as developing resumes,
publicizing internship and job leads, and conducting mock interviews for undergraduate
students. The School of Business and Management’s MBA Career Services Office works
directly with MBA students and employers.

6.   FACULTY

6.1 Demographic

This section simply lists our faculty and basic information about them. We will elaborate
teaching, research, and services of our faculty in separate sections reported below. Full
CVs of our faculty will be available during the period of the external review team’s
campus visit. Please note that the MGS department and the entire business School has no
probationary tenure-track faculty at present time. Every faculty member is tenured. The
situation will quickly change, given that two new, tenure-track faculty members will join
the School in Fall of 2008.




                                             25
Tenured Faculty


Faculty            Rank      Academic Field       Degree Degree Granting Institution
Jonathan Barsky    Associate Marketing            Ph.D.  Golden Gate University
                   Professor
Rex Bennett        Professor Marketing            Ph.D.    University of North Carolina -
                                                           Chapel Hill
Stephen Calvert    Professor   Marketing          Ph.D.    University of Cincinnati
Roger Chen         Professor   Strategy           Ph.D.    University of Texas - Dallas
Alev Efendioglu    Professor   Strategy           Ph.D.    LSU-Baton Rouge
Shenzhao Fu        Associate Marketing            Ph.D.    Indiana University
                   Professor
Leslie Goldgehn    Professor Marketing            Ph.D.    Northwestern University
Oren Harari        Professor   Strategy           Ph.D.    University of California -
                                                           Berkeley
Nicholas           Professor   IB/Marketing       Ph.D.    Bowling Green University
Imparato
Zhan Li            Professor   Marketing          D.B.A.   Boston University
L. W. Murray       Professor   IB                 PhD      Clark University
Peggy Takahashi    Associate IB                   Ph.D.    University of California -
                   Professor                               Berkeley
Heinz Weihrich     Professor Strategy             Ph.D.    UCLA

Adjunct Faculty

•   John Durham is currently at Spitfire Marketing Systems and has been teaching at
    USF since 1989. Prior positions include Sales Manager at KRON/NBC and
    advertising agencies in Nashville and Memphis. Mr. Durham received his MA in
    Political Marketing at the University of Kentucky.
•   Derene Hinchliff is currently Senior Vice President at Santiago Solutions Group
    where she is responsible for New Business Development, Client Servicing, Project
    Management and Strategy Design in multicultural markets for corporate clients,
    encompassing technology, retail, pharmaceuticals, consumer products, financial
    services, multi-level marketing and membership services. Previous positions include
    General Manager/US Hispanic Market at Fiera.com, Inc. Ms. Hinchliff received her
    MBA in International Management at the Garvin School of International
    Management (Thunderbird).
•   Robert Koran is currently Vice President at Bank Austria Creditanstalt USA. Prior
    positions include International Marketing Manager at Superflight, Inc. and Vice
    President/Senior Manager, International Trading and New Business Development at
    Creditanstalt-AWT Trade Services Company. Mr. Koran received his MBA in



                                           26
    Economics and International Business at Prague School of Economics, Graduate
    School of Business.
•   Jim Prost is currently a Marketing Consultant. He develops marketing plans for
    client companies as well as designs and develops research questionnaires. Previous
    positions include Director of Sales/Marketing at Dataquest, Director of Sales at
    Power Up Software Corporation and New Products Marketing Manager at Qume
    Corporation. Mr. Prost received his MBA in General Management at Golden Gate
    University.
•   David Robinson is currently a Senior Lecturer in Marketing and Director of the
    Undergraduate Program at the Walter A. Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley.
    Previous positions include Lecturer in Marketing at Stanford University, Lecturer in
    Marketing at Santa Clara University, Assistant to the MBA Program Director at the
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Mr. Robinson received his MBA degree
    from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
•   Linda Saytes owns her own consulting company. It is focused on public relations and
    marketing communications, primarily for technology vendors. Previous positions
    include Principal Analyst Network Management Worldwide Service at Gartner, Inc.,
    Senior Product Manager at Cisco Systems, Manager of Network Marketing Group at
    Digital Equipment Corporation and Systems Engineer Network Specialist at IBM.
    Ms. Saytes received her MBA at the University of Houston.

6.2 Research

Given the faculty composition of our department, the research of MGS faculty focuses on
three broad areas: Marketing, International Business, and Strategy. The research
summary of each faculty in our department is listed below. For detailed research
activities about our faculty, please refer to the CVs of MGS faculty, which will be
available during the period of the external review team’s campus visit.

•   Jonathan Barsky, Associate Professor of Marketing, primarily researches on customer
    satisfaction meaning and measurement. His research work has been published in
    Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Administration Quarterly, among others.
•   Rex Bennett, Professor of Marketing, focuses his research on competitive advantage
    strategies, customer satisfaction, customer retention strategies, strategic planning, and
    positioning. He has published in such journals as the American Banker, Journal of
    Retail Banking, Bankers Magazine, Bank Marketing, and Journal of Information and
    Technology.
•   Stephen Calvert, Professor of Marketing, concentrates his research on consumers’
    attitudes toward marketing and business practices in Latin America and the United
    States. His articles have appeared in numerous publications including the Journal of
    Marketing Research, Journal Marketing Theory and Practice, and the Journal of
    Marketing Education.
•   Roger (Rongxin) Chen, Professor of Strategic Management, researches on business
    competition in emerging markets, strategic alliances, and high-tech and e-commerce.
    He has published more than 20 articles and proceedings, including the publications at
    prestigious journals such as Academy of Management Journal and Management


                                             27
    International Review. He has received several awards including "Silicon Valley
    Roundtable Guru” Award from the U.S. National Business Economics Association
    and Silicon Valley Roundtable, the Abramson Award for Outstanding Article from
    Business Economics Journal, and outstanding research award from the School of
    Business and Management at the University of San Francisco.
•   Alev Efendioglu, Professor of Strategic Management, has research interests in
    Strategy and Competitive Advantage and Use of Technology in global environments.
    He is the author of two books, chapters in eight other books, and articles in numerous
    professional publications, including Business Horizons, Journal of American
    Academy of Business, Journal of Asia-Pacific Business, Journal of Small Business
    Strategy, Interacting with Computers, and China International Review. For the first
    eight months of its publication in 2004, his research paper titled "Chinese Culture &
    E-Commerce: An Exploratory Study" was listed on the 25 most requested journal
    articles list as number 1 and has constantly been listed in the TOP TEN of this list
    since then.
•   Shenzhao Fu, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Marketing, conducts
    research on technology marketing, e-business marketing, and recently focuses more
    on insurance services marketing in China. His research papers have appeared in
    Journal of International Consumer Marketing, International Journal of Technology
    Management, and Advances in International Marketing, among others.
•   Leslie Goldgehn, Professor of Marketing and Management, primarily conducts
    research on marketing for nonprofit organizations and small businesses and on
    Organizational Behavior and Leadership Areas. Her research work has been
    published in Practice Inspiration and the Council for Advancement and Support of
    Higher Education Journal. She has presented papers at a number of professional
    meetings including The Symposium for Marketing Higher Education, the National
    Business and Economics Society, The Association for Business Education, and the
    Eastern Academy of Management. Dr. Goldgehn was selected as a Fulbright Scholar
    for the Czech Republic and a Fellow of the International Women’s Forum.
•   Oren Harari, Professor of Strategic Management, researches on competitive
    advantage, global management, organizational change, and transformational
    leadership. He has published over 200 columns and articles in selected journals and
    magazines, and numerous presentations to professional and corporate groups around
    the world. He is the author of a number of books, including Break from the
    Pack: How to Compete in a Copycat Economy, the Leadership Secrets of Colin
    Powell, Beep! Beep! Competing in the Age of the Roadrunner, and Leapfrogging the
    Competition: Five Giant Steps to Becoming a Market Leader. He was chosen by the
    London Financial Times as one of the top 40 business management minds in the
    world.
•   Nicholas Imparato, Professor of Management and Marketing, researches innovation,
    brand, leadership and the impact of social and political factors on competitive
    position. Since 1996 he has been a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford
    University, working at the intersection of public policy and business strategy. He has
    authored, edited and co-authored numerous publications, including the books Public
    Policy and the Internet, Capital for Our Time: The Economic Legal, and
    Management Challenges of Intellectual Capital and Jumping the Curve: Innovation



                                           28
    and Strategic Choice in an Age of Transition. He has served as contributing editor
    and columnist for Intelligent Enterprise and Security Technology and Design
    magazines. He has given public sector and corporate presentations in 30 countries
    and conducted proprietary research for Visa International, Cadence, Charles Schwab
    and IBM. He received the Tops in Marketing Award from Sales and Marketing
    Executives International.
•   Zhan Li, Professor of Marketing, primarily researches on relational marketing and
    consumer behavior in emerging markets. He has published over 40 journal articles
    and conference proceedings. His research work has been published in the Journal of
    the Academy of Marketing Science, Journal of Business Research, Industrial
    Marketing Management, Journal of Marketing Channels, among others, and some
    collected by Harvard Business School Publishing. He is a recipient of a number of
    outstanding research awards.
•   L.W. (Bill) Murray, Professor of International Business and Finance, has published
    extensively in the areas of inflation and growth, asset allocation, overseas marketing
    issues, and distance learning. Recent publication outlets include Management
    Dynamics, South African Business Review, Advances in Financial Education, and
    Business Horizons. Professor Murray has also made numerous professional
    presentations both domestically and internationally, and has served as a consultant to
    several Bay Area businesses.
•   Peggy Takahashi, Associate Professor of International Business and Management,
    has research interests in spin-offs in Japanese industries, cross cultural management,
    as well as Japan’s political economy. Her work has been published in the
    International Review of Business, American Sociological Review. She has also
    contributed to collected works for the University of California’s Institute of East
    Asian Studies.
•   Heinz Weihrich, Professor of Global Management, has been primarily researching on
    the competitive advantage of nations and enterprises. Some 140 articles were
    published in journals such as Human Resource Planning, Management International
    Review, Long Range Planning, The Academy of Management Executive, and the
    European Business Review (most outstanding paper in 1999). He is the author or co-
    author of more than 85 books in 16 languages. He is the sole author of the classic
    management book with Harold Koontz. In a survey, his book was ranked as the most
    influential management book in China. In 2007-2008 Weihrich published (some
    books are currently printed) three books in India in English, two books in Chinese
    (one in English and one in Chinese), one book in Portuguese, and two books in
    Spanish. His book Administracion (with the late Harold Koontz) has been the best-
    seller in the Spanish-speaking world for more than 15 years.

MGS faculties are active in conducting and publishing academic and applied business
research. But, we, as a group, are not developing certain focused research themes that
can build our research reputation as an institution among marketing educators and
professionals.

Given the USF mission and our geographical advantages, we could collectively focus our
research on issues related to technology, innovation, emerging markets, and multicultural



                                            29
marketing. We could accomplish this by collaborating among ourselves and by
recruiting faculties who research in these areas.

The intellectual endeavors of MGS faculty are supported by the School-wide Faculty
Development Fund (FDF). Each year, the University allocates a certain amount of
funding to support School of Business and Management faculty’s research and
intellectual activities, through funding scholarly travels, purchasing necessary access to
data and software, covering expenses related to field research, and paying for research
assistants. Faculty members have to submit applications for research grants based on
their research streams. The Faculty Development Committee (FDC) and the Dean jointly
make funding decisions. Junior faculties, who are active researchers, typically have
priority in receiving FDC research grants. Many MGS faculties have received such grants
in the past.

6.3 Teaching

MGS faculty are embracing and adopting a variety of pedagogies. Some faculty is using
computer simulation as their main teaching methods, while some others are relying
heavily on cases. Some are adopting a combination of cases and lectures, while several
are delivering teaching and learning experience through study tours. These pedagogies
offer students different ways to learn and enrich their experience at USF.

MGS department is the leading academic unit to design and lead international study tours
for the School of Business. Most of the study tours offered by School of Business and
Management have been designed and organized by MGS faculties, including Stephen
Calvert, Roger Chen, Alev Efendioglu, Shenzhao Fu, and Peggy Takahashi. Those study
tours covered a number of countries in Asia and Latin America. Students are very
interested in participating in such tours, and they speak very positively about these
international experiences and how much they have learned about globalization and the
effects of cultural differences on business practices.

MGS faculty members are generally teaching the courses in which they have expertise,
which they have developed through their research activities, prior employment and/or
consulting experience. Past teaching assignments are certainly a factor in planning and
scheduling of course assignments. Faculty, department chair, assistant dean for
Academic Programs, and the Dean all work together to finalize the teaching assignments.
Faculty members are generally happy with the courses they are assigned to teach.

The School of Business does have a 2-year rolling plan for teaching assignments. The
plan calls for teaching assignments to be preliminarily determined about two years ahead,
which significantly reduces the stress and confusion regarding course assignments.

MGS faculties are teaching effectively in the classroom. This is reflected by the fact that
a number of MGS faculties, including Rex Bennett (2007), Zhan Li (1997 and 2003), and
Peggy Takahashi (2006), are recipients of School-wide Outstanding Teaching Awards.




                                            30
And two others, Oren Harari and Nicholas Imparato, have also won the most prestigious
teaching award, the University-wide Distinguished Teaching Award in the past.

Besides teaching at USF, MGS faculties have also been active in teaching at other
leading business schools internationally. Heinz Weihrich teaches regularly at the
University of Science and Technology in Ludwigshafen, Germany, and in the BiMBA
program at Peking University in Beijing, China (ranked No. 1 among all MBA programs
in China). Previously, he has also taught in Austria, Egypt, France (INSEAD),
Singapore, Switzerland, Taiwan, and Thailand. Peggy Takahashi has taught at Kwansei
Gakuin University in Japan. Zhan Li has taught many times in the BiMBA program at
Peking University in Beijing, China. Leslie Goldgehn has taught in the Czech Republic
as a Fulbright Scholar. This list can actually go on for a lot longer.

6.4 Services and Diverse Experience

MGS faculties have been actively serving the School, University, and community at
large, and have valuable diverse experience in culture, teaching, and industries.

Several faculty members have served as editors or editors-in-chief for academic journals,
books, and conference proceedings and as reviewers for peer-reviewed journals and
conferences. For instance, Zhan Li and Roger Chen have been serving as Editors-in-Chief
for the Journal of Asia Business Studies. Alev Efendioglu has been Internet Editor for
both Journal of Asia Business Studies and Journal of Asia-Pacific Business.

A number of faculty have been members of boards of directors in a variety of companies
and organizations. A few have extensively consulted for financial services firms,
hospitality establishments, major corporations, and non-profit organizations. For
example,

● Oren Harari, Professor of Strategic Management, has addressed many corporate and
  government audiences and consulted for numerous companies around the world. He
  has served on the boards of directors of several start-up companies.
● Nicholas Imparato, Professor of Management and Marketing, has been an executive
  officer and a member of the Board of Directors of both publicly listed (NYSE;
  NASDAQ) and closely held companies. He has given presentations in 30 countries,
  consulted extensively with CEOs of Fortune 500 firms and local entrepreneurs and
  negotiated with and advised leaders in the public sector, including those at
  ambassador and presidential level.
● Rex Bennett, Professor of Marketing, has extensive consulting and training
  experience in financial industries. His clients include American Bankers Association,
  Bank America, Citicorp, DAI International, SunAmerica Financial Corp., TWA, and
  US Treasury.
● Alev Efendioglu, Professor of Strategic Management, has extensive consulting
  experience and serves as a member of the Board of Directors and as an Independent
  Trustee, and the Chair of the Audit Committee of Ameristock Mutual Fund and
  Ameristock ETF Trust companies.


                                           31
● Jonathan Barsky, Associate Professor of Marketing, has extensive consulting
  experience on customer satisfaction. His clients include businesses, universities, and
  governments in the U.S. and abroad, such as Japan, China, Taiwan, Australia,
  Singapore, London, and Canada.
● Heinz Weihrich, Professor of Strategic Management, worked for and consulted with
  enterprises such as Eastman Kodak, Volkswagen, General Motors (UK), Hughes
  Aircraft, Mercedes-Benz, China Resources Co., and the Institute Pembangunan
  Keusahawanan (Malaysia).

MGS faculty has been active in the School, University, and community committees. For
example, Professors Leslie Goldgehn, Alev Efendioglu, and Zhan Li all have served as
the Chair for the School of Business and Management Peer Review and Promotion
Committee. Professor Roger Chen chaired the School of Business and Management
Faculty Development Committee. Professor Peggy Takahashi co-chaired the
Undergraduate Program Committee. Professor Shenzhao Fu chaired the Academic
Standards Committee. Professors Leslie Goldgehn and Zhan Li have been members of
the Academic Affairs Committee, USF Board of Trustees. Dr. Barsky serves on the
California State Committee on Education and Tourism. Dr. Harari served on the
Committee of Management and Leadership for the U.S. State Department. Dr. Imparato
served eight years on the Development Committee of the USF Board of Trustees. He has
served on the Boards of Trustees of Menlo School (Atherton, CA), the Bahati Education
Foundation (Tanzania) and Business for Diplomatic Action (New York), as well as on the
Operations Committee of the Village Enterprise Fund (East Africa). He was co-leader of
the Homeland Security Initiative of the Bay Area Economic Forum and was honored by
the Bishop Gassis Sudan Relief Foundation for “raising awareness of the plight of the
peoples of Sudan.”

MGS faculty is very diverse in many ways. Several of MGS faculties are foreign born
and raised, or born and raised in an ethnic minority family in the U.S., and speak foreign
languages fluently. Many of them have taught classes at foreign universities or provided
trainings for foreign corporations. Their research interests cover many disciplines, and
their industrial and consulting experiences span across a wide range of business settings.

7.   DIVERSE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF MGS

One of MGS goals is to “maintain a culturally rich and diverse learning environment,” to
reflect and support the USF’s mission.

MGS is very proud of its diverse student body and faculty who have a wide range of
cultural and industrial background. The ethnic breakdown of our graduates is listed in the
table below.




                                            32
Ethnicity of MGS’s Graduates Majoring in Marketing and International Business

              # of        African    Hispanic/            Native                          Interna-
              Graduates   American   Latino       Asian   American   White     Other      tional
UG            1997        5%         10%          24%     1%         38%       11%        11%
Marketing
Majors
UG IB         1856        3%         13%          30%     -          26%       11%        22%
Majors
MBAs with     907         2%         5%           14%     1%         33%       7%         38%
Marketing
Emphasis
MBAs with     462         2%         5%           11%     1%         28%       4%         49%
IB Emphasis

MGS faculty has a very diverse cultural background and industrial experience. Several
faculties have intimate knowledge about foreign cultures and societies such as China,
Japan, Germany, and Turkey. Many of them have consulting/corporate experience in a
variety of industries such as banking, government, chemical, high-tech, health care,
education, and real estate, and have taught at overseas universities. This can be seen from
the earlier “Service and Diverse Experience” section of Faculty.

8. DEPARTMENTAL GOVERNANCE

The main person responsible for the administration and day-to-day operations of the
department is the department chair. Per USF-USFFA Contract, the department chair does
not have the authority to make hire-or-fire decisions, and does not have access to the
teaching evaluations of full time faculty.

The main responsibilities of the department chair include the following:

● to work with the Dean, faculty, and administration to schedule teaching assignments
  for faculty
● to oversee and lead efforts in curriculum designs and updates
● to chair faculty search committees, which involves interviewing candidates at
  conferences, hosting campus visits, and writing reports to the Dean’s office
● to recruit, interview, select, and mentor adjunct faculties
● to provide feedback to the Dean on faculty’s research, teaching, and service
  contributions
● to represent departmental faculty at various college-wide meetings with other
  department chairs, deans, and administrative staff
● to call and schedule departmental meetings and to resolve other departmental issues

Given the fact that MGS department is the home of two top academic programs and
majors (marketing and international business) and that each program has its own
curriculum, student clubs, and other related academic issues, it would be ideal to have
one faculty coordinator for each program, who would be very knowledgeable and
instrumental in dealing with issues within each program.


                                             33
Also, given the increasing demand from assurance of learning, it would be beneficial to
have a core course coordinator so that common assessment instruments and procedures
can be developed, standardized, and implemented by one faculty member for different
sections of a core course. This would also facilitate the accountability of this increasingly
important task.

At this point, the department chair has no support staff. Even though there is a central
support staff group at the School level, they are pretty overwhelmed by other tasks. If a
full time support staff is not possible, a student assistant would be helpful to the
department chair, which would allow the chair to focus on more important issues, rather
than being bogged down by tedious tasks.

9. FACILITIES AND TECHNOLOGIES
The School of Business building, Malloy Hall, provides state-of-the-art facilities
including specialized case-method classrooms, seminar rooms and an executive education
classroom, breakout rooms and individual/group study rooms and spaces; a video
conference room, and computer lab with flexibility to convert all or part of the lab to
teaching/learning spaces as needed. In addition to having all School of Business full-time
and part-time faculty and staff housed in Malloy Hall, the facility provides business
incubator offices and support; student/faculty social spaces, faculty/staff conference
rooms; a faculty/staff lounge; and student government offices.

Outside of Malloy Hall, general purpose classroom sizes limit the possible class
configurations. With the exception of a limited number of very large classrooms (125+),
the next tier of classrooms at USF holds no more than 40-45 students. This limits the
strategies available to meet the increased demand for undergraduate core course sections.

USF has upgraded its multipurpose classrooms in terms of technology capabilities and
also overall finish in the past five years. The majority of classrooms (75%) are
technology enhanced with overhead projectors plus an LCD projector linked to a
computer or video player. By the end of 2008, 98% of all classrooms will be technology
enhanced. In the interim, a portable computer projection cart and/or video equipment
may be reserved and delivered to the classroom. With the exception of a few holes in
coverage, the USF campus is wireless. Many classrooms have moved to whiteboards
which are good for the visual presentation involved in many School of Businesses
courses. However many classrooms continue to rely on chalkboards.

Blackboard, a powerful course-authoring tool, allows faculty to extend the classroom or
create a totally online learning environment. Blackboard features include threaded
discussion forums, digital drop box for submission of student assignments, online
gradebook, document sharing and e-mail messaging.




                                             34
The Center for Instruction and Technology (CIT) provides training for faculty and staff in
Blackboard, current desktop and multimedia applications, demonstrations and workshops
on the latest technology solutions for higher education.

10. OVERALL EVALUATIONS

We present our overall evaluations in terms of our strengths, weakness, opportunities and
challenges we face in the table below.

Strengths                                               Weakness

● A dedicated group of faculty with extensive           ● Faculty’s research interests spread out and lack of
  teaching experience and diverse cultural                 focused themes to build program’s reputation
  background and industrial experience                  ● With only one full time faculty teaching both
● A wide range of academic and applied research            marketing research and marketing strategy
  publications by faculty in the areas of Marketing,       courses at both undergraduate and graduate
  IB, and Strategy                                         levels, we are thin in faculty coverage on these
● An active group of faculty serving the School,           two critical courses
  University, and Community at large                    ● With one experienced IB faculty retiring, we only
● A diverse student body offering a culturally rich        have one full time faculty focusing on the IB
  learning environment                                     program, one of the largest programs in the
● Faculty actively involved in students’ clubs             School
● A solid curriculum for marketing, IB, and             ● Research productivity could be higher
  Strategy to address the stated goals of programs      ● MBA curriculum for both Marketing and IB lacks
● Department’s mission and goals are consistent            of integration among courses, analytical rigor,
  with and supportive of the USF mission                   flexibility, and career focus
                                                        ● Slow development in the areas of measurable
                                                           learning goals and effective mechanisms to
                                                           assess learning outcomes
Opportunities                                           Challenges

● With the anticipated new faculty hires in the         ● Difficulty in recruiting desired faculties due to
  coming years, MGS could regain momentum and              supply-and-demand imbalance
  energy in research output, new course initiatives,    ● With so many new electives to be offered in the
  and closer engagement between faculty and                new MBA curriculum, there is not enough full
  students                                                 time faculties to cover courses, particularly in the
● With careful recruitment and research incentives,        marketing research and IB areas
  MGS could develop focused research themes to          ● Necessary resources to build focused research
  build research reputation and distinctions               themes and exciting new academic programs,
● With the upcoming new MBA curriculum and                 such as multicultural marketing, to differentiate
  undergraduate curriculum redesign, the short             our curriculum from peer schools
  comings associated with curriculum could be           ● Developing and implementing program and
  addressed                                                course learning goals and designing instruments
● The new MBA Marketing Emphasis curriculum                to assess learning outcomes will require faculty
  could establish some exciting tracks, such as            involvement, commitment, and cooperation
  multicultural marketing, global marketing,            ● Need faculty’s input and agreement on the
  marketing technology and innovation, which               particular research and curriculum areas to build
  support the USF mission, leverage on San                 distinctions
  Francisco Bay Area’s location advantages, and
  differentiate from competition




                                                       35
11. ACTION PLANS

Based on the overall evaluations elaborated above, MGS needs to address its weakness
and take on the opportunities, by taking action in the following areas.

MGS department needs new MBA curricula in both marketing and IB emphases, each of
which should contain an integrative structure as well as academic rigor, flexibility, and a
common set of skills and knowledge relevant to that Area of Emphasis. As a matter of
fact, we have just recently voted and adopted a new MBA curriculum for each emphasis
(see Appendix I and II). The two curricula will be implemented, starting in Fall 2008.
Now, the challenge is to work with the deans’ offices and our faculty to properly allocate
courses among us and identify and recruit adjunct faculty to provide adequate coverage.

Urgent work is needed to synthesize the content of core courses, at both undergraduate
and graduate levels, and develop measurable learning goals and effective instruments to
assess learning outcomes. MGS could appoint a core course coordinator, at both
undergraduate and graduate levels, whose responsibility, together with the department
chair, is to oversee the content of core courses and coordinate with faculty to develop
learning goals, assessment tools, collect data, and report the results. Individual faculties
responsible for electives shall follow the same process in devising and improving
standards and methods related to assurance of learning.

MGS faculty needs to think about the research themes that they shall focus on and
develop to build reputation and differentiation from peer schools. Given the USF mission
and location advantages of the San Francisco Bay Area, the research themes could
include: multicultural marketing, emerging markets, and technology and innovation.
Several actions could be taken to deliver research publications in these areas, including
collaborative research work among faculty and strategic recruitments in the near future to
hire new faculty that have research expertise in these areas.

One particular area that MGS shall focus on in research and curriculum is multicultural
marketing and business. One third of U.S. consumers fall into non-White ethnic groups,
including Hispanic, African American, and Asian American. By 2050, these groups will
account for approximately half the U.S. population. Corporations are actively pursuing
these ethnic consumers and desperate in need of business professionals who are
knowledgeable about these markets. Research publications and innovative curriculum on
this area would allow MGS department to leapfrog the competition and build distinctions
for its programs. Given the large population of ethic groups in the San Francisco Bay
Area, this would also be very helpful and natural to attract local students, who are
Hispanic, African American, and Asian, to apply for our programs and School. Many
business schools have been focusing on research and curricula related to technology,
innovation, and entrepreneurship; but few have developed multicultural marketing and
business programs yet. This is our window of opportunity to be innovative and leapfrog
the competition.




                                             36
To increase research output of our faculty, the department shall develop a plan to
encourage collaborative research work among our own faculty. This enhances not only
the research culture in our department, but also the prospect of the upcoming academic
qualification process for our faculty.

In the area of faculty recruitment, we need to develop criteria on the types of faculty we
need to not only cover the courses in marketing research, methodology, and IB, but also
the skill sets that the collective faculty desires from the new faculty hires in terms of
potential collaborative research work and building focused research themes. Needless to
say, we need resource commitment from the Dean’s Office to fill these much-needed
faculty positions.

Overall, with the strength of our faculty, the diverse and rich learning environment we
offer, and the opportunities presented by our geographical location and by new faculty
hires, we are confident about the future of our department and its programs, about our
continuing contributions to the USF mission, and about the prospect that we could build
viable and distinct programs in the Department of Marketing, Globalization, and
Strategy.




                                            37
APPENDIX I

USF MBA MARKETING CONCENTRATION
Approved by MGS Faculty on 11/9/2007

Mission

The USF MBA Marketing Concentration is to deliver an integrative, rigorous, and
flexible curriculum to students who pursue a variety of marketing careers (e.g., product
managers, consultants) in diverse contexts (e.g., Fortune 500 companies, non-profits,
startups).

Learning Goals

Graduates of USF MBA Marketing Concentration are expected:

•   To understand key marketing decisions in a wide range of marketing areas (e.g.,
    global marketing, marketing communication)
•   To develop an integrative perspective of various marketing decisions and their
    relationships
•   To be familiar with marketing research tools to collect and use data in making
    marketing decisions

Design of USF MBA Marketing Concentration (12 units)

Required Marketing Elective (2 units)

•   MBA 6301 Research Methods in Marketing (2 units), Prerequisite MBA 6106

Marketing Electives (8 units)

•   MBA 6303     Global Marketing (2 units), Prerequisite MBA 6106
•   MBA 6304     Consumer Behavior (2 units), Prerequisite MBA 6106
•   MBA 6305     Integrated Marketing Communication (2 units), Prerequisite 6106
•   MBA 6306     Internet Marketing (2 units), Prerequisite 6106
•   MBA 6307     Quantitative Methods in Marketing (2 units), Prerequisite 6106, 6301
•   MBA 6308     Marketing Technology and Innovation (2 units), Prerequisite 6106
•   MBA 6309     Multicultural Marketing (2 units), Prerequisite MBA 6106
•   MBA 6310     Marketing for Non-Profit Organizations (2 units), Prerequisite MBA
                 6106
•   MBA 6311     Marketing Consulting Projects (2 units), Prerequisite MBA 6106
•   MBA 6312     Guerrilla Marketing (2 units), Prerequisite MBA 6106
•   MBA 6313     Marketing in Emerging Economies (2 units), Prerequisite MBA 6106
•   MBA 6314     Sales and Channel Management (2 units), Prerequisite MBA 6106


                                            38
•   MBA 6315 Brand Strategy and Management (2 units), Prerequisite MBA 6106
•   MBA 6396 Special Topics in Marketing (2 units), Prerequisite MBA 6106
•   MBA 6797 International Study Tours (A maximum of 2 out of the 4 units can be
             applied toward the Marketing Concentration), Prerequisite MBA 6106

Required Marketing Capstone (2 units):

•   MBA 6302 Marketing Strategy (2 units), Prerequisite, 8 units of free electives or
             instructor’s permission

Rationale for the Design of USF MBA Marketing Concentration

The required and capstone marketing courses are to ensure that USF marketing graduates
possesses a set of core marketing skills and knowledge applicable to a variety of
marketing careers in diverse contexts. The capstone course is to facilitate students to
develop an integrative perspective of various marketing decisions and their relationships.
Eight units of free electives are intended to offer flexibility to students in choosing
subjects of their interests. The marketing research course, as the required elective, is to
infuse rigor into the Marketing Concentration Curriculum through emphasizing the
analytical and quantitative aspects of marketing decisions.

Provision

Most of the faculty like the idea of offering different themes/tracks under the Marketing
Concentration to differentiate our curriculum from generic ones and to facilitate students
to position them in the marketplace. But, our current staffing capability prevents us from
supporting some interesting themes, such as global marketing, marketing technology and
innovation, marketing research, and multicultural marketing. With new faculty joining
our department in the future, we will revisit this issue shortly and possibly add two or
more new themes in the near future.

Caveats

The MGS faculties have realized that the proposed 2 unit curriculum for graduate
Marketing Concentration also create challenges for faculty, students, and the department.
Faculties will take on a higher teaching load, and students will occur higher costs of
textbooks and take on more exams and projects. From a pedagogy perspective, the 2 unit
curriculum may provide challenges for carrying out certain projects or learning activities.
The Department Chair may have to recruit more adjunct faculties to staff these 2 unit
courses.

However, the MGS faculties have recognized that there is a competitive force pushing us
for curriculum innovation and/or for catching up with the competition. Additionally, the
proposed 2 unit curriculum will give students a lot of flexibility and impart our marketing
program with a greater academic rigor.



                                            39
APPENDIX II

MBA International Business Emphasis
Approved by MGS Faculty on 11/13/2007

Mission

To impart students with a set of core skills and knowledge of managing business and
organizations in an international and global environment.

Learning goals

Upon completion, MBA International Business concentration candidates will be able to:

•   Define globalization and explain how firms conducting business internationally have
    been affected by globalization
•   Understand cultural differences through specific frameworks and how those
    differences affect the conduct of business
•   Develop a solid understanding of key international business functions (e.g.,
    international marketing and international finance).
•   Discuss international business conditions and the role they play in encouraging firms
    to engage in global markets

Design of USF MBA International Business Concentration (12 units)

•   Required IB courses (6 units)
•   Free IB electives (4 units)
•   Required IB Capstone Course (2 units)

Required IB Core (6 units)

•   MBA 6414 Cross Cultural Management (2 units)
•   MBA 6303 Global Marketing (2 units)
•   MBA 6206 International Finance I (2 units)

Free IB electives (4 units)

•   MBA 6703 Global Trends (2 units), prerequisite, 611
•   MBA 6702 Doing Business in . . . (e.g., China, India) (2 units)
•   MBA 6796 Special Topics: Import & Export Management, Investing Overseas, or
             Sustainable Business (2 units)
•   MBA 6797 *International Study Tours (4 units)
•   MBA 6506 *Trends in Global Communications (2-4units)
•   MBA 62xx *International Accounting & Financial Reporting (2-4 units)


                                            40
•   MBA 6602     *Global Product Development (4 units)
•   MBA 6207     International Finance II (2 units)
•   MBA 6512     Global Supply Chain Management (2 units)
•   MBA 6701     Japanese Business, Economics and Society (2 units)

(* indicates the courses of which only 2 out of 4 units can be counted towards IB
emphasis, while the remaining 2 units can be counted towards general MBA electives)

Required IB Capstone Course (2 units)

•   MBA 6704 Managing the Multinational Firm (2 units). Prerequisite, 6 units of IB
             core and 4 units of free electives or instructor permission

Rationale for the Design of USF MBA International Business Concentration

The required and capstone IB courses are to ensure that USF IB graduates possess a set of
core IB skills and knowledge applicable to a variety of IB careers in diverse contexts.
The required Cross Cultural Management course allows students to develop a high level
of cultural sensitivity and appreciate the effects of cultural differences on business
conducts and management practices. The required Global Marketing and International
Finance courses provide students with opportunities to acquire skills in and knowledge of
two key business and management functions (i.e., marketing and finance). The capstone
course imparts students with a global perspective on managing today’s business and
organizations. The free IB electives, from multi-disciplines and across departments, allow
students to choose broad subjects of their interests.

For any 4 unit elective, only 2 out of the 4 units can be counted towards IB emphasis,
while the remaining 2 units towards general MBA electives. This will entail students to
take at least two, rather than one, free IB electives to meet the IB Emphasis requirements,
thus enhancing the breath of students’ IB knowledge and experience.




                                            41

				
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