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					     Portable Stage Design for State of the Kids, Inc.:
                             Semester Report




                                     12/05/2005


Team Members:       Lauren Minches – Time Keeper   lbm2104@columbia.edu
                    Chandni Saxena – Team Leader   cs2235@columbia.edu
                    Joel Yu – Progress Observer    jy2201@columbia.edu
                    Shun Yu – Conflict Manager     sy2192@columbia.edu
                    Crystal Zhou – Videographer    cz2134@columbia.edu


Project Advisors:   Jack McGourty
                    Dana Vlcek
                                               TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ...................................................................................................2
2. PROJECT DESCRIPTION..................................................................................................3
   GATEWAY LAB ........................................................................................................................3
   THE TEAM ...............................................................................................................................3
   THE CLIENT .............................................................................................................................3
   THE PROBLEM..........................................................................................................................4
   DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS...........................................................................................................4
   EVOLUTION OF THE DESIGN ......................................................................................................5
     Alternate Design 1 ..............................................................................................................5
     Alternate Design 2 ..............................................................................................................7
     Preliminary Recommended Design......................................................................................8
     Final Stage Design..............................................................................................................9
3. BACKGROUND RESEARCH...........................................................................................13
   CLIENT’S MISSION .................................................................................................................13
   MOBILE STAGE DESIGNS ........................................................................................................14
4. TRANSITION PLAN AND PROJECT DOCUMENTATION .........................................18
   FUTURE PLANS ......................................................................................................................18
   DESIGN PROCESS ...................................................................................................................18
   DELIVERABLE MAINTENANCE ................................................................................................19
   DELIVERABLE SPECIFICATIONS ...............................................................................................19
5. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS..............................................................20
   WHERE WE ARE NOW..............................................................................................................20
   WHERE WE ARE GOING ...........................................................................................................20
APPENDIX A – TEAM MEMBER REFLECTIONS ...........................................................21
   LAUREN MINCHES..................................................................................................................21
   CHANDNI SAXENA..................................................................................................................22
   JOEL YU ................................................................................................................................23
   SHUN YU ...............................................................................................................................23
   CRYSTAL ZHOU .....................................................................................................................24
APPENDIX B – TEAM PROCESS DESCRIPTION ............................................................26
APPENDIX C – PROJECT TASKS ......................................................................................29
   GANTT CHART .......................................................................................................................29
   WORK BREAKDOWN STRUCTURES ..........................................................................................30
APPENDIX D – DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS .....................................................................31
APPENDIX E – PHOTOGRAPHS ........................................................................................36




                                                                                                                                           1
                                  1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The goal of our project was to design a mobile/portable stage that would be properly, safely, and
effectively equipped to engage the audience that our client, State of the Kids, Inc. hopes to reach.
State of the Kids, Inc. is an organization created to empower the youth by means of
multimedia/theatrical presentations; and with the completion of the mobile stage, they hope to
bring their production “I Am Basketball” to schools and recreation centers throughout the
country. They are currently based in the National Black Theatre on 125th street. Our primary
contact in State of the Kids, Inc. is Ms. Sheila McNeill.

Our initial concerns and ideas regarding the project revolved around the constraints inherent in
the size, power, and mobility that the stage required. After discussing the scope of the project
with Ms. Sheila McNeill, we considered the aesthetic, auditory, and customized features that
could be integrated safely into our mobile stage. To tackle each problem, we assigned research
areas and met weekly to present our results and conclusions. We first researched the necessary
components of the stage: lighting, sound, functionality, and mobility. After we got a general idea
of what the stage should incorporate, we researched the aesthetics of the stage: decorations,
geometry, special effects, and interactive features that would satisfy our client. By the seventh
week of working on the project, we were confident that we had considered the entirety of the
problem at hand. From this research, we generated preliminary designs for the stage. Of course,
we were able to further refine our understanding of the problem and our view of the solution
with the aid of Sheila. She provided valuable feedback on our three preliminary designs during
the midterm presentation and allowed us to make a site visit to the National Black Theatre.

With the completion of our stage design, State of the Kids, Inc. will have a concrete plan to
present to potential sponsors. This, in turn, will mobilize their future productions and indirectly
benefit those who are affected by the performances held around the nation. Our stage design
provides the client something concrete enough to use immediately, while it allows the client to
pursue further refinements to the design with subsequent design teams. The current design is
only capable of dealing with the general, overarching problems (i.e. mobility, functionality).
There is much work that can and should be done in terms of customizing sound, light, and effects
equipment, in addition to streamlining usage of the backstage.

A design project of this scope will always have its limitations, but, as engineers, we kept the final
goal of the project in perspective. The final design for the mobile stage required extensive
research, which led us to the conclusion that we should stick to a more macroscopic view of the
problem. The details regarding components are important, but they become somewhat irrelevant
as the client customizes the design according to her preference.

In the end, the mobile stage design project taught us to work as members of a team, to work with
a client and mentor, and to simply produce a final piece of work that combines innovation,
creativity, and efficiency. We learned to apply critical thinking and problem-solving skills to a
real-life problem with the potential of positive impact on the community. For future design
teams, we recommend that there be a strong focus on the problem rather than getting distracted
by minute details. For the client, we recommend that they pursue further refinement to our
current design in the areas mentioned above regarding sound, light, effects, and the backstage.



                                                                                                   2
                                 2. PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Gateway Lab

Gateway Lab, or Design Fundamentals Using Advanced Computer Concepts, is a required
freshman class for students in the Engineering school. The course has two main purposes: to
teach students how to use specific programs on a computer and to teach project design and time
management. Each team, or group of five students, is given a community project that they must
complete by the end of the semester. Throughout the semester, however, there are many
presentations and reports on the group’s progress. As far as the advanced computer concepts are
concerned, we learn how to use MatLab and Maya in a way that will become useful for our
projects.


The Team

Our team was composed of five members: Chandni, the team leader; Joel, the progress observer;
Lauren, the timekeeper; Shun, the conflict manager; and Crystal, the videographer. As the team
leader, Chandni had the most responsibilities. She was in charge of the group as a whole,
making sure that we were all doing what we were supposed to be. She was also responsible for
all of the assignments and their respective due dates. Lastly, as the team leader, she kept in
contact with our client, Shelia. Joel, the progress observer, was in charge of the progress reports.
He looked to the rest of the group when he needed certain information for each weekly report.
He also had the responsibility of making sure they were turned in on time. As the timekeeper,
Lauren paid attention during the meetings and recorded what was accomplished and what had
not yet been accomplished. Shun, the conflict manager, was needed whenever there was
disagreement among the members of the group. Lastly, Crystal’s job as the videographer
changed during the semester. Because the video portion of the project was cancelled, Crystal’s
role was to be a key group member and aid any other members when they needed help. She also
took the responsibility of taking photographs at the site-visit. Although our team took the
assigned roles, we rarely restricted ourselves to those roles. Shun also worked on modeling using
Maya and sketching the stage designs, Lauren also worked on compiling and designing
PowerPoint Presentations, Crystal also researched extensively, Joel also gave extensive input on
the technology aspect of the stage, and Chandni also sent reminders on meeting times. Thus, we
utilized our individual talents to change our roles to suit the team’s needs. (Also see Appendix B)


The Client

Our client, Shelia McNeill, represents State of the Kids, Inc., a non-profit organization that
performs theatrical productions in The National Black Theater. State of the Kids, Inc. has been
in existence for one and a half to two years. Children ranging from 7 to 19 put on entertaining,
while educational, plays in an attempt to empower the youth in this world. The organization’s
motto is “Youth empowerment through multimedia presentations.” Through their performances,
State of the Kids, Inc. strives to teach kids: “life is about making choices.” Due to the success of




                                                                                                  3
their plays, they are hoping to expand by visiting several southern states; therefore, they need a
mobile stage.


The Problem

State of the Kids, Inc. wants to perform its plays for more audiences in areas other than New
York City. Shelia McNeill has come to us for aid in designing a portable stage her organization
can take around the country. By moving their performances to the national level, they will be
able to reach more children while simultaneously growing as an organization. She would like
the stage to be moved and put together easily, to be interactive, and to have advanced technology
and multimedia.


Design Specifications

Our task for State of the Kids, Inc. was to create a stage that would be portable (See Objective
Tree, Figure 1). More specifically, the stage needed to be easily moved from one location to
another. Thus, it must not be difficult to set up, and if possible, could be set up by one single
person in a reasonable period of time. In addition, this stage needed to be certain dimensions in
order to be used in a multitude of indoor gyms or all-purpose-rooms. This specification brought
about a new problem. The stage must be able to be broken down into pieces that would fit
through a doorway. Even though it would be transported in a large truck, the components of the
stage needed to occupy a small amount of space. For convenience, these separate components
should all be relatively light, to make their mobility easier. Since the individual components
would need to be assembled, the pieces should be simple and be assembled in a relatively easy
manner. Lastly, and most importantly, the stage must be very stable and safe.

The stage itself needs to be intellectually stimulating and provide entertainment in itself. Shelia
requested that we integrate many current technologies into the design of the stage. More
specifically, she wanted there to be a large screen or scrolling marquis located on the back wall
of the stage. She also wanted there to be numerous bright and different colored lights to attract
the kids’ attention. In addition, if possible, she wanted there to be interactive games on the stage
to occupy the audience during scene changes. For example, there could be an area where kids
come up, pick a certain curtain, and then proceed to reach their hands through a hole in the stage
and win prizes such as iPods and digital cameras. The stage needed to provide a socially intimate
and interactive atmosphere.

We were not given many restraints in the design of this stage. We were not forced to consider
the cost because there is no a budget. However, it took us a while to start the design because we
were not able to visit the theater until recently. Moreover, while there, the timing did not work
out in a way that we could see the play put on. Thus, we are forced to imagine what occurs
during the play and create an appropriate stage based on that.




                                                                                                  4
                                              Portable / Mobile Stage



               For: State of the Kids, Inc.                                                  For: Audience



   Mobility                      Safety                Appearance                 Appearance                   Learning



 Size                    Props                     Smooth                         Intimacy         Relevance

   Weight                        Insurance                  Grand                  Awe-Inspiring         Conscious

        Power                                                   Presentable                                  Interaction

              Assembly


                   Constraints:              Defined by Objectives


                                                       Figure 1: Objective Tree




Evolution of the Design

What made our stage unique was its peculiar purpose and specifications. Serving a client ready
to spread the lesson of hard work to kids everywhere, this stage had to have an efficient mobile
aspect while still being innovative and enthralling, at least enough to capture the interest of the
kids. These two specifications are clearly contradicting, for the most part. A flashy stage
generally would entail a heavier and less mobile stage. The design would need to find a balance
between these aspects.

We also needed an indoor stage. Mobile stages on the market right now are better fit for outdoor
use. A stage built for indoor facilities such as gymnasiums and auditoriums has more limitations.
Firstly, a space limitation exists in that the stage has to take up at the maximum less than half the
facility space. Secondly, the doorway to the facility limits the size of each component of the
stage, since each part would have to be carried through the doorway. This precludes the usage of
some items found normally on current outdoor stages, such as large LCD screens and a one-piece
stage floor.

Alternate Design 1

        We started by modeling a normal stage, which was our alternate model #1 (See Figure 2).
        It would consist of a standard aluminum truss that supports the light and sound system
        and the curtains. It would have a rectangular stage floor, a wall in the back of the stage


                                                                                                                           5
for scenery, and a door in the wall that leads to the backstage where actors can prepare
and get ready for their scene. We tried to make it more appealing by placing a screen in
the back to replace the wall and a projector on the truss so that it not only makes the stage
more mobile (we got rid of the wall) but also more flashy.




                             Figure 2: Sketch of Alternate Design 1



To resolve the issue of mobility, the stage floor would be broken down into smaller stage
tiles so that it can be easily carried and moved through doorways. The steel frame would
comprise of long steel rod segments that can be linked together, since it is easier to carry
smaller segments of the heavy structure. We got rid of the back wall section by replacing
it with a screen.

However, this model was quickly discarded because it was too bland and lacked the
ability really to elicit awe in the audience. Furthermore, the huge truss that surrounded
the entire stage limited the visibility of some areas of the stage. There was no provision
of a backstage with this design, and the performing space consisted of just one section for
the actors. We wanted a model that could give the actors more mobility so that they could
also perform on stage left or stage right. This model was also insufficient in creating a
sense of community with the audience, as the stage seemed visually separated from the
audience, and interaction seemed difficult.




                                                                                           6
Alternate Design 2

       We then tried a rotating stage (see Figure 3). This design would consist of three triangular
       stages fused together. At every scene shift, the stage would rotate about its center 120
       degrees to the next, already set-up stage.




                                    Figure 3: Sketch of Alternate Design 2



       The shape and rotating aspect of the stage would make this model very appealing and
       captivate to the audience. However, we decided against this model because it was too far
       away from reality and the scope of present technology. A rotating stage would be very
       hard to implement. Firstly, it would be impractical to expect human beings to rotate such
       a heavy state. Secondly, a motor to rotate so heavy a stage would need to be very
       powerful, and thus would probably not fit under the stage itself. Furthermore, this stage
       would have no provision for staircases as they would inhibit the movement, and thus the
       stage would have to be very low. Because of the shape of this stage, it was also harder for
       actors to interact with the audience. Instead of reaching out to the audience, the
       backwards ‘u’ structure of this stage receded from this audience. There was also no
       provision of a permanent back stage for this model, and we felt that a lot of space on the
       stage – two-thirds of it – was getting wasted in terms of usage but would still be extra
       weight that the assemblers would have to carry into the venue. Thus, we were forced to
       find another model.




                                                                                                 7
Preliminary Recommended Design

      We needed to find something that balanced our first and second model. For our third
      model, we decided to try a three-part stage (See Figure 4).




                             Figure 4: Sketch of Preliminary Recommended Design



      Its unique shape was creative yet feasible to build. The stage increased the interaction
      between the actors and the actors as the ‘U’ shape of the stage drew the audience into the
      theatrical production. The staircase on the two sides of the stage allowed participants
      from the audience to go up the stage on one end and come down the other. The 3-part
      stage also increased the space on stage so that the actors could spread out more. Since the
      stage was composed of three parts, it allowed the client to have multiple scenes setup on
      stage, or use all the extra stage space in various different ways. For example, one part of
      the stage could be used for a live band, while the actors could perform on the other two
      parts, or one part could be an area where games could be setup for the audience to
      participate. The model also allowed for a lot of flexibility in terms of adding some sort of
      mechanism to hold the lighting and sound systems. However, at this point, we were not
      sure how to accommodate the heavy lighting and sound systems that we needed to
      support. We also had few ideas for an organized backstage. At this point, we simply had
      slit-like doors on the stage from where the stage crew could exit to the side of the gym
      hidden by the stage. There was no organized backstage space, however. We also assumed
      that the audience would sit on plain chairs on the gymnasium. The client liked this design



                                                                                                8
       the best of the three models, so it was instantly chosen. As far as the modifications were
       concerned, the site-visit did much to clarify about several aspects of the stage.

Final Stage Design

       At the site-visit, the client discussed various aspects of the stage that made our final
       design more comprehensive. (See Figure 5) (See more pictures of stage in Appendix D)




                              Figure 5: Final Stage Design – Frontstage and Backstage

                                                                                               9
First, the client discussed the interaction of the actors with the audience. We noticed that
the stage at the site-visit (see Appendix E for pictures from the site-visit) had bleacher-
type platforms for the audience, which raised the height from which the production was
viewed by the audience members, and thus increased the involvement of the audience
into the theatrical production. We decided to incorporate this idea into our final design by
adding a similar bleacher-type platform for the seats. Such a platform made the stage
experience unique for the audience members as well, adding to the mission of the client
to motivate youth via multimedia experience.

The client also highlighted the light and sound structures at the client visit. We decided to
add a stage truss similar to the one we had in Alternate Model # 1 to hold the light and
sound systems. We also decided to add more features to make the stage more appealing
to audiences. We recommend a cinema-quality projector and a custom or floor mounted
screen to go along with it, as the stage truss does not extend to the back to be able to hold
a screen that would need to roll down. We also recommend having light-up stairs, lasers,
and fog machines to make the stage more appealing visually. As far as the light and the
sound systems are concerned, we believe that the client needs to choose the equipment as
per their specific needs. Such customization is necessary to particular needs of the
specific production, and selecting the appropriate products here constitutes almost an
entire separate design project.

The client also talked about the back-stage as an area to motivate the local residents
acting in the play to reach their potential and get motivated together in teamwork. So we
added a backstage to our design with organized space for dressing rooms, storage space
for props and costumes, and with white boards to organize the scenes.

This stage design is particularly mobile, which was the chief criterion we used while
designing the stage. We relied of the entire stage to be composed of smaller stage
components that are attached together (See Figure 6). Using such stage components will
make the stage easier to transport, as these individual pieces are light and easy to
assemble.




                       Figure 6: Stage Components joining to form larger stage.


The particular picture shown is the mobile stage sold by Stage Right and Staging
Concepts, and it can be put together by two people, which makes the assembling
relatively easy.




                                                                                          10
Our stage is mobile also because accessories can be stored separately and then added to
the stage when needed. For example, the stairs can be joint to the stage as shown in
Figure 7 by attaching rods that go above and below the edge of the stage to the stage.
Skirting usually has buttons at the ends of the stage, and the rest is attached to the stage
through the use of Velcro (See Figure 8). Seating rails in the audience’s bleachers can
similarly be attached via screws (See Figure 9).




                             Figure 7: Stairs attached to the Stage.




                            Figure 8: Skirting attached to the Stage.




                               Figure 9: Audience Seating Rails.


The walls in the stage will also be very light cubicle-style walls (See Figure 10) that can
block light but are easy to handle. The walls will be also to make the dressing room. Such




                                                                                         11
walls are chosen because they are very easy to assemble and light to carry, and yet
relatively stable. They will add to the mobility of the stage.




                                 Figure 10: Cubicle-style walls.



The stage truss, which will be one of the heaviest parts of the mobile stage, is made more
portable by breaking it down to smaller parts that can be assembled at the performance
venue, to make transportation around the country and especially from the truck to the
gymnasium or community center easy (See Figure 11). Almost all the objects that make
up our stage will fit through an average gymnasium door and are light enough to be
carried in on a dolly.




                           Figure 11: Portable Stage Truss Components.



The process of refining the final stage design involved detailed client feedback, thorough
research, and various steps of revising the stage. The final design incorporates several
aspects of an intriguing stage, with lots of interaction with the audience, plenty of
backstage space for the actors and storage, front stage space for various activities at once,
and facilities to add extensive stage technology.




                                                                                          12
                                 3. BACKGROUND RESEARCH

Client’s Mission

The client State of the Kids, Inc. believes in “youth empowerment through multimedia
presentations.” We conducted research on the current education state of the children in the
United States of America to find that the mission of the client was well founded. Figure 12
shows that the annual income of people with no high school education was lower than that of a
high school graduate, whose income in turn was lower than that of a college graduate. It is
therefore important to point out to the current youth that higher education is important for them
to have higher earnings. State of the Kids, Inc. believes in youth empowerment by encouraging
to people to pursue their dreams actively by making something of their lives instead of passively
waiting for an opportunity. Considering that income depends directly on educational degree, it is
important to urge youth to pursue their ambitions, in many instances by going for higher
education.




                          Figure 12: Graph of Educational Degree for adults ages 20-29 in 2004.




Another set of data that supports the organization’s mission is plotted in Figure 13. According to
this set of data, the percentage of aspiring athletes that are accepted to NBA has declined rapidly
over the past 15 years. The competition is get tougher and tougher, and at such point, it is
important to interrupt fantasy and motivate students to take practical steps to reach their goals,
which is the message of the organization State of the Kids.




                                                                                                  13
                       Figure 13: Percentage of aspiring athletes accepted to NBA (NCAA statistics).




Mobile Stage Designs

Several different models of mobile stage designs currently exist in the market. The first type is
one in which a truck carries all the materials, and then unfolds itself to become the stage (See
Figure 14 and Figure 15). Such a stage can be assembled in 30 minutes.




                                    Figure 14: Stageline SL 100, Mobile Stage Rentals.




                                                                                                       14
                                Figure 15: Sellner MS2416 Mobile Stage, Quik Stage.



This model of stage design gave us a general idea of how to efficiently place light and sound
systems on a stage. However, we did not adopt this model, as it is relatively difficult to take a
truck into a community center or an average gymnasium and then unpack due to the sheer size
and weight of a truck. Furthermore, the way this design is constructed allows for little flexibility
in terms of rearranging certain blocks, and because it is not made of smaller parts, it is not
portable.

There were also plenty of stage design models that were more suited to the client’s needs, and
that we recommend the client use to construct our stage. Integrity Furniture had an excellent
lightweight structure (See Figure 16).




                          Figure 16: Mobile Staging and Portable Staging, Integrity Furniture.


Integrity Furniture’s stage design was extremely lightweight – each 4 ft. x 8 ft. structure weighed
only 142 pounds. In this design, individual platforms would be latched together to form a much
larger stage area. Thus, it would be easy to carry smaller stage pieces into the venue and then
assemble them at the location. This design had a very simple setup and was available in various
different heights. The stage had several different surfaces such as carpet, hardboard, and
polypropylene, and thus gave the client a lot of flexibility. These stages also folded to be stored
in less than 2 inches in height. However, this structure was not as stable as the one of some other
designs.

Stage Right and Staging Concepts had another lightweight design, which was still strong enough
to carry a weight of 125 pounds per square feet. It is composed of small units attached together
in a stable design. It is also relatively easy to assembly, as only two people are needed to
assemble it. (See Figure 17) The diagram for this design also shows how easy it is to transport
such individual units, as their tops can be stored together on custom-made objects with wheels on
them, while, their stands can be stored separately.



                                                                                                 15
                                     Figure 17: Stage Right and Staging Concepts



Another model of portable stages was by Sico Europe Ltd (See Figure 18). This stage, like most
other mobile stages, rolled freely on custom-made stands on wheels, so that heaving lifting is not
required for assembling the stage. Sico’s Dual Height Mobile Folding Stage is a particularly
better model because it is more stable and because it can be adjusted to two different heights.
The stability for this stage is enhanced by built in stage connections that firmly lock one stage
component to another. This model supports 125 pounds per square foot, and hence it is a
particularly strong model. In addition to being strong and stable, this model is also relatively
lightweight, and thus can be transported easily from the truck to the gymnasium. It is also easy to
assemble, as only one person is needed to assemble the stage. This model is available in two
different sizes: 4 ft. x 8 ft. and 6 ft x 8 ft. This allows for more flexibility in arranging the stage
pieces to accommodate for different shapes of the entire stage.




                             Figure 18: Dual Height Mobile Folding Stage, Sico Europe Ltd.



Sico’s Tri Height Mobile Folding Stages (See Figure 19) are also particularly flexible. Their
height can be changed in six inch increments between two surfaces. They are easy to fold and
their automatic snaplocks make changing height easy. They are easy to setup, as only one person
is needed to assemble the stage. They are available in 4 ft. x 8 ft. and 6 ft. x 8 ft. sizes. Their
stability arises from built in stage connections that firmly lock neighboring stages with each
other. This more sturdy stage design supports a weight of 125 pounds per square feet.



                                                                                                    16
                            Figure 19: Tri Height Mobile Folding Stage, Sico Europe Ltd.




Sico’s Roll N’ Set Mobile Stage (See Figure 20) was one of the most stable stages that we
discovered in our research. The design was stable because of it’s double lock system, that made
the each component more strongly attached with the next, leading to greater stability for the
stage as a whole. This model was also slightly bigger as the average size covered 128 square feet
of stage per unit. The individual pieces took as much as 8 ft. x 8 ft. This model’s height was also
flexible, as four different height levels were available. However, as a tradeoff for the added
stability, the model was not as lightweight or as easy to setup, as four people were needed to
assemble the stage.




                               Figure 20: Roll N’ Set Mobile Stage, Sico Europe Ltd.


It is up to the preference of the client as to whether she prefers a light stage model, which makes
transportation and assembly relatively easy, or a stable or strong model, which has a more
complicated assembly procedure and weighs more.




                                                                                                17
               4. TRANSITION PLAN AND PROJECT DOCUMENTATION

Future Plans

Our work was not based on any prior work, because State of the Kids, Inc. has never attempted
to design a mobile stage before. We also did not find any situations on the Internet during
research that matched our problem. Most of the stages we found were simple platforms in
rectangular shapes, or they were trucks that turned into stages, meant for outdoor settings.

Our stage could be improved upon and perfected in many ways. What we have designed is a
simple sketch of the architecture of the stage. We have not incorporated into our proposal the
exact details of the props or technology that would be used. If a future team were given this
same project and given our stage as a basis for the design, they would be able to perfect it.
Specifically, the group would be able to pick out speakers, lighting, curtains, etc. that would
complete the stage. They would then have to research how to transport all of that, while making
it light and easily movable. In addition, while we have an idea of what entertainment we want to
include, such as a screen, we do not have the specifications for it. The next group could look up
screen technologies and determine what would work best with the set up we have designed. In
addition, as with any product that includes technological features, it would need to be
maintained. Periodically, the newest technologies in lighting, screens, speakers, etc. would have
to be researched. Then, it could be determined whether these advances would benefit the
functionality of the stage. If so, some one would need to be in charge of the replacements.

The client is very enthusiastic about this project. Future teams must have thorough
communication with the client – even redundant at times. They must design the stage with the
latest technology so that the stage is visually appealing, because the client wants the stage itself
to remain memorable to the audience. While stage needs to be glossy, it also needs to be mobile,
and thus future teams will have to bear both specifications in mind when they add detail to
several aspects of the stage.


Design Process

The following is an abbreviated step-by-step procedure of what our group did for this project:
   1. We met each other, assigned our respective roles, and chose times during the week to
       meet.
   2. We then began to research the client and the components of a stage. From this research,
       we came up with a list of questions to ask the client when we had our first meeting.
   3. Next, we met with the client and acquired all the necessary information. We also chose a
       time when we could visit the theater and possibly see a performance.
   4. We continued our research, but this time it was much more detailed and specific. We
       concentrated on finding building blocks for the stage.
   5. Then, we came up with three possible designs for the stage.
   6. We finalized these designs and compiled a midterm report to present to the client.
   7. After making our presentation, we met with the client to get feedback.




                                                                                                 18
   8. Our group then assessed our performance thus far. We decided what we needed to alter
      and then continued to work more on our design.
   9. Lastly, we prepared a final stage design and modeled it on Maya. We wrote a final report
      to go with it and presented it to the client.


Deliverable Maintenance

The use of our stage is based purely on the components the client decides to purchase. Each
individual component of the stage floor will have an instruction set within it. In the same way,
the effects, such as the lighting and speakers, will have their instructions. State of the Kids, Inc.
will need to have a technician or crew to set up the stage each time.

The stage must be maintained in the same way that any technology or hardware would need to be
maintained. The crew must pay attention to all of the stage components to make sure they are in
prime condition. It is important, for example, that none of the legs is wobbly. If something is
broken, it must be replaced right away. We would recommend purchasing extra stage platforms
and traveling with them as backup in the case of an emergency. In addition, State of the Kids,
Inc. should hire someone to be aware of the upcoming technologies. Although it is not
necessary, it would be beneficial to update the lighting, speakers, screen, and projector every
once in a while.


Deliverable Specifications

See photographs of site visit in Appendix E.
See diagrams and technical drawings of deliverable in “Evolution of the Design” section under
“2. Project Description” and in Appendix D.
See work breakdown structure and Gantt Chart in Appendix C.




                                                                                                  19
                     5. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Where we are now

We have taken up the project of portable/mobile stage design from its inception. We analyzed
the problem and did preliminary research on the subject, in order to gain a solid understanding
for the problem. After doing all of this, we put everything together in one computer-design
model for the portable stage. The final deliverable is a model of the structure of the stage only.
We have researched specific technologies for the building of this stage, but they are not readily
applicable at this stage in the process of designing the stage. The computer-designed model takes
into account this variability in the specific equipment to be used and provides high
customizability. The stage design takes into account primarily ergonomic, safety, performance,
and mobility issues.

For the client, this final deliverable should be enough to present to potential sponsors as a basic
model for what the stage should look like if built. It is geared more towards being a conceptual
foundation upon which State of the Kids can build. It presents a generic display of what the stage
could be with lighting, rendering and surface modeling. The stage design allows flexibility for
change according to more specific, future needs. Considering, especially, the fact that there was
no specified budget limit, anything can be done with the stage. The equipment can be high-end
or low-end; the stage pieces can be ordered pre-manufactured or they can be hand-made with
cheap materials. With a limitless budget, anything can be done for the project. Specialists and
professionals can be hired. Experts can be consulted. The design attempts to provide something
that will be able to maximize the boundless budget. It does not limit it with too many
specifications and constraints; rather it is a general design that will allow for a great amount of
customization and upgrades.


Where we are going

For future teams, the problem will most likely take on a more specific challenge. Issues that we
dealt with only in passing could be considered with more research. Perhaps some in depth design
can be done with acoustics and visuals. With the current design, it cannot be sure as to how the
sound quality will be if it is set up as is. Also, the lighting was something that we estimated
based on current stage designs, but it is more than likely that there are specific design issues
regarding the light: colors, numbers, movement, and effects. There might be some use for
streamlining the backstage for use by the crew, actors and actresses. We have filled some
requests regarding the backstage, but there can surely be more to do for the amateur participants
in these productions. Future designs will require a more physical approach to the problem,
maybe even some trial and error work. More will need to be done at the site, gathering
information on the more specifics needs of the organization in terms of stage equipment.
Questions that might be answered by a subsequent design team: How much power is needed in
terms of sound? How many lights are needed? How large should the projector and screen be?
How can we make the stage more interactive? A good way to approach further design of this
portable/mobile stage might be to build a scale model of the stage and receiving client feedback
for further refinement.



                                                                                                20
                     APPENDIX A – TEAM MEMBER REFLECTIONS

Lauren Minches

While I feel that this course’s intention is good, I do not feel I benefited in the way that was
intended. First, the computer part of the course was more tedious than anything else. I don’t
think MatLab applied to our projects at all, causing no one to take them seriously. In order to
gain a real understanding of a program such as MatLab, it would take much more time and
concentration. But, because time was limited, we breezed through many concepts, and didn’t
fully comprehend any of them. Maya, on the other hand, was much more enjoyable. While we
were being taught the software, I could apply this to my project, the portable stage, and see that I
would be using this software to produce the final result of the project. Thus, I had a different
point of view when being instructed. Also, Maya was taught in a much clearer and succinct way,
making the homework easier and more enjoyable.

Secondly, the group projects we not taken as seriously as I think was desired. I didn’t fully
understand why a company would want to come to a bunch of 18 and 19 year-olds to solve a
problem. Because of that, the projects seemed more like homework than a real life task.
Specific to my project, I felt like what we were doing wasn’t actually going to be turned into
anything. Because Shelia stated that there was no budget, as her sponsors were people like Allen
Iverson, the project seemed unrealistic. In addition, Shelia was not very easy to keep in contact
with and didn’t show up to our midterm presentation. Even more, I now felt that the project was
a joke.

However, I did enjoy working with my group. We are all very different people and ended up
complementing each other well. Although I was given the title of “Timekeeper,” I didn’t feel as
if I had a real role in the group. Thus, I never really paid attention to what was due and the tasks
we had to complete. Luckily, our group leader, Chandni, was very responsible and kept us all on
track. Then, I ended up missing the site visit due to illness, and felt even more as if my presence
wasn’t important. That feeling had me restless, so I decided to start volunteering to do more
work. When it came time to distribute sections of the final report, I volunteered for more than
others in order to make up for my lack of attention during the semester.

While I don’t feel that I learned a great deal about computers or project management, I do feel
that I got something out of this course. I learned that being a “slacker” only provides temporary
fulfillment. When a project starts to conclude, and you feel as if you didn’t do your share of
work, that temporary fulfillment changes into a feeling of guilt. The feeling of unimportance and
the concern that your group members aren’t happy with the work you’ve done was not worth it.
In the future, I think I will volunteer more and try to make a bigger difference. Not necessarily
because I care or believe in the task we have to complete, but because I want to leave the course
feeling good about myself and feeling confidant that my group members enjoyed working with
me.




                                                                                                 21
Chandni Saxena

The beginning of this project was a little rough. When I read the title: “Portable/Mobile Stage,” I
was not sure as to what this phrase was describing. I thought of a theatre stage built for the
handicapped that was accessible. It could also be a stage placed in a house to make climbing
stairs for the handicapped easier. The one-page project description was not very explicit either.
However, this ignorance of mine was soon cleared when I searched for “Portable Mobile Stage”
on Google. The interview with the client also clarified many aspects of the deliverable. The
initial phase was a little tough because the project seemed very vague in the beginning, and it
was hard to know exactly what was expected of the deliverable. Ms. Sheila is very enthusiastic
about the project, and I really wanted our team to come up with a good deliverable; however, we
were not sure what our task was, as we could come up with anything from the basic design of a
mobile stage, to taking an existing mobile stage design and making it extravagant and appealing.
We were not sure what made a stage appealing either, as although we have visited concerts
before, no one in the team had theatrical experience. Therefore, while our Midterm Report had
very detailed designs of the stage itself, the stage was not adequate for a theatrical audience, and
we had not considered several technical details as we had little experience in theatre.

The site visit did much to help me visualize a deliverable. The National Black Theatre was
adorned with antique and authentic African art. As Crystal and I entered the theatre lobby, we
felt that we had entered another world. Seeing the stage also did much to help us understand
various aspects of a well-designed stage. In our midterm report, we had not considered any
provisions for a backstage for the performers. Our final deliverable, on the other hand, shows
how after the site-visit, we really brainstormed to construct a suitable backstage for the
performers. This is because Ms. Sheila really emphasized how most of the performers were not
trained actors but rather local residents who would be acting on stage with little previous
experience. Thus, the backstage area would provide an area for building team-spirit and
encouraging performers to explore their talents and shed their shyness aside and act – much as
the organization State of the Kids’ purpose is to encourage youth to shed their own shyness aside
and pursue their ambitions. The site-visit also helped us in increasing the community feeling in
our stage design as Ms. Sheila advised that we add bleachers-type seats for the audience. We
learnt technical details about light and sound systems, and the visit really helped us in refining
our final design. The site-visit really helped me understand the mission of the Organization State
of the Kids, and I wish we could have organized a visit earlier with the client.

As a team leader, it was a little hard for me to communicate with my team initially. I often felt
that I was sending information in e-mails that my teammates were not reading, and it was a little
frustrating in the beginning. However, with time I realized that I really needed to streamline my
e-mails and use the least amount of words to convey my message. I also began consolidating e-
mails, and I worked on organizing my e-mails so that each piece of information was in a
different paragraph. After making these changes, I was glad to see how most of my teammates
would respond with e-mails and it was evident that my communication via e-mails was getting
better. My experience as a team-leader was also very rewarding as I learnt how to divide tasks
efficiently and to stay updated on the assignment deadlines. I really enjoyed working with my
particular team because everyone is very talented, and our talents are in very diverse fields. For
example, one member is excellent at writing progress reports, another has excellent skills at



                                                                                                 22
designing and consolidating PowerPoint presentations, a third has a natural talent in making
models (through sketches or by using Maya), while another has excellent skills at photography. I
try to contribute to the team with my organizational skills. We make a great team because of how
our skills complement each other’s.


Joel Yu

When we first received the task of portable/mobile stage design, I was very excited to have such
a seemingly fun project. We were building something for kids without a budget. What more can
be said? It seemed like an exciting task with overwhelming possibility. Sheila gave us a great
amount of freedom to do with the stage what we liked, even ridiculous things like light-up
staircases, fog machines and anything else that we might think is interesting.

However, things changed quite quickly. Just thinking about the final deliverable, I realized that
our project put us in quite a precarious position. In one respect, we need to stay efficient, figuring
out how to keep the project realistic and mobile. In another, we need to utilize the limitless
budget to create something excessive enough to perpetuate further sponsorship and interest in the
organization and the productions. It was and is quite frustrating to figure out how to approach the
final deliverable. How much do we need to provide? How much is expected of us? The project is
as simple as figuring out a way to move a stage and as complicated as figuring out what specific
sound, light, and effects equipment needs to be used and what the needs of this equipment are in
terms of power and control. Most of the frustration I experienced was due to our client. I know
that we were warned that the clients should not be expected to know anything regarding the
problem or its solutions. However, I was still somewhat irritated with Sheila’s general vagueness
and apparent lack of interest in the project. “Something that will make the kids say ‘wow’,” she
says. What does that mean? If we could build a stage that could just get up and do a jig, call out
students by name and then give them hugs it would be perfect. The frustrating thing is that this
sort of ridiculous design is not so ridiculous if you are looking at a limitless budget. Also, how
could we really know how to approach the problem without anyone being familiar with acting or
stage crew work? When we needed desperately to do a site visit, she cancels and does not show
for the midterm presentation. I don’t know if I could have felt more de-motivated to do this
project.

I am just very thankful for the team. For their sake, I manage to complete my work and not let
the project go to pieces. The other members of the team seem quite a bit more motivated than me
in terms of delivering something good to Sheila. They are eager to do work and to do it well. I
have had a great time working with the team to put together the design, using our various
strengths and weaknesses to be a well-oiled design machine. I hope that this project has been less
frustrating for them than it has been for me.


Shun Yu

The task at first seemed extremely daunting, and particularly vague… a mobile stage? The first
question that came to my mind was how would this be innovative if there were already mobile



                                                                                                   23
stages on the market. The second question was how college freshman such as ourselves could
design any stage, let alone a mobile one. After our first client meeting however, these fears were
alleviated.

The client’s narration of her problem helped me understand the problem much better than the
problem description given on the first day. We had to make a stage that was mobile, appealing,
and indoor. This meant our project would focus less on technical analysis and more on creative
things such as brainstorming for ideas. The meeting was useful in that I now knew exactly what
the problem was and could now proceed to solve it. It made me feel useful since we were
actually working to make a difference (before, I doubted that we can even make a difference,
given our lack of expertise in the field).

Before long, we had to get started on the project and had to meet outside of class. Scheduling and
going to meetings was an enjoyable yet frustrating experience. The obvious frustration was
finding a right time when all of us had the same segment of free time so that we could convene
and work on the project. Of course, even when we found that segment of time, there were still
times when some of us did not make it. For example, a miscommunication on my part resulted in
a funny situation where I waited in the Gateway lab for 10 minutes wondering where my
teammates were while my teammates waited in the Carleton lounge for 10 minutes wondering
where I was.

Nevertheless, the meetings were enjoyable in that we got our work done with relative
smoothness and efficiency. For one, I was very happy to find absolutely no conflicts within our
group. On my team projects in high school, there was usually some argument between group
members on a personal level or over a design decision. However, everyone here worked without
conflict and any disagreement in design was solved by a simple vote (and with the dissenting
party complying without argument). Everyone was friendly and eager to get the work done.

Later in the term, we started MAYA. It seemed very exciting at first because I’ve always wanted
to do graphical modeling but never got started on it. So, when the team needed someone to do
the MAYA modeling, I volunteered so that I would have more time to play around with it.
Unfortunately, it really was not as interesting or as easy as I thought it would be. Soon,
excitement turned to frustration as a mis-click led to unwanted trimmings, a black surface turns
green for mysterious reasons, etc. Slowly but surely however, the model finished. I clicked the
render button and felt a great sense of pride.


Crystal Zhou

My expectations for the Gateway project, to be honest, were at first very low in terms of how
much we can accomplish with a real life situation. The criteria I originally judged upon was from
that of my high school project experiences because in high school, groups/team assignments
meant a way to split work and do less individually. However, with the Mobile Stage project, I
felt that the flexible yet dated schedules provided a good basis for what each team needed to
complete. The aspect that I think was the most important is that each person in team has an
important role. Although the timekeeper or videographer ended up as rather obsolete positions,



                                                                                                24
my experience with my group left me impressed with how tasks are completed much faster if
they are designated for each person. I was supposed to be videographer, but by the end of these
twelve weeks, I became the photographer and team researcher. Everyone in my team was
extremely good about accepting his or her fair share of a report or presentation, which I believe
helped our project really succeed. Compatibility in a team is necessary for a semester long
assignment.

On a more personal level, my experience working on the project with four strangers who I’ve
come to greatly respect as friends has been amazing. Interacting with Sheila, our client contact,
with each team member, and with our advisor has impacted me to think differently towards an
assignment of this scope. Though I like to think otherwise, I am not what one would call a
leader. I prefer to observe and work off and possibly further develop other people’s ideas. This
was, as I’ve stated in self-assessment surveys, a weakness of mine because I fear judgmental
opinions from people. A proud moment for me in this project was when our team first tried to
sketch plausible models for the stage we wanted to present to our clients. It was during our
weekly meeting outside of class and the task as told by our leader was for each of us to draw
some designs on a sheet of paper, which we’ll share with the group. Oral skills may not be my
strength, but art and drawing was something I’m not self-conscious about. When it came my turn
to put forth my model, not only did my team members express immediate enthusiasm to further
work off the model, but they actually told me “good job!” As simple as those two words may be,
praise generally affects humans in positive manners and I felt like I contributed a part of myself
to this project. In fact, our current and final stage model is a deviation of my original drawing on
a napkin. To see the group take my suggestion and evolve it so thoroughly goes to show me that
whether my idea may seem irrelevant or not, contributions from the shyest to the boldest are
what makes a team diverse in creation and innovation.

In the end, I will still be quieter than most, which isn’t exactly the most advantageous to
productivity, but I learned through this Gateway project that being outspoken might not be the
most effective; it is being effective with words or other means such that I can convey my ideas
while respecting those of others’. Overall, I am happy with our group’s accomplishments—we
catered to the client’s needs and limitations, while keeping in mind our own goals and confines.




                                                                                                 25
                     APPENDIX B – TEAM PROCESS DESCRIPTION

Most members of our team agree that our team was extraordinary in that we had very few
conflicts and we worked smoothly together. Apart from the initial problem of taking on project
                                                                         conflicts. Our
roles, we never needed the conflict resolution manager to solve intra-team team
established our own procedure of getting the tasks accomplished throughout the semester.

Our team functioned in a smooth fashion during meetings and while getting assignments done.
Instead of meeting regularly every week without any agenda, we scheduled meetings with
specific tasks in mind, and at the beginning of the meeting, each team member knew what tasks
were to be completed by the end of the meeting. The meetings had a very open environment, in
which each member’s input was welcome. We often had different ideas about our project design,
but each member recognized which aspects of each idea were better, and instead of sticking to
the idea we had individually proposed, we tried to mix the best aspects of each idea to create our
stage design. Thus, it is evident in our final design how different aspects of the alternate designs
are still incorporated, and the final design itself is a product of everyone’s input. During meeting
time, we usually discussed the content that would go into different assignments. Thus, we
revised the stage design and gave inputs into what would go into Progress Reports, so that the
Progress Reporter did not have the burden of doing all the work. However, the Progress Reporter
did write the reports, and must receive the credit for doing a lot of work. While we discussed
ideas at meetings, we divided tasks for different assignments such as the midterm and final report
and presentation, and accomplished those specific tasks individually. In this manner, we saved a
significant amount of time by dividing and conquering the tasks.

The members in the team had several interpersonal aspects that enhanced the productivity of the
team. All members of our team are very intelligent, focused, and talented individuals who want
to contribute to the success of our team. Our drive to do as much work as possible was what
caused the initial conflict over who would have what roles, because each member wanted to
contribute to the fullest extent possible. However, once our project began, no member remained
tied to their official roles, which made our group very flexible, and which allowed us to
accomplish even more tasks. For example, the videographer not only took photographs but also
did extensive research; the progress reporter not only typed the progress reports but also
contributed extensively to the stage design; the time keeper not only fulfilled her responsibilities
but also compiled and designed all the PowerPoint presentations; and the Conflict Resolution
Manager not only resolved the initial conflict but also sketched the stage designs and worked
extensively on the Maya simulations. Since everyone in the project had such diverse talents, we
utilized each member’s talent to the fullest without being bound to our official team roles.

Together, our team overcame several challenges by working together. At the beginning of the
project, we had a lack of knowledge and experience in theatrical productions. Therefore, we did
a lot of independent research on different aspects of mobile stages and discussed it as a group,
which was a good initial step to familiarize ourselves with the project. We also attempted to
organize a site-visit of the client’s venue for performance to gain some ideas about stages and
performances more specific to the client’s needs. This too was an initial challenge, as the client
was busy and unable to schedule a site-visit soon enough; we faced this challenge by having a lot
of correspondence via both e-mails and phone to finalize a date for the visit. Our initial challenge



                                                                                                 26
of dividing team roles was overcome by utilizing the conflict resolution manager to help us
decide our roles.

However, like any average team, our team members too had characteristics that detracted from
complete effectiveness. Since each member was driven to do most of the work, we had an initial
conflict over taking team roles. Furthermore, each member in our team is taking very hard
classes – I guess that is a characteristic of the Engineering school though – which makes it
difficult for us to schedule meeting times that are convenient for everyone. This was partially
why only two members from our team could visit the client’s venue for theatrical production.
Our large course load also makes it hard for us to complete assignments ahead of time. Thus, we
often procrastinated throughout the term, and worked on this report and presentation in the two
weeks before they were due. Since this was not enough time, we struggled to get our individual
tasks to the compilers in time. In addition, our team is composed on detail-oriented individuals;
few of us are able to look away from the details into long-term project trends. Because of this
characteristic in most of the team members, we focused more on each progress report or
assignment as it came, and less on continuously revising the stage design at each meeting, which
could have resulted in a better design.

Therefore, given a second chance, there are a few things that we would do differently. We will
concentrate a little bit more on long-term and big picture ideas, and begin work on different
assignments a little earlier, while working on modifying the stage design in every meeting.
Instead of devoting entire meetings to revising the design of the mobile design, we would break
up the task by revising it in pieces at each meeting in addition to the design revision meetings so
that the design constantly improves. Furthermore, we did not know until one week before the
design was due regarding the extent to which we were expected to design our simulation. We
had not imagined that we would be expected to add color and light sources to our design.
Because the Maya modeling tutorials were arranged in this manner, we had felt that it would be
easy to model the stage in the last week, since our sketches and design ideas were already ready
and we wanted to have the flexibility to change the design without having to have the model on
Maya constantly changed, because it is hard to make changes on Maya. We realized one week
before the design was due during class that a lot more than we had assumed was expected of the
design. This delayed the Maya simulation and caused time crunching. If given a second chance,
we would start the Maya simulation right after we were given the first tutorial on Maya. Many of
the reasons why our team was not perfect were because we were busy in other courses and
activities as well, and it is difficult to change that fact even if given a second chance at doing this
project.

We learnt several important lessons throughout the project regarding teamwork. We learnt to
appreciate the diversity of roles and talents in our team, and to exploit this diversity to have
maximum efficiency for the group by dividing tasks according to specialty. We also learnt that
while there are many project subjects with which we maybe completely unfamiliar, through
research and perseverance, we can become more familiar and eventually come up with our own
ideas to improve upon existing technology. We were perhaps the last group in Gateway to have
knowledge about theatre or stage productions, and yet we were able to accomplish the task due
to extensive research. We also learnt that the client is often busy, and thus clear and continuous
correspondence with the client is often necessary. The client was unable to come to the Midterm



                                                                                                    27
Presentation because she was not informed of the date and time of our presentation. Thus, we
learned that having a redundancy in communication does not hurt. We improved our
communication with the client regarding the site-visit.

If we were to work on a new project, we would incorporate the lessons we learnt into the new
project. We would continue to have research as the first step to get more acquainted with the
project, irrespective of how alien the concept is initially to us. We would continue to utilize our
individual talents efficiently to increase both the productivity of the project and the quality of the
deliverable. We would also maintain extensive communication with the client right from the
beginning. We would also use a new project as a developmental opportunity by beginning to
think more long-term about the project and revising the deliverable continuously while beginning
several tasks of the project earlier. Our team works well together because of our individual
characteristics of diverse talents and intense focus, and we would continue these qualities into
any project.




                                                                                                   28
                                           APPENDIX C – PROJECT TASKS

Gantt Chart

 No.                 TASK                  WK 1   WK 2   WK 3   WK 4   WK 5   WK 6   WK 7   WK 8   WK 9 WK 10 WK 11 WK 12 WK 13


 1     Assign team roles
 2     Coordinate meeting times
 3     Prepare Progress Report # 1
 4     Research Client
 5     Conduct preliminary research
 6     Set agenda for client meeting
 7     Set questions for client meeting
 8     Prepare Progress Report # 2
 9     Interview Client
       Email client summarizing
 10    meeting
 11    Prepare Progress Report # 3
 12    Coordinate site-visit with client
 13    Formulate design specifications
 14    Prepare Progress Report # 4
       Conduct detailed research on
 15    stages
 16    Brainstorm designs of stage
 17    Refine preliminary design
 18    Finalize preliminary design
 19    Prepare draft of presentation
 20    Finalize presentation
 21    Rehearse presentation
 22    Prepare draft preliminary report
 23    Revise draft preliminary report
 24    Submit preliminary report
 25    Prepare Progress Report # 5
 26    Make presentation
 27    Seek feedback from client
       Create action plans based on
 28    client feedback
 29    Prepare Progress Report # 6
 30    Assess team performance
       Action plans to improve team
 31    performance
 32    Prepare Progress Report # 7
 33    Refine design
 34    Finalize design
 35    Prepare Progress Report # 8
 36    Create Model of stage design




                                                                                                                     29
 37    Prepare Progress Report # 9
 38    Prepare draft final report
 39    Revise draft final report
 40    Prepare draft of presentation
 41    Finalize presentation
 42    Rehearse presentation
 43    Submit final report
 44    Present final design to client




Work Breakdown Structures

Task                                    Duration   Task                                         Duration
                                        (Weeks)                                                 (Weeks)
Start                                   0          10. Present preliminary design to client     1
1. Research client                      2          11. Seek client feedback                     1
2. Conduct preliminary research on      1          12. Format action plans based on             1
stages                                             feedback
3. Prepare for meeting with client      2          13. Visit client’s current theatrical site   3
4. Interview Client                     1          14. Finalize design                          1
5. Formulate Design Specifications      2          15. Create surface model of design           1
6. Conduct detailed research on         2          16. Write final report                       1
mobile stages
7. Prepare preliminary design           2          17. Prepare final presentation               1
8. Prepare presentation                 1          18. Present final design to client           2
9. Write preliminary report             1          End                                          0




                                                                                                      30
APPENDIX D – DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS




   Figure 21: Top View from Front of Final Deliverable Design




   Figure 22: Top View from Back of Final Deliverable Design




                                                                31
Figure 23: Side view of Front Stage of Final Deliverable Design




   Figure 24: Audience View of Final Deliverable Design




                                                                  32
 Figure 25: Audience Bleachers of Final Deliverable Design




Figure 26: Lights, Sounds, and Effects of Final Deliverable Design



                                                                     33
                           Figure 27: Backstage of Final Deliverable Design




Figure 28: Dressing Room




                                                                              Figure 29: Lamps and White Board




                                                                                                                 34
Figure 30: Front view of Preliminary Recommended Design




Figure 31: Top view of Preliminary Recommended Design




                                                          35
        APPENDIX E – PHOTOGRAPHS




                   Figure 32: National Black Theatre




Figure 33: Two different angles of State of the Kids, Inc.’s current stage




                                                                             36
Figure 34: Cultural aspects incorporated into the theatre




                                                            37

				
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