improvement by cuiliqing

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									                           TABLE OF CONTENTS
                      “Fostering Excellence for a Lifetime”

Vision, Mission Statement, and Beliefs………………………………….. Page 2
       School ―Value Statements‖………………………………………… Page 3

School Improvement Legal Requirements
       School Reflection Statement on the 2008-09 School Year……….. Page 4
       School Improvement Committee Process………………………… Page 5
       School Improvement Committees‘ Rosters……………………….. Page 6
       Description and location of Curriculum…………………………… Page 9
       Titles and Description of Assessment Instruments……………….. Page 11
       Parental Participation in School…………………………………… Page 12
       Technology as a Learning Tool……………………………………. Page 13
       Safe and Disciplined Learning Environment……………………… Page 16
       Attendance Data and Goal…………………………………………. Page 18
       Graduation Data and Goal………………………………………… Page 19
       Diploma Data and Information……………………………………..Page 20
Unique Local Insights
      Faculty Demographics …………………………………………….. Page 23
      Student Demographics …………………………………………….. Page 24
      Bernhardt Survey of Staff ….……………………………………... Page 25
      Bernhardt Survey of Students ………..……………………………. Page 26
      Bernhardt Survey of Parents ………………………………………. Page 27
      One-year Follow-up Study…………………………………………. Page 28
      Five-year Follow-up Study………………………………………… Page 29
      Community Partnerships……………………………………………Page 30
      AP Courses / Dual Credit/ Articulation……………………………. Page 32

Benchmark Data
     AYP Data……….. ……………………………………………….. Page 34
     Assessment Data (PSAT, SAT, AP, Core Forty )…………………. Page 37

School Improvement Action Plans 2010-11
       Target Goal One……………………………………………………. Page 43
       Target Goal Two…………………………………………………… Page 45

Evaluation Instruments
      Target Goal One …………………………………………………… Page 48
      Target Goal Two …………………………………………………... Page 49

Cultural Competency Plan (closing the achievement gap)…………….. Page 52

Appendix
     AdvancED Standards Assessment Report…………………………Page 56
     Professional Development………………………………………… Page 64
     Waivers for ROTC replacing Physical Education………………….Page 66
           Floyd Central Senior High School

                                  Our Mission

Every student successfully completes high school.

                                   Our Beliefs
 Students will assume full responsibility as citizens in a democratic society, learning to
work with and respect others while maintaining their own ideas, views, and convictions.

Students will display positive qualities associated with personal character and integrity
as well as interpersonal skills and common courtesies important to a civilized society,
                     including service and commitment to others.

Students will be able to set realistic goals and to recognize that their choices and actions
    have positive outcomes and negative consequences, which will affect their lives
                                   and the lives of others.

            Students will be intellectually curious and self-directed learners.

     Students will use literacy skills needed to be successful in an information age.
   These include listening, reading, writing, speaking, mathematical, technological,
  and analytical skills, as well as the ability to recognize logical and illogical thinking
                          in efforts to reach rational conclusions.

Students will understand that meeting their potential will include intellectual, physical,
     and artistic development beyond those skills associated with basic literacy.

  Students will recognize the importance of living in a diverse and global community.

Students will gain skills needed to pursue personal and career goals beyond high school.




                                             2
        Floyd Central Senior High School




                         Value Statements

As a member of the Floyd Central Faculty, I am
                committed to:




 Transforming Floyd Central High School into a professional learning community.

Using the study group process as the primary means for professional development to
           support and implement our PL 221 school improvement plan.

         Developing a writing plan for each course I teach each semester.




                                        3
SCHOOL SUMMARY STATEMENT ON THE 2008-2009 SCHOOL YEAR

The 2008-2009 school year for Floyd Central High School was a very successful one.
The faculty and staff continued work on the PL 221 School Improvement Plan in
preparation for our Quality Assurance Review (QAR) by the North Central / AdvancED
Association of Schools in 2011-12. Teachers participated in professional development
opportunities in writing across the curriculum efforts, technology training in Interwrite
Tablet, Classroom Performance Systems, and Curriculum Mapper.

Staff members met for professional development training in two full-day sessions at the
start of school and another one full day planned by the school district as a whole. Our PL
221 School Improvement Committee met seven times to monitor our school
improvement plan and to approve a rolling three year plan for continued school
improvement.

The school also had an exemplary year in extra-curricular and co-curricular activities as
well as in academic competitions. The high school orchestra and choral music programs
qualified for state finals in the spring. The school finished first in the Hoosier Hills
Conference All Sports Trophy. The girls‘ volleyball team went to the state finals for the
third year in row, boys‘ golf finished fourth in the state and girls‘ softball made their first
final four appearance.

In the spring of 2009, we graduated 371 students, granting 89 regular diplomas, 133 Core
40 Diplomas and 141 Academic Honors Diplomas. In addition to diplomas awarded, five
students earned Course Completion Certificates and three students earned Certificates of
Achievement. One hundred seventy five students earned nearly four million dollars in
scholarships. Of those students, nine were National Merit Commended students and five
were National Merit finalists.

The results for NCLB were disappointing compared to previous years. We made AYP in
twelve out of the possible seventeen cells. Our PL 221 status is ―Academic Progress‖ for
the fifth year in a row. Although we made the cut-score percentage in all sub-groups
except Special Ed English, we did not meet the participation rule for SES/Special Ed in
both math and English.




                                              4
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PROCESS SUMMARY

To kick off the seventh year of our school improvement plan, we had a full-day in-service
on August 11th, 2009. We reviewed our school improvement plan for this school year
and focused on Floyd Central culture and climate. The remaining part of the in-service
was focused on the academic integrity policy, turn-it-in software and Interwrite software
training. We also reviewed curriculum mapping plans for the year and practiced mapping
in computer labs.

Our other in-service day was January 19, 2010. District meetings, organized by the
various departments across the district, occupied the morning. In the afternoon most
teachers returned to the building. We focused on classroom strategies that lead to higher
order thinking skills, and using the Internet as an instructional tool. English Language
Arts continued curriculum mapping as part of the district initiative and Algebra I and
biology began work on common formative assessments.




                                           5
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEES

Our school improvement committees are the driving force behind the implementation of
our school improvement plan. The Continuous Improvement Committee serves as the
Steering Committee for our school improvement plan. This committee meets seven
times during the school year. Responsibilities are to implement the strategies of the plan,
review all data, paying especially close attention to the evaluation instruments for the
target goals and thoughtfully discussing any changes to the plan. The membership of the
different committees responsible for implementing the strategies is listed on next three
pages. Below each committee are the meeting dates. Minutes for each committee
meeting and the minutes for the Continuous Improvement Committee are located in Mrs.
Whaley‘s office as well.

Continuous Improvement Committee (Steering Committee) 2009-2010
J. Whaley Co-Chair    Admin                          L. Prifogle Co-Chair Teacher
L. Jensen             Principal                      C. Beyl               Teacher
R. Willman            Admin                          B. Cambron            Teacher
M. Clark              Counselor                      B. Fitzgerald         Teacher
A. Hampton            Teacher                        S. Moss               Teacher
B. Alexander          Media Specialist               K. Uhl (ex officio)   Media
                                                                       Technologist

Meeting dates:        August 27th            October 28th           December 10th
                      January 27th           February 17th          April 7th
                      May 12th


School Improvement Committee (PL 221)
L. Jensen             Principal                      J. Lang               Teacher
J. Hollingsworth      IUS/Parent                     R. Smith              Student
S. Knotts             Support Staff                  D. Schraffenberger    Parent
R. Willman            Admin                          B. Cambron            Teacher
J. Whaley             Admin                          E. Sparrow            Parent
Meeting Dates:
        October 19th : Agenda items: Review committee responsibilities, review PL 221,
review school improvement plan, update on strategies, review data, review evaluation
tools, review Bernhardt results, discuss staff development plans for year, construction
update
        February 1st Agenda items: Review data, update on strategies, strategies for next
year, review evaluation tools for target goals, professional development for next year,
construction update

                                            6
        March 8th Agenda items: Review school improvement plan, update on AYP data,
literacy goal and summer reading initiative, summer school preview, rotation of
committee membership, tour new construction
        May 10th Agenda items: Review school improvement plan, final AYP data,
summer reading and online assessment, tour new construction.

Writing Across the Curriculum Committee
L. Jensen, Co-Chair   Admin                      B. Fitzgerald         Teacher
A. Lowe               Teacher                    A. Hampton            Teacher
N. McRae, Co-Chair    Teacher                    W. Austin             Teacher
K. Mayer-Sebastian    Teacher                    M. Clark              Counselor
R. Wolfe              Teacher


Meeting Dates:        TBA

Freshmen Transition Committee
R. Willman Co-Chair   Admin                      M. Clark Co-Chair     Counselor
E. Morrissey          Counselor                  J. Newkirk            Counselor
L. Engebretson        HS Teacher                 K. Hamsley            Counselor
B. Clifton            Support Staff              L. Schellenberg       Counselor
J. Beatty             MS Teacher                 S. Griffin            MS Admin


Meeting Dates: TBA

Building Committee
L. Jensen Co-chair    Admin                      W. Austin, Co-chair   Teacher
J. Whaley             Admin                      B. Cambron            Teacher
R.Willman             Admin                      C. Street             Teacher
H. Yankey             Teacher                    T. Stansbury          Teacher
P. Hartog             PTO                        K. Stevens            Support-Staff
Emily Wimbec          Student

Meeting Dates:        August 5th September 9th   November 4th    February 10th
                      April 7th  May 5th

Non-Completers
R.Willman, Co-Chair          Admin               E. Morrissey          Counselor
L. Schellenberg, Co-Chair    Counselor           M. Clark              Counselor
K. Hamsley                   Counselor           J. Newkirk            Counselor
L. Jensen                    Admin               J. Whaley             Admin

Meeting Dates:        This committee meets every Monday of each week in Mr.
                      Willman‘s office at 8:00 AM




                                          7
School Safety Committee

R. Willman, Co-Chair          Admin                 Ben Gipe                Teacher
G. Shultz, Co-Chair           SRO                   K. Lehman               Teacher
A. Tanner                     Nurse

Meeting Dates:         September 9 October 15     November 12


SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEES

Technology Committee

J. Whaley                     Admin
B. Alexander, Co-chair        Media Specialist      D. Traughber            Teacher
K. Uhl                        Media Tech            N. McRae                Teacher
W. Austin                     Teacher               C. Laduke               Teacher
T. Barnes                     Teacher               K. Hamsley              Counselor

Meeting Dates:                February 8, 2010

Reading Committee

L. Jensen, Co-chair           Admin                 J. Adams                Teacher
B. Alexander, Co-chair        Media Specialist      C. Beyl                 Teacher
S. Moss                       Teacher               M. Neal                 Teacher
K. Charbonneau                Teacher               M. Harbison             Teacher
J. Whaley                     Admin

Meeting Dates: Did not meet this year, because of our focus on curriculum mapping.
This committee will begin meeting the next school year 2010-2011.

Mapping Council

L. Jensen, Co-chair           Admin                 L. Prifogle, Co-chair   Teacher
J. Whaley                     Admin                 S. Moss                 Teacher
K. Bixler                     Teacher               T. Harbison             Teacher
C. Street                     Teacher               M. Clark                Teacher
B. Cambron                    Teacher               J. Lang                 Teacher
L. Lee                        Teacher               C. Jackson              Teacher
A. Hampton                    Teacher               C. LaDuke               Teacher
L. Stevens                    Teacher               B. Krammes              Teacher

Meeting Dates:         August 11th           September 10th

Due to a shift in district focus, our mapping initiative was confined to English-Language
Arts, Algebra I and Biology.



                                            8
SCHOOL CURRICULUM

The content taught is based on the Indiana Academic Standards. All teachers have copies
of the Indiana academic state standards for the courses that they teach. Pacing guides are
being developed for mathematics and English/language arts.

Areas of the curriculum are organized under the guidance of the district‘s Curriculum
Council and committees include math, science, language arts, social studies, world
language, and health.     Each discipline has a curriculum chair that is in charge of
reviewing and revising the curriculum on an annual basis.

Each teacher has developed a course syllabus aligned with state standards. State
standards can also be found on the web at the DOE site (www.doe.state.in.us). All
departments meet frequently to review and revise departmental goals aimed at improving
student achievement. Specific curriculum or content goals for the year result from these
meetings.

Language arts and math departments meet each year to review student academic
achievement as measured by standardized testing efforts. Curriculum is adjusted in
response to these results. Identified concerns are also shared with the faculty as a whole
in an effort to make increased student achievement a goal for the entire school. The
remaining departments and programs meet during study groups and faculty meetings to
establish intervention strategies aimed at improving student achievement. Teachers have
been trained in authentic assessment strategies, the use of rubrics, writing techniques and
applied instructional strategies in an effort to provide students with a curriculum that will
prepare them to be more successful students. These materials are available to teachers
and copies are available in all administrative offices and the media center.

Floyd Central strongly encourages students to pursue the most rigorous course of study
possible. All students are encouraged to enroll in seven full classes.      Advanced
Placement, honors, and accelerated courses exist in many departments and a rich and
diverse curriculum is offered to all students. Diploma requirements are discussed at
numerous parent meetings, in group and individual counseling sessions, in grade level
orientation meetings, in a variety of printed materials and program presentations.
Students not enrolling in rigorous courses that support their stated program goals are
counseled into appropriate courses and parents are required to approve any lower level
course requests. Through such actions students are encouraged and supported in their
efforts to pursue the Core 40 Diploma, the Technical Honors Diploma and the Academic
Honors diplomas.




                                             9
SCHOOL INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

As a large comprehensive high school, Floyd Central High School offers a diverse
number of curricular opportunities across numerous departments. Instructional focus and
monitoring of programs are accomplished primarily through faculty meetings based upon
instructional improvement, a two-year new teacher orientation program, and a year-long
school based professional development program guided by a school improvement team
comprised of faculty and school administration members. Classroom observations by
school administrators are established by contract according to non-tenure and tenure
status. Both formal and walk-through observations are made for all teachers scheduled
for observation by contract and board policy. The administrative staff makes a concerted
effort to visit all remaining teachers through informal walk-through observations.

Teachers across the curriculum employ many instructional strategies and tools in their
classrooms. Among those most frequently observed in teacher observations include direct
teaching, cooperative learning, the use of individual and group presentations, teacher and
student use of power-point as an instructional and presentation tool, differentiated
instruction, project-based instruction, performance-based assessment, video-streaming
tools, the use of a variety of computer labs throughout the school for research and writing
experiences, and the use of scientific probes in advanced lab courses. As we complete the
technology component of our building renovation, teachers will be trained on the
SMART software package and use of the SMART panels. Interdisciplinary teacher
collaboration across the curriculum encompasses the performing arts, writing across the
curriculum, and brain compatible instruction. There is a continued curricular expansion
of a co-teaching initiative in core programs involving special needs and regular education
students. Classroom observation forms are housed in teacher files in administrators‘
offices.

Recent school improvement efforts have focused upon improving the delivery of
instruction, broadening assessment strategies to include writing, and the greater use of the
higher levels of Bloom‘s Taxonomy in performance and assessment experiences. The
advent of our building program has increased our focus on the use of technology in the
classroom, and our staff has a greater awareness and expectation that high school has
become a performance experience for students and staff alike in an age of high
accountability. Successful professional learning communities must be willing to adopt
the instructional strategies that have proven to be most successful in enabling students
to gain the skills necessary to succeed in a variety of post-secondary experiences.




                                            10
TITLES AND DESCRIPTION OF ASSESSMENT INSTRUMENTS

Floyd Central utilizes a variety of assessment instruments throughout the course of the
school year. All of the assessment instruments except two are state or national tests. The
two exceptions are the district exams in math and the school-based Local Writing
Assessment. Our faculty is in the process of writing common formative assessments in
Pre-Algebra, Algebra I, English 9, English 10 and Biology. The remaining assessment
instruments listed below provide essential information to monitor the academic success
of the institution. The End of Course Core 40 (ECA) exams are required by the state to
provide an opportunity to measure readiness for college. The state graduation qualifying
exam will now include English 10 and Algebra I, and nine graders will have to take the
Biology Core 40 exam as part of the NCLB requirements. Both the PSAT and SAT
Exams are used as predictors for college readiness. Tracking these scores over time
allows us to see longitudinal progress. The local writing assessment is a program
designed at the building level to monitor our writing program at multiple levels. The
district exam for math is still used by the department to measure district established
expectations for math students.

Test Name                  Type of Exam                    Grade Level

Core 40 Exams
      Biology         Criterion-referenced exam            Grades 9-10
      Algebra I       Criterion-referenced exam            Grades 9-12

PSAT                  Aptitude exam                        Grades 9-11

SAT                   Aptitude exam                        Grades 9-12

Local Writing
Assessment            Criterion-referenced exam            Grades 9-12

Local Common       Criterion-referenced exam               Pre-Algebra, Algebra I
Formative Assessments                                      English 9, English 10
                                                           Biology

Language Proficiency
Assessment (LAS) English proficiency exam                  Grades 9-12
                   ENL students only

District Exams        Criterion-referenced exam            Grades 9-12
(Math only)




                                           11
PARENTAL PARTICIPATION

Floyd Central enjoys excellent parental support throughout the school. Our PTO/Renaissance
program has been used as a model for other schools seeking to broaden parental support and
academic achievement by students. The PTO/Renaissance program meets monthly at the school
in executive sessions. One agenda item that is discussed at each of these meetings is how to
increase more parent involvement. A sub-committee has been put together to explore new ideas
and strategies to deal with this issue. It has numerous active committees functioning throughout
the school year. Some of these functions are staff and student of the month, after-prom programs,
financial aid workshop and scholarship workshops. In addition to this program, the school enjoys
tremendous parent support through support groups for athletic teams and parent boosters,
cheerleader and dance teams, and for the band, choir, orchestra, and drama programs as well.
Parents are also involved with textbook adoption efforts, Building Committee, NCA Committee,
School Improvement Committee (PL 221) and with various committees established by the
superintendent of schools. Excellent schools always enjoy outstanding parental support and Floyd
Central has been blessed with outstanding parental involvement and support.

 Activity                       Frequency of meeting         Number of parents
                                                             involved
 PTO Renaissance General        Monthly                      10-15
 Meeting
 Student of the Month Lunch     Monthly                      4-5
 Success Card Rewards           Monthly                      8-10
 Staff Celebration Meals        Three times a year           8-10
 Thanksgiving Staff Thank       Once a year                  4-5
 You Letters
 Homecoming Dance               Once a year                  10-15
 VIP Breakfast                  Once a year                  50
 After Prom Festivities         One event, many planning     50--75
                                meetings
 Sports Physicals               One event, several           20-30
                                planning meetings
 Annual Open House              Once a year                  500
 Financial Aid Workshop         Once a year                  150
 Counselor Nights Out           Four meetings a year, one    200
                                per grade level
 New Student/New Parent         One meeting per year, in     50
 Orientation                    July




                                            12
TECHNOLOGY AS A LEARNING TOOL

Floyd Central High School makes extensive use of technology and the Internet throughout the
curriculum. After the completion of the building project, the school will house ten networked
computer labs that are also connected to the Internet for use across the curriculum. Starting in
2008, our school began a major building renovation that will bring state-of-the-art technology to
every classroom.

 Business              Two networked labs for computer keyboarding,
                       computer applications and accounting classes. Students are asked
                       to access the Internet in these classes as well.

 Computer              One networked lab with access to the Internet.
 Programming

 Communication         Two networked labs for both programs; two networked labs for
 Systems; CADD;        Project Lead the Way.
 PLTW
 Journalism            One networked lab with access to the Internet.

 Media Services        One networked lab with access to the Internet
                       for student and classroom use; additional computers are available
                       on the floor of the media center.

 General Purpose       Five networked labs with Internet access for use by all departments
                       and disciplines.

 Credit Recovery       Laptops and Wi-Fi enable students to make up credits.
 Lab

 The school district has an established Technology Continuum that guides the use of all
 technology across the curriculum. FCHS has created enough computer labs for general
 use and for those classes that require dedicated labs like journalism, business, computer
 programming, and industrial technology. In addition to these labs, additional computers
 exist in many classrooms for individual teacher and student use.

 Curricular Uses of Technology and the Internet

 Career      Students do research using the Internet and write a career paper that
 Information is based on their research. Students learn power-point presentations for use
             in classes throughout their high school careers.

 English        An established writing curriculum is in use that requires the use of
                computer labs and the Internet at all grade levels. This work becomes part
                of a student‘s writing portfolio. READ 180 is a technology-based reading
                program designed to raise reading levels. Floyd Central is using this
                program as an intervention for students who are below grade level in
                reading.


                                            13
Math           Most math students are required to have a scientific or graphing calculator
               after Algebra I. Graphing calculators are extensively used in advanced
               classes.

Science        Computers with electronic probes exist in science classrooms,
               especially in advanced programs. Students make use of the
               Internet for reports and research.

Social         Students make reports and are required to make use of the Internet
Studies        in a variety of classes. In economics, students must use the Internet for
               completion of the career portfolios in preparing a career option plan.

Music          Computers are in wide use in our music program, especially in AP Music
               Theory classes. Students have access to computers and music software
               programs that enhance advanced music skills.

Radio/TV       The Radio and TV program makes extensive use of computers and other
               technologies relevant to the industry.

Project Lead Project Lead the Way is a series of courses designed to prepare students
The Way      for the scope, rigor and discipline of engineering and engineering
             technology before entering college. The classes make extensive use of
             technology.

Teacher Use of Technology
             All teachers have access to a teacher workstation in their classroom
             with access to the Internet. All teachers are trained in the use of an
             electronic grade book. Many teachers make use of a web page and
             LCD projectors, etc. in the classroom.
It has always been the belief at FCHS that professional development would include a
technology component. In 1998-1999, a Joint Technology Committee was formed to
study the technology needs of the building. A vision statement was created and the staff
and students were surveyed to determine needs.

The school‘s vision is to provide teachers and students with the training needed to make
the most effective use of available technological resources so that students can leave
school with the critical technological skills needed to be successful.

For 2010-2011 and 2011-2012, staff members focused on two primary areas: introducing
new technology that will be available in every classroom after our renovation is
completed and curriculum mapping using the web based program, ―Curriculum
Mapper.‖ As part of this professional development plan, time was set aside during in-
service days to offer training in both areas. Goals include an awareness level for all staff
of the capabilities of new technology and a rudimentary level of curriculum mapping.
The success of both efforts will be evaluated by staff at the end of the year.




                                            14
For 2010-2011, staff members will receive training in technology for professional
development. Teachers will be receiving their technology training during our in-services
and during faculty meetings scheduled for next year.


School Technology Goals:
                    Provide training on the technology brought in with our building
                     renovation project. This training will bring teachers the latest
                     developments in SMART technology and classroom performance
                     systems. In addition, our staff will continue to build their expertise
                     on the web-based programs, ―Turnitin.com‖ and ―Quia.‖




                                           15
SAFE AND DISCIPLINED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

Floyd Central High School‘s goal is to provide the safest and most positive learning
environment possible. Appropriate student behavior is an integral part of an effective
school climate. We have implemented a progressive discipline system that requires the
issuing of demerits for inappropriate behavior. Listed on this page and the next are two
graphs representing FCHS‘ discipline record. The first graph shows the number of
incidents per specific behaviors over a four year period, and the bottom graph represents
the number of suspensions and expulsions for the last four years.

1000

 900

 800

 700

 600

 500                                                                            2006-07
 400                                                                            2007-08

 300                                                                            2008-09

 200                                                                            2009-10

 100

   0




Floyd Central‘s discipline is very consistent year to year. A gradual increase in
enrollment is not factored into the discipline statistics. Of continuing concern are tardies
and truancies, as they are often indicators of more serious activity (fighting, drugs) in the
hallways when there is little supervision. The demerit system serves to document
infractions and provides a structure for progressive discipline.




                                             16
SAFE AND DISCIPLINED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT (continued)


      900
      800
      700
      600
      500
      400                                                                      2006-07
      300                                                                      2007-08
      200                                                                      2008-09
      100
                                                                               2009-10
        0
               Expulsions    Out of School        TTD         In-School
    2006-07       26             263              294            781
    2007-08       13             175              195            536
    2008-09        3             125              202            588
    2009-10        4             180              263            690


The number of suspensions and expulsions fluctuates from year to year as noted in the table
above. In the past four years, there has been one major change in the dispositions assigned as
shown above and that occurred during the 2006-07 school year for in-school suspensions. In-
school suspensions almost doubled from the year before and out-of-school suspensions increased
as well. The 2007-08 and 2009-09 school years show a return to the pattern that we normally
expect, although in-school suspensions remain high.

At Floyd Central, we use SAL as a strategy to keep students in school and on track. Our credit
recovery program also helps students who may fall behind in credits due to disciplinary action.
Counselors work with at risk students, as does our student services liaison.




                                             17
ATTENDANCE DATA

For the past fourteen years FCHS has been above the state average on attendance and
graduation rates. Our attendance goal is to continue performing above the state
average and maintain our 96% plus rate each year. Last year we were above the
state average for attendance and graduation rates.


                                  Attendance Data
  97.50%
  97.00%
  96.50%
  96.00%
  95.50%
  95.00%                                                                                 FCHS
  94.50%                                                                                 State
  94.00%
  93.50%
             2004-05    2005-06    2006-07        2007-08   2008-09     2009-10
     FCHS    97.20%     96.40%      95.89%        96.70%    96.60%      96.14%
     State   95.90%       96%        96%           95%       96%


The table below contains the attendance for each of our subgroups identified by No Child Left
Behind legislation. This data is inconclusive due to the fact we have just started collecting.
Need this

               2007             2008          2009             2010               2011
Overall        96%              96.7%         96.6%            96.14%
Special Ed     95.33%           94.9%         94.51%
SES            94.12%           92.9%         93.09%
Ethnicity      96.90%           96.6%         96.94%

Strategies to improve attendance include the services of a full-time school liaison to monitor and
track attendance. Students must document excused absences with the liaison and serve make-up
days for excessive absences. The school nurse monitors seriously ill students and assists with
interventions when appropriate. The attendance clerk calls home daily on any absence that is not
reported by the parent or guardian. Counselors also stay involved in attendance issues. One
attendance incentive is the Renaissance card program. Students with excessive absences are not
eligible for a Renaissance card. A study committee with the goal of making the attendance
policy less cumbersome was created during the 2009-2010 school year.




                                             18
GRADUATION DATA
 95.00%
                                  Graduation Rate
 90.00%


 85.00%


 80.00%
                                                                                        FCHS
                                                                                        STATE
 75.00%


 70.00%


 65.00%
              2005-06            2006-07            2007-08           2008-09
   FCHS        87.30%            90.40%              90%               87.60%
   STATE        76%              76.50%              78%               81.50%


  Starting with the graduating class of 2006, the Indiana Department of Education changed the
  formula for computing a school‘s graduation rate.           The DOE determines a school‘s
  graduation rate by following a cohort group that enters a school the first day their freshmen
  year. By law, students must graduate from high school in four years. Only students who
  earn a diploma are considered graduates. Neither a ―GED‖ nor a ―Certificate of Course
  Completion‖ will count as successfully completing high school. Each school must monitor
  the transition of students in their cohort throughout the four years. After a disappointing
  first year graduation rate (2006) at 87.30%, we implemented several strategies (documented
  in this plan) and improved our graduation rate by over 3% to 90.44% for the class of 2007.
  One of our strategies is tracking the graduating success of specific subgroups.

  Listed in the table to follow are the subgroups we have been tracking for three years. The
  Steering Committee will continue to monitor this data and look for additional strategies and
  interventions on how to improve the success of a subgroup.

  Our counselors have intensified their efforts to counsel and encourage students who are at
  risk of not graduating. Interventions and strategies include parent meetings, emails, and
  telephone calls as well as allowing students to enter credit recovery as soon as they are
  identified as being at risk.




                                           19
             Number Diplomas Minimum Core 40               TechnicalHAcademic Dropout
             Students Granted Diploma                      Honors    Honors
2008
Overall           372        326         114         135         na         114
Special Ed         37         22          10           1                     0           0
Free/Red           32         27           7          12                     4           0
Minority            7          6           0           3                     3
2009
Overall           430        370          97         133         na         141          3
Special Ed         39         21          13          2                      0
Free/Red           37         22          10          8                      4
2010
Overall           424        347          83         145          8         111
Special Ed         44         20          16          4           0          0
Free/Red           41         23          16          4           3          0
Minority           15         15           5          4           0          5

DIPLOMA DATA AND INFORMATION

The Floyd Central Student Services department encourages students to pursue the most
rigorous diploma path available to them. Counselors encourage students to sign up for
Core 40 Academic Honors or Core 40 Technical Honors if they are college bound. This
advocacy of the rigorous diploma begins at Highland Hills Middle School, where senior
high counselors assist eighth graders in building their career paths and selecting an
appropriate diploma. All eighth grade students enter a Four Year Academic Plan in the
program ―Prep HQ‖ which allows student and parent access from home. Two parent
meetings for eighth grade students bring parents into the planning process. Counselors
and administrators stress the value of rigorous course selections at those parent meetings.

Teachers of advanced and elective courses are encouraged to market their classes to
eighth grade students by developing brochures and applications to promote a specific
class. During the Activity Fair, a part of eighth grade registration, teachers and students
staff informational tables to promote electives. Those course selections and plans made
in eighth grade will lead to solid career paths in high school.

The eighth grade parent meetings are followed by ―Counselors‘ Night Out‖ at each grade
level in high school. Diploma paths and any changes in requirements are explained to
parents. Counselors stress the value of rigorous course selection at each parent meeting.
Counselors can cite numerous examples of students gaining admittance to highly
competitive universities because of their rigorous preparation. Individual questions
following the meetings demonstrate that parents carefully consider all options. The basic
Core 40 diploma is always an option if a student is pursuing post-secondary
opportunities.

Counselors meet with administrators weekly. Diploma changes are discussed in the
meetings and strategies for promoting courses and diploma tracks are discussed and
debated. Floyd Central also uses AP Potential, a service of the College Board. AP
Potential recommends that selected students take AP courses based on their PSAT scores.
Posters with student names on them are posted by English teachers and each counselor is
given a list of students and matching course recommendations.
                                            20
                                   CORE FORTY DIPLOMA
    Floyd Central High School currently grants three diplomas to its graduating classes: the
    traditional minimum diploma (42 credits), Core Forty, and Academic Honors.
    Beginning with the class of 2010, all of our students are encouraged to pursue the most
    rigorous diploma track possible. The state of Indiana requires all students entering high
    school to pursue a Core Forty diploma. Listed below are two graphs showing the
    percentage of students who actually earn a Core Forty diploma and the breakdown by
    gender. As the results show below the percentage of students earning a Core Forty
    diploma are above or at the state average.
P




    P




P   P
                             Percentage of Students Receiving
                                     Core 40 Diploma
                 80%
                 70%
                 60%
                 50%
                 40%
                 30%                                                                      FCHS
                 20%                                                                      STATE
                 10%
                  0%
                             2005-06     2006-07   2007-08   2008-09     2009-10
                 FCHS         65%          66%      75%       64%         60%
                 STATE        67%          70%      72%       75%


                                 Core 40 Diploma by Gender
          90
          80
          70
          60
          50
          40                                                                                      Female
          30                                                                                      Male
          20
          10
           0
                   2005-06             2006-07     2007-08     2008-09          2009-10
        Female          75               49          64           84               78
        Male            60               72          71           57               67




                                                       21
                          ACADEMIC HONORS DIPLOMA
The Academic Honors Diploma (AHD) is the most rigorous diploma the state of Indiana
offers. On the average, seventy-four percent of our ninth graders enter high school
pursuing this diploma. Listed below are two graphs showing the percentage of students
who actually earned an Academic Honors diploma and the breakdown by gender. A
concern at Floyd Central is that we dropped below the state average as in 2005-06. We
now see an emerging trend that more students are earning the Academic Honors diploma,
largely due to the new diploma requirements.

                 Percentage of Students Receiving an
                     Academic Honors Diploma
   40%

   35%

   30%

   25%

   20%
                                                                               FCHS
   15%
                                                                               State
   10%

    5%

    0%
             2005-06     2006-07      2007-08      2008-09     2009-2010
    FCHS      23%         33%          34%           33%          26%
    State     30%         31%          31%           36%




                Academic Honors Diploma by Gender
       90
       80
       70
       60
       50
       40
                                                                             Female
       30
                                                                             Male
       20
       10
         0
              2005-06    2006-07      2007-08     2008-09      2009-10
    Female      44          77          75           84          71
    Male        37          47          39           57          30

                                         22
                                 FACULTY DEMOGRAPHICS

                                       06-07                07-08       08-09       09-10
Administrators                           4                     4          4           4
Teachers                                79                   78          78          77.5
Counselors                               4                     4          4           4
Library / Media Specialist               1                     1          2           2
ISTEP+ Remediation Staff                 1                     1          1           1
Instructional Assistants                13                    12.5       13.5        14.5
Administrative Support Staff            10                    10         10          10
Custodial Staff                         17                    17         17          17
Cafeteria Staff                         16                    16         16          16
Special Education Facilitator            1                      1          1          1
School Resource Officer                  1                      1          1          1

                                       06-07             07-08            08-09             09-10
Full-time Equivalent                    66.4              73.9              85               84.5
Average Age                              39               39.9              39                40
Average Experience                      12.8              13.9             13.5              13.4


                             Student Teacher Ratio
                       25

                       24

                       23

                       22

                       21

                       20

                       19
                             2005-06   2006-07      2007-08     2008-09   2009-10
                   Series1    24.5      23.2         22.4        22.9       21.2


Six years ago our staff was divided when the middle school staff moved to their new
school, Highland Hills Middle School. This has had a major impact on the composition
of our school staff. Currently we have 84.5 full-time equivalents. All faculty members
meet the NCLB requirements for being a highly qualified staff. The average age has
leveled off at 41 years and teaching experience decreased only slightly from the year
before. These statistics are reflection of the new hires for this year, 2009-10. This ratio is
not necessarily an actual statistic for every course that is taught. The core classes,
English, math, science, and social studies still have a target goal of 26 to 1 ratio.




                                               23
                        FLOYD CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL

                            STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS

The 2009-2010 official enrollment on ADM day of Floyd Central High School is 1,653.
The student body has an ethnic make-up of 96.37% white and 3.63% of several different
ethnicities, an increase from last year. Our students predominantly come from a middle
to upper middle class socio-economic background. Our enrollment has decreased by 23
students from the previous year. The five-year average is at 1,668. We are expecting a
flatline enrollment for next year. Listed below is a pie chart of the enrollment by grade
for this year and a table showing grade enrollments the last five years.


                   FCHS Total Population 2009-2010




                      9th grade, 24.50%
                                                  12th grade, 26.40%




                      10th grade, 26.00%
                                                    11th grade, 23%




                              ENROLLMENT FIGURES
                  05-06            06-07         07-08           08-09        2009-10
   th
  9 Grade          450              456           380             418           405
 10th Grade        396              456           451             373           430
 11th Grade        421              397           457             437           380
 12th Grade        358              414           372             453           438
   Total          1625             1723          1660            1681          1653




                                           24
                        BERNHARDT SURVEY ANALYSIS

Teacher Survey Analysis

One component of our school improvement process is to survey all stakeholders, using
the Victoria Bernhardt surveys on school climate and culture (results on the following
pages). The teacher survey is a sixty-five item questionnaire focusing on school climate
and culture that measures how teachers feel about working in the school, relating to the
administrative team, receiving recognition for their work, and working with diverse
groups of the population. The responses are scored on a Likert Scale with ‗1‘ meaning
strongly disagree and ‗5‘ meaning strongly agree. Listed below are two sets of tables
representing the top five and bottom five response averages. The table below contains
the five questions that received the highest response average on the survey. This year‘s
top responses have four holdovers from last year. The new addition is ―I believe this
school has a good public image.‖


                                                              2009 2008 2007 2006
                           QUESTIONS
I love seeing the results of my work with students            4.72     4.67     4.62     4.62
Student achievement can increase through providing a          4.61     4.66     4.64     4.54
threat-free environment
I love to teach                                               4.65     4.59     4.66     4.48
I feel that learning can be fun                               4.63     4.56     4.58     4.55
I believe this school has a good public image                 4.59     4.44     4.38     4.38

The table below contains the five questions that received the lowest response average on
the survey. No question response scored an average in the disagreement range of 2.4 or
lower on the five-point scale. New to the bottom five responses areas are ―I believe
student achievement can increase through using ongoing student assessments relative to
standards.‖ and ―I believe student achievement can increase through teaching to state
standards.‖

                                                       2009 2008 2007                  2006
                   QUESTIONS
Teachers in this school communicate with each other    3.6      3.27     3.36          3.49
to make learning consistent across the grades
I believe student achievement can increase             3.7      3.79     3.64          3.86
through using ongoing student assessments
relative to standards
I communicate with parents about class activities      3.66     3.40     3.41          3.77

Morale is high on the part of students                 3.78     3.56     3.42          3.53
I believe student achievement can increase             3.59     3.64     3.56          3.79
through teaching to state standards



                                          25
                          BERNHARDT SURVEY ANALYSIS

Student Survey Analysis

As part of the Bernhardt model, students attending FCHS responded to a questionnaire
designed to measure how they felt about their learning environment. Students were asked
to respond to items using a five-point scale with ‗1‘ meaning strongly disagree and ‗5‘
meaning strongly agree. The listing on the following pages shows the average responses
to each item on the questionnaire. This year the high school randomly surveyed 590
students. Listed below are two sets of tables representing the five questions that have the
highest and lowest response average. The first table represents the questions that
received an average in the strongest agreement range of a 4.5 or higher on a five-point
scale. For the most part the top five and bottom five responses remained the same as the
last four years. New to the top five this year is ―I feel ready for the real world with
reference to my ability to learn on my own.‖

                                                                   2009 2008 2007 2006
                         QUESTIONS
Doing well in school makes me feel good about myself               4.12   4.13   4.11   4.18
I feel ready for the real world with reference to my ability to    4.14   4.05   4.10   4.10
read
My teachers expect me to do my best                                4.04   3.90   3.91   4.00
I feel ready for the real world with reference to my               4.04   3.92   3.95   3.97
ability to learn on my own
I feel ready for the real world with reference to my ability to    4.02   3.89   3.93   3.98
process information


The bottom table represents the five questions that received the lowest response average
on the questionnaire. There was no question that received a response average in the
disagreement range of 2.4 or lower. The bottom responses remain the same from last
year with the exception ―In my classes time is spent using computers.‖


                                                                  2009    2008   2007   2006
                        QUESTIONS
In classrooms time is spent working in small groups               2.99    2.97   2.96   2.98
In classrooms time is spent doing work I find meaningful          3.03    2.95   2.92   2.89
In my classes, time is spent using computers                      2.93    2.98   2.98   2.89
I feel that I am in charge of what I learn                        2.89    2.77   2.82   2.75
School is fun here                                                3.02    2.73   2.71   2.85




                                             26
                         BERNHARDT SURVEY ANALYSIS

Parent Survey Analysis

The third group to be surveyed using the Bernhardt model are the school‘s parents. Every
parent was given the opportunity to complete the survey during this year‘s Open House.
Parents responded to a thirty-five question survey designed to measure how they felt
about the overall learning environment the school provided for their student. Parents
were asked to respond to items using a five-point scale with ‗1‘ meaning strongly
disagree and ‗5‘ meaning strongly agree. The graphs on the following pages show the
average responses to each item on the questionnaire. This year 117 parents took the
survey. Listed below are two sets of tables representing the parents‘ top five and bottom
five responses. The first table represents the questions that received the highest response
average on the five-point scale. New to the top five this year is ―I respect the school‘s
teachers.‖


                                                            2009    2008    2007     2006
                      QUESTIONS
I support my child‘s learning at home                       4.71    4.74    4.62     4.76
I would recommend this school to other families             4.6     4.6     4.5      4.5
Overall, the school has a good public image                 4.6     4.57    4.55     4.49
Parent volunteers are vital to the school community         4.61    4.5     4.46     4.52
I respect the school’s teachers                             4.59    4.45    4.40     4.42

The bottom table represents the five questions that received the lowest response average
on the questionnaire. There was no question that received a response average in the
disagreement range of 2.4 or lower. This year‘s changes to the bottom five are the
addition of ―The school provides adequate information about non-college options.‖ and
―There is adequate supervision before and after school.‖
                                                              2009 2008 2007 2006
                        QUESTIONS
Teachers help me know how to support my child‘s learning 3.9         3.69 3.91 4.17
at home
I am informed about my child‘s progress at school             3.9    3.74 3.73 4.06
There is adequate supervision before and after school         3.94 3.88 3.77 4.03
The school provides adequate information to students          3.85 3.83 3.73 4.13
about non-college options
Students are treated fairly by other students                 3.82 3.81 3.72 3.69




                                            27
                           ONE YEAR FOLLOW-UP STUDY

Every year the administrative team surveys the graduating seniors to learn where students
are heading after graduation. On the average, 84.6% (based on a five-year average) of
our students will continue in some type of post-secondary school experience. Listed
below is a pie chart of last year‘s graduating class. Below the pie chart is a table
representing the actual numbers for the last four years, as self-reported by the senior class
in the spring of each year.



                    Military Service,  Class of 2009
                           2% Working full-
                                      Undetermined, 5%
                                   time, 2%
                     Tech school, 3%

                 Attending 2 year,
                       10%




                                                      Four year
                                                     college, 78%




                   Class of          Class of         Class of       Class of    Class of
                     2009              2008            2007           2006        2005
  Class Size          453               332             404            352         348
  Four year        353-78%           249-75%         277 -70%       242 -70%    236 – 67%
   college
  Two year          45-10%           43-12%           38-9%          21-7%       19 – 5%
   college
  Technical          6-3%             12-4%           5- 1%          5- 2%       36 – 10%
    school
   Military          9-2%             9-3%            8 – 2%        10 – 4%       7 – 2%
   service
 Working full
  /part time         9-2%             6-2%            26-6%         38-11%       43 – 12%
  Unknown           23-5%            13--4%          50 – 12%       20 – 5%       10 – 4%




                                                28
                         FIVE YEAR FOLLOW-UP STUDY

Every year the administrative team contacts the graduating class of five years ago by mail
and has them complete a questionnaire on how well they were prepared for college and
the job market. The alumni are asked how poorly prepared or well prepared they were in
the areas of oral communication, math, science, writing skills, interpersonal skills,
computer skills, foreign language, and technology. On the average, twelve percent of the
alumni in the graduating classes returned the survey.            Listed below is a chart
representing the results of the graduating classes from 2003 to 2005.

HOW WELL PREPARED WERE YOU FOR COLLEGE / JOB MARKET IN
THE FOLLOWING AREAS:

            Poorly Prepared     Prepared                    Well Prepared
Class of:        2003 2004 2005    2003 2004              2005    2003 2004 2005

Oral          0%         7%     0%        45%    30%      40%       55%    63%    59%
communication

Math              0%     11%    4%        42%    33%      36%       58%    55%    54%

Science           0%     3%     0%        34%    53.5% 45%          66%    43%    54%

Writing           0%     3%     18%       45%    44%      31%       55%    52%    50%

Interpersonal     6%     3%     0%        39%    41%      40%       55%    55%    59%
Skills

Computer          10%    4%     4%        45%    38%      36%       45%    58%    59%
Skills

World             18%    24%    9%        41%    36%      40%       41%    40%    36%
Language

Technology        6%     0%     4%        55%    50%      40%       39%    50%    54%


Only five percent of the class of 2005 returned this year‘s survey. With such a low
response, it is difficult to draw statistically valid conclusions. One area is noted for
consideration:
     Writing dropped to 81% of the respondents reporting that they were prepared or
       well prepared for college. The class of 2002 was the first year that the writing
       across the curriculum initiative was implemented. This is the first year that score
       has dropped. We will continue to monitor this data.




                                            29
                                  COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

   As we advance into the 21st century all stakeholders, families, educators, administrators, and business
   and community leaders must come together to build a consensus upon the assets needed to ensure
   success for all students. We at FCHS value the importance of forming partnerships with the business
   community and recognize the benefits that our students gain by these arrangements. Research shows
   that students who participate in a business-education program demonstrate a higher level of ability in job
   skill development, work ethic, job training, and job awareness. FCHS partnerships are not limited to the
   business community. In fact, we believe a partnership is defined as mutually beneficial arrangements
   among businesses, communities, agencies, or other organizations, and a school that are essential to
   student success. FCHS places a major emphasis on volunteering and completing community service
   work. Community service requirements are embedded throughout the curriculum and every senior must
   complete a minimum of 10 hours of community service each semester in order to graduate. By getting
   involved in volunteer and community work, FCHS students may gain:

               an opportunity to give back to the community
               an opportunity to see how a community agency works
               an opportunity to work collaboratively towards a common goal
               an understanding of the community with whom they are working
               an opportunity to experience cultural diversity
               an understanding of the political and economic realities of the community agency they
                are assisting
               an opportunity to build their organizational and leadership skills
               an understanding of themselves, their strengths and limitations
               an opportunity to become an advocate for the community agency with which they work

BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS
   Prosser School of Technology
   The courses at Prosser School of Technology closely correlate with the curriculum offerings of Floyd
   Central. Currently 211 junior and seniors are enrolled. The majority of seniors will be employed in
   their occupational area the second semester. Co-op students are employed both semesters. All Prosser
   students have training plans and training agreements with their employers.

   Indiana Workforce Development
   Two career counselors on staff offer free interest inventory assessments and career counseling to
   all our students and parents.

   Economic Region 14/School to Work Initiative
   We have formed a partnership with Indiana Economic Region 14, whose membership includes local
   businesses and industries, as well as the Chamber of Commerce, to encourage graduates to stay in our
   geographic area for employment.




                                                      30
BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS (continued)


BUSINESS PATRONS AND SUPPORTERS
    Floyd County Memorial Hospital                     Regional Federal Bank
    Coca-Cola                                          Sam‘s Tavern
    United Parcel Service                              Your Community Bank
    Heavenly Ham                                       Physicians Associates
    Samtec

    In addition to the above listed partnerships, both the ―Project Lead the Way‖ program as well as the
    ―Floyd Central Finance Academy‖ have advisory boards, formed from business and community leaders.

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS
    Community Foundation of Southern Indiana
    A non-profit organization that builds a permanent resource of funds to meet community needs.

    Lions Club
    Free eye care for students who qualify.

    Rotary Club
    The New Albany Rotary Club awarded Floyd Central a $200.00 grant to support Focus on Freshmen.

HIGHER EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS

    Articulation and / or dual credit agreements with the following universities, colleges, and tech
    schools
           Indiana University                          Northwestern Ohio University
           Ivy Tech State College                      Sullivan University
           Louisville Technical Institute              University Technical Institute
           Vincennes University                        Spencerian College

    Bridge to College Programs

           Indiana University Southeast        Ivy Tech State College
           Sullivan College                    Spencerian College




                                                     31
ADVANCED PLACEMENT / DUAL CREDIT / ARTICULATION

Floyd Central offers several opportunities for students to earn college credit while still enrolled
in high school. These opportunities come in four forms: Advanced Placement courses, Dual
Credit, Articulation Agreements, and Bridge to College.

Advanced Placement Courses

Floyd Central offers several Advanced Placement (AP) courses (see list below). The advantages
of taking an AP course can be measured in several ways. Students will be able to study courses
at their achievement level and, depending upon their preparation, could be exempt from several
hours of college course work or receive college credit.

To enroll in an AP course a student must complete an application and meet the criteria selected
by the instructor in order to be admitted. Advanced Placement courses are designed so that
students take a test upon completion of a year‘s work. It is a requirement that students must take
the AP exam in each course enrolled. Students not enrolled in an AP course may take the exam
at a cost.
                         FCHS Advanced Placement Course Offerings
                              Biology
                              Calculus
                              Chemistry
                              Computer Science
                              English Language & Composition
                              English Literature & Composition
                              European History
                              Government
                              Music Theory
                              Psychology
                              Studio Art 2D-Design
                              Studio Art-Drawing
                              US History
Dual Credit Courses

Floyd Central has entered a dual credit agreement with Ivy Tech State College that provides the
opportunity for juniors and seniors to earn college credit for advanced courses taught by
qualified FCHS faculty affiliated with Ivy Tech. There is no cost to the student. Listed below
are the courses that FCHS has an agreement with Ivy Tech State College. We will apply for
national certification for our Project Lead the Way program, which will allow us to grant dual
credit for all of the courses in the sequence.

       Floyd Central course                  Ivy Tech State College course
       Pre-Calculus                          MAT 137 Trig                (3 hours)
       AP English                            ENG Composition 101-102 (3 hours)
       Astronomy                             Astronomy                   (3 hours)
       Spanish III/IV                        Spanish 101-102             (3 hours)
       Earth Space II: Geology               Geology 101                 (3 hours)
       AP Government                         American Gov. Pol. Sci. 101 (3 hours)
       AP Biology                            Biol 100                    (3 hours)


                                            32
Articulation Agreements

Floyd Central has entered into several articulation agreements with surrounding post-secondary
schools. The difference between a dual credit and an articulation agreement credit is that a
student must attend the institution issuing the articulation agreement in order to receive the
college credit. College credit is granted and all fees waived provided the student has earned a
least a ―B‖ or better in the articulation course. Listed below are the schools and the courses that
FCHS has linked with articulation agreements.

       Floyd Central Course                  Louisville Technical Institute
       Design Processes I                    Intro to Drafting
       CADD                                  Computer Aided Drafting
       Computer Applications                 Computer Fundamentals
       Drawing I-II                          Drawing

       Floyd Central Course                  Ivy Tech State College
       Algebra II                            Intermediate Algebra
       Chemistry I                           Chemistry
       Earth Space II: Geology               Geology
       Computer Applications                 Intro to Microcomputers
       Sociology                             Intro to Sociology
       English AP                            English Composition

       Floyd Central Course                  Sullivan College
       English 12H                           Communication Skills
       Business Law I-II                     Principles of Business Law
       Algebra II                            College Algebra
       Accounting I                          Intro to Accounting
       Accounting II                         Principles of Accounting

       Floyd Central Course                  Spencerian College
       Business Law I-II                     Business Law
       Accounting I                          Accounting for the Business Office

Bridge to College Program

The FCHS Bridge to College program allows seniors to enroll in college courses taught at
Indiana University Southeast (IUS). The Bridge to College program provides students with an
opportunity to develop a realistic appreciation and understanding of the expectations for students
in college level courses. A student‘s senior academic record must meet or exceed the Indiana
University freshman admission policy. These courses are taught at Indiana University Southeast
and a student must receive permission to attend during the school day.




                                            33
I. AYP RESULTS (No Child Left Behind Act)

In 2002 Congress passed and President Bush signed into law the ―No Child Left Behind
Act.‖ This federal law requires schools to show improvement in student performance on
an annual basis. This differs greatly from Indiana‘s accountability law, Public Law 221.
Indiana requires schools to show improvement of cohort groups (every year) with a
requirement of improvement over a three year rolling average. The No Child Left
Behind legislation requires schools to test in English and math every year in grades 3-10.
This improvement is measured each year as the school‘s ―Adequate Yearly Progress
(AYP).‖ A school must maintain an ―Adequate Yearly Progress‖ (AYP) in overall
performance for each exam and for each sub group over 30 students in number. Listed
below are the results of our ―Adequate Yearly Progress‖ the last six years. Our school
traditionally has four sub groups: Overall, White, Free and Reduced Lunch and Special
Education. In 2007 we did not have enough free lunch (30) students to have a subgroup.
In 2007, we were pleased to learn that we made AYP in all subgroup categories including
special education math and English for the first time since the implementation of NCLB.
Our school improvement plan contains strategies to address this concern and it has paid
off.

AYP RESULTS

2004                        ENGLISH                             MATH           GRADUATION
 AYP Categories      # of Students % Passing Cut %        % Passing Cut %         2003       2004
 Overall                1135        81.9      55.4         84         53.7       96.15        91.7
 White                  1114        82.2      55.4         84.3       53.6
 Free Lunch               94        55.3      47           58.5       45.2
 Special Ed              122        25.4      48.4         37.7       46.7
 Black



In 2004-05 we made AYP in the subgroups overall, and white, and free lunch. We did
not make AYP in the sub group special education in both English and math. We did not
make AYP on our graduation rate, which is a secondary indicator.

2005                        ENGLISH                             MATH           GRADUATION
 AYP Categories      # of Students % Passing Cut %        % Passing Cut %        2004        2005
 Overall                  359       81.3      59.9         82.3      58.4        91.7         95.6
 White                    352       81.8      59.8         82.2      58.3
 Free Lunch               36        58.3      52.8         52.8      45.7
 Special Ed               41        19.5      48.6         39***     46.9
 Black



In 2006 we made AYP in the subgroups overall, white, and free lunch. We made safe
harbor in math for special education but not in English. We did make AYP in the
graduation rate, which is a secondary indicator.   The cut score for all subgroups
increased this year.




                                           34
2006                       ENGLISH                               MATH            GRADUATION
 AYP Categories       # of Students % Passing Cut %         % Passing Cut %        2005        2006
 Overall                  416        82.7      60.3          84.1       58.5       95.6         87.4
 White                    403        83.4       60.2         84.5       58.7
 Free Lunch                NA       NA        NA            NA        NA
 Special Ed                39        25.6**    48.0          43.6**    46.4
 Black



The chart above indicates we made AYP in the subgroups for overall and white. This is
the first year we did not have a subgroup for free lunch (SES). We did make AYP in
subgroup special education in both English and math because of safe harbor calculations.
This is the first time in we made AYP in all categories since NCLB inception.

2007                       ENGLISH                               MATH            GRADUATION
 AYP Categories       # of Students   % Passing   Cut %     % Passing   Cut %      2006        2007
 Overall              415             82.4        60.3      83.1        58.8       87.4         90.44
 White                399             82.7        60.2      83.2        58.7
 Free Lunch           40              47.5***     48.2      56.1        46.6
 Special Ed           46              17.4***     49.4      29.8***     47.8
 Black



The chart above indicates we made AYP in the subgroups for overall and white. We did
not make AYP in subgroup special education in both English and math although we made
both of these areas last year because of safe harbor calculations. This is the first time we
have not made AYP in at least one testing area for special education. Also for the first
time we did not make AYP in Free Lunch English or meeting the 95% participation
(94.3%) requirement. We made AYP in 14 out of the 17 possible cells.

2008                       ENGLISH                               MATH            GRADUATION
 AYP Categories       # of Students   % Passing   Cut %     % Passing   Cut %      2007     2008
 Overall              347             82.4%       67%       87.8%       65.9%     90.44    89.35
 White                335             82.1%       66.9%     87.7%       65.8%
 Free Lunch           36              55.6%       55.3%     58.8        54%
 Special Ed           36              33.3%***    55.3%     58.3%       54%
 Black



The chart above indicates we did quite well on making the cut scores for every sub-group
except Special Ed English. However we did make the 95 % participation rule in both
sub-groups SES and Special Ed math and English. We made 12 out of 17 categories.




                                              35
AYP History (responsible for students attending 162 days)
     2002--Made 7 out of 9 categories (Special Ed math and English
     2003--Made 10 out of 11 categories (Special Ed English
     2004 --Made 10 out of 13 categories (Special Ed English / math also 95 %
     participation)
     2005 – Made 16 out of 17 categories (Special Ed English (math--safe harbor)
     2006 -- Made AYP in all sub groups (Special Ed by safe harbor)
     2007 – Made 14 out of 17 categories (special Ed English /math—SES English)
     2008 -- Made 12 out of 17 categories (Special Ed English / Participation SES /
     Special Ed)




                                         36
I. PSAT / SAT COMPOSITE SCORES
Listed below are graphs representing PSAT and SAT scores for the past four years. We
have been above the state and national composite score averages for the past ten years
with one exception (SAT 2002-03). The PSAT (listed first) is made up of three sub-tests:
English, math, and writing. The PSAT was revised in 2004. One of the changes in the
exam was not to include analogies as in the past. The three sub-test scores make-up the
Selection Index Composite Score. In 2005, our students scored the highest mean
selection index in the school‘s history at 160.4. The SAT is made-up of three sub-tests,
English, math and writing. The writing sub-test was added in 2006.

The SAT exam was revised in 2006 and the sub-test on writing was added. That is why
there is a jump in the mean score starting in 2006. Last year‘s scores were once again
above the state and national averages.

              PSAT Selection Index Mean for College-
                          Bound Juniors
        155
        150
        145
        140
        135                                                               FCHS
        130
        125                                                               STATE
                2005-06      2006-07        2007-08       2008-09
                                                                          NATIONAL
 FCHS            152.1        153.6          149.1         152.9
 STATE           137.1        136.5          135.9
 NATIONAL        142          140.8          141.3


              SAT Composite Scores for College-Bound
                             Seniors
    1560
    1540
    1520
    1500
    1480                                                                 FCHS
    1460                                                                 STATE
    1440                                                                  NATIONAL
    1420
                2005-06      2006-07       2007-08        2008-09
 FCHS            1527         1542             1526        1538
 STATE           1493         1511             1511        1504
 NATIONAL        1518         1469             1485        1483




                                          37
II. ADVANCED PLACEMENT EXAM SCORES

Starting with the class of 2010, one of the criteria needed to gain an Academic Honors
Diploma is to participate in an Advanced Placement (AP) course and take the exam.
This new diploma requirement has motivated us to increase our Advanced Placement
course offerings.     To enroll in an AP course at FCHS a student must complete an
application and meet the criteria selected by the instructor in order to be admitted. The
Advanced Placement courses are designed so that students take a test upon completion of
a year‘s work. It is a requirement that students must take the AP exam in each course
enrolled. Students not enrolled in an AP course may take the exam at a cost.

The AP exam is scored on a scale of one (the lowest score) to five (the highest score).
A goal of our instructors is for all students to score a three or better. Listed in the table
below are the average scoring results per AP course the past four years. The number in
parentheses is the total number of students who took the test.

 AP course                     2006            2007            2008            2009

 Art Studio-2D                 Not Offered     Not Offered     Not offered     3.375 (8)

 Biology                       3.667           Not Offered     2.48            Not offered

 Calculus                      2.69 (29)       2.19 (67)       2.43 (53)       2.638 (58)

 Chemistry                     Not offered     Not offered     Not offered     1.909 (11)

 Computer Science              3.0 (3)         3.5 (4)         4 (1)           1 (2)

 English Composition           3.13 (16)       3.62 (26)       3.7 (20)        3.486 (37)

 Government                    3.0 (11)        3.13 (15)       2.76 (17)       3.35 (20)

 Music Theory/ aural           3.8 (22)        3.33 (12)       3.41 (17)       3 (17)

 Music Theory/non-aural        4.409 (22)      4.5 (12)        4.118 (17)      4 (17)

 Psychology                    Not offered     2.97 (27)       3.16 (41)       3.654 (52)

 US History                    2.5 (26)        2.85 (52)       2.18 (54)       2.104 (77)




The table above shows the results of our AP exams for the past four years. The table
reflects that our AP scores have been declining the past three years. One explanation is
that enrollment in our AP classes on average have increased each year. One of our goals
is to increase enrollment in our AP classes each year. To assist us in reaching this goal,
we use the PSAT AP Potential report to identify students who have the potential to take
AP courses based on their PSAT scores. Our guidance department does an excellent job
with the aggressive recruitment and enrollment of students for these classes.




                                             38
III. CORE FORTY/ ISTEP + RESULTS

Since the Core 40 has become the graduation exam, it is now referred to as the ―ISTEP +
Algebra I Graduation Examination.‖

Three years ago, we assembled a team of algebra teachers to examine the data and
develop a study guide for the exam. That team will continue to meet as we strive to
improve our scores. The Algebra I team is developing common formative assessments
for each quarter of the school year. We believe this initiative will be reflected in an
improvement on the end of year test.

It may also be noted that our top mathematics students take Algebra I and the Algebra I
exam at Highland Hills Middle School.

  80.00%
                  Algebra I ISTEP + Graduation Exam
  70.00%                  Formerly Core 40
  60.00%


  50.00%


  40.00%
                                                                                  FCHS
  30.00%                                                                          State

  20.00%


  10.00%


   0.00%
               2006         2007             2008     2009         2010
     FCHS     21.90%       34.80%        32.30%       42%          76%
     State    23.70%        29%              34%      42%          61%


                 Number of students taking           Number of students passing
2006             278                                 62
2007             296                                 107
2008             209                                 85
2009             283                                 113
2010*            285                                 172
*First time testers




                                             39
CORE FORTY/ISTEP + RESULTS cont’d.

Our district offers two levels of high school math at the middle school level. Students
may elect to take Algebra I as seventh graders and geometry as eighth graders. The
student who begins with Algebra I in the seventh grade may then take six years of high
school math classes, culminating with AP Calculus.

Our top mathematics students take Algebra I and the Algebra I Core 40 exam at Highland
Hills Middle School in either the seventh or eighth grade. The last four years of scores
from Highland Hills Middle School are reflected below.


   120%
                        Highland Hills Middle School
   100%
                     ISTEP+ Algebra I Graduation Exam
                             Formerly Core 40
    80%



    60%
                                                                                 HHMS
                                                                                 State
    40%



    20%



       0%
              2006          2007         2008         2009         2010
    HHMS      70%          44.70%       75.24%        92%          100%
    State    23.70%          29%         34%          42%          61%



                    Number of students taking         Number of students passing
2006                95                                58
2007                77                                37
2008                149                               112
2009                105                               97
2010                132                               132




                                           40
CORE FORTY/ISTEP + RESULTS cont’d

This is the first year for the ISTEP + English 10 Graduation Examination. This year will
become our benchmark for following years for this exam. The district initiative of
common formative assessments will help our teachers focus their efforts on identified
standards and indicators.




                        ISTEP + English 10 Exam Results
  90.00%
  80.00%
  70.00%
  60.00%
  50.00%
  40.00%
  30.00%                                                                          FCHS
  20.00%                                                                          State
  10.00%
   0.00%
                     2010
     FCHS        82.80%
     State       62.00%



The ECA for biology is also a new test, beginning with the year 2010. We were
disappointed in our scores on the test and will continue working on standards and
indicators.



                             Biology ECA 2009-10
              70%
              60%
              50%
              40%
              30%                                                      2009-10
              20%
              10%
                0%
                             FCHS                   STATE
             2009-10         61%                     35%




                                          41
CORE FORTY/ISTEP + RESULTS cont’d


Disaggregation by subgroups for Spring 2010 ISTEP+ECA



                         Algebra I         Biology      English 10
    2010 (spring)
      Overall               76%              61%          83%
     Special Ed             45%              25%          42%
        SES                 54%              33%          65%




                                     42
  Action Plan and Professional Development Template
                    For 2009--2011
Action Plan Goal #1

 Students will improve writing skills




Research-Based Strategies to Reach this Goal

   1. All teachers will receive professional development training on the “Levels of
      Writing” program.

   2. Each teacher will be required to submit a writing plan for each course they
      teach to the Assistant Principal of Staff Development for each semester.

   3. Each semester a sampling of student English portfolios are reviewed by the
      head of the English department and the assistant principal for staff and
      curriculum.

   4. All English teachers grades 9-10 will create common formative assessments
      aligned to the English 10 ISTEP+ test.

   5. All English Honors classes will complete a summer reading assignment with
      summer online assessments.

   6. All faculty members will participate in study groups focused on reading for
      2010-2011.

Strategies for Unique Populations

   1. English Lab courses (for credit) for grade 9 and 10 are available for Special
      Education students and at-risk students who need English resource.

   2. Co-taught English courses in grades 9 and 10 will be offered for Special
      Education students and at risk general ed students.

   3. READ 180 program includes a strong writing component.

   4. ISTEP+ tutorial program will be available for students who have not passed
      the English ISTEP exam.

   5. ENL teacher will provide support to all ENL students one period a day.




                                         43
Corresponding Professional Development Activities

   1. All departments will hold semester meetings reviewing their writing calendars
      and discuss best practices.

   2. New teachers will attend an in-service on the “Levels of Writing” program

   3. Best practices on writing will be shared by the administrative team or teacher
      leaders at faculty meetings

   4. English teachers will conduct a test analysis and review test data on the Core
      Forty English 10 exams with the Assistant Principal of Staff Development.

Timeline
 All strategies will be implemented throughout the 2009-11 school years.



Resources

      “The Neglected “R”; the Need for a Writing Revolution.” National
       Commission on Writing in America’s Schools and Colleges. College Board,
       2003.
      Bear, George and Proctor, Willis. “Impact of a Full-Time Integrated
       Program on the Achievement of Non-Handicapped and Mildly Handicapped
       Children.” Exceptionality: A Research Journal, v1 n4, p.227-38, 1990.
      Floyd Central’s “Levels of Writing” manual
      New Albany Floyd County School Corporation’s Writing Framework
       Database
      Floyd Central’s “Co-Teaching” manual

How will this Professional Development, when implemented, result in increased
teacher effectiveness leading to higher student achievement?
 As our research states, writing across the curriculum will raise students writing
 scores on standardized testing. But more importantly, requiring students to write in
 the content areas yields a gain for students in their knowledge base of those content
 areas. The professional development initiative of the faculty on the ―Levels of
 Writing‖ will allow us to develop a common vocabulary for teaching writing to our
 students. When teachers assign a writing task, through the common vocabulary,
 students will know what the expectations are for that assignment and how it will be
 assessed. Having all teachers teaching writing the same way leads to teacher
 effectiveness and, as the research states, this leads to higher student achievement.


Target Goal #1       Students will improve writing scores

Year          Sub group             Evaluation Instrument                      Score
2009-10       Overall               ECA Core 40 English 10 will be our evaluation tool

                                           44
Action Plan and Professional Development Template
                     2009-2011
Action Plan Goal #2

 Increase graduation and completion rates for all students.




Research –Based Strategies to Reach this Goal

   1. Implement the “Focus on Freshmen” initiative which includes the following
      activities: Assemblies on “Making High School Count”, Counselor Night
      Outs, Parent Pre-Registration Night, and host a Freshmen orientation for
      parents and students before schools starts.

   2. Sophomore mentoring program with our home school liaison.

   3. Continue to expand and improve our after school Credit Recovery program
      for students who have failed a class during the school year.

   4. Hire a counselor to follow-up with all non-graduates during the summer to
      assure that these students will complete by October 1st .

   5. Create a tracking process (paper trail) of each graduating cohort that is
      updated daily.

   6. Create essential maps via curriculum mapping for English language arts.

   7. Create Algebra I, English 10 and Biology common formative assessments.

   8. All faculty members will participate in study groups focused on reading for
      2010-2011.

Strategies for Unique Populations

   1. All strategies above apply to all our unique population groups.

   2. ENL teacher will be available one period of the day to provide support to our
      ENL population.

   3. READ 180 program will help students who are reading below grade level.

   4. Special education and general ed students will be placed in collaborative (co-
      taught) classes all subject areas. Resource support will be offered in English
      Lab and math lab if needed.



                                           45
   5. ISTEP+ tutorial program will be offered to students who are unsuccessful on
      the ISTEP+ exam.




Corresponding Professional Development Activities

   1. All co-teachers will participate in curriculum planning sessions with the
      Assistant Principal of Staff Development during the summer.

   2. Our counseling staff will conduct work sessions during the summer to
      formulate ideas and strategies for the Focus on Freshmen initiative.

   3. During faculty and department meetings, teachers will be informed of
      strategies that will be implemented and the success of these strategies.

   4. All Algebra I and pre-algebra teachers will create common formative
      assessments aligned to the Algebra I ISTEP+ exam.

Timeline
 All strategies will be implemented throughout the 2009-11 school year.


Resources

      Lampert, Joan. “Easing the Transition to High School; A Field Study of a
       Freshman Advisory Program in a Chicago High School.” Educational
       Leadership, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, v62 n7
       p.61-63, April 2005.
      “Virginia: A Study of Effective Practices in Virginia’s Schools: Educators’
       Perspectives of Effective Practices Leading to Student Success on SOL Tests”
       Virginia Department of Education, 2000.
      Professional development monies
      Curriculum mapping software
      School Resource Officer
      Credit Recovery Software, Novel Stars Suite

How will this Professional Development, when implemented, result in increased
teacher effectiveness leading to higher student achievement?
 Our second target goal is not an academic performance goal. However, our goal‘s success
 hinges on the premise that students must be successful academically. Interventions that are
 implemented throughout a student‘s high school career will lead to the accomplishment of
 the goal of having students graduate from high school.




                                              46
Improvement goal projections

Target Goal #2     Students will successfully complete high school.

Year         Sub group           Evaluation Instrument                          Rate
2006         Overall             Graduation rate****                            87%
2007         Overall             Graduation rate                                90.4%
2008         Overall             Graduation rate                                  90%
2009         Overall             Graduation rate                                87.6%
2010         Overall             Graduation rate                        projected 90%
2011         Overall             Graduation rate                      projected 90.5%




                                       47
    EVALUATION INSTRUMENTS FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT GOALS

Target Goal #1        Students will improve writing scores

As a member of the North Central Association we use NCA school improvement
software to analyze the success of our strategies in meeting stated goals. There are two
evaluation instruments used to evaluate the impact of the strategies to improve writing.
They are:

       1) Our local writing prompt assessment
       2) ISTEP+ English 11

When applicable we have disaggregated the data on all the above exams in the following
areas: Overall, Special Ed, Social Economic Status, Top Quartile and Bottom Quartile.

As we move into the ECA/ISTEP+ for English 11, we will begin building our data from
that test to assess our goals.




                                          48
EVALUATION INSTRUMENTS FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT GOALS

Target Goal #2           Students will successfully complete high school.

There are five evaluation instruments used to evaluate the impact of the strategies to help
students successfully complete high school. They are:

       1)   Graduation rate
       2)   Number of students dropping out
       3)   Freshman failures per semester
       4)   Number of students receiving their diplomas on commencement day
       5)   Nongrad follow-up report


Our baseline for comparison is the 2005-06 school year. Listed below are the results of
the 2008-09 school year compared to the baseline year.

   1) Graduation Rate

  95.00%
                                  Graduation Rate
  90.00%

  85.00%

  80.00%
                                                                                   FCHS
  75.00%                                                                           STATE

  70.00%

  65.00%
               2005-06            2006-07         2007-08         2008-09
    FCHS        87.30%            90.40%           90%            87.60%
    STATE        76%              76.50%           78%            81.50%


   The above graph represents our graduation rate compared to Indiana‘s the last four
   years. We have been above the state average the past ten years. As noted earlier in
   this document, the process for determining the graduation rate changed in 2005-06.




                                             49
   2) Number of students not earning a diploma

                          FCHS Dropouts/Unknowns
      12

      10

        8

        6

        4

        2

        0
                    2006-07                  2007-08                   2008-09
    Series1              10                     7                         5


In 2006, the State of Indiana changed the way a school‘s graduation rate was figured.
The above chart represents the number of students who did not earn a diploma for the
following reasons: dropped out, missing not found, earned a GED, and earned a
Certificate of Achievement or Completion. Because of the new formula for determining
graduation rate, we are responsible for keeping track of all students who enter our school
as freshmen and beyond.

   3) Freshmen failures per semester

                                    Freshman Failures
      30%
      25%
      20%
      15%                                                                           1st Sem
      10%                                                                           2nd Sem
       5%
       0%
               2005-06        2006-07     2007-08      2008-09      2009-10


We firmly believe that a strong indicator that students will successfully complete high
school is the number of credits a student earns during his / her freshman year. Our goal
is every freshman will have a minimum of 12 credits at the end of his / her freshman
year. For this reason we monitor the number of freshmen that fail a semester class. The
above chart represents the data from the last five freshmen classes.




                                           50
   4) Number of students receiving diplomas on commencement day
      90%
      88%
              Percent Earning Diplomas on Graduation Day
      86%
      84%
      82%
      80%                                                                           Earning…
      78%
      76%
      74%




Our mission statement is for every student to successfully complete high school. Ideally,
that would mean every student would receive a high school diploma. One specific data
point that our school has been examining the last couple of years is the number of
students who enter their senior year on track to graduate, but do not receive a diploma on
the date of commencement. The above graph represents the percentage of students per
each senior class that received a diploma at commencement. Each year will we have a
significant number (see graph above) of seniors who will start the year on track to
graduate but will not complete the necessary graduation requirements. We call this the
―Precipice Syndrome.‖ Seniors will get close to the edge of graduating and will not see
it through.    Our counseling staff continues to study this issue. This year our credit
recovery coordinator has joined the weekly counselor meetings to increase
communication regarding the at-risk students.

   5) Non-grad follow up report

       Year                Non Grads          Completed by October        Percentage
                                              1st that fall               Completed
       2003*                     58                     38                    66%
        2004                     38                     24                    63%
        2005                     44                     20                    45%
        2006                     42                     14                    33%
        2007                     36                     18                    50%
        2008                     33                     18                    51%
        2009                     67                     29                    43%
The chart above represents data that is created on commencement day of the year listed.
The second column (non grad) represents the number of students who do not receive their
diploma or certificate of completion on commencement day. According to state statute,
a school has until October 1st, the next year to amend the school‘s graduation rate. The
percent completed represents the success of our non-graduate strategies that we are
implementing. The year 2003 (marked with an asterisk) was the first year that we started
implementing non-graduate strategies.


                                           51
                       FCHS Cultural Competency School Plan

                              Cultural Competency Plan

Indiana Code 20-10.2-3 requires all schools to consider methods to improve the cultural
competency of the school‘s teachers, administrators, staff, parents, and students. Part of
the code requires schools to identify the ethnicity, socioeconomic, cultural, language-
minority, and exceptional learning groups that are included in the school‘s population.

Enrollment on ADM day was 1,653. The student body has an ethnic make-up 96.4%
white and 3.6% of several different racial and ethnic populations. The table below
illustrates the various subgroups by enrollment.


                        Ethnicity            Number of students
                     American
                     Indian                            2
                     Black / Non-
                     Hispanic                         13
                     Asian / Pacific                  16
                     Hispanic                          9
                     Multi-Racial                     21


The two remaining sub-groups identified by state code are special education students and
students who qualify for free and or reduced lunch. Our special needs student population
makes up 11% of the total student population and our free and reduced lunch population
makes up 10%. The chart below lists the actual enrollment numbers by grade level.


 Grade Level          Special Education           Free and or Reduced lunch
     9th                      44                              57
    10th                      38                              50
    11th                      46                              43
    12th                      57                              52
   Totals                    185                             202


The entire student population participates in all programs and strategies involving our
school improvement plan. Every student is encouraged to pursue at the minimum a Core
Forty Diploma. Each of the subgroups however, listed above is involved with a variety
of interventions and strategies designed to support continued and improving academic
achievement.




                                           52
Special Education

Special needs students have struggled to meet AYP the in language arts.

   -   A major school goal is to move from special needs resource classrooms for our
       LD and ED students to 100% inclusion within the regular education curriculum in
       the 2008-09 school year.
   -   READ 180 is a reading comprehension program, provided by the district, that is
       designed to raise reading levels. It will be fully implemented during the 2010-11
       school year.
   -   Eleven teachers are participating in collaborative classrooms involving math
       [Algebra I], English [9 and 11], biology, life science, physical science, career
       information, government, U. S. History and economics.
   -   In 2007-2008 a non-credit Math Lab became available all seven periods of the
       school day. Students will be able to back-pass from a study hall to receive tutorial
       services in math.
   -   Those teachers working collaboratively to implement this initiative spent fifteen
       hours in professional development before beginning the program. New teams
       receive training in the summer.
   -   In 2008, training and planning was expanded to include additional hours of
       planning and working together developing instructional strategies for all of these
       classes.
   -    ―Focus on Freshmen‖ is another initiative designed as an intervention and
       support strategy to identify those ninth graders struggling to earn credits. Each
       student identified as an ―at-risk‖ freshman meets with the freshman counselor and
       an individual support plan is created with parents and the student to provide
       needed support to become a successful student.
   -   Special needs students struggling with academic achievement or earning course
       credits have opportunities for credit recovery or remediation through summer
       school programs.
   -   The ―40 Assets‖ training model has been integrated into school climate and
       culture.
   -   An English Lab period gives extra assistance to those students struggling with
       English language arts skills.

Racial and Ethnic Minority Students

Minority students as a subgroup at Floyd Central are being academically successful.
   - Focus on Freshmen supports all students in gaining academic achievement.
   - Floyd Central makes an annual report to the school board and the district‘s
       Multicultural Committee regarding academic progress on each of the various
       racial and ethnic subgroups.
   - A diversity unit is embedded within a required career information and exploration
       class during the freshman year. All teachers utilize a diverse range of materials in
       the classroom to ensure cultural relevancy and success for all students.




                                            53
Racial and Ethnic Minority Students (continued)

   -   All U.S. History classes incorporate a week long diversity unit celebrating the life
       of Dr. Martin Luther King, culminating in an annual special MLK celebration and
       presentation for all U.S. History students.
   -   All students struggling with academic achievement or earning course credits have
       opportunities for credit recovery or remediation through summer school classes.
   -   All staff members participate in special diversity training sponsored by the school
       district.
   -   A non-credit Math Lab is currently available all seven periods of the school day.
       Students will be able to back-pass from a study hall to receive tutorial services in
       math
   -   The ―40 Assets‖ training model was introduced in 2007-08 and integrated into the
       climate and culture of the school.
   -   READ 180 is a reading comprehension program, provided by the district, that is
       designed to raise reading levels. It will be fully implemented during the 2010-11
       school year.
   -   An English Lab period gives extra assistance to those students struggling with
       English language arts skills.

Free and Reduced Lunch Students

   -   Focus on Freshmen supports all students in gaining academic achievement.
   -   Floyd Central makes an annual report to the school board and the district‘s
       Multicultural Committee regarding academic progress on various subgroups,
       including socioeconomic status.
   -   All students struggling with academic achievement or earning course credits have
       opportunities for credit recovery or remediation through summer school classes.
   -   A non-credit Math Lab is currently available all seven periods of the school day.
       Students will be able to back-pass from a study hall to receive tutorial services in
       math.
   -   READ 180 is a reading comprehension program, provided by the district, that is
       designed to raise reading levels. It will be fully implemented during the 2010-11
       school year.
   -   The ―40 Assets‖ training model was introduced in 2007-08 and integrated into the
       climate and culture of the school.
   -   An English Lab period gives extra assistance to those students struggling with
       English language arts skills.

Gifted and Talented Subgroup

   -   Floyd Central High School‘s school improvement plan is written for all students,
       including the performance of our gifted and talented students.
   -    Floyd Central offers a variety of advanced courses for those traditionally gifted
       academic students that include honors/college preparatory courses, advanced
       placement courses, four world languages and an advanced science program. An
       extensive visual and performing arts curriculum is also available to all students.
   -   Our major school-wide writing across the curriculum initiative is aimed at all
       students in all levels of coursework.


                                           54
   -   A special PSAT initiative has been introduced to better prepare students for the
       PSAT, resulting in more students earning national merit semi-finalist and finalist
       status.
   -   Strategies for high ability learners are stressed in new teacher meetings and
       teacher observation conferences.

Teachers and Staff

   -   All staff members participate in diversity training sponsored by the school district.
   -   All teachers and instructional support staff are integral parts of the school
       improvement team and participate in staff development opportunities aimed at
       improving academic achievement for all students.
   -   All counselors and instructional staff members actively participate in study groups
       aimed at fulfilling the school‘s mission statement that all students successfully
       complete high school.
   -   The ―40 Assets‖ training model was introduced in 2007-08 and integrated into the
       climate and culture of the school.




                                            55
                       AdvancED Standards Assessment Report

The Standards Assessment Report is designed to serve as a valuable self-assessment and
as a tool to help schools prepare for their Quality Assurance Review. The report is based
on the AdvancED standards, which serve as the foundation of the accreditation process.
In order to earn and maintain accreditation, schools must meet the AdvancED standards,
engage in a process of continuous improvement, and host a Quality Assurance Review at
least once every five years.

The Standards Assessment Report engages the school community in an in-depth
assessment of each of the seven AdvancED standards. In completing the report, the
school identifies the data, information, evidence, and documented results that validate
that it is meeting each standard. This self assessment helps the school identify areas of
strength and opportunities for improvement.

The Standards Assessment Report also serves as the primary resource for the Quality
Assurance Review Team, which uses the report to prepare for the visit to the school. The
team uses insights gathered from the report and information obtained during the on-site
visit to provide feedback to the school and to make an accreditation recommendation.
The data on the following pages is a summary report of the school snapshot from May
2009.




                                            56
                         Standard 1 - Vision & Purpose
STANDARD: The school establishes and communicates a shared purpose and
direction for improving the performance of students and the effectiveness of the
school.

Impact Statement: A school is successful in meeting this standard when it commits to a
shared purpose and direction. The school establishes expectations for student learning
aligned with the school‘s vision that is supported by school personnel and external
stakeholders. These expectations serve as the focus for assessing student performance
and school effectiveness. The school‘s vision guides allocations of time and human,
material, and fiscal resources.

Indicators Rubric: Please indicate the degree to which the noted practices/processes are
in place in the school. The responses to the rubric should help the school identify areas
of strength and opportunities for improvement as well as guide and inform the school‘s
responses to the focus questions and examples of evidence.

Definitions of Indicators Rubric
            Not Evident--Little or no evidence exists
            Emerging--Evidence indicates early or preliminary stages of
               implementation of practice
            Operational--Evidence indicates practices and procedures are actively
               implemented
            Highly Functional--Evidence indicates practices and procedures are fully
               integrated and effectively and consistently implemented



INDICATORS
                                                                 Not Evident




                                                                                          Operational


                                                                                                        Functional
                                                                               Emerging




In fulfillment of this standard, the school:                                                            Highly
1.1 Establishes a vision for the school in collaboration with                                           X
     its stakeholders
1.2 Communicates the vision and purpose to build                                                        X
     stakeholder understanding and support
1.3 Identifies goals to advance the vision                                                              X
1.4 Develops and continuously maintains a profile of the                                                X
     school, its students, and the community
1.5 Ensures that the school‘s vision and purpose guide the                                              X
     teaching and learning process
1.6 Reviews its vision and purpose systematically and revises                                           X
     them when appropriate




                                           57
                    Standard 2 - Governance & Leadership
STANDARD: The school provides governance and leadership that promote student
performance and school effectiveness.

Impact Statement: A school is successful in meeting this standard when it has leaders
who are advocates for the school‘s vision and improvement efforts. The leaders provide
direction and allocate resources to implement curricular and co-curricular programs that
enable students to achieve expectations for their learning.          Leaders encourage
collaboration and shared responsibility for school improvement among stakeholders. The
school‘s policies, procedures, and organizational conditions ensure equity of learning
opportunities and support for innovation.


INDICATORS




                                                                  Not Evident




                                                                                           Operational


                                                                                                         Functional
                                                                                Emerging




                                                                                                         Highly
In fulfillment of this standard, the school operates under
the jurisdiction of a governing board that:
2.1 Establishes policies and procedures that provide for the                                             X
      effective operation of the school
2.2 Recognizes and preserves the executive, administrative,                                              X
      and leadership prerogatives of the administrative head
      of the school
2.3 Ensures compliance with applicable local, state, and                                                 X
      federal laws, standards, and regulations
In fulfillment of this standard, the school has leadership
that:
2.4 Employs a system that provides for analysis and review                                               X
      of student performance and school effectiveness
2.5 Fosters a learning community                                                                         X
2.6 Provides teachers and students opportunities to lead                                                 X
2.7 Provides stakeholders meaningful roles in the decision-                                              X
      making process that promote a culture of participation,
      responsibility, and ownership
2.8 Controls curricular and extracurricular activities that are                                          X
      sponsored by the school
2.9 Responds to community expectations and stakeholder                                                   X
      satisfaction
2.10 Implements an evaluation system that provides for the                                               X
      professional growth of all personnel




                                           58
                         Standard 3 - Teaching & Learning
STANDARD: The school provides research-based curriculum and instructional
methods that facilitate achievement for all students.

Impact Statement: A school is successful in meeting this standard when it implements a
curriculum based on clear and measurable expectations for student learning that provides
opportunities for all students to acquire requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Teachers
use proven instructional practices that actively engage students in the learning process.
Teachers provide opportunities for students to apply their knowledge and skills to real world
situations. Teachers give students feedback to improve their performance.


INDICATORS




                                                                       Not Evident




                                                                                                Operational


                                                                                                              Functional
                                                                                     Emerging




                                                                                                              Highly
In fulfillment of this standard, the school:
3.1      Develops and implements curriculum based on clearly                                                  X
         defined expectations for student learning
3.2      Promotes active involvement of students in the learning                                X
         process, including opportunities for them to explore
         application of higher-order thinking skills and investigate
         new approaches to applying their learning
3.3      Gathers, analyzes, and uses data and research in making                                              X
         curricular and instructional choices
3.4      Designs and uses instructional strategies, innovations,                                X
         and activities that are research-based and reflective of
         best practice
3.5      Offers a curriculum that challenges each student to excel,                             X
         reflects a commitment to equity, and demonstrates an
         appreciation of diversity
3.6      Allocates and protects instructional time to support                                   X
         student learning
3.7      Provides for articulation and alignment between and                                    X
         among all levels of schools
3.8      Implements interventions to help students meet                                         X
         expectations for student learning
3.9      Monitors school climate and takes appropriate steps to                                 X
         ensure that it is conducive to student learning
3.10 Provides comprehensive information and media services                                                    X
         that support the curricular and instructional programs
3.11 Ensures that all students and staff members have regular                                   X
         and ready access to instructional technology and a
         comprehensive materials collection that supports the
         curricular and instructional program



                                               59
                  Standard 4 - Documenting & Using Results

STANDARD: The school enacts a comprehensive assessment system that monitors
and documents performance and uses these results to improve student performance
and school effectiveness.

Impact Statement: A school is successful in meeting this standard when it uses a
comprehensive assessment system based on clearly defined performance measures. The
system is used to assess student performance on expectations for student learning, evaluate
the effectiveness of curriculum and instruction, and determine interventions to improve
student performance. The assessment system yields timely and accurate information that is
meaningful and useful to school leaders, teachers, and other stakeholders in understanding
student performance, school effectiveness, and the results of improvement efforts.


INDICATORS




                                                                     Not Evident




                                                                                              Operational


                                                                                                            Functional
                                                                                   Emerging




                                                                                                            Highly
In fulfillment of this standard, the school:
4.1 Establishes performance measures for student learning that                                X
      yield information that is reliable, valid, and bias free
4.2 Develops and implements a comprehensive assessment                                        X
      system for assessing progress toward meeting the
      expectations for student learning
4.3 Uses student assessment data for making decisions for                          X
      continuous improvement of teaching and learning
      processes
4.4 Conducts a systematic analysis of instructional and                            X
      organizational effectiveness and uses the results to improve
      student performance
4.5 Communicates the results of student performance and                                                     X
      school effectiveness to all stakeholders
4.6 Uses comparison and trend data of student performance                                     X
      from comparable schools in evaluating its effectiveness
4.7 Demonstrates verifiable growth in student performance                                     X
4.8 Maintains a secure, accurate, and complete student record                                               X
      system in accordance with state and federal regulations.




                                             60
                    Standard 5 - Resource & Support Systems
STANDARD: The school has the resources and services necessary to support its
vision and purpose and to ensure achievement for all students.

Impact Statement: A school is successful in meeting this standard when it has sufficient
human, material, and fiscal resources to implement a curriculum that enables students to
achieve expectations for student learning, to meet special needs, and to comply with
applicable regulations. The school employs and allocates staff that are well qualified for their
assignments. The school provides ongoing learning opportunities for all staff to improve
their effectiveness. The school ensures compliance with applicable local, state, and federal
regulations.


INDICATORS




                                                                      Not Evident




                                                                                               Operational


                                                                                                             Functional
                                                                                    Emerging




                                                                                                             Highly
In fulfillment of this standard, the school:
5.1    Recruits, employs, and mentors qualified professional                                                 X
       staff that are capable of fulfilling assigned roles and
       responsibilities
5.2    Assigns professional staff responsibilities based on their                                            X
       qualifications (i.e., professional preparation, ability,
       knowledge, and experience)
5.3    Ensures that all staff participate in a continuous program                                            X
       of professional development
5.4    Provides and assigns staff that are sufficient in number to                             X
       meet the vision and purpose of the school
5.5    Budgets sufficient resources to support its educational                                 X
       programs and to implement its plans for improvement
5.6    Monitors all financial transactions through a recognized,                                             X
       regularly audited accounting system
5.7    Maintains the site, facilities, services and equipment to                               X
       provide an environment that is safe and orderly for all
       occupants
5.8    Possesses a written security and crisis management plan                                 X
       with appropriate training for stakeholders
5.9    Ensures that each student has access to guidance services                                             X
       that include, but are not limited to, counseling, appraisal,
       mentoring, staff consulting, referral and educational and
       career planning
5.10 Provides appropriate support for students with special                                    X
       needs




                                              61
        Standard 6 - Stakeholder Communications & Relationships
STANDARD: The school fosters effective communications and relationships with
and among its stakeholders.

Impact Statement: A school is successful in meeting this standard when it has the
understanding, commitment, and support of stakeholders. School personnel seek
opportunities for collaboration and shared leadership among stakeholders to help students
learn and advance improvement efforts.


INDICATORS




                                                                   Not Evident




                                                                                            Operational


                                                                                                          Functional
                                                                                 Emerging




                                                                                                          Highly
In fulfillment of this standard, the school:
6.1 Fosters collaboration with community stakeholders to                         X
     support student learning
6.2 Has formal channels to listen to and communicate with                        X
     stakeholders
6.3 Solicits the knowledge and skills of stakeholders to enhance                 X
     the work of the school
6.4 Communicates the expectations for student learning and                                  X
     goals for improvement to all stakeholders
6.5 Provides information about students, their performance,                                 X
     and school effectiveness that is meaningful and useful to
     stakeholders




                                            62
           Standard 7 - Commitment to Continuous Improvement
STANDARD: The school establishes, implements, and monitors a continuous
process of improvement that focuses on student performance.

Impact Statement: A school is successful in meeting this standard when it implements a
collaborative and ongoing process for improvement that aligns the functions of the school
with the expectations for student learning. Improvement efforts are sustained and the
school demonstrates progress in improving student performance and school effectiveness.
New improvement efforts are informed by the results of earlier efforts through reflection
and assessment of the improvement process.



INDICATORS




                                                                  Not Evident




                                                                                           Operational


                                                                                                         Functional
                                                                                Emerging




                                                                                                         Highly
In fulfillment of this standard, the school:
7.1 Engages in a continuous process of improvement that
     articulates the vision and purpose the school is pursuing
     (Vision); maintains a rich and current description of                                               X
     students, their performance, school effectiveness, and the
     school community (Profile); employs goals and
     interventions to improve student performance (Plan); and
     documents and uses the results to inform what happens
     next (Results)
7.2 Engages stakeholders in the processes of continuous                                    X
     improvement
7.3 Ensures that plans for continuous improvement are aligned
     with the vision and purpose of the school and expectations                            X
     for student learning
7.4 Provides professional development for school personnel to
     help them implement improvement interventions to achieve                              X
     improvement goals
7.5 Monitors and communicates the results of improvement                                   X
     efforts to stakeholders
7.6 Evaluates and documents the effectiveness and impact of                                              X
     its continuous process of improvement




                                            63
                         PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

The vision of Floyd Central High School is ―fostering excellence for a lifetime.‖ The
school‘s mission is to ensure that ―every student successfully completes high school.‖
For both vision and mission, the school‘s professional development program is to provide
training and support to foster excellence through best practice in the areas outlined
through specific target goals. The entire faculty will focus upon improving writing skills
through the writing across the curriculum initiative. Improving and developing school-
wide efforts to ensure the successful completion of appropriate high school programs is
an underlying goal.

The school is fortunate that all teachers in the core subject areas meet the standards for
being highly qualified teachers as established by the federal No Child Left Behind
(NCLB) mandate. Therefore, there is no need to require professional development for
teachers to meet the highly qualified criteria.

Professional development at Floyd Central High School is conducted through several
venues. These include faculty meetings, departmental meetings, new teacher seminars
during year one and year two, workshops in the summer, professional conferences, and
waiver days for early student release. Strategies employed in conducting professional
development for faculty include collaboration, study groups, training trainers, and other
research-based initiatives.


Faculty Meetings
Faculty meetings are scheduled after school twice a month. Faculty meetings are used to
review school calendar events, to discuss and examine test data, and to conduct
professional development activities on curriculum and instructional strategies. During
the second faculty meeting three times per semester, study groups will focus on reading.


Department Meetings
All departments meet a minimum of once a semester with the core departments meeting
as often as four times a year. During these meetings, discussions are held on test data,
curriculum changes, staff issues, relevant mandates from the legislature and the DOE,
and best practices in the classroom.


New Teacher Seminars
 All new teachers to Floyd Central High School, regardless of teaching experience, are
required to participate in a two year mentoring program.      Meetings are held once a
month (in the mornings) to discuss school policies/procedures and to introduce best
practices in the classroom. Some of the topics covered include Differentiated Instruction,
Problem-Based Learning, Cooperative Learning, Bloom‘s Taxonomy, Brain Compatible
Teaching, and test writing.
                                           64
Future Directions

One of the strengths of Floyd Central High School is our ability to anticipate changes and
carefully study data to support those changes. We currently have several study
committees investigating new programs and initiatives. All of these programs would
involve professional development activities.

              Our School Improvement Committee has decided to re-open study of a
               building-wide reading initiative. We had agreed on this focus, but the
               district initiative of curriculum mapping was very time-consuming and the
               committee did not want to burden faculty members with an additional
               program. We plan to begin with reading the book I Read It, But I Don‘t
               Get It (Chris Tovani, Stenhouse, 2000) in study groups during the 2010-
               2011 school year.
              At the urging of the superintendent, we began researching the
               International Baccalaureate Diploma. To date, we have engaged in
               personal research and done site visits to explore bringing this diploma path
               to Floyd Central High School.
              Our current attendance policy is cumbersome and does not yield results
               that are equal to effort. We are in talks with New Albany High School to
               re-write board policy and make better use of staff time.
              Our Board of Education has asked us to enter discussion on drug testing
               athletes and drivers. This policy may also extend to those in the
               performing arts. We currently have committees active in developing
               policy and procedures to implement drug testing in the fall of 2010.
              Two years ago we began offering ―Project Lead the Way‖ classes, that
               provide a career pathway to engineering or engineering technology. The
               classes have been very successful and we will be seeking national
               certification for the course sequence.
              We have opened a course sequence in the business department to ―educate
               students in finance and business fundamentals as they relate to financial
               institutions, financial planning, business and personal financial services,
               investment and securities, risk management and corporate finance‖
               (Indiana State Course Titles and Descriptions, November, 2008.) The
               sequence is called the ―Finance Academy‖ has includes an advisory board
               of community members. This has opened an additional career pathway for
               our students.




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