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The Earned Income Tax Credit and the Volunteer Income Tax

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The Earned Income Tax Credit and the Volunteer Income Tax Powered By Docstoc
					The Earned Income
Tax Credit and the
Volunteer Income Tax
Assistance Program

HOW ELECTED OFFICIALS CAN
GET INVOLVED IN OUTREACH
         THE EARNED INCOME TAX CREDIT AND THE
         VOLUNTEER INCOME TAX ASSISTANCE
         PROGRAM: HOW ELECTED OFFICIALS CAN GET
         INVOLVED IN OUTREACH

 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
 CHAPTER 1: EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
        About the Federal EITC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
        About State EITCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
        About the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
        EITC Q&A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

 CHAPTER 2: IDEAS FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
        Ideas for Elected Officials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
        Sample Newsletter Article and Website Ideas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
        Template Op-Ed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
        Template Media Advisory for Elected Official’s Site Visit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
        Template Press Release for Elected Official’s Site Visit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
        Talking Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

 CHAPTER 3: HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
        How Elected Officials are Getting Involved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
        Media Coverage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

 CHAPTER 4: EITC STATISTICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
        EITC Receipt by State. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
        EITC Receipt by Congressional District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
        Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Results by State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

 CHAPTER 5: EITC RESOURCES AND CONTACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119




To find a VITA site near you, call 1-800-829-1040 or visit the National Community Tax Coalition’s website
at http://www.tax-coalition.org/programs.cfm
Dear Elected Official,

Thank you for taking the time to explore how you can work with your constituents to help
them build economic security for their families and in their community. The federal Earned
Income Tax Credit (EITC), which is also available as a state tax credit in 24 states, helps low
and middle income working families keep more of the money they earn so they can afford needed
food and other necessities. Unfortunately, many eligible families aren’t aware of the EITC and
aren’t receiving the credit. As an elected official, you can help raise awareness of the program
and connect with your constituents – a win-win situation.

The National Community Tax Coalition (NCTC), a nationwide network of community tax
preparation programs and The Hatcher Group, a public affairs and communications firm that
connects nonprofits and foundations to policymakers and the media, have come together with
the generous support of the Kellogg Foundation to raise awareness of the EITC, the importance
of Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) sites, and the need to build support for EITC
benefit expansions and program funding increases.

One of the most effective ways to achieve these goals is for local, state, and federal elected
officials to help educate their constituents about the availability of the EITC, free tax assistance
sites, and to work in support of the program. You have a valuable “bully pulpit” that allows you
to reach more people in your community and educate them about building economic security. In
this troubling economy filled with news of job layoffs, rising gas and food prices, and home
foreclosures, it’s more important than ever that families in need know about the programs that
exist to help.

Many members of Congress, governors and state legislators are already conducting EITC
outreach, as you’ll see in the Examples of Outreach Chapter. We’re proud of the EITC’s long
history of bipartisan support. We encourage you to take a look at what others are doing and see
how you can get involved. While an average of 75 percent of eligible people receive the EITC,
there are many families in your state that are missing out on benefits that could help them climb
the economic ladder.

We’ve put together this toolkit, and an accompanying version specifically for EITC advocates, to
help make your job easier. Included in the guide, you’ll find new and unique EITC outreach ideas
for working with your constituents, and template materials such as press releases, newsletter
articles and opinion-editorials. We’ve also packed it full of EITC data and resource materials so
you have all the facts at your fingertips on how important the EITC is to America’s families and
why it should be supported and expanded.

Thank you for your interest in this guide and support for this valuable program. If you have any
questions or would like any assistance in conducting a site visit to a VITA site or being
connected with EITC advocates in your state, please contact:

Amy Battjer, Senior Associate, The Hatcher Group, amy@thehatchergroup.com, 301-656-0348
Laura Hayes, Senior Associate, The Hatcher Group, laura@thehatchergroup.com, 301-656-0348
Lucy Mullany, NCTC Field Organizer, lmullany@economicprogress.org, 312-252-0280 x. 270

An electronic version of this toolkit can be found at
http://www.thehatchergroup.com/EITCoutreach.html

Sincerely,




David Marzahl                                               Ed Hatcher
Executive Director                                          President
Center for Economic Progress                                The Hatcher Group
Chapter 1
 EITC
 BACKGROUND
 AND
 DOCUMENTS
        About the Federal EITC
        About State EITCs
        About the Volunteer Income
        Tax Assistance Program
        EITC Q&A
                                ABOUT THE
            1                   FEDERAL EARNED INCOME TAX CREDIT
                                The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a federal tax credit for low-income working
                                individuals and families. It is intended to reduce the tax burden on low-income workers,
EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS




                                supplement their wages, and help families make ends meet. Even workers whose income is too
                                small to pay taxes can receive a refund though the EITC. In tax year 2006, the EITC provided
                                $43.7 billion in reduced or eliminated tax liability and cash refunds to more than 22 million low-
                                income families.

                                The EITC is one of the most successful federal anti-poverty programs ever developed. The
                                impact of the EITC on a working family’s income can be considerable. For example, in 2009, a
                                single parent raising two or more children and earning between $12,050 and $18,750 is eligible
                                for the maximum EITC of $4,824—a full 25 to 40 percent increase in the family’s income.
                                Taxpayers with one child can claim a maximum EITC of $2,917. Claiming the Child Tax Credit
                                in addition can provide up to $1,000 per child to eligible families.


                                                                                                                         Who is eligible?
                                                                                                                         Working families with children
                                                                                                                         that have annual incomes
                                                                                                                         below approximately $34,000
                                                                                                                         to $41,000 (depending on
                                                                                                                         marital status and the number
                                                                                                                         of children in the family) are
                                                                                                                         eligible for the EITC. Also, low-
                                                                                                                         income workers without
                                                                                                                         children who have incomes
                                                                                                                         below approximately $13,000
                                                                                                                         ($16,000 for a married couple)
                                                                                                                         can receive a very small EITC.1



                                More than four million people – roughly half of them children – escape poverty each year as a
                                result of the EITC. A study by The Brookings Institution found the EITC reduces poverty among
                                young children by nearly one-fourth.2

                                The EITC significantly increases the number of single parents who join the workforce. One
                                study found the proportion of single mothers who worked increased dramatically between 1984
                                and 1996 due to legislative increases in federal EITC benefits.3


                                1
                                  Eligibility description and chart provided by Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, “Policy Basics: The Earned Income Tax Credit”
                                (http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2505)
                                2
                                   Sawhill, I. & Thomas, A. (2001). A hand up for the bottom third: Toward a new agenda for low-income working families. Washington,
                                DC: The Brookings Institution.
                                3
                                   Meyer, B. D. & Rosenbaum, D. T. (2001). Welfare, the Earned Income Tax Credit, and the labor supply of single mothers. Quarterly
                                Journal of Economics, 116(3), pp. 1063–1114.

           6
Interviews with EITC recipients find that they use their refunds to pay off debt, invest in educa-
tion, and secure decent housing, thus enhancing economic well-being and promoting commu-
nity revitalization in their neighborhoods.
                                                                                                                                     1
AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT




                                                                                                                                    EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS
In the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the Earned Income Tax Credit
was temporarily expanded for two specific groups: families with three or more children and
married couples. Effective for the 2010 and 2011 filing seasons, the EITC will support these tax-
payers by:

       Creating a new “third tier” of the EITC for families with three or more children. In this
       tier, the credit would phase in at 45 percent of income (up from 40 percent under current
       law), effectively increasing the maximum credit for these families by almost $600.
       Increasing marriage penalty relief by raising the income threshold at which the EITC be-
       gins to phase out for married couples to $5,000 above the amount for unmarried filers (an
       increase of $2,000).

These changes will benefit an estimated 7.7 million families nationwide by increasing the
amount of EITC for which they are eligible and make 900,000 families newly eligible for the
credit. The amount of EITC dollars going to American families will increase by $4 billion – an
8.8 percent increase from current law. President Obama’s budget includes a proposal to make
these temporary changes to the EITC permanent, and U.S. Senator Max Baucus recently intro-
duced legislation that would make these improvements permanent.

HOW TO IMPROVE THE EARNED INCOME TAX CREDIT

By reducing poverty and encouraging work, the EITC is viewed as one of the most successful
policies enacted in recent history. Yet the EITC could do more to close the gap between what
families earn and what they need to make ends meet. While the American Recovery and Rein-
vestment Act made significant improvements to the federal EITC, those changes are temporary
and additional changes could be made to improve the EITC even further. A few options have
been developed by legislators, think tanks and public policy organizations, including:

Expand the credit for childless workers
The EITC is available to childless workers, but only for individuals with incomes of up to
$13,000 ($16,000 for married couples). However, these low-income workers still face a high
federal tax burden and many of these tax filers are non-custodial parents that provide child
support to their children’s custodial parent.

Further, labor force participation among lesser-skilled men is declining and an expansion to the


4
  See The Brookings Institution. 2008. “The Scouting Report: Decrease Poverty and Increase Opportunity.” November 26, 2008 Inter-
view with Rebecca Blank, http://www.brookings.edu/events/2008/1126_poverty_chat_transition.


                                                                                                                                                7
                                EITC could provide an additional incentive to work.4 The EITC could be expanded for these
                                low-income workers by increasing the income limits for which they are eligible for the credit,
            1                   increasing the maximum credit amount, and reducing the age at which they can claim the credit
                                (currently an individual must be 25 to be eligible for the EITC).

                                Further reducing the “marriage penalty”
                                The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act slightly reduced the “marriage penalty” built into
EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS




                                the EITC. Currently, families with two earners must report both incomes – a policy which
                                results in lower EITC benefits for married couples. However, there remains a significant
                                marriage penalty even after the ARRA adjustment. Proposals include allowing the couple to
                                disregard half of the earnings of the lower earning spouse if that would provide a larger EITC5 or
                                allowing the primary worker to claim the child-based EITC and the secondary earner to claim a
                                smaller credit for low-earning spouses.6




                                5
                                  Center for American Progress. 2007. “From Poverty to Prosperity: A National Strategy to Cut Poverty in Half.” Washington, D.C.
                                (April, 2007), http://www.american¬progress.org/issues/2007/04/pdf/poverty_report.pdf, accessed March 25, 2009; Berube, Alan,
                                David Park, and Elizabeth Kneebone. 2008. “Metro Raise: Boosting the Earned Income Tax Credit to Help Metropolitan Workers and
                                Families.” Washington, D.C.: Policy Program, Brookings Institution (June).
                                6
                                    Berlin, Gordon. 2009. “Transforming the EITC to Reduce Poverty and Inequality.” Pathways (Winter): 28–32.



           8
Table 1. EITC-Eligible Tax Units and Credit Amounts Pre-Recovery Act Expansions and Post-Recovery Act Expansions

                                        Pre-Recovery Act Expansions
                                      Pre-Recovery ActExpansions                                        Post-Recovery Act Expansions
                                                                                                      Pre-Recovery Act Expansions
                                                                                        Tax Units

                       EITC-Eligible EITC-Eligible      EITC Sum Average EITC
                                                                                        Benefiting
                                                                                          From
                                                                                                       Newly EITC-   Additional
                                                                                                       Eligible Tax EITC Amount %Increase in
                                                                                                                                                       1
State                    Tax Units Tax Units (%)         ($1000s)     ($)               Proposal*         Units       ($1000s)    EITC Amount
Alabama                      463,636        22.8%            864,551      1,865            145,335            17,599      67,962         7.9%
Alaska                        59,167        18.0%            100,666      1,701             16,104             1,571        8,078        8.0%
Arizona                      500,123        17.4%            957,273      1,914            184,556            21,357     100,441        10.5%




                                                                                                                                                      EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS
Arkansas                     284,165        23.4%            553,302      1,947             98,128            10,736      45,243         8.2%
California                 2,759,162        16.8%          5,561,291      2,016          1,062,709          117,043      588,403        10.6%
Colorado                     347,907        15.2%            620,598      1,784            109,517            12,034      59,717         9.6%
Connecticut                  206,087        12.4%            367,388      1,783             53,809             7,589      26,741         7.3%
Delaware                      64,363        16.1%            119,963      1,864             19,220             2,918        9,718        8.1%
District of Columbia          41,302        12.9%             65,547      1,587              7,450               743        3,982        6.1%
Florida                    1,433,629        16.6%          2,670,844      1,863            434,257            54,316     217,202         8.1%
Georgia                      817,040        19.6%          1,587,836      1,943            269,558            29,314     133,699         8.4%
Hawaii                        96,802        15.4%            175,339      1,811             29,996             4,450      15,707         9.0%
Idaho                        126,819        19.5%            245,035      1,932             54,954             7,757      29,558        12.1%
Illinois                     970,985        16.7%          1,882,262      1,939            322,413            37,312     171,884         9.1%
Indiana                      515,385        18.2%            938,116      1,820            159,169            18,997      83,429         8.9%
Iowa                         218,225        16.0%            373,798      1,713             63,007             9,873      33,649         9.0%
Kansas                       205,956        16.8%            379,559      1,843             70,901             9,465      37,984        10.0%
Kentucky                     405,672        22.0%            742,291      1,830            114,749            14,372      58,389         7.9%
Louisiana                    450,028        24.1%            864,241      1,920            130,131            13,293      59,572         6.9%
Maine                        106,538        17.2%            190,305      1,786             32,700             4,797      15,359         8.1%
Maryland                     332,594        12.6%            603,499      1,815             85,616            13,768      42,331         7.0%
Massachusetts                381,797        12.3%            684,086      1,792             90,116            12,304      42,248         6.2%
Michigan                     857,590        19.0%          1,578,230      1,840            238,707            27,669     126,423         8.0%
Minnesota                    347,122        14.3%            596,494      1,718            102,648            16,122      55,049         9.2%
Mississippi                  318,757        26.2%            621,784      1,951             99,620             9,917      47,675         7.7%
Missouri                     519,440        19.4%            941,069      1,812            154,608            17,987      78,102         8.3%
Montana                       86,493        19.8%            161,183      1,864             23,807             2,777      12,473         7.7%
Nebraska                     133,784        16.6%            258,132      1,929             49,999             5,048      26,766        10.4%
Nevada                       180,663        14.9%            331,458      1,835             66,194             7,668      35,511        10.7%
New Hampshire                 76,515        12.4%            134,159      1,753             20,062             2,512        9,055        6.7%
New Jersey                   503,322        12.5%            967,244      1,922            145,758            19,163      73,032         7.6%
New Mexico                   211,900        24.1%            391,777      1,849             62,627             5,482      32,221         8.2%
New York                   1,388,714        15.6%          2,653,481      1,911            424,293            49,447     216,425         8.2%
North Carolina               796,537        19.6%          1,485,543      1,865            250,511            31,901     123,655         8.3%
North Dakota                  46,190        15.8%             76,827      1,663             13,069             1,245        6,115        8.0%
Ohio                         962,715        18.4%          1,781,718      1,851            264,930            34,424     134,023         7.5%
Oklahoma                     347,572        21.7%            677,211      1,948            129,410            15,073      66,298         9.8%
Oregon                       298,261        16.9%            511,155      1,714             93,662            12,607      48,504         9.5%
Pennsylvania                 951,997        16.5%          1,726,267      1,813            270,381            35,596     139,967         8.1%
Rhode Island                  69,592        14.0%            133,070      1,912             20,567             1,887      10,253         7.7%
South Carolina               403,048        20.6%            748,879      1,858            111,784            15,840      55,478         7.4%
South Dakota                  67,902        18.7%            113,473      1,671             19,791             2,548        9,002        7.9%
Tennessee                    587,439        21.2%          1,075,600      1,831            174,891            21,035      84,511         7.9%
Texas                      2,167,278        21.5%          4,480,302      2,067            858,983            80,446     463,129        10.3%
Utah                         190,419        17.7%            386,608      2,030             88,628            14,242      48,981        12.7%
Vermont                       53,965        17.7%             96,208      1,783             12,464             1,294        6,726        7.0%
Virginia                     519,578        14.5%            968,004      1,863            142,961            20,112      68,741         7.1%
Washington                   468,405        15.4%            810,532      1,730            137,400            16,687      70,258         8.7%
West Virginia                173,651        21.7%            306,160      1,763             50,186             7,914      24,981         8.2%
Wisconsin                    422,324        16.0%            770,174      1,824            116,765            16,431      61,877         8.0%
Wyoming                       36,132        14.4%             60,063      1,662              9,941             1,252        5,845        9.7%

U.S. Total               23,974,687           17.5%      45,390,595            1,893      7,709,042         915,934       3,992,374         8.8%

Source: Brookings Institution MetroTax Model
*Units "benefit" from an expansion proposal if (A) their EITC credit amount increases; or (B) they become eligible for the EITC under the new param

Note: This analysis uses the 2007 American Community Survey PUMS. "Current Law" is based on tax year 2007 eligibility criteria.
"House Expansion Proposal" includes a third tier for families with three or more qualifying children that follows the income guidelines
for families with two children, but phases in at 45%; it also includes a marriage penalty relief provision that phases out $2,000 after
TY2007 levels for married couples.

                                                                                                                                                                  9
                                ABOUT STATE EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS
            1                   Twenty-four states (counting the District of Columbia) have created a state version of the
                                Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) to reduce the tax burden on low- and moderate-income
                                working families. The state EITC supplements the federal credit and works as a rebate for state
                                taxes paid by low-income working people. In addition, local governments in Montgomery
EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS




                                County, Md., San Francisco and New York City offer their own version of EITCs.

                                                                                                     Almost all state EITCs are
                                                                                                     “refundable,” meaning that if
                                                                                                     the size of the family’s credit
                                                                                                     exceeds the amount of state
                                                                                                     income tax it owes, the fam-
                                                                                                     ily receives the difference in
                                                                                                     the form of a refund check.

                                                                                                       States with EITCs use the
                                                                                                       same eligibility rules as the
                                                                                                       federal EITC, meaning only
                                                                                                       people who work can qualify
                                                                                                       for the credit. To simplify
                                                                                                       the process for states, most
                                                                                                       states typically use a fixed
                                Map provided by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
                                                                                                       percentage of the federal
                                                                                                       credit to calculate the state
                                credit. State credits range from 3.5 percent of the federal credit to 40 percent of the federal
                                credit.

                                The first state EITCs were enacted in the 1980s and a few states picked up the policy in the
                                1990s. But in recent years, state EITCs have become increasingly popular with eight states
                                enacting a state-level EITC and 11 states expanding existing credits since 2002. A number of fac-
                                tors contribute to the increased interest in adopting state EITC:

                                      CONTINUED CHILD POVERTY AND ECONOMIC HARDSHIP
                                      Millions of children in working families live in poverty, and millions of families with
                                      incomes modestly above the poverty line have difficulty affording food, housing and other
                                      necessities. The federal EITC now lifts about 4.4 million peopleo — over half of them
                                      children — out of poverty each year, making it the nation’s most effective antipoverty
                                      program for working families. State EITCs supplement the federal credit, lifting more fam-
                                      ilies out of poverty and helping near-poor families make ends meet.

                                      SLOW WAGE GROWTH
                                      Wage and salary growth has been weak in recent years. Concern about low wages has led
                                      a number of states and the federal government to raise their minimum wages, but even


           10
        with those increases, many low-wage jobs don’t provide a sufficient income on which to
        live. Refundable state EITCs provide low-income workers with a needed income boost.

        REGRESSIVE TAX SYSTEMS
                                                                                                                                      1
        States rely heavily on “regressive” taxes such as sales, excise and property taxes, which hit
        poorer families harder than wealthier ones when measured as a share of a family’s income.
        Since a state EITC is aimed only at low- and moderate-income families, it helps offset the




                                                                                                                                     EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS
        impact of regressive taxes, making state tax systems more fair.

        EXTENSIVE EVIDENCE THAT EITCS ENCOURAGE WORK
        Studies have shown that EITCs encourage families to obtain jobs and remain employed.

        EVIDENCE THAT EITCS ARE USED FOR ASSET-BUILDING EXPENDITURES
        Many people use their EITC refunds to make the kinds of investments that enhance eco-
        nomic security and promote economic opportunity, such as paying off debt and investing
        in education.

        EASE OF ADMINISTRATION
        A state EITC requires adding just one line to a state income tax form and the calculation is
        very simple. States with EITCs report very low additional administrative costs with the
        credit – typically a fraction of one percent.7




7
  List of reasons for increased interest taken from Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, “Policy Basics: Sate Earned Income Tax
Credits” (http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2506)


                                                                                                                                            11
                                     TABLE 1: STATE EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS BASED ON THE FEDERAL EITC
                                                                                                                                               Workers Without
            1                                                            Percentage of Federal Credit                                              Qualifying
                                            State*                     (Tax Year 2008 Except as Noted)                    Refundable?          Children Eligible?
                                Delaware                                               20%                                    No                      Yes
                                District of Columbia                                   40%                                    Yes                     Yes
                                Indiana                                       6% (to 9% in 2009)                              Yes                     Yes
                                Illinois                                                5%                                    Yes                     Yes
EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS




                                Iowa                                                    7%                                    Yes                     Yes
                                Kansas                                                 17%                                    Yes                     Yes
                                Louisiana                                              3.5%                                   Yes                     Yes
                                Maine                                   5% (partially refundable in 2010)                   Partiallya                Yes
                                Maryland b                                             25%                                    Yes                     Yes
                                Massachusetts                                          15%                                    Yes                     Yes
                                Michigan                                     10% (to 20% in 2009)                             Yes                     Yes
                                Minnesota c                                      Average 33%                                  Yes                     Yes
                                Nebraska                                               10%                                    Yes                     Yes
                                New Jersey                                  22.5% (to 25% in 2009)                            Yes                     Yes
                                New Mexico                                             10%                                    Yes                     Yes
                                New York d                                             30%                                    Yes                     Yes
                                North Carolina e                             3.5% (to 5% in 2009)                             Yes                     Yes
                                Oklahoma                                                5%                                    Yes                     Yes
                                Oregon f                                                6%                                    Yes                     Yes
                                Rhode Island                                           25%                                  Partiallyg                Yes
                                Vermont                                                32%                                    Yes                     Yes
                                Virginia                                               20%                                    No                      Yes
                                Washington                                5% in 2009 (to 10% in 2010)                         Yes                     Yes
                                                                                  4% — one child
                                                                                14% — two children                              Yes                       No
                                Wisconsin                                      43% — three children




                                *Notes: From 1999 to 2001, Colorado offered a 10 percent refundable EITC financed from required rebates under the state’s “Tax-
                                payer Bill of Rights” amendment. Those rebates, and hence the EITC, were suspended beginning in 2002 due to lack of funds and
                                again in 2005 as a result of a voter-approved five-year suspension of TABOR. Under current law, the rebates will resume in 2011,
                                but a recent income tax cut that also depends on the rebates is likely to exhaust the funds, leaving the EITC unfunded.
                                a
                                  Maine's EITC was made partially refundable during the 2009 legislative session. For tax years 2010 and beyond the EITC will be
                                refundable up to $150 for taxpayers filing married joint returns and $125 for all other taxpayers.
                                b
                                  Maryland also offers a non-refundable EITC set at 50 percent of the federal credit. Taxpayers in effect may claim either the refund-
                                able credit or the non-refundable credit, but not both.
                                c
                                  Minnesota’s credit for families with children, unlike the other credits shown in this table, is not expressly structured as a percentage
                                of the federal credit. Depending on income level, the credit for families with children may range from 25 percent to 45 percent of the
                                federal credit; taxpayers without children may receive a 25 percent credit.
                                d
                                  Should the federal government reduce New York’s share of the TANF block grant, the New York credit would be reduced automati-
                                cally to the 1999 level of 20 percent.
                                e
                                  North Carolina's EITC is scheduled to expire in 2013.
                                f
                                  Oregon's EITC is scheduled to expire at the end of 2013.
                                g
                                  Rhode Island made a very small portion of its EITC refundable effective in Tax Year 2003. In 2006, the refundable portion was in-
                                creased from 10 percent to 15 percent of the nonrefundable credit (i.e., 3.75 percent of the federal EITC)
                                h
                                  Washington’s EITC is worth five percent of the federal EITC or $25, whichever is greater. When the matching rate rises to ten per-
                                cent in 2010, the minimum value will rise to $50.




           12
ABOUT THE VOLUNTEER INCOME TAX
ASSISTANCE PROGRAM                                                                                      1
BUILDING FINANCIAL SECURITY FOR LOW-INCOME FAMILIES




                                                                                                       EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS
Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) programs offer free tax help and related
financial services to low-income individuals and families. During the 2009 filing season, VITA
programs directly served more than one million underserved taxpayers, including low-wage
workers, persons with disabilities, the elderly, Native Americans, rural populations, and those
with limited English-language skills. VITA clients often have the opportunity to open bank ac-
counts and to invest their refunds in safe financial products such as U.S. Savings Bonds, while
avoiding the high fees charged by paid preparers and refund anticipation loans (RALs).

Due to high unemployment rates, reduced wages and scaled-back hours, many additional work-
ers will qualify for VITA services over the next two years. For families living on tight budgets, it
is now more important than ever to have access to free tax services and the opportunity to take
advantage of the new tax benefits enacted as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment
Act.8 At a time when VITA programs are poised to ramp-up services, sources of local funding
have started to dry up. State and local governments are cutting back, while private foundations
are beginning to limit grant-making.

Funding from state and local governments, private foundations and individual donors in combi-
nation with in-kind contributions from volunteers and community organizations enabled VITA
programs to dramatically increase the number of returns prepared over the past five years. Many
VITA programs are firmly established in their communities, but struggle to balance the need to
meet growing demand with the desire to reach underserved populations where there are no
VITA sites or other alternatives to paid preparers. The 2008 Consolidated Appropriations Act9
created an $8 million competitive matching grant program to enable grant recipients to assist
underserved populations living and working in hard-to-reach rural, Native, urban and suburban
communities.

Congress can help VITA programs meet the tax and financial service needs of underserved
communities by continuing to increase the appropriation for the VITA Grant Program. Ad-
ditional funding, beyond the original $8 million appropriation, would make it possible for VITA
programs to effectively serve and reach more working families hit hard by the recession.

THE IMPACT OF COMMUNITY VITA

Community VITA programs are well worth the additional investment. For underserved work-
ers, the program offers free tax preparation and serves as a gateway to mainstream financial serv-
ices. To the volunteers who dedicate tens of thousands of hours during tax season, VITA

8
    Pub. L. 111-5, Sep. 30, 2009.
9
    Pub. L. 110-161, Dec. 26, 2007 (121 Stat. 1975).


                                                                                                              13
                                programs are an opportunity to give back to their communities. For the federal government,
                                VITA programs are a way to improve taxpayer services and to ensure that workers receive the
            1                   tax benefits they have earned. A substantial increase in federal funding for the VITA Grant Pro-
                                gram will enable community VITA programs to strengthen and expand their role as:

                                          One Piece of the Economic Recovery Puzzle: VITA programs help low-income workers
                                          to access tax benefits, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit.
EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS




                                          A Smart Alternative to Paid Preparers: VITA program clients keep 100 percent of their
                                          tax refunds and avoid high-cost loan products.

                                          A Bridge to Financial Security: Many VITA programs offer clients the opportunity to
                                          open bank accounts, invest in U.S. Savings Bonds and access public benefits.


                                THE VITA GRANT PROGRAM

                                While VITA programs have been in existence for 40 years, which is as long as the federally
                                funded Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) and Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC)
                                programs combined, the program did not receive federal funding until the 2008 Consolidated
                                Appropriations Act10 authorized an $8 million competitive matching grant program.

                                The 2009 Omnibus Appropriations Act11 extended funding by $8 million through September 30,
                                2010. And the President’s FY 2010 budget proposes to continue funding by an additional $8 mil-
                                lion through September 30, 2011.

                                Congress created the matching grant program to help VITA programs achieve the follow-
                                ing objectives:

                                          Enable the VITA programs to extend services to underserved populations in hardest-to-
                                          reach areas, both urban and non-urban
                                          Increase the capacity to file returns electronically
                                          Heighten quality control
                                          Enhance training of volunteers
                                          Significantly improve the accuracy rate of returns prepared at VITA sites.

                                FIRST-YEAR RESULTS

                                From July to September 2008, 379 VITA programs applied for $30 million in funding with 111
                                first-year applicants receiving a grant. Grant amounts ranged from $731 to $600,000 with a
                                median grant of $56,000. Of the $8 million available in FY 2008, the IRS allocated $7.4 million



                                10
                                     Pub. L. 110-161, Dec. 26, 2007 (121 Stat. 1975).
                                11
                                     Pub. L. 111-8, Mar. 11, 2009 (123 Stat. 634).


           14
for grants and retained the remaining $600,000 to cover a portion of the $2.1 million it cost to
administer the program in its first year.12

Diverse organizations received funding, including community-based organizations, local United
                                                                                                                                               1
Ways, asset-building coalitions, national nonprofits, AARP, community action agencies, local
and tribal governments and public universities. Programs serving rural populations received
one-fourth of the grant funding, while organizations serving Native American communities and




                                                                                                                                              EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS
disabled persons received 5 and 3 percent of the funding, respectively.

During the 2009 filing season, the IRS conducted its first rigorous evaluation of VITA tax prepa-
ration accuracy.13 The study, which will serve as a baseline for future evaluations, is expected to
be released in late 2009.

VITA programs file more than 90 percent of tax returns electronically. During filing season
2009, approximately half of all VITA clients requested direct deposit with nearly 3,000 choosing
the split refund option (a substantial increase from the 2008 filing season) that enables taxpay-
ers to direct refunds toward multiple accounts. VITA programs view direct deposit and split
refunds as a way to promote asset-building at tax sites. For example, in 2009, numerous
programs allowed clients to direct a portion of their refund toward the purchase of U.S. Savings
Bonds.

THE COST OF PAID TAX PREPARATION AND REFUND ANTICIPATION LOANS

Low-income workers and their families have benefited from the creation and expansion of
refundable tax credits, such as the EITC and the Child Tax Credit. However, these and other tax
credits continue to increase tax code complexity, making it nearly impossible for low-income
workers to complete their tax returns unassisted. The majority of Americans need help prepar-
ing their tax returns. In 2007, paid tax preparers completed nearly 87 million tax returns – 63
percent of all returns filed. The percent of low-income taxpayers relying on paid tax preparers is
even higher: for example, nearly three-fourths of the 23 million EITC recipients rely on a paid
preparer.

H&R Block, one of the more competitively-priced tax preparers, charged an average of $187 per
return in 2009. Meanwhile, consumer advocates estimate that in 2007, 5.4 million EITC recipi-
ents took out a refund anticipation loan (RAL) at an average cost of $96 per loan. As VITA
programs plan how to help clients take advantage of next filing season’s expanded tax benefits,
many paid preparers will be looking for ways to profit from expected large tax refunds.

In 2008, the average VITA client earned $18,800 before taxes or about $9 per hour. At this hourly
rate, a person must work 21 hours just to cover the average cost of tax preparation at H&R
Block. This same person needs to work nearly 6.5 additional hours to purchase an H&R Block
refund anticipation loan.

12
   During a May 20, 2009 meeting at the Center for Economic Progress’s office in Chicago, IL, the Internal Revenue Service’s
Stakeholders, Partnerships, Education, and Communication office provided information on the fiscal year 2008 administrative ex-
penses and indicated that the IRS would increase the allocation of grant funds toward administrative expenses in fiscal year 2009.
13
   The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) conducts an evaluation each year. Although the study includes a
statistically valid sample of tax sites and tax returns, it islimited to a small number of tax sites. Further, the 2008 audit examined only
36 returns between VITA and the Tax Counseling for the Elderly programs.
                                                                                                                                                     15
                                REFUND ANTICIPATION LOANS14
            1                   Refund Anticipation Loans (RALs) are one- to two-week loans secured by a taxpayer’s expected
                                tax refund. For a steep price, RALs provide taxpayers near-instant access to their tax refunds.
                                Unfortunately, many taxpayers do not understand the true cost of RALs or know that by choos-
                                ing direct deposit they can receive their tax refund in as little as 10 days. Paid tax preparation
EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS




                                and RALs are an enormous drain on federal programs like the EITC and Child Tax Credit. Every
                                dollar spent on high-cost services and products is one less dollar hard-working taxpayers have
                                available to spend or save.

                                       8.7 million taxpayers purchased a RAL during the 2007 filing season
                                       Taxpayers paid an estimated $833 million in RAL fees
                                       The cost of a $3,000 RAL ranges from $62 to $110
                                       63 percent of RAL customers receive the EITC
                                       RAL fees drain $523 million from the EITC program

                                COST OF PAID TAX PREPARATION AND RALS TO THE EITC PROGRAM 15
                                 Type of fee                                                      Cost to taxpayer            Drain on EITC Program

                                 Tax preparation fee                                              $183                        $996 million

                                 RAL loan fee (including dummy account fee)                       $58 or $107.50              $523 million

                                 Add-on RAL Fee (for 20%)                                         $40                         $44 million

                                 Total Cost                                                       $281 or $330.50             $1.56 billion


                                Source: Fox, Jean Ann and Chi Chi Wu, Big Business, Big Bucks: Quickie Tax Loans Generate Profits for Banks and Tax Preparers
                                While Putting Low-Income Taxpayers At Risk, National Consumer Law Center and Consumer Federation of America, Washington,
                                DC: Feb. 2009 http://www.consumerlaw.org/issues/refund_anticipation/content/2009_RAL_Report.pdf.


                                COMMUNITY VITA AND ASSET-BUILDING SERVICES

                                Tax preparation remains the cornerstone of VITA programs. But in recent years, more VITA pro-
                                grams have offered financial services and products to help clients save and invest their tax
                                refunds. Total federal tax refunds returned to VITA clients reached $1.4 billion in 2009, mak-
                                ing tax season the time for workers to take account of their family’s finances and invest in their
                                children’s futures.

                                A recent survey of National Community Tax Coalition member organizations found that two
                                out of three programs offer clients the opportunity to open checking and saving accounts at tax


                                14
                                   Fox, Jean Ann and Chi Chi Wu, Big Business, Big Bucks: Quickie Tax Loans Generate Profits for Banks and Tax Preparers While
                                Putting Low-Income Taxpayers At Risk, National Consumer Law Center and Consumer Federation of America, Washington, DC:
                                Feb. 2009, http://www.consumerlaw.org/issues/refund_anticipation/content/2009_RAL_Report.pdf.
                                15
                                   Fox, Jean Ann and Chi Chi Wu, Big Business, Big Bucks: Quickie Tax Loans Generate Profits for Banks and Tax Preparers While
                                Putting Low-Income Taxpayers At Risk, National Consumer Law Center and Consumer Federation of America, Washington, DC:
                                Feb. 2009, http://www.consumerlaw.org/issues/refund_anticipation/content/2009_RAL_Report.pdf.

           16
time. In addition, one-quarter of programs offer clients the opportunity to invest a portion of
their refund in U.S. Savings Bonds or Certificates of Deposit (CDs). Each tax season, VITA
programs offer new, innovative financial products to connect their clients to the financial
mainstream. For example, during the 2009 filing season, several programs piloted low-fee
                                                                                                   1
prepaid debit cards that allow unbanked clients to take advantage of direct deposit, electronic
bill pay, and ATM access. VITA programs not only open doors to working-family tax credits,
but also act as a gateway to financial opportunity.




                                                                                                  EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS




                                                                                                         17
                                EITC Q & A
            1                   BASIC FACTS ABOUT THE EITC:

                                Q. What is the Earned Income Tax Credit?
EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS




                                A. The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a federal tax credit for low-income working individ-
                                   uals and families. It is intended to reduce the tax burden on low-income workers, supplement
                                   their wages and help families make ends meet. Even workers whose income is too small to
                                   pay taxes can receive a refund though the EITC. In tax year 2006, the EITC provided $43.7
                                   billion in reduced or eliminated tax liability and cash refunds to 22.4 million low-income
                                   families.

                                Q. What does it mean to be a refundable tax credit?

                                A. This means that the family gets a refund check even when the credit is greater than the
                                   amount they owe in taxes. Due to the refundable nature of the EITC, it has become the
                                   largest federal income support program for low-income working families.

                                Q. Who qualifies for the EITC?

                                A. Working families with children that have annual incomes below approximately $35,000 to
                                   $48,000 (depending on marital status and the number of children in the family) generally are
                                   eligible for the EITC. Also, poor workers without children who have incomes below approxi-
                                   mately $13,000 ($16,000 for a married couple) can receive a very small EITC.

                                Q. How do people claim the EITC?

                                A. To claim the EITC, you must file a tax return. Families making below $42,000 can get their
                                   taxes done for free at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) site. These trained volun-
                                   teers can help families complete their taxes and ensure they claim valuable credits including
                                   the EITC and the Child Tax Credit. You can find a VITA site by calling the IRS toll-free num-
                                   ber at 1-800-906-9887 or visiting the National Community Tax Coalition website at
                                   www.tax-coalition.org.

                                MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT THE EITC:

                                Q. Isn’t the EITC just welfare?

                                A. No, the EITC is not welfare. You must work to claim the EITC. The refundable nature of the
                                   EITC is what makes it such a powerful tool to help hard-working families keep more of their
                                   hard-earned dollars. Each year EITC refunds lift more than 4.4 million people – roughly half
                                   of them children – out of poverty. The families who would receive a refund do pay taxes.




           18
  Low-income families pay sales tax, property tax, excise tax and other taxes. A refundable
  EITC helps offset these other taxes, thereby making the tax system more fair. Extensive re-
  search has shown that the EITC increases workforce participation among low-income fami-
  lies, but refundability is key to this effect.
                                                                                                     1
Q. What about the fraud and overpayment rates? I’ve heard that many people who claim the
   EITC don’t qualify.




                                                                                                    EITC BACKGROUND AND DOCUMENTS
A. The rates you may have heard about are based on studies completed by the IRS in 1999 and
   2001. These studies are seriously compromised by major methodological problems that likely
   caused the estimate to overstate the actual error rate.

  Overpayment is not the same as "fraud." To the extent these studies found actual overpay-
  ment, it was largely the result of families with few resources attempting to understand and
  comply with fairly complicated rules — not intentional abuse of the tax system.

  Since then, Congress and the IRS have worked toward simplifying the rules and increasing
  oversight in order to reduce confusion and reduce potential rates of fraud and overpayment.
  Among the changes:

        Congress passed a new Uniform Definition of Qualifying Child, which simplified the
        definition and helped clear up confusion that had previously been a significant source
        of errors.
        The IRS developed a powerful database to help identify cases in which an EITC
        claimant may be wrongly claiming a child.
        Since 2001, the IRS has improved its methods for identifying EITC filers who appear to
        be under-reporting their income.
        The IRS has launched an initiative to identify commercial tax prepares who have sub-
        mitted a significant volume of erroneous EITC claims and to target the preparers for
        more intensive enforcement and education activities.
        The IRS holds extensive oversight with the VITA program to ensure quality prepara-
        tion. The IRS requires volunteers to be IRS-certified by passing a competency exam.
        Additionally, the VITA sites have no profit motive to inflate refunds.

  By comparison, noncompliance in other parts of the tax system results in a much higher loss
  of income for the IRS than any EITC overpayments. The 2001 IRS “tax gap” study, which as-
  sessed noncompliance throughout the tax code, found that 51 percent of rent and royalty in-
  come, 57 percent of small business income and 72 percent of farm income went unreported.
  This misreporting of business income is at least 10 to 12 times the size of total EITC overpay-
  ments.




                                                                                                           19
Chapter 2
 IDEAS FOR
 ELECTED
 OFFICIALS:
 GETTING INVOLVED IN FREE
 TAX ASSISTANCE AND EITC
 OUTREACH
      Ideas for Elected Officials
      Sample Newsletter Article and Website Ideas
      Template Op-Ed
      Template Media Advisory
      Template Press Release
      Talking Points
                              IDEAS FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS:
                              GETTING INVOLVED IN FREE TAX ASSISTANCE
                              AND EITC OUTREACH
                              Every year during tax season, Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) sites across the country
           2                  help low- and moderate-income people file their taxes. At these VITA sites, individuals and
                              families receive much needed tax assistance at no cost, while also learning about the tax credits
                              they may be eligible for that will help them make ends meet.
IDEAS FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS




                              One of the most important tax credits for low- and middle-income working families is the
                              Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). The EITC rewards work and helps put more money back in
                              the pockets of hard-working Americans and stimulates local economies.

                              The EITC consistently receives bipartisan support, having been created under President Ford
                              and expanded under Presidents Reagan, Bush Sr., and Clinton. The program also received
                              support by President Bush, and President Obama has already expanded the program to
                              temporarily increase EITC benefits. It is an issue that everyone can stand behind and promote as
                              an economic resource for their state.

                              HOW TO GET INVOLVED

                              VITA sites and the EITC are remarkable programs, but too often families don’t know about the
                              programs and miss out on the benefits. An elected official can help increase awareness and build
                              connections with their constituents through EITC outreach. Following are a list of easy ways to
                              get involved and help families in your community.

                              1. CONDUCT A SITE VISIT: The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, which is funded in
                              part by the IRS, is available nationwide and offers free tax help to low- to moderate-income
                              (approximately $42,000 and below) people. VITA sites are usually located at community
                              centers, libraries, schools, malls or other convenient locations. Most locations also offer free elec-
                              tronic filing. Tax services are also available for seniors and military.

                              A great way to draw attention to VITA sites is by conducting a site visit and inviting the media.
                              Most sites open in January and opening day events often include press conferences and
                              community activities to raise the site’s profile. Sites would gladly welcome an elected official at
                              their press conference, touring the site, and meeting families on opening day. Alternatively, visits
                              can be arranged anytime throughout tax season. Most tax sites are happy to help arrange press
                              activities around these visits as well.

                              To locate the nearest VITA site in your district or state, call 1-800-829-1040.

                              Template Site Visit Materials are included in this toolkit



           22
2. CELEBRATE EITC AWARENESS DAY: The Internal Revenue Service has declared the last
week day in January as federal EITC Awareness Day. Many state officials have started state
EITC Awareness Days, issuing proclamations, sending out press releases or holding events.

Governors have traditionally issued the state proclamations, but state officials and members of
Congress should join with them to show their support for the programs.

The IRS has a number of resources to learn more about EITC Awareness Day. These can be                 2
found at: http://eitc.irs.gov and http://www.irs.gov/newsroom/article/0,,id=178072,00.html

3. HOLD A TOWN HALL MEETING: Officials often hold town-hall type meetings throughout




                                                                                                       IDEAS FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS
the year. During tax season, officials can provide their constituents with information about the
EITC and VITA sites at these community gatherings. Hand out flyers and ask that audience
members share flyers with their co-workers and that offices display information about the EITC
in their lunchroom or staff break rooms.

4. INCLUDE EITC AND FREE TAX ASSISTANCE INFORMATION IN NEWSLETTERS AND
WEBSITES: Many elected officials include information about the EITC and free tax assistance
information in their newsletters and on their websites. This is an excellent and easy way to get
the word out to your constituents. Details on the EITC, locations of VITA sites, and contact in-
formation can be included. A website could include a link to your community’s VITA sites with
information about who is eligible for the EITC and what materials people should bring to have
their taxes filed.

A Sample EITC Newsletter is included in this toolkit

5. START A STATE EITC CAMPAIGN: Twenty-four states (counting the District of Columbia)
have created a state version of the EITC to reduce the tax burden on low- and moderate- income
working families. The state EITC supplements the federal credit and works as a rebate for state
taxes paid by low-income working people. In addition, local governments in Montgomery
County, Md., San Francisco and New York City offer their own version of EITCs.

Look into creating a state EITC or increasing the benefit level if your state already has enacted a
state EITC. The site, www.stateEITC.com is an excellent resource to explore what other states
have done and how to work toward building or strengthening a state EITC in your state.

6. BUILD RELATIONSHIPS: Local and state groups are responsible for running the free tax
assistance sites and would welcome the support of elected officials. In addition to local, state, or
federal elected officials visiting a tax site, a site visit is a great way for your staff members to
learn more about the local group and how their boss can get involved.




                                                                                                             23
                              SAMPLE NEWSLETTER ARTICLE AND
                              WEBSITE IDEAS
                              Dear Neighbor,

           2                  Did you know that there are a number of locations in our community where low- and moderate-
                              income people can get help filing their taxes at no cost? The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance
                              (VITA) program, which is funded in part by the IRS, offers free tax help to people making less
                              than approximately $42,000 a year.
IDEAS FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS




                              In addition to receiving much-needed tax help, families will also learn about important tax cred-
                              its that they may be missing out on. The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a tax credit espe-
                              cially for low-income working families. It helps workers keep more of the money they earned,
                              which helps families pay their rent and buy groceries or new shoes for their kids.

                              In 2007, ## families received the EITC in our state, but there are many more who are eligible but
                              don’t know about the program. I’m hopeful that more (State) families will learn about the EITC,
                              visit a VITA site and file their taxes this year. The amount of your EITC refund depends on
                              things like income and family size, but many families receive rebates of a couple thousand dol-
                              lars – make sure you don’t miss out on your refund. If you didn’t claim the EITC in the past, you
                              may also be able to file amended claims and receive more of the money you’ve earned.

                              To find a VITA site near you, call 1-800-829-1040 or visit my website at XXXX.

                              Please let your friends, families and co-workers know about this important service. No one en-
                              joys filing their taxes, but VITA sites help make it a little easier.

                              WEBSITE IDEAS

                              An elected official’s website is an excellent way to further spread the word about the EITC and
                              the availability of VITA sites. If you already have this important information on your website,
                              take a moment to make sure it’s up-to-date and if there are any additional resources you can in-
                              clude. Below are links that would provide your constituents with this important information.

                              EITC Assistant
                              http://www.irs.gov/individuals/article/0,,id=130102,00.html
                              This is the IRS’s site for determining EITC eligibility. Available in English and Spanish.

                              VITA Information
                              http://www.irs.gov/individuals/article/0,,id=107626,00.html
                              This is the IRS’s site on the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program. It includes information
                              on the materials needed when filing taxes as well as how to find a site.




           24
IRS Official EITC Central Site
http://www.eitc.irs.gov
This site is geared toward IRS partners and tax preparers, but also includes links and tools for
tax payers. It’s a user-friendly site with forms, marketing and education toolkits, EITC statistics
and press materials.

State EITC Online Resource Center
http://www.stateeitc.com
This site provides elected officials, advocates and others with information about State EITC’s,
                                                                                                      2
including a 50 state map with information on each state’s EITC, new reports and videos and
success stories from states that have implemented a state level EITC.




                                                                                                      IDEAS FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS




                                                                                                            25
                              TEMPLATE OP-ED
                              Tips: This op-ed could be pegged to EITC Awareness Day in January or to the opening of the
                              VITA sites to enhance its newsworthiness. Otherwise, the ideal time to submit this op-ed is in
                              February or March, when people are more likely to have received their W-2’s and more likely to
                              be ready to prepare their taxes. Also, feel free to insert statistics pertaining to your district and
           2                  anecdotes that demonstrate the impact of the EITC on families’ lives and the local economy.



                              By Elected Official
IDEAS FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS




                              In this current economic climate, many of our [state/city/region]’s hard-working families are
                              doing all that they can to make ends meet, yet still falling short. As the 2010 tax season begins, I
                              want to make sure that all citizens who qualify for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) re-
                              ceive the boost of help that they deserve.

                              The EITC is a federal tax credit that provides extra financial support to low- and moderate-in-
                              come working families. Refunds help families pay for necessities, like utility bills, rent and chil-
                              dren’s school supplies. The EITC makes a tangible impact on the lives of people in our
                              community.

                              The EITC is available to working people with low to moderate incomes, helping supplement
                              wages. The amount of the EITC varies, depending on families’ income and number of children.

                              These funds have a significant impact on helping families make ends meet. But the EITC also has
                              a remarkable impact on our local economy. Every year, the program brings back $[Dollars]* to
                              our [state/city/region]. The EITC is a win-win for reducing poverty among working families and
                              boosting the community as a whole.

                              Nationally, eligible low-income taxpayers fail to claim billions of EITC dollars every year – bil-
                              lions of dollars that could go back into the pocketbooks of families and back into our economy.
                              In [state/city/region] alone, $[Dollars] in EITC dollars annually go unclaimed.

                              Too often, eligible families are unaware of the EITC and the benefits they can receive. But thanks
                              to a growing number of free tax preparation sites – often known as Volunteer Income Tax Assis-
                              tance (VITA) sites — families can receive guidance and assistance at no cost.

                              VITA sites, which are supported by partnerships between the Internal Revenue Service and
                              nonprofit organizations, offer free tax assistance by trained volunteers to low- and moderat- in-
                              come families and individuals, the elderly and the military. Across the nation, nearly 12,000
                              VITA sites offer free tax preparation services to people earning less than $42,000 per year.

                              In [state/city/region], we have [Number]* VITA sites providing this help right in our commu-



           26
nity. [Provide information about local tax site, with phone and website information.] I hope that
all eligible families will take advantage of this free assistance.

In the 2009 tax season, VITA sites in [state/city/region] helped [Number] families complete
their tax returns and collectively receive $[Dollars] in refunds.

Now, more than ever, our families need this kind of support. It is my hope that all of the families
in [state/city/region] who qualify this year will receive the full extent of tax relief that they de-
serve.
                                                                                                        2
*These statistics can be found in Chapter 4.




                                                                                                        IDEAS FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS




                                                                                                              27
                              TEMPLATE MEDIA ADVISORY FOR ELECTED
                              OFFICIAL’S SITE VISIT
                              MEDIA ADVISORY                                                       CONTACT:
                              [Date]                                                               [Name, Number]
           2                     In Midst of Economic Challenges, [Elected Official] Recognizes
                                     Local Economic Boost from Earned Income Tax Credit
                                    [Official] to Visit [Site] to Highlight Free Tax Preparation for Low-Income Families
IDEAS FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS




                                     WHAT:           [Elected Official] to visit [Site] offering free tax preparation for low- and
                                                     moderate-income families
                                     WHEN:           [Time and Date]
                                     WHERE:          [Location]

                              [City] – As the 2010 tax season begins, [Elected Official] is calling attention to the free income-
                              tax filing assistance offered to low- and moderate-income families throughout [Region]. On
                              [Date], [Elected Official] will visit [Site Name], one of [Number] of sites in the area providing
                              this free service that helps ensure families complete accurate returns and receive tax credits for
                              which they’re eligible, including the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax Credit.

                              “Nationwide, billions of dollars in Earned Income Tax Credits go unclaimed by low-income
                              taxpayers every year,” [Elected Official] said. “In these challenging economic times, we want to
                              ensure that all of the eligible hard-working, low-income families in our area are receiving the
                              EITC, and getting money back to help make ends meet.”

                              In 2009, [Site Name] prepared tax returns for [Number] families, helping them collectively
                              receive $[Dollars] in refunds.

                              The EITC is available to working people with low to moderate incomes, helping supplement
                              wages and encouraging work. The amount of the EITC varies, depending on families’ income
                              and number of children, and is typically spent on necessities such as rent or utilities.

                              “The EITC is one of our most valuable anti-poverty tools,” [Elected Official] said. “Not only does
                              it help boost families’ financial stability, but it also brings money back into our local economy.”

                              Across the nation, the Internal Revenue Service partners with nonprofit organizations to
                              operate nearly 12,000 free tax preparation sites. These Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)
                              sites offer free tax help by trained volunteers to people earning less than approximately $42,000
                              per year. Free tax assistance is also available for seniors age 60 and older, as well as military
                              personnel and their families.

                              For more information about VITA sites, please call the IRS toll-free at 1-800-906-9887.
                                                                          ####

           28
TEMPLATE PRESS RELEASE FOR ELECTED
OFFICIAL’S SITE VISIT

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                               CONTACT:
[Date]                                                              [Name, Number]                     2
     [Elected Official] Highlights Benefits of Free Tax Preparation
                   Services for Low-Income Families
     At [Site], [Official] Recognizes Local Economic Impact from Earned Income Tax Credit




                                                                                                       IDEAS FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS
[City] – With the 2010 tax season in full swing, [Elected Official] visited [Site] today to call
attention to the free income-tax filing assistance available for low- and moderate-income
families throughout [Region]. [Site Name] is one of [Number] sites in the area providing this
free service that helps ensure families complete accurate returns and receive tax credits for
which they’re eligible, including the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax
Credit.

“In these challenging economic times, it is important that our community’s hard-working
families get the credits and refunds they deserve,” [Elected Official] said. “The EITC is a valuable
source of support that can help families climb the economic ladder.”

Nationally, eligible low-income taxpayers fail to claim billions of EITC dollars every year. Free
tax preparation sites – known as Volunteer Income tax Assistance (VITA) sites – run in part-
nership by the Internal Revenue Service and nonprofit organizations, offer families cost-free
assistance by trained volunteers.

In 2009, [Site Name] prepared tax returns for [Number] families, helping them collectively
receive $[Dollars] in refunds.

“The EITC helps reduce poverty and increase stability for working families,” [Elected Official]
said. “It also brings much-needed money flowing back into our local economy.”

The EITC is available to working people with low to moderate incomes, helping supplement
wages and encouraging work. The amount of the EITC varies, depending on families’ income
and number of children, and it is typically spent on necessities such as rent or utilities.

Across the nation, nearly 12,000 VITA sites offer free tax preparation services to people earning
less than $42,000 per year. Free tax assistance is also available for seniors age 60 and older, as
well as military personnel and their families.

For more information about VITA sites, please call the IRS toll-free at 1-800-906-9887.
                                               ####

                                                                                                             29
                              TALKING POINTS
                              The following talking points can be used by elected officials and their offices for a variety of out-
                              reach efforts around the EITC and free tax assistance.

                              SPREADING THE WORD ABOUT THE AVAILABILITY OF FREE TAX
           2                  ASSISTANCE CAMPAIGNS

                                 The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program, which is funded in part by the IRS,
                                 provides free tax help to people making less than approximately $42,000 a year.
IDEAS FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS




                                 It’s important to increase awareness about the availability of VITA sites. When workers
                                 don’t know about VITA sites, they often turn to paid preparers, which results in high fees
                                 and the loss of important income that is needed to make ends meet.

                                 Highly knowledgeable and well-trained volunteers assist families and individuals with their
                                 taxes at VITA sites. Even more importantly, families learn about the important tax credits
                                 they may be eligible for, including the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax
                                 Credit.

                                 Nationwide, billions of dollars in Earned Income Tax Credits go unclaimed by low-income
                                 taxpayers every year because they don’t know they’re eligible or don’t file a claim.

                                 Free tax preparation helps working families and benefits the economic health of the entire
                                 community. Tax refunds put more money back into the local economy and helps families
                                 climb up the economic ladder.

                              THE BENEFITS OF THE EARNED INCOME TAX CREDIT

                                 The Earned Income Tax Credit is a tax credit for low-income working individuals and fami-
                                 lies. The goal of the program is to reduce the tax burden on low-income workers and supple-
                                 ment their wages.

                                 In tax year 2006, 22.4 million low-income families and individuals across the nation received
                                 EITC benefits totaling $43.7 billion. These are families who are working hard, many at more
                                 than one job, but whose low wages are preventing them from getting ahead. The EITC can
                                 make the difference in making ends meet.

                                 The EITC is widely credited as one of most successful anti-poverty programs ever enacted.
                                 Each year the EITC lifts more than 4.1 million people out of poverty including more than 2
                                 million children.

                                 The EITC consistently receives bipartisan support, having been created under President



           30
Ford and expanded under Presidents Reagan, Bush Sr., and Clinton. The program also re-
ceived support by President Bush, and President Obama has already expanded the program
to temporarily increase EITC benefits.

Members of Congress, governors and local officials around the country have come out in
support of the program and have protected its funding throughout the years. It is an issue
that everyone can stand behind and promote as an economic resource for their state.

In the recent economic stimulus legislation, the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment
                                                                                               2
Act, the federal Earned Income Tax Credit was temporarily expanded for two specific
groups: families with three or more children and married couples. These benefits are set to
expire in two years. President Obama’s proposed budget includes making these temporary




                                                                                               IDEAS FOR ELECTED OFFICIALS
changes to the EITC permanent and U.S. Senator Max Baucus recently introduced legisla-
tion that would make these improvements permanent.

An additional improvement to the program would be to increase the maximum EITC benefit
for childless adults. This would increase the financial incentive for finding and keeping a
job.

The EITC benefits your economy. EITC tax refunds are most often spent on necessities, such
as utility bills, household items, school clothes or school tuition. These refund dollars go
right back into the local economy creating a win-win for families and the community —
whether rural, urban, or suburban.




                                                                                                     31
Chapter 3
 HOW OTHERS
 ARE GETTING
 INVOLVED IN
 EITC OUTREACH
 EXAMPLES FROM ELECTED
 OFFICIALS AND MEDIA
 COVERAGE
                                                   HOW ELECTED OFFICIALS ARE GETTING
                                                   INVOLVED




                                                                                     Congressman Leonard Boswell
                    3                                                                Press Release, February 3, 2009

                                                         CONGRESSMAN BOSWELL ENCOURAGES ELIGIBLE CONSTITUENTS TO
                                                                       SEEK EARNED INCOME TAX CREDIT
                                                            EITC COULD BE A CRITICAL FINANCIAL HELP TO MANY IOWANS
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   For Immediate Release
                                                   February 3, 2009

                                                   Washington, DC – As we enter the tax season, Congressman Leonard Boswell today is encouraging
                                                   constituents in the 3rd Congressional District to find out if they are eligible for the Earned Income
                                                   Tax Credit (EITC).
                                                   “Many Iowans experienced financial hardships last year,” said Boswell. “People may be eligible for
                                                   EITC for the first time and need to see if they qualify for this credit.”
                                                   The amount of the EITC, the government’s largest tax benefit program for working families and
                                                   individuals, is determined by earned income and family size.
                                                   For the 2008 tax year, the maximum credit is $4,824 for a family with two or more children; $2,917
                                                   for a family with one child and $438 for a childless taxpayer.
                                                   Generally, earned income and adjusted gross income must each be less than:
                                                                     $38,646 ($41,646 married filing jointly) with two or more qualifying children;
                                                                     $33,995 ($36,995 married filing jointly) with one qualifying child;
                                                                     $12,880 ($15,880 married filing jointly) with no qualifying children.
                                                   “Even in better economic times, the IRS research indicates that one in four eligible taxpayers fails to
                                                   claim EITC each year,” added Boswell. “For example, people over age 65 usually are not eligible.
                                                   However, if they are raising a grandchild who meets certain requirements, they may be eligible for
                                                   EITC.”
                                                   Boswell added, “Workers who do not have a child or who do not live with their own child may be
                                                   unaware that they could still be eligible for a credit.”
                                                   Taxpayers who qualify for EITC should explore available free tax preparation services. The IRS
                                                   provides assistance to low-income taxpayers at more than 400 IRS offices nationwide, including Des
                                                   Moines. The IRS also recently announced that its Taxpayer Assistance Centers will be open on some
                                                   Saturdays in February to help taxpayers who are eligible for the EITC.
                                                   “In these hard economic times, this is a significant credit which can put money in people’s pockets,”
                                                   said Boswell.
                                                   For further information, go to www.irs.gov or call the Des Moines office at 515-564-6618.
                   34                                                                                  ###
                              Congressman Sherrod Brown
                                 Newsletter, April 2008

                                         TAX DAY                                                 3
With the April 15th federal filing deadline rapidly approaching, I encourage all eligible
Ohioans to take advantage of the Federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), the




                                                                                                HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
Economic Stimulus Payment, and the free tax preparation services offered throughout the
state.

The Earned Income Tax Credit is a federal tax credit that may be available to working
individuals or families who earned less than $40,000 in 2007. The average credit is
$1,800, with a maximum credit of $4,700. Last year, 798,000 Ohio taxpayers claimed the
EITC, returning $1.2 billion dollars to our state's economy. Millions of dollars remain
unclaimed by taxpayers unaware of this important tax credit.

Beginning in May, Economic Stimulus Payments will begin to be mailed or deposited
electronically to eligible recipients throughout Ohio. In order to receive an economic
stimulus payment, everyone must have filed a 2007 tax return, including those receiving
Social Security, Veterans and Railroad Retirement Benefits, who under normal
circumstances are not required to file.

Ohio's seniors, veterans, retirees, and persons with low income are strongly encouraged
to file in order to take advantage of this important stimulus payment. Stimulus payments
will range up to $600 for individuals ($1,200 for married couples) with many parents
receiving an additional $300 for each eligible child younger than 17 years of age.

If you have access to the internet and your gross income was $54,000 or less, you can
take advantage of free online filing through the IRS' web site. If you need a little more
help, free tax preparation assistance is available - for additional information on these free
tax preparations locations, interested persons should contact the IRS VITA SITE locator
hotline at: 1-800-906-9887, or Tax Counseling for the Elderly sites (TCE): 1-888-337-
7669.




                                                                                                           35
                                                                                        Congressman Jim Himes
                                                                                     Press Release, February 6, 2009

                                                                  JOB LOSS NUMBERS HIGHLIGHT IMPORTANCE OF EITC
                                                   For Immediate Release
                    3                              February 6, 2009

                                                   BRIDGEPORT, CT – Congressman Jim Himes (D-CT) joined Mayor Bill Finch (Bridgeport) and
                                                   community activists today to remind Bridgeport-area citizens of the need to submit their tax returns
                                                   and apply for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). They also highlighted the free tax assistance
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   program Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) that helps low-income workers and seniors
                                                   prepare their taxes to ensure full and accurate returns.

                                                   "Today's reports of nearly 600,000 lost jobs in just the last month highlights, more than ever, the
                                                   importance of the Earned Income Tax Credit—one of the most effective anti-poverty tools we have,"
                                                   said Congressman Himes. "But many workers miss out by not completing a tax return form. I
                                                   encourage working families in the area to make use of VITA's programs—we don't want to leave
                                                   money on the table that could put food on the table."

                                                   The EITC puts money back in the pocketbooks of hard-working, low-income families, helping them
                                                   close the gap between what they earn and what they need to make ends meet. But every year, eligible
                                                   Connecticut families lose out on thousands of dollars because they do not file their tax returns.

                                                    "What VITA is doing to help Bridgeport-area families is extremely important, especially in these
                                                   tough economic times," said Mayor Finch. "My office will support this effort in any way possible to
                                                   ensure that low-income working families in our area take advantage of the free volunteer assistance
                                                   available to them through the auspices of VITA."

                                                   To receive the EITC, individuals must be working and must file a tax form with the Internal Revenue
                                                   Service. Parents with dependent children receive even more money. Income ceilings are set for
                                                   married couples, single parents, and individuals. The amount of the EITC varies depending on the
                                                   number of children in a family and the annual income. For example, a family of four making $25,000
                                                   per year would receive over $3,100 from the EITC.

                                                   Research shows that the EITC improves the quality of life for families and the state's economy in
                                                   several ways. The program reduces poverty, especially for children, and helps low-wage workers
                                                   make ends meet. Additionally, the EITC costs very little to administer and puts money immediately
                                                   back into the local economy.

                                                   For more information about the EITC, visit
                                                   http://www.irs.gov/individuals/article/0,,id=130102,00.html.
                                                                                                    ###
                   36
       A




                               Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton
                                  Press Release, February 12, 2009

       NORTON'S 9TH ANNUAL TAX AND INFORMATION FAIR TO OFFER FREE
         ELECTRONIC FILING FOR RAPID REFUND, INFORMATION ABOUT
      STIMULUS PACKAGE JOB TRAINING BENEFITS TO D.C. RESIDENTS, AND
                             OTHER SERVICES
                                                                                                               3
Washington, D.C. - As District residents struggle with rising unemployment and a frightening
economic outlook, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) will hold a press conference at
11 a.m., in room 146-A, during her 9th Annual Tax Preparation and Information Fair, Saturday, Feb.




                                                                                                             HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
14, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Washington Convention Center. More than 150 tax professionals from
the Internal Revenue Service, OTR, AARP, and the D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue will provide
free tax preparation to District residents. She has secured a larger space for the fair this year and 15
additional computers to speed service. This service is offered to D.C. residents who file basic tax
returns, as a viable alternative to the high-interest Rapid Refund Anticipation Loans targeted at low
and moderate income families who want to access their money quickly. Filing is done electronically
for rapid results. Residents who qualified for but did not apply last year for their stimulus rebate
check will be guided on how to claim tax credits for their rebate.

A District resident who benefitted from the Congresswoman's D.C.-only $5,000 tax credit for home
buyers will talk about how the tax credit helped her buy a home here even during the economic
crisis. A representative from the District's business community will speak about Norton's business
tax credits, especially the tax break for businesses that have D.C. residents as employees. The
Maryland and D.C. Credit Union Association will be on hand to open checking accounts for residents
with as little as $5, and testing for HIV/AIDS will be available, as at all Norton events. The
Congresswoman also will discuss the benefits for the District in the President's stimulus package,
including the pre-apprenticeships and apprenticeships funded by a Norton amendment, and benefits
and projects that will benefit District residents.

More than 500 residents attended the tax fair last year, and the Congresswoman, who offers this
service each year to help mitigate the insult to D.C. taxpayers who pay federal taxes but lack
reciprocal representation in Congress, expects a particularly large turn-out this year, as residents
seeking to save their money during this worst economic crisis since the 1930s want information and
assistance on taxes and the many refundable tax credits available. Tax credit increases include an
increase in the maximum amount allowed under the Hope Credit, from $1650 to $1800, a credit used
mostly by college students. Residents will also learn about a tax credit extended to D.C. residents
who have students enrolled in college in Midwestern disaster areas, and hear about changes to the
Earned Income Tax Credits.

In addition to getting their taxes prepared, tax fair participants will learn more about the transition to
digital television from representatives from the FCC. They will be able to open a credit union
account for direct deposit of their income tax refund, and talk to IRS representatives about identity
                                                                                                                        37
theft, or speak to representatives from the D.C. College Savings Plan about starting a college fund.
                                                                           Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton
                                                                              Press Release, February 14, 2009

                                                   NORTON GIVES SELECTED PREVIEW OF STIMULUS TAX BREAKS THAT
                                                          HELP RESIDENTS AT TAX FAIR PRESS CONFERENCE

                                                   Washington, DC-Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), at her Annual Tax
                                                   and Information Fair press conference this morning, Saturday, February 14, at 11 a.m.,
                                                   will give residents a quick preview of a new or extended crop of tax credits passed on
                                                   Friday in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. "President Obama has kept his
                                                   word and refocused tax breaks on poor and middle-income people," Norton said.
                                                   "Whether the tax credit for plug-in vehicles, a 65% subsidy for continuing health
                    3                              insurance benefits after a job loss, or $250 for retirees and the disabled, this bill focuses
                                                   tax relief where it has been missing and most needed. What follows is a summary
                                                   statement of each of several selected tax breaks in the stimulus bill for individuals,
                                                   families and businesses.
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   A Quick Study Preview of Some Tax Breaks for Individuals and Families:

                                                   "Making Work Pay" Tax Credit
                                                   Tax cut for 95% of working families, by providing a refundable tax credit in 2009 and
                                                   2010 of up to $400 for working individuals and $800 for working families.

                                                   Premium Subsidies for COBRA Continuation Coverage for Unemployed Workers
                                                   65% subsidy for COBRA continuation premiums for up to 9 months for workers who
                                                   have been involuntarily terminated, and for their families. This subsidy also applies to
                                                   health care continuation coverage if required by states for small employers.

                                                   Payment to Recipients of Social Security, SSI, Railroad Retirement and Veterans

                                                   Disability Compensation Benefits
                                                   One-time payment of $250.

                                                   Increase in Earned Income Tax Credit
                                                   Temporary increase in the earned income tax credit for working families with three or
                                                   more children.

                                                   Temporary Suspension of Taxation of Unemployment Benefits
                                                   For 2009, suspends federal income tax on the first $2,400 of unemployment benefits per
                                                   recipient.

                                                   Extension of Emergency Unemployment Compensation
                                                   Through December 31, 2009, the bill continues the Emergency Unemployment
                                                   Compensation program, which provides up to 33 weeks of extended unemployment
                                                   benefits to workers exhausting their regular benefits.




                   38
Increase in Unemployment Compensation Benefits
Increase in unemployment weekly benefits by an additional $25 through 2009.

Increase in Eligibility for the Refundable Portion of Child Credit

"American Opportunity" Education Tax Credit
The bill would provide financial assistance for individuals seeking a college education.
For 2009 and 2010, the bill would provide taxpayers with a tax credit of up to $2,500 of
the cost of tuition and related expenses.

Computers as Qualified Education Expenses in 529 Education Plan
Section 529 Education Plans are tax-advantaged savings plans that cover all qualified
education expenses, and computers and computer technology will now qualify.                      3
Sales Tax Deduction for Vehicle Purchases
Taxpayers will get a deduction for state and local sales and excise taxes paid on the
purchase of new cars, light trucks, recreational vehicles, and motorcycles through 2009.




                                                                                                HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
Extension of Alternative Minimum Tax Relief for 2009
Provides more than 26 million families with tax relief in 2009 by extending AMT relief
for nonrefundable personal credits and increasing the AMT exemption amount by
$70,950 for joint filers and $46,700 for individuals.

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Contingency Fund
Creates through FY 2010 a capped, temporary TANF Emergency Contingency Fund to
provide states with relief.

Expansion of Trade Adjustment Assistance Programs for Displaced Workers

Homebuyer Tax Credits

See chart attached.

Some Notable Business Tax Credits:
      The bill creates a new category of tax credit bonds for the construction,
      rehabilitation, or repair of public school facilities or for the acquisition of land on
      which a public school facility will be constructed.
      Expansion of new markets tax credit.
      Long-term extension and modification of renewable energy production tax credit.
      Plug-in electric drive vehicle station credit.
      Five-year carry back of net operating losses for small businesses.




                                                                                                           39
                                                                                  Congressman Richard Neal
                                                                                Press Release, February 12, 2008

                                                        NEAL URGES ELIGIBLE TAXPAYERS TO SEEK FREE ASSISTANCE
                                                         MANY WORKING FAMILIES STILL ELIGIBLE FOR TAX CREDIT

                                                   For Immediate Release
                    3                              February 12, 2008

                                                   (WASHINGTON)-- Congressman Richard E. Neal today urged working families in
                                                   western and central Massachusetts to determine whether they are eligible for the Earned
                                                   Income Tax Credit (EITC). The EITC is available primarily for low-income working
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   families, but households earning as much as $39,000 may also be eligible. More than 22
                                                   million taxpayers nationally received approximately $43.7 billion in EITC in 2007. This
                                                   year, the maximum credit for a family of two or more children is $4,716.

                                                   “I am doing everything I can to get all working families the tax credits they have earned.
                                                   I believe the true purpose of the EITC was to encourage low-income workers to remain
                                                   active in the workforce. The IRS has estimated that about 20% of eligible families
                                                   nationally are still unaware that they qualify for the EITC. In my district alone, there are
                                                   as many as 10,000 families that should be claiming credits up to $4,000 per household,”
                                                   said Congressman Neal.

                                                   During the 2007 filing season, there were 40,866 EITC returns in the 2nd Congressional
                                                   District totaling $72,375,918. Of that number, 61% used a paid preparer, and only 3%
                                                   used the free IRS taxpayer assistance. Based on these numbers, 25,111 recipients had to
                                                   pay for taxpayer assistance.

                                                   “Unfortunately, this tax credit for working families is very complex, which is why many
                                                   of the recipients had to pay a professional for assistance. I strongly encourage those who
                                                   are eligible, or who think they are eligible, to seek out the free assistance offered locally,”
                                                   said Neal.

                                                   The IRS offers regional Taxpayer Assistance Centers that help people with filing their tax
                                                   returns, including claims for the EITC. On Saturday, February 16, the IRS center will be
                                                   located in the Federal Building, 1550 Main Street, Springfield. The office will be open to
                                                   the public from 8:30am to 12:30pm.

                                                   Taxpayers interested in determining whether they are eligible for the EITC may also visit
                                                   the IRS website at www.irs.gov/eitc. Those taxpayers who do qualify can also use the
                                                   website to find other taxpayer assistance locations and use the IRS Free File Program.



                   40
 A




                         Congresswoman Lucille Roybal-Allard
                            Press Release, February 8, 2009

A MESSAGE FROM CONGRESSWOMAN LUCILLE ROYBAL-ALLARD (CA-
                            34)
  THIS TAX SEASON, CONGRESSWOMAN LUCILLE ROYBAL-ALLARD                                           3
 URGES ALL ELIGIBLE WORKING FAMILIES TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF
THE EARNED INCOME TAX CREDIT, CHILD TAX CREDIT AND FREE TAX
                    PREPARATION SERVICES




                                                                                                HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
For Immediate Release
February 8, 2008

Each year, thousands of hardworking families in the 34th Congressional District and
throughout the Los Angeles area lose money they're entitled to because they fail to take
advantage of two important tax credits – the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the
Child Tax Credit (CTC). Could you be one of them? As the April 15 deadline approaches
for filing your taxes, I encourage you to find out whether you qualify for one or both of
these credits. The answer could mean more money in your pocket, even if you don't owe
taxes.

If your family earned less than $39,783 in 2007, you may be eligible for the Earned
Income Tax Credit. Eligibility for the credit depends on factors such as your total income
and family size. For some families, the Earned Income Tax Credit is worth up to $4,716.
The funds are first used to pay any federal taxes owed by an eligible worker. After any
tax liability is paid off, tax filers receive all of their remaining Earned Income Tax Credit
dollars in the form of a check from the IRS.

The Child Tax Credit allows families to claim a credit worth up to $1,000 for each
qualifying child under 17. Similar to the Earned Income Tax Credit, the Child Tax Credit
is first used to reduce or pay off any taxes owed by the family. After that, depending
upon a family's income, some filers might also qualify to receive a refund of all or part of
any leftover Child Tax Credit funds.

In 2004, I was pleased to support measures passed by Congress to permit more military
families earning combat pay to qualify for both the Child Tax Credit and the Earned
Income Tax Credit. These tax credits provide a welcomed financial boost to our
deserving men and women in uniform.




                                                                                                           41
                                                    A


                                                   By taking advantage of the Child Tax Credit and the Earned Income Tax Credit, eligible
                                                   families can keep more of their hard earned dollars. Additional eligibility information
                                                   about both tax credits appears below. Your questions can also be answered by calling the
                                                   IRS at 1-800-829-1040 or by visiting the federal agency's web site at www.irs.gov.

                                                   Free tax preparation services from trained community volunteers are also available
                                                   through the "Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)” program. To find out if you
                                                   qualify or for the Los Angeles locations nearest you, please visit http://www.eitc-la.com
                                                   or the 211 hotline in Los Angeles County. Seniors can also locate free AARP tax-aide
                                                   counseling sites in their area by calling 1-888 227-7669.

                    3                              Here are the highlights of the 2007 EITC eligibility requirements:

                                                          A taxpayer must provide valid Social Security numbers for everyone listed on the
                                                          tax return. Social Security numbers issued to non-citizens who have permission to
                                                          work legally in the United States are also accepted.
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                          Workers who were raising one child in their home and who earned less than
                                                          $33,241 in 2007 (or less than $35,241 for married workers) are eligible for a
                                                          federal EITC of up to $2,853.
                                                          Workers who were raising two or more children in their home and who earned
                                                          less than $37,783 in 2007 (or less than $39,783 for married workers) are eligible
                                                          for a federal EITC of up to $4,716.
                                                          Workers who were not raising children in their home, were between 25 and 64 on
                                                          December 31, 2007, and who earned less than $12,590 in 2007 (or less than
                                                          $14,590 for married workers) are eligible for a federal EITC of up to $428.
                                                          Eligible EITC taxpayers who failed to file previously can file amended tax returns
                                                          for the past three years to collect overdue refunds.

                                                   The 2007 Child Tax Credit eligibility requirements are as follows:

                                                          The taxpayer must have either a Social Security number or an Individual
                                                          Taxpayer Identification Number issued by the IRS.
                                                          The taxpayer must have a qualifying child under the age of 17 who lived with the
                                                          tax filer for more than half the year in the United States. The child (whether a
                                                          citizen or non-citizen) must have either a valid Social Security number or an
                                                          Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN).
                                                          The taxpayer must have earned more than $11,750 in 2007 to receive a CTC
                                                          "refund."
                                                          The CTC is available to married couples filing jointly with incomes up to
                                                          $110,000, $75,000 for those filing as single, head of household or as a qualifying
                                                          widow(er) and $55,000 for married couples filing separately. At incomes above
                                                          these amounts, the benefit of the CTC is reduced.
                                                          Eligible CTC taxpayers who failed to file previously can file amended returns for
                                                          the past three years to collect overdue refunds.

                                                   I hope you find this information beneficial.


                   42
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                             Congressman Jose Serrano
                            Press Release, January 1, 2008

     SERRANO REMINDS WORKING FAMILIES TO APPLY FOR EARNED
                      INCOME TAX CREDIT

Congressman José E. Serrano urged lower-income Americans to take advantage of the
Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and to use the free services that are available to help      3
them file their taxes this year. Below is information from the IRS on the EITC and free
preparation sites.




                                                                                            HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
“Lower income families should not pass up the opportunity for free tax preparation help
or to apply for any tax credits they qualify for,” Serrano said. “We work hard to provide
these credits, and it’s very important that the folks who need them are able to take
advantage of them. Besides the EITC, there are also other tax credits people may qualify
for, but without a professional helping, they could miss them. Because of that, I urge
people to use the free preparation help that is made available. Don’t lose out on money
that may be owed you and your family.”

The following is information from the IRS:

The new maximum credit is $4,716 for a family with two or more children; $2,853 for a
family with one child and $428 if there are no children. The Earned Income Tax Credit is
the federal government’s largest program benefiting working families.

The new income limits are $37,783 ($39,783 if married filing jointly) for families with
two or more children; $33,241 ($35,241 if married filing jointly) for families with one
child or $12,590 ($14,590 if married filing jointly) if there are no children.

Investment income must be $2,900 or less. Children must meet certain age, relationship
and residency requirements.

The EITC is a valuable but complex tax break for lower income workers. Free help is
available. Workers who qualify for EITC also may qualify for free tax preparation
assistance. Community volunteers can help taxpayers.

Taxpayers can find free tax preparation sites in their area by calling 1-800-829-1040 and
New York City residents can call 311 for free tax help. Once a location has been found,
people should come prepared with the following items:




                                                                                                       43
                                                   • Proof of identification
                                                   • Social Security Cards (or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number, ITIN) for you,
                                                   your spouse and dependents and/or a Social Security Number verification letter issued by
                                                   the Social Security Administration
                                                   • Birth dates for you, your spouse and dependents on the tax return
                                                   • Current year’s tax package if you received one
                                                   • Wage and earning statement(s) Form W-2, W-2G, 1099-R, from all employers
                                                   • Interest and dividend statements from banks (Forms 1099)
                                                   • A copy of last year’s Federal and State returns if available
                                                   • Bank Routing Numbers and Account Numbers for Direct Deposit
                                                   • Total paid for day care provider and the day care provider's tax identifying number (the

                    3                              provider's Social Security Number or the provider's business Employer Identification
                                                   Number)
                                                   • Information for other income
                                                   • Information for deductions/credits
                                                   • To file taxes electronically on a married filing joint tax return, both spouses must be
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   present to sign the required forms.

                                                                                              ###




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 A




                           Congresswoman Nydia Velazquez
                            Press Release, February 4, 2008

  CONGRESSWOMAN VELÁZQUEZ ANNOUNCES FREE ASSISTANCE
AVAILABLE TO LOW-INCOME WORKERS FILING FOR EARNED INCOME
                       TAX CREDIT
                                                                                             3
WASHINGTON, DC – As local working families begin to prepare their tax returns,




                                                                                            HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
Congresswoman Nydia M. Velázquez (D-N.Y.) today announced that free tax filing
assistance is available for residents in New York’s 12th Congressional District who
qualify for the Earned Income Tax Credit.

“The Earned Income Tax Credit is one of our most important anti-poverty tools. At a
time when the rise in costs of living has left many in our city cash-strapped, the Earned
Income Tax Credit can help them make ends meet,” Congresswoman Velázquez said.
“Applying for the EITC can be complex and confusing for the average person. I
encourage those who need assistance to visit one of the free tax preparation sites where
community volunteers can help.”

District 12 residents seeking free assistance applying for the Earned Income Tax Credit
should dial 311 to find the location of the nearest Volunteer Income Tax Assistance
(VITA) site. In areas where 311 is not available, they may dial 1-800-906-9887.

Services are also available at the IRS-Brooklyn office, which will be operating on
extended hours in February:

Internal Revenue Service, Brooklyn office
625 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201
Phone: (718) 488-2068
Regular Hours: Monday – Friday; 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Extended Hours: Saturdays, February 9 and 16; 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Those planning to visit one of the tax preparation sites should make sure to bring the
following items:

       Proof of identification;
       Social Security Cards for you, your spouse and dependents and/or a Social
       Security Number verification letter issued by the Social Security Administration;
       Birth dates for you, your spouse and dependents on the tax return;


                                                                                                       45
                                                   A


                                                       Current year’s tax package if you received one;
                                                       Wage and earning statement(s) Form W-2, W-2G, 1099-R, from all employers;
                                                       Interest and dividend statements from banks (Forms 1099);
                                                       A copy of last year’s Federal and State returns if available;
                                                       Bank Routing Numbers and Account Numbers for Direct Deposit;
                                                       Total paid for day care provider and the day care provider's tax identifying
                                                       number (the provider's Social Security Number or the provider's business
                                                       Employer Identification Number);
                                                       Information for other income;
                                                       Information for deductions/credits; and
                                                       To file taxes electronically on a married filing joint tax return, both spouses must

                    3                                  be present to sign the required forms.
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                   46
 A



                                             ,           ,

  CONGRESSWOMAN VELÁZQUEZ ANNOUNCES NEW LEGISLATION TO
   PROVIDE ADDITIONAL EITC BENEFIT FOR OVERTIME WORKERS

VISITS SUNSET PARK COMMUNITY CENTER WHERE FREE, BILINGUAL TAX
     PREPARATION SERVICES ARE PROVIDED FOR EITC RECIPIENTS

BROOKLYN, NY – With tax season in full swing, Congresswoman Nydia M. Velázquez
(D-N.Y.) today visited a community center in Sunset Park to encourage local workers to
seek out free tax preparation services being offered for Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)
recipients. The Congresswoman announced new legislation that would strengthen the
EITC to provide an additional credit for the hardest workers in our economy who often
do not receive overtime pay or other benefits.                                                   3
“The Earned Income Tax Credit is one of our most important anti-poverty tools, and it
helps to build the middle-class. It’s vitally important that every eligible taxpayer receives
this credit, and I commend the Center for Family Life in Sunset Park and Food Bank for




                                                                                                HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
New York for all they are doing to provide free, bilingual tax preparation services to the
community,” Congresswoman Velázquez said.

At today’s event, Congresswoman Velázquez stressed that in addition to filing for the
Earned Income Tax Credit, local residents must file a tax return this year to be eligible
for the one-time economic stimulus rebate. The rebates, totaling hundreds of dollars per
family, will be sent automatically to qualified individuals who have filled out a 2007 tax
return.

“This year, the stimulus rebate will provide much-needed support to more than 8.3
million New Yorkers,” Congresswoman Velázquez said. “Now we must look forward,
and work to create a tax benefit that will lend a hand of assistance to the hardest workers
who continue to struggle to make ends meet.”

The Congresswoman’s legislation, “The Overtime Restoration Act of 2008,” would
strengthen the EITC for low-income individuals who work more than 40 hours per week.
The bill would provide a worker who is eligible for the EITC with a one percent bonus
credit for every week he or she exceeds 40 hours of work. According to the Census
Bureau, 64,000 people in the New York City area received the EITC in 2005 and
reported that they regularly worked more than 40 hours per week. These are the workers
targeted by the Congresswoman’s legislative proposal.

“It’s clear that our neighbors are forced to take on second and third jobs, working nights
and weekends, just to make ends meet. Yet they aren’t getting benefits or overtime pay
from any of their employers. The Overtime Restoration Act would provide our hardest
workers with the additional credit they need to get through these tough economic times,”
Congresswoman Velázquez said.




                                                                                                           47
                                                    A




                                                                                        Senator Lanza
                                                                                Press Release, January 29, 2009

                                                    SENATOR LANZA REMINDS STATEN ISLANDERS THAT TOMORROW IS
                                                                      EITC AWARENESS DAY
                    3                              Posted by Andrew J Lanza on Thursday, January 29th, 2009

                                                   Staten Island – State Senator Andrew J. Lanza (R-I, Staten Island) reminds Staten
                                                   Islanders that tomorrow is "EITC Awareness Day".
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   According to the IRS, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable credit for
                                                   people who work but do not earn high incomes. It helps eligible taxpayers to lower their
                                                   taxes or receive refunds. New York State and New York City also have local versions of
                                                   the EITC.

                                                   In spite of the extensive awareness campaigns by the IRS and its partners, millions of
                                                   taxpayers still do not claim their EITC, according to the IRS.

                                                   Senator Lanza and the IRS want all eligible taxpayers to receive the EITC they deserve.
                                                   According to the IRS, there are eight different locations for Staten Island residents to get
                                                   free tax help this year, starting February 1. The list of sites and information on each
                                                   location are attached in a PDF.

                                                   Those needing more assistance can feel free to call Senator Lanza’s office at 718-984-
                                                   4073.

                                                   "People are struggling more than ever before. I want all Staten Islanders to know that we
                                                   are here to help and I thank the IRS for raising awareness about this important tax credit.”
                                                   Senator Lanza said.

                                                   Last year, Senator Lanza partnered with the IRS and H & R Block to provide free tax
                                                   filing services across Staten Island to help senior citizens get the 2009 Economic
                                                   Stimulus Payment.

                                                                                              ###




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 A




                               Governor Steve Beshears
                             Press Release, January 5, 2009

     UNVEILS WEB SITE LISTING FREE TAX PREPARATION LOCATIONS

For Immediate Release
January 5, 2009
                                                                                              3
FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 5, 2009) – Governor Steve Beshear announced today a
campaign to encourage more Kentuckians to apply for the Earned Income Tax Credit




                                                                                             HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
(EITC), a refundable federal tax credit for low- and middle-income working individuals
and families.

“The EITC is one of our best anti-poverty tools, and I want to make sure every eligible
Kentuckian takes advantage of it and gets the money they deserve,” Gov. Beshear said in
announcing the campaign.

Specifically, Gov. Beshear announced a list of nearly 200 free tax preparation sites
serving 90 counties across the state where volunteer tax preparers who have been trained
and are IRS-certified will assist Kentuckians with their taxes and help them apply for the
EITC.

Information about these sites, including addresses and phone numbers, is available on the
Web site Gov. Beshear unveiled in October -- www.assistance.ky.gov. These sites will
begin offering their services on various dates between mid-January and February 1, and
their hours vary by site. Therefore, Gov. Beshear encouraged Kentuckians to call the
sites before visiting. He also noted that the Kentucky Department of Revenue provides
free online tax assistance, and their link can also be found on the Web site.

Eligibility for the EITC is based on income, as is the amount of the credit. Workers who
earn up to $41,000 may be eligible, and credits can be as high as $4,824.

In tax year 2005, the most recent year available, Kentuckians filed more than 345,000
EITC claims for a total of $633.4 million in benefits statewide. Unfortunately, an
estimated 20 percent of eligible workers still do not claim their EITC benefits, according
to the Internal Revenue Service, mostly for lack of awareness.

Gov. Beshear also noted the impact the EITC has on local economic growth. Nearly all of
the funds from the credit, 97 percent, are infused into local communities.

Kentuckians can also find out information about the sites by calling this toll-free phone
number provided by the United Way of Kentucky: (877) 566-4968. Or, workers who live

                                                                                                        49
                                                   in Jefferson, Oldham, Shelby, Bullitt, Spencer, Nelson, Henry, Trimble, Carroll, Boone,
                                                   Kenton, Campbell, Grant, Scott, Woodford, Anderson, Jessamine, Fayette, Bourbon,
                                                   Montgomery, Clark, or Madison counties should dial 2-1-1.

                                                   As part of Gov. Beshear’s campaign, he has recorded a radio public service
                                                   announcement, and the Kentucky Department for Community Based Services (DCBS)
                                                   will distribute EITC and free tax preparation site information to more than 300,000
                                                   existing clients.

                                                   In addition to participation by DCBS and DOR, several private groups are assisting in
                                                   this effort, including the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) Tax Aide
                                                   Program, the United Way of Kentucky, the Kentucky Asset Success Initiative, the
                    3                              Louisville Asset Building Coalition and the Northern Kentucky Asset Building
                                                   Coalition. Representatives of these organizations joined the Governor for today’s event.

                                                   “AARP volunteers are excited and ready to help Kentuckians with their tax returns,” said
                                                   Delores Wathen, Kentucky AARP Tax Aide Program coordinator. “We are thrilled that
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   Gov. Beshear has organized this campaign to let more Kentuckians know about free tax
                                                   preparation sites, and encourage more to apply for the Earned Income Tax Credit.”

                                                   Participating sites will also have available applications for other need-based government
                                                   assistance, such as the Kentucky Children’s Health Insurance Program (KCHIP),
                                                   Kentucky Transitional Assistance Program (KTAP) and food stamps.

                                                   “The Earned Income Tax Credit is one of the most effective ways hard-working
                                                   Kentuckians can increase their income,” said Harmony Little, program manager for
                                                   LexLinc, a member of KASI. “In spite of the numerous benefits of the EITC, it remains
                                                   a hidden treasure unknown to many who are eligible to receive the credit. For those who
                                                   do take advantage of the credit, it can give a significant boost to their income.”

                                                                                              ###




                   50
                               Governor Phil Bredesen
                            Press Release, January 23, 2009

    GOVERNOR PROCLAIMS JANUARY 30TH EITC AWARENESS DAY
   FEDERAL TAX CREDIT HELPS IMPROVES LIVES OF WORKING LOW
                       INCOME FAMILIES

For Immediate Release
                                                                                                3
January 23, 2009




                                                                                               HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
NASHVILLE — A statewide push is underway for working Tennesseans to receive
millions of dollars that are left unclaimed every year. Last year, more than 588,000 low
income families and individuals in the state received the Earned Income Tax Credit
(EITC), with refunds totaling $1.2 billion dollars.

 “The federal government estimates that up to 25 percent of the Tennesseans who would
have qualified for the Earned Income Tax Credit last year didn’t claim it,” said Governor
Phil Bredesen. “That’s why I’m working to help raise awareness of this valuable federal
tax refund and why I hope all Tennesseans who qualify to visit a free tax preparation site
will do so and take advantage of this benefit.”

Governor Bredesen is proclaiming January 30th Tennessee Earned Income Tax Credit
Awareness Day and recorded public service announcements that are currently running on
radio and television stations across the state. Listeners and viewers are urged to call 2-1-
1 to find out where the nearest Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) site is located.

The Department of Human Services is also encouraging clients who participate in the
Food Stamp and Families First programs to have their taxes done for free at their local
VITA site and claim all of the money they are due. More than 200,000 notices were sent
to clients who are eligible for the EITC benefit.

“The Department realizes our clients are working diligently to become self-sufficient,"
said Commissioner Virginia T. Lodge. "We want to reinforce their efforts by raising
awareness about the EITC, which allows low-income families to receive a substantial
refund from their federal income taxes.”

 DHS has teamed up with the United Way’s 2-1-1 community services information line,
the Tennessee Alliance for Financial Independence and the IRS to direct low income
clients to their nearest VITA site location.




                                                                                                          51
                                                   The EITC, which was launched in the mid-1970s, is a significant part of the U.S. tax
                                                   code. Many DHS clients enrolled in the Food Stamp program and in Families First, the
                                                   state's Temporary Assistance to Needy Families program, will qualify for the EITC. It is
                                                   a refundable federal income tax credit that provides hundreds, even thousands of dollars
                                                   to qualified filers each year, depending on family size and income.

                                                   "In a time when working families are struggling to make ends meet, they should take
                                                   advantage of every bit of tax relief the federal government provides," said U.S.
                                                   Congressman Jim Cooper (D-Nashville). "Too many eligible families don't know about
                                                   the Earned Income Tax Credit, so we need to do a better job of getting the word out. I
                    3                              hope all eligible Tennesseans will use this tax refund to put some money back into their
                                                   bank accounts in tough times."

                                                   The following lists the maximum credit a single, head of household filer can claim:
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   Income Qualifications and Refund Examples
                                                   Earned income and adjusted gross income less than:                      Maximum Credit:
                                                   $12,880; ($15,880 if married filing jointly) with no qualifying child            $438
                                                   $33,995; ($36,995 if married filing jointly) with one qualifying child           $2,917
                                                   $38,646; ($41,646 if married filing jointly) with more than one qualifying child $4,824

                                                   For more information on the EITC and local VITA sites, visit www.tn.gov or the Tennessee
                                                   Alliance for Financial Independence at www.tnafi.org. For more information on DHS and its
                                                   programs, visit: www.state.tn.us/humanserv or contact Michelle Mowery Johnson at 615-
                                                   313-4707.
                                                                                            ###




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                               Mayor Manuel A. Diaz
                           Media Advisory, January 26, 2009

     IN TOUGH ECONOMIC TIMES, MIAMI’S FREE SERVICES TO HELP
       RESIDENTS FILE FOR BENEFITS AND SAFEGUARD FINANCES                                       3
 -Mayor Diaz to Kick Off 2009 Earned Income Tax Campaign and Your Money Bus –

For Immediate Release




                                                                                               HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
January 26, 2009

(Miami, FL)-- City of Miami Mayor Manny Diaz will launch the City’s 2009 Earned
Income Tax Credit (EITC) and free tax preparation campaign at a press conference on
Monday, January 26, 2009 at 10:00 a.m., at the Youth Co-Op Center, 3525 NW 7 St.
The center will also be the stop for Your Money Bus, offering free financial advice to
Miami residents that same day, from 10 am to 3 pm.

During Your Money Bus stop in Miami, volunteer financial advisors will be on-hand to
conduct one-on-one consultations. Residents will be able to obtain answers to their
financial questions from financial advisors, and will also have an opportunity to pick-up a
handy toolkit full of information on debt reduction and saving.

At the press conference, information will be available regarding over 20 City-
sponsored locations that will be offering free tax preparation services as part of this
year’s EITC campaign. Eligible residents who file their tax returns at these sites can learn
if they qualify to receive a federal income tax refund of up to $4,824 via the Earned
Income Tax Credit (EITC) and up to an additional $1,000 per child via the Child Tax
Credit (CTC). There will also be more information about the City’s new Benefit Bank
locations offering access to Federal and State benefits, such as Food Stamps, cash
assistance and Medicaid.

EITC tax credits can result in sizable refunds for low-income working families and help
millions of individuals out of poverty nationwide. Each year, thousands of eligible
households in the City of Miami fail to claim this entitlement, leaving millions of dollars
worth of EITC benefits unclaimed.

Partners in the 2009 EITC campaign include the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Eastern
Financial Credit Union, the Benefit Bank, and the City’s Economic Initiatives and
Neighborhood Enhancement Team (NET) department. The Your Money Bus Tour is


                                                                                                          53
                                                   sponsored by the City of Miami, ACCESS Miami, TD AMERITRADE Institutional,
                                                   NAPFA Consumer Education Foundation, and Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine

                                                   During the Your Money Bus stop in Miami today, volunteer financial advisors will be
                                                   on-hand to conduct one-on-one consultations. Residents will be able to obtain answers
                                                   to their financial questions from financial advisors, and will also have an opportunity to
                                                   pick-up a handy toolkit full of information on debt reduction and saving.

                                                   ACCESS Miami, Mayor Diaz’s anti poverty strategy, has and continues to successfully
                                                   empower City of Miami residents and small business entrepreneurs by tackling four
                                                   cornerstones: access to existing benefits, access to capital, wealth and accumulation of
                                                   assets, and financial literacy. The program has received national recognition, with grants
                    3                              and awards from the Council for the New American City, the Mayors Business Council
                                                   at the U.S. Conference of Mayors, the National League of Cities, and the National City
                                                   Livability Award.
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   Because of our leadership, in the past 18 months or so (2007-08) Miami became a
                                                   founding member of Cities for Financial Empowerment - a 7-city working group
                                                   dedicated to financial empowerment of at-risk city residents - Pioneering cities from
                                                   across the country that have made tangible and measurable commitments to supporting
                                                   financial empowerment programming - reducing poverty by addressing key underlying
                                                   causes.




                   54
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                              First Lady Dawn Gibbons
                           Media Advisory, January 18, 2009
 NEVADA FIRST LADY DAWN GIBBONS TO KICK OFF "NATIONAL EITC
   AWARENESS DAY" WITH UNITED WAY OF SOUTHERN NEVADA                                           3
For Immediate Release
January 18, 2009




                                                                                              HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
LAS VEGAS, Nev. – Nevada’s First Lady Dawn Gibbons will kick off National Earned
Income Tax Credit (EITC) Awareness Day and launch the “Earn !t Keep !t Save !t”
collaborative on Thursday, Jan. 31 at 2pm at Nevada Partners in North Las Vegas.
EITC is the largest federal cash assistance program for low-income, working taxpayers
and helps to lift more families out of poverty than any other government program.
Eligible taxpayers who earned less than $39,783 in 2007 can receive a refund of up to
$4,716.
“Our mission is to connect families with the resources and tools to access money
available to them through the EITC,” said First Lady Gibbons. “The positive affect that
this tax credit can have on Nevada’s hard-working individuals is staggering.”
First Lady Gibbons will be joined by State Senator Steven Horsford, CEO of Nevada
Partners and the Culinary Training Academy; Otto Merida, President and CEO of the Las
Vegas Latin Chamber of Commerce; and Dan Goulet, President and CEO of United Way
of Southern Nevada. The event will be held on Jan. 31, 2008 at 2:00 pm, in Nevada
Partners’ newly-constructed community banquet and events center at 710 W. Lake Mead
Blvd., North Las Vegas. Live demonstrations of e-file tax preparations will occur at the
conclusion of the press conference. “Earn !t Keep !t Save !t,” a new community
initiative formed by United Way of Southern Nevada in partnership with the Internal
Revenue Service (IRS) and local businesses and organizations, works to increase the
number of low- to moderate-income workers in Clark County claiming and receiving the
EITC.
“According to the IRS, 16% of Clark County’s qualifying families received EITC last
year,” said Goulet. “Millions of dollars went unclaimed, and we want to do something
about it.”
Earn !t Keep !t Save !t partners will provide free tax assistance preparation and e-filing,
delivered by IRS-trained volunteers to eligible participants at multiple sites throughout
Clark County. Other services include bilingual counseling in the areas of credit and debt
relief, financial education, and homeownership. For more information on the EITC, who
qualifies, and where free tax sites are located, dial 2-1-1 or go to irs.gov/eitc.
                                                                                                         55
                                                   Earn !t Keep !t Save !t Partners
                                                   ACORN – Bank of America – Bank of Nevada – CHR, Inc. – City of Henderson – City
                                                   of Las Vegas – City of North Las Vegas – College of Southern Nevada – Community
                                                   Bank of Nevada – Consumer Credit Counseling – East Las Vegas Community
                                                   Development – Excalibur Hotel & Casino – Family TIES of Nevada – Goodwill of
                                                   Southern Nevada – HSBC Bank Nevada, NA – HACA – HELP of Southern Nevada –
                                                   Housing Authority, Clark County – Internal Revenue Service – Latin Chamber of
                                                   Commerce – Nat’l Federation of Filipino-American Associations – Nevada Federal
                                                   Credit Union – Nevada HAND – Nevada Legal Services – Nevada Partners – Nevada
                                                   Society of Enrolled Agents – Nevada State Bank – USAA Savings Bank – United Labor
                                                   Agency of Nevada – United Way of Southern Nevada – University of Nevada Las Vegas

                    3                              – Volunteer Center of Southern Nevada – Wells Fargo & Company
                                                   About the Earned Income Tax Credit
                                                   Enacted by Congress and signed into law by President Gerald Ford in 1975, the EITC is a
                                                   refundable tax credit that reduces or eliminates taxes for low-income married or single
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   working people (such as payroll taxes), and also serves as a wage subsidy for low-income
                                                   workers. The EITC returned more than $225,000,000 to the Clark County economy last
                                                   year.
                                                   About United Way of Southern Nevada
                                                   United Way collaborates with volunteers, stakeholders and community leaders to uncover
                                                   key strategies designed to develop community-based solutions to our community’s most
                                                   pressing health and human service issues. Beyond quick fixes, these strategies are
                                                   delivering long-term solutions, aligned with benchmarks and achievement standards, to
                                                   change community conditions. For more information about southern Nevada’s most
                                                   pressing needs and how United Way’s community-based agenda is improving lives, call
                                                   702-734-2273 or visit uwsn.org.




                   56
                             Governor Jennifer Granholm
                            Press Release, January 31, 2008

      JANUARY 31 IS NATIONAL EARNED INCOME TAX CREDIT DAY
                           IN MICHIGAN
            TAX CREDIT HELPS WORKING FAMILIES MOVE
                                                                                                 3
                     TOWARD SELF-SUFFICIENCY

For Immediate Release




                                                                                            HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
January 31, 2008

Gov. Jennifer M. Granholm has proclaimed Jan. 31 as Earned Income Tax Credit Day in
Michigan.

"The Internal Revenue Services estimates that more than $300 million in Earned Income
Tax Credits goes unclaimed by low-income taxpayers in Michigan," DHS Director
Ismael Ahmed said. "The Earned Income Tax Credit is a proven anti-poverty tool that
makes the difference for Michigan's working families.

"Governor Granholm's proclamation helps more people learn about this critical support in
their efforts to overcome poverty, put a down payment on a home, take care of their
families, and become financially self-reliant."

For the 2007 tax season - depending on a person's income and number of dependents -
the federal EITC can reach a maximum of:

       $4,716 for families with two or more children.
       $2,853 for families with one child.
       $428 for taxpayers with no children.

Michigan enacted a state earned income tax credit in 2006 that becomes effective during
the 2008 tax season. Under the agreement, working families are eligible to receive a
percentage of the federal EITC, starting with 10 percent for 2008 and increasing to up to
20 percent in 2009.

Michigan's Earned Income Tax Credit Initiative, started in 2003, spurred development of
Volunteer Income Tax Assistance centers in 81 counties and helped spread information
on ICAN! electronic filing services. There were 664,900 returns filed through volunteer
sites in Michigan during the 2006 tax season. Also in the 2006 tax season, more than $1.2
billion in EITC returns were approved by the IRS and the average Michigan refund was
$1,931.
                                                                                                       57
                                                   "We know without a doubt that workers and their families spend Earned Income Tax
                                                   Credit money in their communities - paying their bills and buying items for their families.
                                                   This credit provides communities with a needed boost in consumer spending and - in turn
                                                   - creates more jobs," said Lt. Gov. John D. Cherry Jr. "This day helps to raise the public's
                                                   awareness that critical tax relief exists for working low-income families here in
                                                   Michigan."

                                                   Michigan's Earned Income Tax Credit Initiative is a partnership involving the Office of
                                                   the Governor, departments of Human Services, Treasury, Labor and Economic Growth,
                                                   Internal Revenue Service, Accounting Aid Society, Michigan Association of CPAs,
                                                   Michigan Community Action Agency Association, Michigan State University, and many
                    3                              local agencies and organizations. Oversight for the Statewide EITC Coalition, which
                                                   leads the initiative, is a joint effort between Michigan Poverty Law Program, Michigan
                                                   League for Human Services, and the C.S. Mott Group for sustainable Food Systems at
                                                   Michigan State University.
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   For more information about the EITC filing or to find free tax preparation sites, go
                                                   to www.michiganeic.org

                                                   For more information on Department of Human Service go to
                                                   www.michigan.gov/dhs




                   58
                                 Governor Joe Manchin
                         Weekly Column Article, February 27, 2009

   STATE AND FEDERAL FAMILY TAX CREDITS AVAILABLE FOR FAMILIES
           FROM THE GOVERNOR’S DESK: A WEEKLY COLUMN BY
                        GOV. JOE MANCHIN

It is tax season again and time for West Virginians to complete the necessary personal income       3
tax forms for both the state and federal government. This year, I encourage you to take
advantage of all available credits, exemptions and modifications because in this global
economic downturn, every opportunity to save a hard-earned penny is worth the effort.




                                                                                                   HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
In tax year 2007, a new tax credit called the West Virginia Family Tax Credit (WVFTC)
became available. The WVFTC is a tax credit available to certain individuals or families that
may reduce or eliminate their West Virginia personal income tax. Did you make less than
$38,300 in 2008? Is your modified gross income equal to or less than $2,700 above the federal
poverty guideline income for 2008? If you answered “Yes” to either question, you may qualify
for this credit. You can learn more about the qualifications and complete the WVFTC form in
the IT-140 booklet by visiting www.wvtax.gov.

Qualified taxpayers should also take advantage of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) on
their federal personal income tax. For tax year 2008 tax, the EITC could lower your federal
income tax by as much as $4,824. And, because the EITC is a refundable credit, it may result in
money being refunded to you. In order to take advantage of the EITC, you must qualify and file
a tax return even if you are not otherwise required to file.

My wife, Gayle, is the honorary chairwoman of the EITC program in West Virginia. As
governor and first lady, we have witnessed first-hand the challenges working families face in
the tax process, as well as the positive impact of tax credits. The EITC has bipartisan support,
as well as backing from the business community, because most EITC dollars are spent locally.

In the 2007 tax year, more than 24 million people nationwide took advantage of the EITC.
However, up to 25 percent of the eligible individuals still don’t claim the EITC, showing that
millions of people nationwide do not get the credit they deserve. Please don’t be left out this
year – find out if you qualify by visiting eitc.irs.gov today.

Any extra money can go a long way, and the WVFTC and EITC can help individuals in many
ways, including: moving from expensive rental housing to home ownership; purchasing a used
or new car to commute to better jobs; attending a local college or university to improve their
skills; or, staying current with mortgage payments to avoid foreclosure. Please ask your tax
preparer if you are eligible for these credits, and encourage your family and friends to see if
they qualify.

                                                                                                              59
                                             ###
                                                    A




                                                                         CITY OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
                                                                                   Office of the Mayor
                                                                                   Thomas M. Menino
                                                                             Press Release, February 1, 2008

                    3                              MAYOR HELPS WORKING FAMILIES PUT “MONEY IN THEIR POCKETS”
                                                          Kicks Off EITC Campaign with Opening of 24 FREE Tax Prep Sites
                                                    Mayor Thomas M. Menino, joined by members of the Boston Earned Income Tax
                                                                                      Credit
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   (EITC) Coalition and IRS Tax Specialist Don Dill kicked off another tax season today.
                                                   Menino announced that the Boston EITC Campaign has opened 24 free tax preparation
                                                   sites (visit www.bostontaxhelp.org for a list of sites) throughout the City to assist
                                                   residents in filing their taxes and claiming the EITC. Additionally, Boston Public Health
                                                   Commissioner Barbara Ferrer provided important information that tax payers may need
                                                   to meet the new state law requiring people to prove they have health insurance. The
                                                   Boston EITC Coalition is dedicated to raising more awareness of this important cash
                                                   benefit for working people. The coalition in Boston is recognized as a national leader in
                                                   offering free tax prep sites for qualified EITC recipients and increasing the number of
                                                   families accessing the EITC. When residents take advantage of the federal and state
                                                   EITC, it brings significant benefits to the local economy as many families use that money
                                                   to pay bills, buy groceries, or start a savings account. “When working families do not
                                                   claim the EITC, which they have worked hard for and are entitled to, money is lost to the
                                                   entire community that could go towards job creation and boosting the economic activity
                                                   of the whole city,” Mayor Menino said. “Last year, our free tax prep sites returned almost
                                                   $15 million in federal and state refunds to families across the city. Ultimately the EITC
                                                   benefits all Boston neighborhoods and results in greater economic opportunity.” Mayor
                                                   Menino also urged employers to inform their workers about the underutilized tax credit.
                                                   “The best way to get this money into the hands of the people who earned it is by getting
                                                   the word out,” the Mayor said. According to national estimates, approximately $8 million
                                                   went unclaimed last year in Boston.

                                                   EITC Eligibility
                                                   The EITC is a federal and state tax credit available to many low-to-moderate income
                                                   working families and individuals. Eligible residents can qualify for up to $5,000 in
                                                   federal and state money, but many people are unaware of the EITC and therefore don't
                                                   apply for it. Last year the Campaign returned $15 million total tax dollars and served
                                                   9,000 Boston families. Through the direct efforts of the EITC Campaign, the dollars
                                                   returned to hardworking families has increased $5 million over the last two years. The
                                                   number of households claiming the credit has increased by over 3%, yet there are still

                   60
millions of unclaimed dollars. With the help of volunteers, the Campaign aims to return
millions in tax refund dollars to the pockets of Boston’s low-to-moderate income
families. Residents who qualify for the tax credit can go to the tax prep site in their
community and have their taxes done for free. All tax prep sites use E-file and allow tax
filers to receive their tax refund within 7 to 10 days. They will also receive financial
counseling and have a chance to learn about and access economic enhancements such as
health care and foodstamps. Families and individuals may qualify for the earned income
tax credit if they worked in the year 2007 and earned less than $39,000 (visit the website
for all income limit requirements). To find out if you qualify for the tax credit, call 617
918 5275 or visit www.bostontaxhelp.org.

The Boston EITC Campaign is a collaboration of government agencies, foundations,
community-based, non-profit organizations, as well as the business community. The
                                                                                               3
Internal Revenue Service (IRS) provides free software and training materials to the
volunteer sites.




                                                                                              HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
Together, the Campaign and the IRS provide training to site staff and volunteers.




                                                                                                         61
                                                    A


                                                   MEDIA COVERAGE




                    3                                                    Atlanta Business Chronicle
                                                                              January 30, 2009
                                                        BOLLING TOUTS FOOD BANK’S ‘PROSPERITY CAMPAIGN’ SUCCESS
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   BY: JOHN MANASSO
                                                   ATLANTA BUSINESS CHRONICLE - STAFF WRITER

                                                   In addition to the high-powered names like Atlanta City Council President Lisa Borders
                                                   and U.S. Rep. John Lewis seated next to him, Atlanta Community Food Bank founder
                                                   Bill Bolling yielded the podium to a pair of ordinary citizens on Friday.

                                                   They spoke at the news conference at the Atlanta Workforce Development Agency to
                                                   attest to the success of the Food Bank’s “Prosperity Campaign.” Founded last year, the
                                                   Prosperity Campaign helps income tax filers who make less than $42,000 file their
                                                   returns for free and also helps them to take advantage of the Earned Income Tax Credit.

                                                   The EITC, Bolling said, helped more than 9,400 people in metro Atlanta to receive about
                                                   $11 million in tax refunds last year. Bolling said the program saved taxpayers $1.6
                                                   million.

                                                   One of the people who took advantage of it was Shandace Boswell, who paid $400 to
                                                   have her taxes filed the previous year. Last year, through the help of the EITC, she
                                                   received a refund of $4,000. Boswell was referred to the program through one of the
                                                   Food Bank’s partners, the Center for Working Families.

                                                   She said she used the money to pay childcare and commuting expenses.

                                                   Lewis sits on the U.S. House of Representatives Ways and Means Committee and chairs
                                                   the subcommittee on oversight. That committee oversees the Internal Revenue Service.
                                                   Rick Byrd, local commissioner of Wage and Investment, also was present.

                                                   Lewis pointed out that people eligible for the EITC, if they have not filed for it in
                                                   previous years, can file amended returns, making themselves eligible for past the EITC in
                                                   past years.




                   62
 A


He credited the program with lifting 5 million people out of poverty each year, saying the
program provided $47 billion in returns across the country last year. He said 950,000
people in Georgia are eligible for the EITC and that the program brought $2 billion to the
state last year.

He cautioned that “too many of the poorest do not know” about the program. “The IRS is
here to help you, not to arrest you and put you in jail,” he said.

Byrd said the IRS believes that one out of four people who are eligible for the EITC do
not claim it.

“We have money,” he said, “please let us send it to you.”

Bolling called the EITC refunds “real money for the real economy.”                            3




                                                                                             HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                                                                        63
                                                   A




                                                                                     The Boston Globe
                                                                                     February 12, 2008

                                                                               CREDIT WHERE IT'S DUE

                                                   ONE OF the most powerful government programs to help fight poverty among low-
                                                   wage worker is the earned income tax credit. Those who claim the credit stand to
                    3                              keep thousands more of the dollars they earn. That's a tremendous boon, especially
                                                   now when the economy is weak. But this underused tax policy needs more publicity
                                                   - which the City of Boston is trying to provide.

                                                   Last year, one Roxbury mother of three received $8,000 by applying retroactively
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   for several years of the tax credit, according to officials at ABCD, the local
                                                   antipoverty agency. Altogether, Boston's tax filers claimed $73 million through the
                                                   EITC in 2006, getting an average of $1,700 each, according to the Internal Revenue
                                                   Service.

                                                   The beauty of EITC is that it's a tax credit - not a rebate - so it can even put money in
                                                   the pockets of people too poor to owe any income taxes. It's a policy that rewards
                                                   work, helps families, and stimulates the economy.

                                                   The number of claims in Massachusetts is increasing. Still, many who could benefit
                                                   don't know about the EITC.

                                                   "When working families do not claim the EITC, which they have worked hard for
                                                   and are entitled to, money is lost to the entire community that could go toward job
                                                   creation and boosting the economic activity of the whole city," Mayor Menino said
                                                   in a statement.

                                                   Nationally, some 20 to 25 percent of eligible taxpayers fail to claim the credit,
                                                   according to IRS estimates.

                                                   Even many who do file for the credit end up losing money because they pay to have
                                                   their taxes prepared, according to the nonprofit Brookings Institution, a think tank in
                                                   Washington.

                                                   Brookings says that of the 70 percent who paid tax preparers in 2004, a third got
                                                   dicey "refund loans" from companies that advance filers the amount of their refunds
                                                   but charge high fees.

                                                   Mayor Menino, the IRS, and local organizations have set up 25 tax preparation sites
                                                   for people who are eligible for the EITC. It's free help filling out tax forms and filing
                                                   electronically.



                   64
A list of the locations is available at cityofboston.gov/bra/eitc. Financial counseling
is also available at all the sites.

The challenge is to reach the millions who are missing out on the EITC. The IRS
doesn't have an advertising budget, spokeswoman Peggy Riley says, so it relies on
cities and local partners to spread the word.

That creates work for several players. Federal and state governments could fund
efforts to find and inform the missing 20-plus percent, setting up outreach pilot
programs across the country. Foundations could help fund this effort. And
advertising agencies could run pro bono EITC campaigns.

To do the most good, this wage-friendly tax policy should become common
knowledge.




                                                                                          65
                                                                                    The Boston Globe
                                                                                    February 10, 2008

                                                       FREE SERVICE HELPS BOSTONIANS WITH TAX PREPARATION,
                                                                             CREDITS


                    3                              For folks like Floriece Holland, every bit of extra cash helps. Last year Holland and
                                                   her three children - now ages 4, 6, and 19 - were living in a single rented room in
                                                   Dorchester. She was living from check to check.

                                                   "I was practically homeless," said Holland. "We didn't have our own bathroom or
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   our own kitchen."

                                                   A temp agency got her an assignment at Action for Boston Community
                                                   Development, where she enrolled in home-buying classes.

                                                   "When my teacher looked at my taxes, she asked me why I didn't do any earned
                                                   income tax credits," Holland said. "I said, `What's that?"'

                                                   The EITC is a federal and state tax credit available to low- to moderate-income
                                                   working families and individuals. But many of those who could benefit from the
                                                   credit don't know about it.

                                                   Seeking to change that, Boston Mayor Thomas Menino set up the Boston EITC
                                                   campaign, a free service supported by local nonprofits and volunteers that helps
                                                   Bostonians who earn $40,000 or less per year prepare their tax returns and, if they
                                                   are eligible, claim the EITC.

                                                   With tax day approaching, 24 free tax-prep sites have opened for the season and are
                                                   offering assistance with returns, as well as health insurance enrollment - now a state
                                                   requirement.

                                                   Holland ended up with about $8,000 from EITC, for that year and retroactively.

                                                   She got an apartment in Roxbury, with a kitchen, a bathroom, and bedrooms for her
                                                   children.

                                                   "With my earned income tax credits this year, I'm taking my kids on vacation,"
                                                   Holland said. "They deserve it."

                                                   For information on the tax-prep sites, call 617-918-5275 or visit bostontaxhelp.org.




                   66
                                   Brooklyn Daily Eagle
                                     January 29, 2009

          NEWS AND NOTICES FROM LOCAL ELECTED OFFICIALS

Tax season is upon us once again, and Assemblywoman Janele Hyer-Spencer (D-Staten
Island/Brooklyn) is reminding New Yorkers about the Earned Income Tax Credit. Friday
is EITC Awareness Day, which the IRS designated to spread the word about this often-
overlooked tax credit available for lower-income individuals and families.
                                                                                                3
“The EITC returns tax dollars back to hardworking families that desperately need to




                                                                                               HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
cover their expenses, yet so many people aren’t aware of this opportunity,” Hyer-Spencer
said. “Working families earning less than $42,000 a year could be eligible for as much as
a $6,500 tax credit.”

The Earned Income Tax Credit is a refundable credit that helps eligible taxpayers lower
their federal, state and New York City taxes or receive refunds. According to the IRS,
millions of taxpayers fail to claim their EITC.

“This year more than ever, working families are under enormous financial pressure and it
is critical that everyone eligible claim their credit. Doing so will provide much needed
relief both at home and also in our community as these families now have resources to
buy needed goods and services from local businesses.”

All wage-earning taxpayers with a valid Social Security Number are eligible, with the
following adjusted gross income limits:

• $12,880 ($15,880 if married filing jointly) if there is no qualifying child;

• $33,995 ($36,995 if married filing jointly) if there is one qualifying child; or

• $38,646 ($41,646 if married filing jointly) if there is more than one qualifying child.

“In addition to this tax credit, the Mayor’s NYC EITC Coalition can help qualifying New
Yorkers file their taxes at free or low-cost tax preparation sites all over the city,” Hyer-
Spencer said. “These savings can go a long way, especially in today’s economic
environment.”

To learn more about EITC eligibility and low-cost tax preparation centers, individuals
can call 311 or visit www.nyc.gov/eitc.

                                            ***


                                                                                                          67
                                                   Recently Assemblywoman Hyer-Spencer had the good fortune of attending the historic
                                                   inauguration of President Barack Obama as the 44th president of the United States. “It
                                                   was an honor to witness President Obama’s oath of office and to see him embark on such
                                                   an unprecedented and inspiring journey.”

                                                   “The magnitude and enthusiasm of the crowd was truly awe inspiring. Everyone I met,
                                                   regardless of their age or background, was excited about building a better America. We
                                                   simply must harness this energy for positive change and build upon it here in Bay Ridge,”
                                                   Hyer-Spencer said.

                                                   Our country is facing some very serious and pressing issues and together we must
                    3                              strengthen the economy, create new jobs, give science and technology the attention they
                                                   deserve and bring the nation together for a common purpose. Time and again, our nation
                                                   has looked adversity in the eye and come out victorious and the current economic crisis is
                                                   no different – with hard work and commitment, America will prevail,” Hyer-Spencer
                                                   said.
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                   68
 A




                                 Central Florida News 13
                                    January 30, 2009

             UNITED WAY HELPS YOU CLAIM YOUR TAX MONEY

ORLANDO -- The Heart of Florida United Way is working in Central Florida to help
residents make sure that when it comes to filing their taxes, they get all the money they
                                                                                            3
are entitled to from the government.

The United Way held a meeting at the Englewood Community Center Thursday to
educate people about the Earned Income Tax Credit, also known as the EITC.

Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, City Commissioner Tony Ortiz and the president of
the Heart of Florida United Way, Robert Brown, were in attendance.

People who qualify for EITC can get anywhere from $428 to $4,824 depending on their
income and meeting the eligibility guidelines.

Brown said it is easy to find out if you are eligible.

"If anybody even thinks they are eligible, simply call 211 and ask about the
EITC program, or go onto the Web site at HFUW.org and click through to the EITC
program and they can see whether they are eligible. It's really easy and the money is
there," Brown said.

There are guidelines for who is eligible for the money. Click here for a questionnaire to
help you find out.

In broad strokes, you may be eligible if you:
       Make less than $12,880 a year and have no children
       Make less than $33,995 and have one child
       Make less than $38,646 and have two or more children

Those salaries go up if you are married and file jointly. Here are those numbers:
       Make less than $15,880 and have no children
       Make less than $36,995 and have one child
       Make less than $41,646 and have more than one child

  If you want some help figuring this all out, the IRS has guidelines for choosing a tax
                                        preparer.

                                                                                            69
                                                                                      The Chattanoogan
                                                                                      January 23, 2009

                                                      BREDESEN ANNOUNCES TENNESSEE EARNED INCOME TAX CREDIT
                                                                         AWARENESS DAY
                    3
                                                   Gov. Phil Bredesen is proclaiming Jan. 30 Tennessee Earned Income Tax Credit
                                                   Awareness Day. A statewide push is underway for working Tennesseans to receive
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   millions of dollars that are left unclaimed every year. Last year, more than 588,000 low
                                                   income families and individuals in the state received the Earned Income Tax Credit
                                                   (EITC), with refunds totaling $1.2 billion dollars.

                                                   “The federal government estimates that up to 25 percent of the Tennesseans who would
                                                   have qualified for the Earned Income Tax Credit last year didn’t claim it,” said Governor
                                                   Phil Bredesen. “That’s why I’m working to help raise awareness of this valuable federal
                                                   tax refund and why I hope all Tennesseans who qualify to visit a free tax preparation site
                                                   will do so and take advantage of this benefit.”

                                                   Tennesseans are urged to call 2-1-1 to find out where the nearest Volunteer Income Tax
                                                   Assistance (VITA) site is located. The Department of Human Services is also
                                                   encouraging clients who participate in the Food Stamp and Families First programs to
                                                   have their taxes done for free at their local VITA site and claim all of the money they are
                                                   due. More than 200,000 notices were sent to clients who are eligible for the EITC benefit.

                                                   “The Department realizes our clients are working diligently to become self-sufficient,"
                                                   said Commissioner Virginia T. Lodge. "We want to reinforce their efforts by raising
                                                   awareness about the EITC, which allows low-income families to receive a substantial
                                                   refund from their federal income taxes.”

                                                   DHS has teamed up with the United Way’s 2-1-1 community services information line,
                                                   the Tennessee Alliance for Financial Independence and the IRS to direct low income
                                                   clients to their nearest VITA site location.

                                                   The EITC, which was launched in the mid-1970s, is a significant part of the U.S. tax
                                                   code. Many DHS clients enrolled in the Food Stamp program and in Families First, the
                                                   state's Temporary Assistance to Needy Families program, will qualify for the EITC. It is
                                                   a refundable federal income tax credit that provides thousands of dollars to qualified
                                                   filers each year, depending on family size and income.



                   70
"In a time when working families are struggling to make ends meet, they should take
advantage of every bit of tax relief the federal government provides," said U.S.
Congressman Jim Cooper (D-Nashville). "Too many eligible families don't know about
the Earned Income Tax Credit, so we need to do a better job of getting the word out. I
hope all eligible Tennesseans will use this tax refund to put some money back into their
bank accounts in tough times."

The following lists the maximum credit a single, head of household filer can claim:

Income Qualifications and Refund Examples:
If your earned income and adjusted gross income less than: Maximum Credit:

If your earned income and adjusted gross income is less than $12,880, ($15,880 if
                                                                                            3
married filing jointly) with no qualifying child, your maximum credit is $428.

If your earned income and adjusted gross income is less than $33,995,($36,995 if married




                                                                                           HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
filing jointly) with one qualifying child, your maximum credit is $2,852.
If your earned income and adjusted gross income less than $38,646; ($41,646 if married
filing jointly) with more than one qualifying child is maximum credit is $4,716.

For more information on the EITC and local VITA sites, visit www.tn.gov or the
Tennessee Alliance for Financial Independence at www.tnafi.org . For more information
on DHS and its programs, visit: www.state.tn.us/humanserv.




                                                                                                      71
                                                   A




                                                                                   New York Daily News
                                                                                     January 30, 2009

                                                       ARE YOU MISSING OUT ON YOUR TAX CREDIT? FIND OUT NOW


                                                   BY: BILL EGBERT
                    3                              DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

                                                   EVEN IN the middle of the credit crunch, there's still one credit that's easy to get.

                                                   The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is available to low-income workers and can
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   provide as much as $6,500 per family - but you have to file a tax return to claim it.

                                                   Rep. José Serrano is bringing Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Doug
                                                   Shulman to the Bronx today for an event to encourage eligible New Yorkers to take
                                                   credit where credit is due.

                                                   "The Earned Income Tax Credit helps hundreds of thousands of Bronx individuals
                                                   and families to make ends meet," said Serrano (D-South Bronx).

                                                   "Unfortunately, some individuals who qualify for the credit miss out on this benefit
                                                   each year."

                                                   The Citizen's Advice Bureau is hosting the 10 a.m. event at its Bronx Works site, on
                                                   the fifth floor of 391 E. 149th St.

                                                   Workers with a valid Social Security number who make less than $42,000 a year can
                                                   be eligible for the EITC.

                                                   Families with more than one qualifying child can claim as much as $6,500, and
                                                   families with one child receive slightly more than half of that. Individuals can expect
                                                   about $600.

                                                   Serrano's office estimates that in his district alone, 130,422 people claimed their
                                                   EITC last year, bringing over $311 million into the poorest congressional district in
                                                   the nation. But thousands more workers who were eligible missed out.

                                                   Since workers with incomes low enough to qualify for the EITC generally pay no
                                                   income taxes, many don't bother to file a return because they don't expect a refund.
                                                   But they cheat themselves out of money that is rightfully theirs, the congressman
                                                   insisted.




                   72
"By taking advantage of many free tax preparation services throughout the city,
hardworking individuals and families can claim this credit," Serrano said.

Free tax preparation help will be offered at the event by Ariva, the nonprofit arm of
CheckSpring, a full-service bank that has collaborated with the city on programs to
offer free or low-cost financial services to struggling New Yorkers.

The city Department of Consumer Affairs also has a network of 54 Volunteer
Income Tax Assistance sites across the boroughs. A call to 311 can locate the site
nearest you.

"This tax credit is an important resource for individuals and families," said Serrano.
"If you qualify, you should not miss out."                                                3




                                                                                         HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




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                                                                                       The Flint Journal
                                                                                       January 31, 2009

                                                        MORE IN GENESEE COUNTY COULD QUALIFY FOR EXTRA CASH IN
                                                                           THEIR TAX RETURN

                                                   BY: KRISTIN LONGLEY
                    3                              THE FLINT JOURNAL

                                                   GENESEE COUNTY, Michigan -- It's your hard earned money, and you want to keep it,
                                                   right?
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   As the dreaded tax season gets underway, a host of Genesee County agencies are
                                                   spreading the message about how to keep more of your income in your wallet. Volunteers
                                                   are standing by in at least nine sites throughout the county to prepare taxes for free to
                                                   those who qualify.

                                                   The federal earned income tax credit is designed to help low- to moderate-income
                                                   workers put as much as $4,824 back in their pockets this year, and a new Michigan
                                                   earned income tax credit is worth up to 10 percent of the federal credit.

                                                   And in these tough economic times, a couple extra thousand dollars can do wonders for
                                                   the typical Genesee County family.

                                                   "It's a down payment on a car or a house or it can be put in savings as a cushion," said
                                                   Martin Barillas of Metro Housing Partnership. "This money that can be brought to
                                                   taxpayers can change lives."

                                                   The Genesee County Tax Assistance and Financial Services Coalition is working to
                                                   educate the public about the credit and hosted a kickoff event on Saturday attended by tax
                                                   assistance volunteers and city officials. With many people earning less income these
                                                   days, more families are sure to qualify for the tax credits.

                                                   Thajuana Moore, 34, of Flint said the tax credit could help her pay the rent and purchase
                                                   her prescription medications.

                                                   "That kind of help would be great," said Moore, who hasn't previously applied for the
                                                   credit. "It's real hard these days."




                   74
As many as 25 percent of Michigan taxpayers who are eligible for the credit don't claim
it, according to the IRS. Families annually lose about $70 million in uncollected EITC
money, according to the Michigan Association of United Ways.

The local tax assistance coalition has seen hundreds of people benefit from the credit
through its Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, which helped file more than 1,600
tax returns last year.

At least nine sites -- including some Flint churches, the Flint Public Library and the
University of Michigan-Flint -- are available this year to provide free tax services for
people with household incomes lower than $42,000, said Carlos Cisneros, chairman of
the coalition.
                                                                                               3
Since 2002, more than $83 million has come back to Genesee County because of the
earned income tax credit.




                                                                                              HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
"That money gets recycled in the community with people using local grocery stores,
paying rent, whatever," said Flint City Councilman Sheldon Neeley. "That's important for
any municipality."

The city of Flint has been supporting the tax assistance coalition for several years with a
portion of its federal Community Development Block Grant funds. Mayor Don
Williamson issued a proclamation Saturday, presented by city officials in his absence,
proclaiming it to be National Earned Income Tax Credit Day.

"We need to make sure families that deserve a chance make it," Neeley said. "They need
to get every opportunity to do so."




                                                                                                         75
                                                                                          Journal Star
                                                                                        January 30, 2009

                                                           QUINN IN PEORIA TO TOUT FREE TAX-FILING ASSISTANCE

                    3                              PEORIA — Newly sworn governor Pat Quinn will be in Peoria today to encourage
                                                   working families to get the help they need to file income tax returns and get back
                                                   thousands of dollars.
                                                   "Every eligible person in Illinois deserves to receive the full Earned Income Tax Credit
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   (EITC)," Quinn said in a news release. "The EITC is the best pro-job, pro-family and
                                                   anti-poverty tax relief ever devised. In partnership with the Center for Economic
                                                   Progress, our office is offering those eligible taxpayers free assistance to fill out their
                                                   state and federal tax returns and get their full refunds quickly and painlessly."
                                                   Quinn will speak at 11:30 a.m. at Friendship House, 800 NE Madison Ave.
                                                   Quinn was sworn in to office Thursday after former Gov. Rod Blagojevich was convicted
                                                   at his impeachment trial and voted out of office by the Illinois Senate. Quinn, formerly
                                                   lieutenant governor, was one of Blagojevich's critics and promptly was sworn in.
                                                   This year, Illinois is supporting free tax counseling at locations across the state. Most
                                                   sites will open Jan. 24 and provide services through April 15. The services are provided
                                                   free of charge to families with annual incomes less than $45,000 and to individuals with
                                                   incomes less than $20,000.
                                                   In Peoria alone, the Center for Economic Progress did 751 federal tax returns last year,
                                                   returning $1.1 million to those families.
                                                   Quinn will be joined by state Sen. David Koehler, D- Peoria; state Rep. Mike Smith, D-
                                                   Canton; state Rep. Jehan Gordon, D-Peoria; Peoria Mayor Jim Ardis; David Marzahl,
                                                   executive director of the Center for Economic Progress; and Mary Ruth Herbers, senior
                                                   director of programs for the Center for Economic Progress.
                                                   For information on the Tax Counseling Project, call the Center for Economic Progress'
                                                   toll-free statewide number at (888) 827-8511 or visit the Web site at
                                                   EconomicProgress.org.




                   76
       A




                                             News Blaze
                                          February 04, 2009

   FIRST LADY MARIA SHRIVER, LOCAL COMMUNITY LEADERS CONNECT LOW
                           INCOME FAMILIES


First Lady Maria Shriver and Local Community Leaders Connect Low Income Families Across the
State through WE Connect Campaign                                                                            3
Today, First Lady Maria Shriver toured Northern California as part of her 2009 'WE Connect'
Campaign, a groundbreaking public-private partnership designed to help California's working
families. Through her WE Connect events, Shriver connected hundreds of families with the




                                                                                                            HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
information and tools they need to take full advantage of valuable financial resources, such as the
Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). The push for WE Connect coincides with the start of tax season
and at a time when families are in desperate need of community resources.

In Sacramento, the First Lady was joined by Assembly Speaker Karen Bass (D-Los Angeles),
Assemblymember Dave Jones (D-Sacramento) and Mayor Kevin Johnson. Stockton Mayor Ann
Johnston joined Shriver in Stockton and Assemblymember Tom Tolarkson (D-Antioch) in Oakland.

"The worsening national economic climate makes it more important than ever to help California
families get connected to a variety of support services to help during this challenging time," said First
Lady Maria Shriver. "Millions of dollars in Earned Income Tax Credit go unused every year simply
because families do not know that they are eligible to receive it. With such wonderful partners and
community leaders, WE Connect can make a difference and give families the chance to get ahead."

"In this economic climate, moving people living in poverty toward self-sufficiency and financial
independence saves lives and strengthens families," said Senate President pro Tem Darrell Steinberg.
"My hat is off to both Sacramento Food Bank & Family Services and First Lady Maria Shriver's WE
Connect campaign for doing the important work of putting resources and the people who need them
together in one place."

Assembly Speaker Karen Bass said, "In tough times it's important to remember that we are all
connected - that we are all in this together. The innovative public-private partnership Maria Shriver
has mobilized with WE Connect gives California families valuable information and assistance to tap
into the resources that are available to them. Being there for people in need is one of our most
important human connections. WE Connect is certainly there for - and making a difference for -
California families."

Since 2005, Shriver has raised awareness of the EITC through her "WE Connect" campaign,
including other key resources to serve working families who work hard but struggle to make ends
meet. In addition to the tax credit and financial incentive programs available, www.WEConnect.net


                                                                                                                       77
                                                          A


                                                   aims to help people connect with resources to keep their homes, put food on the table and find a job
                                                   in a time when unemployment is so rampant.

                                                   Intuit Inc. and its foundation participate in this public-private partnership by providing both financial
                                                   and in-kind support. "In these difficult economic times, it's more important than ever to connect
                                                   Californians with programs and services that can put money in their pockets, programs like the
                                                   federal Earned Income Tax Credit. But to benefit from these programs, people have to be aware of
                                                   them, understand their eligibility and know how to apply," said Brad Smith, president and CEO of
                                                   Intuit Inc. "Intuit and our Intuit Financial Freedom Foundation are proud to continue our partnership
                                                   with California First Lady Maria Shriver's WE Connect Campaign, lending our technological
                                                   expertise to help the First Lady empower Californians to break down the barriers to these money-
                    3                              saving programs."

                                                   As one of the most innovative statewide efforts promoting the EITC, WE Connect uses all available
                                                   channels to reach out to the over 625,000 eligible families in California who currently are not
                                                   claiming this credit and also connects them with other key programs and services. The campaign
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   partners with community organizations, statewide programs and major corporations to reach working
                                                   families where they shop, eat, work, live and learn.

                                                   To achieve this, the WE Connect campaign includes the following components:
                                                   www.WEconnect.net: This website is a one-stop-shop connecting Californians to programs and
                                                   services for which they may be eligible. The site now houses an all-inclusive resource map, the first
                                                   of its kind in the country, which connects visitors to hundreds of locations near them offering free tax
                                                   assistance, job fairs and other resourceful events.

                                                              WEb Connector: The WEb Connector, the campaign's exclusive online tool, developed by
                                                              partner Intuit for this campaign, helps working families determine exactly which of the nine
                                                              programs they may be eligible for and how to apply - all with the click of a mouse.
                                                               WE Connect Events: WE Connect events take place throughout the state in partnership
                                                              with a network of statewide partners providing free tax preparation for eligible working
                                                              families and individuals with one-on-one assistance. Families can learn about and apply for
                                                              key services and programs while having the opportunity to have their taxes prepared for
                                                              free. WE Connect materials, including the 2009 La Opinion supplement and 10 Tips for
                                                              Financial Empowerment are made available at all events.
                                                              La Opinion Partnership: Through a partnership with La Opinion, the nation's largest
                                                              Spanish-speaking newspaper in the country, WE Connect has developed its second edition
                                                              of a 24 page, full color, bi-lingual supplement that will be distributed to over 1.2 million
                                                              Californians in need. The supplement contains pertinent information on all of the programs
                                                              and services that the campaign covers and highlights success stories of those who have
                                                              benefited from the resources provided.
                                                              Connecting Working Families in the Workplace: WE Connect reaches out to working
                                                              families through their workplace by providing information to a network of small
                                                              businesses, business associations, unions, and small business development centers. Our goal
                                                              is to engage small business owners in educating their employees about important resources
                                                              that may help them. Materials available will include "Connector" tool kits, workplace
                                                              posters and brochures, payroll inserts and email blasts.


                   78
       A


For more information on Maria's WE Connect campaign, visit: www.WEconnect.net.

About the WE Connect Partners

The WE Connect campaign partners with community organizations, statewide programs, unions,
small businesses and major corporations to connect with working families. WE Connect partners
include: Intuit, The Governor and First Lady's Conference on Women, Legal Aid Society of Orange
County, Central California Legal Services, California Volunteers, AmeriCorps, California
Department of Social Services, United Way of Greater Los Angeles, United Way of Bay Area, La
Opinión, California Association of Food Banks, ClearChannel, California First 5, SEIU, AFSCME,
Save the Children, AT&T, PG&E, Sempra Energy Utilities, California Black Media Association,
Visa, Inc., California Network of Small Business Development Centers, and Wal-Mart, in addition to
over 200 regional organizations across the state.
                                                                                                        3
Sacramento Food Bank & Family Services




                                                                                                       HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
The Sacramento Food Bank & Family Services (SFBFS) is dedicated to assisting those in need by:
Alleviating their immediate pain and problems and moving them toward self sufficiency and financial
independence. SFBFS accomplishes the above goals through the following services: Educating the
illiterate, providing moms with guidance and their infants with food and diapers, strengthening
families through a program of ethics and self-esteem, providing early childhood education and youth
services, feeding the hungry, clothing the poor, housing homeless families with children, furnishing
seniors with a social club and volunteer opportunities, providing high-tech knowledge for youth.

Dorothy Jones Community & Health Center

Dorothy L. Jones Community and Health Center is one out of five Family Resource Centers operated
by the Community Partnership for Families of San Joaquin. The Community Partnership for Families
was founded by leaders from neighborhood groups, the faith community, schools, public and private
health, social service, criminal justice agencies, city, and county government, and the business
community. The Partnership's mission is to promote policies and programs that enable all these
groups to work together-in a systematic manner-to build strong and resourceful families and
communities in San Joaquin County.

The Unity Council

The Unity Council provides comprehensive workforce development services through its Multi-
Cultural One Stop Career Center that specializes in serving limited English proficient clients and
provides services in eight languages: Spanish, Laotian, Mien, Cantonese, Mandarin, Vietnamese,
Cambodian, and English. The AmeriCorps members also participate as volunteers in the Volunteer
Income Tax Assistance (VITA) project. This project has assisted over 1,500 families and has returned
over $750,000 in earned income tax credit (EITC) to our community. The AmeriCorps program has
proven to be an excellent opportunity for youth from our community to develop into our future
leaders.




                                                                                                                  79
                                                    A




                                                                                       The News Journal
                                                                                        March 22, 2009

                                                                  GROUPS OFFER FREE TAX HELP AT MANY SITES

                                                            'SUPER SATURDAY' KICKS OFF EFFORT TO ASSIST FILERS
                                                                          THROUGHOUT STATE
                    3                                                             BY EDWARD L. KENNEY
                                                                                   THE NEWS JOURNAL
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   Every year for the past several years, Louis Jervey has been using the tax refund he
                                                   receives from the state to pay off his federal taxes, which are typically about $1,200.

                                                   But Saturday was different.

                                                   Jervey, 76, of Wilmington, who is retired from the DuPont Co. and living on a fixed
                                                   income, brought his paperwork to a site that offers federal and state tax help for low-
                                                   income Delawareans.

                                                   "It looks good for him to get money back," said Tracey Parker, site manager for the tax-
                                                   help office at the Goodwill store on Lea Boulevard in Wilmington. The better results will
                                                   come about because she advised Jervey to file jointly with his wife rather than separately.

                                                   Money cannot buy that kind of advice, because it is offered free to low-income residents
                                                   at dozens of sites statewide, mainly at nonprofit or faith-based organizations.

                                                   "The whole business of helping people in low-income situations is vitally important,"
                                                   said U.S. Rep. Mike Castle, R-Del., who attended an Internal Revenue Service "Super
                                                   Saturday" event at the Goodwill that was designed to kick off the opening of such sites
                                                   statewide. "We want to make sure that these families are helped. We need to reach out
                                                   and make a difference."

                                                   The free service is being offered as the April 15 deadline for filing taxes approaches.

                                                   Almost 9,000 people statewide have received more than $13 million in tax refunds this
                                                   year through the service, said Joy McManus, a representative with Nehemiah Gateway, a
                                                   nonprofit agency that runs the Delaware Earned Income Tax Credit Campaign and
                                                   recruits volunteers who help prepare taxes.

                                                   Jim Daugherty, a territory manager for the IRS in Delaware and Pennsylvania, said the
                                                   nationwide Voluntary Income Tax Assistance program, which includes the campaign in


                   80
 A


Delaware, has been in operation for more than 30 years and was established by Congress
to help low-income citizens file tax returns.

"If they were to go to a commercial preparer, we're saving them a couple hundred
dollars," he said.

Castle said he also attended the event Saturday to draw attention to the fact that there are
more than 5,000 Delawareans who are eligible for tax-return money from their 2005
income taxes. The deadline for receiving those refunds also is April 15.

"There are a lot of people who don't think they're required to file," McManus said. "They
don't know that this money is owed to them. People are scared of doing taxes. It's very
complicated."                                                                                   3
"So if they do file, they will get that money," Castle added. "You're dealing with an
education issue. People just don't know."




                                                                                               HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
McManus said the tax-preparation help also is offered to small businesses, and bilingual
volunteers are placed at sites where there is need.

Federal and state returns are completed for any taxpayer whose household income does
not exceed $45,000, and they are electronically filed, so refunds can be received in as
little as 10 days. The average household income of the service's customers is just under
$20,000 in Delaware, McManus said.

"With the IRS and taxes, people can be a bit scared," she said. "The biggest thing is, we
don't want them to sit at home and say it's too complicated. We want them to at least
come in and ask questions."




                                                                                                          81
                                                                                           The Republican
                                                                                           March 14, 2009

                                                                          FREE TAX ASSISTANCE NOW AVAILABLE

                    3                              By JIM KINNEY
                                                   THE REPUBLICAN BUSINESS WRITER
                                                   SPRINGFIELD - Free tax help is a mouse click away from people who meet certain
                                                   requirements.
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   U.S. Rep. Richard E. Neal, D-Springfield, joined with representatives of the computer and
                                                   financial software industries Friday to promote the Free File Alliance at a news conference at
                                                   American International College here in advance of the April 15 tax deadline.
                                                   Under the program, makers of tax software make their products available for free to people
                                                   earning less then $56,000 who meet certain other requirements through the Internal Revenue
                                                   Services' Web site, www.IRS.gov and the state Department of Revenue, www.mass.gov/dor.
                                                   Neal said people need to file a tax return if they are to take advantage of the Earned Income
                                                   Tax Credit. Neal has championed the tax credit over the years as a member of the House Ways
                                                   and Means Committee and chairman of its Subcommittee on Select Revenue Measures. The
                                                   Earned Income Tax Credit can mean federal refunds of as much as $4,824 for people with two
                                                   or more children, or $2,917 for people with one child depending on the person's income.
                                                   The Free File Alliance is a group of 19 computer-software companies that make their products
                                                   available free to taxpayers online through www.IRS.gov. Five companies also offer free
                                                   Massachusetts tax-returns, according to www.mass.gov/dor.
                                                   Bernard F. McKay, vice president of corporate affairs for Intuit, makers of TurboTax and
                                                   Quicken, said the industry provides the software for free as a public service. He's based in
                                                   Washington but attended the news conference.
                                                   Each of the 19 companies have slightly different eligibility requirements for the free program.
                                                   For example, his TurboTax is available to members of the military including the National
                                                   Guard and Reserves. Other companies look for first-time filers or people who meet age
                                                   requirements, he said.
                                                   Free File doesn't keep people's information and members don't sell people anything, McKay
                                                   said. The idea is to keep people away from services that offer "instant" refunds that are really
                                                   high-interest loans.
                                                   "You don't need it," McKay said. "If you file electronically, the IRS can get you the refund in a
                                                   week."

                   82
                                          Sun Journal
                                        January 27, 2009


                 FREETAXPREPARATIONAVAILABLEFOR FAMILIES
           FREE TAXPREPARATION AVAILABLE FORFAMILIES

BY ANN BRYANT
SUN JOURNAL STAFF WRITER                                                                             3
FARMINGTON - Free, confidential tax preparation is again available for working families in
western Maine who earn less than $50,000 a year.




                                                                                                    HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
This is the seventh year of the program, now sponsored by Western Maine CA$H, a community
coalition comprised of several service organizations and one business.

IRS-certified volunteers, including some University of Maine at Farmington students, are ready to
help people with appointments held at UMF. They help with tax preparation and offer more
information to help individuals manage, budget and save toward financial goals, said Janet Smith
of Women, Work and Community. Last year, 182 returns were prepared, representing more than
$400,000 in tax refunds and

credits along with 65 earned income tax credits amounting to $110,000 for families. That is
money that has come back to Franklin County, Smith said.

The volunteers are trained to help individuals claim all the benefits they deserve, including the
earned income tax credit where one may qualify for up to $4,824, and the child and dependent
care tax credit, Smith said.

The program continues to grow. In 2007, 135 returns were prepared, she told some members of
the coalition who gathered and Sen. Walter Gooley, R-Farmington, Rep. Thomas Saviello, U-
Wilton and Rep. Paul Gilbert, D-Jay, invited to kick off this year's program.

"It's an excellent program with trained volunteers who offer confidentiality at no charge. I'd
recommend this for anyone," Gilbert said. He previously served as a community volunteer for the
program.

The program helps people get more money back to keep and spend within the community, said
Becky Allen Davis of Bangor Savings Bank, the one business involved in the coalition.

"Financially independent people support local business and if businesses are healthy then the
community is healthy," she said, citing one reason she's involved.

Approximately 15 to 20 university students participate even after receiving course credit.




                                                                                                               83
                                                   "It's a way for them to connect with people and give back to the community," said Frank Engert,
                                                   professor of business at UMF.

                                                   Deb Auch, a jewelry designer from Strong, told coalition members Thursday how seeking help
                                                   with tax preparation led her to attend other programs offered by some of the coalition's service
                                                   organizations. The programs offered her help expanding her 20-year business.

                                                   The free tax preparation program is supported by the Casey Family Services, an agency of the
                                                   Annie E. Casey Foundation, a national organization that makes grants to communities for
                                                   programs that help disadvantaged children and families.

                                                   For more information or to schedule an appointment for help with tax preparation, people may

                    3                              call 778-7954 and leave a message. A volunteer will return the call and explain what forms need
                                                   to be brought to the appointment, Engert said.
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                   84
                               Tampa Bay Beach Beacon
                              Tuesday, February 17, 2009

           BEACHES CHAMBER OFFERS FREE TAX HELP
 THE SESSIONS ARE HELD THURSDAYS AT THE CHAMBER OFFICE IN ST.
                         PETE BEACH


BY BOB MCCLURE
                                                                                                3
TAMPA BAY BEACH BEACON

ST. PETE BEACH – Lower and middle income residents have a new, free option




                                                                                               HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
available for getting their income tax returns completed this year.

The Tampa Bay Beaches Chamber of Commerce has teamed up with the Wealth
Building Coalition of Pinellas County to offer free income tax preparation service for
those earning $42,000 or less as part of an effort to make single parents aware of the
benefits of the earned income credit.

The free sessions are Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the chamber office, 6990 Gulf
Blvd., St. Pete Beach.

“The government committee wanted to bring this forward to offer our chamber members,
such as the hotels on the beaches,” said Doreen Moore, chairwoman of the TBBCC
government committee. “So many of our employees are single parents and they’re so
intent on getting their money back as quickly as possible that they do their taxes at one of
those places that loans money for interest rates as high as 300 percent. And a lot of them
are not taking advantage of the earned income credit.”

The Earned Income Tax Credit, or the EITC, is a refundable federal income tax credit for
low to moderate income working individuals and families. When the EITC exceeds the
amount of taxes owed, it results in a tax refund to those who claim and qualify for the
credit.

To qualify, taxpayers must meet certain requirements and file a tax return, even if they
did not earn enough money to be obligated to file a tax return.

According to the Internal Revenue Service, the EITC has no effect on certain welfare
benefits. In most cases, EITC payments will not be used to determine eligibility for
Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income, food stamps, low-income housing or most
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families payments.



                                                                                                          85
                                                   “This is the first year the IRS has allowed (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) sites to
                                                   have remote locations and file electronically,” said Laura Berkowitz, a member of the
                                                   chamber’s government committee. “We’re trying to get people to take advantage of this
                                                   and to take advantage of the earned income credit.”

                                                   Moore said the program will continue as long as the chamber sees a need for it.

                                                   “Hopefully, it will continue through April,” she said.

                                                   The mission of the Wealth Building Coalition is to promote and expand asset-building
                                                   opportunities for low and moderate income households in Pinellas County.
                    3                              Its goals are to promote awareness of the federal earned income tax credit, improve
                                                   community access to VITA sites and provide various education programs to the public.

                                                   For further information, call Cherin Stover at 328-0618 or the Tampa Bay Beaches
HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH




                                                   Chamber of Commerce at 360-6957.




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                                    WCAX-TV News
                                    January 30, 2009
                 VERMONTERS MISSING OUT ON TAX CREDIT
Many Vermonters are eligible for thousands of dollars in tax credits they're not claiming.
Officials say about 25 percent of people who qualify do not claim the Earned Income Tax
Credit at the state and federal levels. It's targeted at helping low-income families. Any
                                                                                               3
Vermont family that files a joint tax return and makes less than $42,000 is eligible for
money back. Last year the average refund was thousands of dollars.




                                                                                              HOW OTHERS ARE GETTING INVOLVED IN EITC OUTREACH
"It is a substantial benefit that many Vermonters are not aware of and that's what we are
trying to get the word out about," said Jeb Spaulding, D-Vt. Treasurer.
"With everyone feeling the pressure of the economic downturn it's important we take
advantage of any tax breaks that are rightfully available to us," said Sen. Diane Snelling,
R-Chittenden County.
Even if you've missed the Earned Income Tax Credit in the past, you can go back up to
three years and claim your money. And low-income Vermonters may also be eligible for
free tax filing help.




                                                                                                         87
Chapter 4

 EITC
 STATISTICS
      EITC Receipt by State
      EITC Receipt by Congressional District
      Community Volunteer Income Tax
      Assistance Results by State
                  EITC RECEIPT BY STATE, TAX YEAR 2006
                  Source: Brookings Institution analysis of IRS SPEC data



                           State    Total Returns    EITC Returns    Share EITC Total EITC Amount ($) Average EITC ($)
                             AL          1,961,595         498,940          25.4%       1,125,960,884            2,257
                            AK             325,624          40,040          12.3%          66,261,354            1,655
                             AZ          2,488,711         410,294          16.5%         797,261,337            1,943
                            AR           1,156,125         282,881          24.5%         588,095,397            2,079
                            CA          15,238,373       2,391,150          15.7%       4,555,478,745            1,905
                            CO           2,155,833         268,454          12.5%         470,299,228            1,752
                            CT           1,672,771         171,682          10.3%         296,595,328            1,728
                            DE             401,132          58,904          14.7%         110,252,636            1,872
                            DC             275,464          46,880          17.0%          85,828,767            1,831
                             FL          8,316,023       1,600,918          19.3%       3,124,150,946            1,951
                            GA           3,968,533         909,892          22.9%       1,976,701,895            2,172
      4                      HI            616,554          85,379          13.8%         146,633,797            1,717
                             ID            622,957         103,318          16.6%         191,047,455            1,849
                             IL          5,814,931         870,282          15.0%       1,715,198,986            1,971
                             IN          2,901,266         449,955          15.5%         841,918,082            1,871
EITC STATISTICS




                             IA          1,354,530         177,335          13.1%         308,401,785            1,739
                            KS           1,252,848         177,814          14.2%         323,604,927            1,820
                            KY           1,781,729         352,720          19.8%         666,305,104            1,889
                             LA          1,800,382         496,082          27.6%       1,138,787,660            2,296
                            ME             623,267          87,794          14.1%         148,095,393            1,687
                            MD           2,619,603         341,330          13.0%         627,830,548            1,839
                            MA           3,069,344         315,267          10.3%         529,960,360            1,681
                             MI          4,514,582         677,496          15.0%       1,299,220,630            1,918
                            MN           2,504,164         272,811          10.9%         463,509,281            1,699
                            MS           1,182,001         380,623          32.2%         878,090,208            2,307
                            MO           2,655,601         450,179          17.0%         856,961,955            1,904




      90
State   Total Returns    EITC Returns    Share EITC Total EITC Amount ($) Average EITC ($)
 MT           455,197           72,049        15.8%           125,823,689            1,746
 NE           813,483          112,211        13.8%           203,497,643            1,814
 NV          1,148,702        168,076         14.6%           303,612,242            1,806
 NH           648,698           63,290         9.8%           102,699,684            1,623
 NJ          4,102,013        485,880         11.8%           900,252,192            1,853
NM            860,654         195,256         22.7%           379,256,990            1,942
 NY          8,681,542       1,487,311        17.1%         2,821,948,510            1,897
 NC          3,893,440        784,108         20.1%         1,577,535,179            2,012
 ND           309,827           39,557        12.8%            67,444,629            1,705
OH           5,413,829        816,646         15.1%         1,531,439,384            1,875
 OK          1,497,736        309,747         20.7%           611,525,843            1,974
OR           1,636,728        225,240         13.8%           390,917,949            1,736   4
 PA          5,939,936        795,985         13.4%         1,422,120,983            1,787
 RI           504,040           67,382        13.4%           123,711,822            1,836
 SC          1,900,673        437,200         23.0%           894,480,469            2,046




                                                                                             EITC STATISTICS
 SD           372,011           56,146        15.1%            99,557,452            1,773
 TN          2,680,641        568,057         21.2%         1,125,077,612            1,981
 TX          9,824,089       2,247,349        22.9%         4,912,183,987            2,186
 UT          1,041,713        140,606         13.5%           259,855,028            1,848
 VT           314,838           38,389        12.2%            60,318,477            1,571
 VA          3,503,737        495,612         14.1%           926,379,855            1,869
WA           2,922,859        354,387         12.1%           619,954,276            1,749
WV            762,401         145,422         19.1%           261,351,818            1,797
 WI          2,691,134         311,902        11.6%           548,785,245            1,759
WY            252,557           31,753        12.6%            54,584,815            1,719




                                                                                                91
                  EITC RECEIPT BY CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT, TAX
                  Source: Brookings Institution analysis of IRS SPEC data
                  Representatives' names come from: http://clerk.house.gov/member_info/olm110.html (accessed June 16, 2008)

                                State                                Representative                             District Number
                                 AL             Jo Bonner                                         District 1
                                 AL             Terry Everett                                     District 2
                                 AL             Mike Rogers                                       District 3
                                 AL             Robert B. Aderholt                                District 4
                                 AL             Robert E. (Bud) Cramer Jr.                        District 5
                                 AL             Spencer Bachus                                    District 6
                                 AL             Artur Davis                                       District 7
                                 AK             Don Young                                         At-Large
                                 AZ             Rick Renzi                                        District 1
                                 AZ             Trent Franks                                      District 2
                                 AZ             John B. Shadegg                                   District 3
      4                          AZ
                                 AZ
                                                Ed Pastor
                                                Harry E. Mitchell
                                                                                                  District 4
                                                                                                  District 5
                                 AZ             Jeff Flake                                        District 6
                                 AZ             Raúl M. Grijalva                                  District 7
                                 AZ             Gabrielle Giffords                                District 8
EITC STATISTICS




                                 AR             Marion Berry                                      District 1
                                 AR             Vic Snyder                                        District 2
                                 AR             John Boozman                                      District 3
                                 AR             Mike Ross                                         District 4
                                 CA             Mike Thompson                                     District 1
                                 CA             Wally Herger                                      District 2
                                 CA             Daniel E. Lungren                                 District 3
                                 CA             John T. Doolittle                                 District 4
                                 CA             Doris O. Matsui                                   District 5
                                 CA             Lynn C. Woolsey                                   District 6
                                 CA             George Miller                                     District 7
                                 CA             Nancy Pelosi                                      District 8
                                 CA             Barbara Lee                                       District 9
                                 CA             Ellen O. Tauscher                                 District 10
                                 CA             Jerry McNerney                                    District 11
                                 CA             Jackie Speier                                     District 12
                                 CA             Fortney Pete Stark                                District 13
                                 CA             Anna G. Eshoo                                     District 14
                                 CA             Michael M. Honda                                  District 15
                                 CA             Zoe Lofgren                                       District 16
                                 CA             Sam Farr                                          District 17
                                 CA             Dennis A. Cardoza                                 District 18
                                 CA             George Radanovich                                 District 19




      92
YEAR 2006


Total Returns        EITC Returns       Share EITC       Total EITC Amount ($)    Average EITC ($)
           280,726             77,526           27.6%              184,325,887                 2,378
           286,222             80,799           28.2%              190,067,210                 2,352
           270,935             79,943           29.5%              181,823,878                 2,274
           259,882             63,332           24.4%              131,107,017                 2,070
           297,143             58,182           19.6%              120,059,851                 2,064
           312,748             45,108           14.4%                90,070,547                1,997
           253,938             94,049           37.0%              228,506,495                 2,430
           325,624             40,022           12.3%                66,261,354                1,656
           279,387             61,081           21.9%               119,935,048                1,964
           382,410             53,794           14.1%              101,874,621                 1,894
           306,297             36,761           12.0%                65,358,398                1,778
           237,799
           299,830
                               62,911
                               27,855
                                                26.5%
                                                 9.3%
                                                                   133,733,472
                                                                     45,790,377
                                                                                               2,126
                                                                                               1,644
                                                                                                        4
           363,559             42,259            11.6%               77,172,175                1,826
           301,796             83,231           27.6%              175,695,126                  2,111
           317,632             42,399           13.3%                77,702,119                1,833




                                                                                                        EITC STATISTICS
           268,400             75,144           28.0%              159,818,084                 2,127
           308,801             67,037           21.7%              137,907,452                 2,057
           319,547             66,988           21.0%              133,354,513                 1,991
           259,377             73,709           28.4%              157,015,348                 2,130
           286,405             38,048           13.3%                63,834,063                1,678
           281,471             49,323           17.5%                88,602,675                1,796
           330,610             39,731           12.0%                72,065,053                1,814
           331,877             32,348            9.7%                52,727,830                1,630
           283,683             53,133           18.7%              103,364,771                 1,945
           308,778             23,018            7.5%                32,844,789                1,427
           276,984             34,297           12.4%                61,120,891                1,782
           340,297             33,969           10.0%                46,952,728                1,382
           278,454             37,171           13.3%                63,886,858                1,719
           305,117             24,533            8.0%                41,701,712                1,700
           329,598             34,902           10.6%                64,774,040                1,856
           317,882             22,023            6.9%                31,066,021                1,411
           285,744             29,085           10.2%                49,642,343                1,707
           297,492             17,247            5.8%                26,208,232                1,520
           302,209             22,764            7.5%                35,831,313                1,574
           273,906             31,978            11.7%               55,669,630                1,741
           268,031             41,382           15.4%                79,350,045                1,918
           255,428             63,058           24.7%              128,596,453                 2,039
           289,542             53,267           18.4%              105,126,508                 1,974




                                                                                                           93
                  State                      Representative                 District Number
                   CA     Jim Costa                           District 20
                   CA     Devin Nunes                         District 21
                   CA     Kevin McCarthy                      District 22
                   CA     Lois Capps                          District 23
                   CA     Elton Gallegly                      District 24
                   CA     Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon           District 25
                   CA     David Dreier                        District 26
                   CA     Brad Sherman                        District 27
                   CA     Howard L. Berman                    District 28
                   CA     Adam B. Schiff                      District 29
                   CA     Henry A. Waxman                     District 30
                   CA     Xavier Becerra                      District 31
                   CA     Hilda L. Solis                      District 32
                   CA     Diane E. Watson                     District 33
                   CA     Lucille Roybal-Allard               District 34
                   CA     Maxine Waters                       District 35
      4            CA
                   CA
                          Jane Harman
                          Laura Richardson
                                                              District 36
                                                              District 37
                   CA     Grace F. Napolitano                 District 38
                   CA     Linda T. Sánchez                    District 39
                   CA     Edward R. Royce                     District 40
EITC STATISTICS




                   CA     Jerry Lewis                         District 41
                   CA     Gary G. Miller                      District 42
                   CA     Joe Baca                            District 43
                   CA     Ken Calvert                         District 44
                   CA     Mary Bono Mack                      District 45
                   CA     Dana Rohrabacher                    District 46
                   CA     Loretta Sanchez                     District 47
                   CA     John Campbell                       District 48
                   CA     Darrell E. Issa                     District 49
                   CA     Brian P. Bilbray                    District 50
                   CA     Bob Filner                          District 51
                   CA     Duncan Hunter                       District 52
                   CA     Susan A. Davis                      District 53
                  CO      Diana DeGette                       District 1
                  CO      Mark Udall                          District 2
                  CO      John T. Salazar                     District 3
                  CO      Marilyn N. Musgrave                 District 4
                  CO      Doug Lamborn                        District 5
                  CO      Thomas G. Tancredo                  District 6
                  CO      Ed Perlmutter                       District 7
                   CT     John B. Larson                      District 1
                   CT     Joe Courtney                        District 2
                   CT     Rosa L. DeLauro                     District 3




      94
Total Returns        EITC Returns       Share EITC       Total EITC Amount ($)    Average EITC ($)
           216,008             78,902           36.5%              176,859,686                 2,242
           269,482             72,912           27.1%              159,444,645                 2,187
           292,947             54,584           18.6%               111,967,570                2,051
           283,287             40,930           14.4%                75,199,664                1,837
           301,414             28,329            9.4%                48,669,592                1,718
           303,116             54,677           18.0%               114,210,386                2,089
           305,775             35,226            11.5%               61,488,193                1,746
           288,193             47,881           16.6%                87,076,793                1,819
           265,562             55,301           20.8%              106,663,367                 1,929
           290,642             47,227           16.2%                81,055,402                1,716
           333,955             23,641            7.1%                28,135,963                1,190
           218,427             62,374           28.6%              123,607,531                 1,982
           252,663             59,290           23.5%               115,522,221                1,948
           265,629             63,328           23.8%              120,853,257                 1,908
           221,877             63,104           28.4%              133,279,099                 2,112
           249,281             74,769           30.0%              162,500,438                 2,173
           306,597
           253,449
                               35,033
                               66,564
                                                 11.4%
                                                26.3%
                                                                     59,416,979
                                                                   141,884,920
                                                                                               1,696
                                                                                               2,132
                                                                                                       4
           248,609             57,309           23.1%               114,470,409                1,997
           248,954             53,094           21.3%              109,617,814                 2,065
           284,233             37,170           13.1%                66,088,675                1,778




                                                                                                       EITC STATISTICS
           301,754             60,677           20.1%              125,304,967                 2,065
           294,986             26,650            9.0%                44,933,218                1,686
           260,657             71,388           27.4%              156,468,363                 2,192
           312,442             48,591           15.6%                97,058,760                1,997
           325,997             65,693           20.2%              137,054,717                 2,086
           307,475             29,731            9.7%                48,449,542                1,630
           227,297             48,663           21.4%                96,568,143                1,984
           326,470             21,324            6.5%                31,796,432                1,491
           312,999             46,943           15.0%                91,332,071                1,946
           330,620             28,942            8.8%                47,367,748                1,637
           304,841             76,906           25.2%              154,344,273                 2,007
           295,183             32,806            11.1%               56,310,462                1,716
           294,045             39,897           13.6%                67,111,487                1,682
           293,582             42,788           14.6%                75,264,849                1,759
           318,557             30,916            9.7%                48,995,861                1,585
           299,879             47,592           15.9%                84,557,524                1,777
           302,423             40,143           13.3%                70,947,976                1,767
           299,309             42,730           14.3%                76,957,792                1,801
           350,057             22,507            6.4%                36,540,041                1,623
           292,026             41,772           14.3%                77,035,185                1,844
           342,682             40,608            11.9%               71,267,073                1,755
           340,076             29,665            8.7%                48,530,764                1,636
           333,157             36,309           10.9%                62,800,454                1,730




                                                                                                          95
                  State                       Representative                 District Number
                   CT     Christopher Shays                    District 4
                   CT     Christopher S. Murphy                District 5
                   DE     Michael N. Castle                    At-Large
                   DC     Eleanor Holmes Norton                District 98
                   FL     Jeff Miller                          District 1
                   FL     Allen Boyd                           District 2
                   FL     Corrine Brown                        District 3
                   FL     Ander Crenshaw                       District 4
                   FL     Ginny Brown-Waite                    District 5
                   FL     Cliff Stearns                        District 6
                   FL     John L. Mica                         District 7
                   FL     Ric Keller                           District 8
                   FL     Gus M. Bilirakis                     District 9
                   FL     C. W. Bill Young                     District 10
                   FL     Kathy Castor                         District 11
                   FL     Adam H. Putnam                       District 12
      4            FL
                   FL
                          Vern Buchanan
                          Connie Mack
                                                               District 13
                                                               District 14
                   FL     Dave Weldon                          District 15
                   FL     Tim Mahoney                          District 16
                   FL     Kendrick B. Meek                     District 17
EITC STATISTICS




                   FL     Ileana Ros-Lehtinen                  District 18
                   FL     Robert Wexler                        District 19
                   FL     Debbie Wasserman Schultz             District 20
                   FL     Lincoln Diaz-Balart                  District 21
                   FL     Ron Klein                            District 22
                   FL     Alcee L. Hastings                    District 23
                   FL     Tom Feeney                           District 24
                   FL     Mario Diaz-Balart                    District 25
                   GA     Jack Kingston                        District 1
                   GA     Sanford D. Bishop Jr.                District 2
                   GA     Lynn A. Westmoreland                 District 3
                   GA     Henry C. ``Hank'' Johnson Jr.        District 4
                   GA     John Lewis                           District 5
                   GA     Tom Price                            District 6
                   GA     John Linder                          District 7
                   GA     Jim Marshall                         District 8
                   GA     Nathan Deal                          District 9
                   GA     Paul C. Broun                        District 10
                   GA     Phil Gingrey                         District 11
                   GA     John Barrow                          District 12
                   GA     David Scott                          District 13
                   HI     Neil Abercrombie                     District 1
                   HI     Mazie K. Hirono                      District 2




      96
Total Returns        EITC Returns       Share EITC      Total EITC Amount ($)    Average EITC ($)
           322,265             29,567            9.2%               51,059,558                1,727
           334,591             35,533           10.6%               62,937,479                1,771
           401,132             58,903           14.7%              110,252,636                1,872
           275,464             46,880           17.0%               85,828,767                1,831
           308,783             58,658           19.0%              115,272,123                1,965
           302,171             62,450           20.7%             122,773,079                 1,966
           302,562             94,695           31.3%             201,719,884                 2,130
           331,327             57,384           17.3%             109,462,790                 1,908
           380,693             60,385           15.9%              112,966,116                1,871
           345,965             58,990           17.1%              113,217,487                1,919
           357,376             56,019           15.7%              104,110,881                1,858
           368,243             72,705           19.7%             145,558,314                 2,002
           334,106             45,269           13.5%               81,389,279                1,798
           308,379             43,465           14.1%               74,253,216                1,708
           307,470             77,224           25.1%             156,682,785                 2,029
           344,040             74,576           21.7%             153,326,978                 2,056
           344,432
           391,613
                               44,966
                               51,927
                                                13.1%
                                                13.3%
                                                                    81,359,648
                                                                    96,928,594
                                                                                              1,809
                                                                                              1,867
                                                                                                      4
           368,761             65,929           17.9%             129,599,156                 1,966
           345,879             52,229           15.1%             100,178,557                 1,918
           296,288            106,292           35.9%              231,311,847                2,176




                                                                                                      EITC STATISTICS
           300,656             70,568           23.5%             131,177,741                 1,859
           341,402             45,255           13.3%               83,746,676                1,851
           324,609             52,937           16.3%               96,821,415                1,829
           306,420             78,822           25.7%             146,133,227                 1,854
           345,662             46,359           13.4%               83,677,952                1,805
           286,237             84,310           29.5%             176,167,705                 2,090
           346,541             53,952           15.6%             100,773,363                 1,868
           326,407             85,551           26.2%             175,542,132                 2,052
           273,825             74,315           27.1%             161,181,873                 2,169
           246,358             91,290           37.1%             217,646,965                 2,384
           328,982             69,063           21.0%             149,406,674                 2,163
           281,323             76,128           27.1%             164,941,505                 2,167
           289,159             65,560           22.7%             148,247,608                 2,261
           356,958             29,853            8.4%               53,838,309                1,803
           363,369             60,799           16.7%             122,129,631                 2,009
           288,066             83,868           29.1%             191,694,558                 2,286
           314,929             60,612           19.2%             120,220,187                 1,983
           294,459             64,541           21.9%             133,921,912                 2,075
           321,863             60,809           18.9%             123,841,190                 2,037
           265,980             87,833           33.0%             202,648,749                 2,307
           343,260             85,221           24.8%             186,982,733                 2,194
           317,720             39,042           12.3%               65,459,873                1,677
           298,834             46,337           15.5%               81,173,924                1,752




                                                                                                         97
                  State                        Representative                 District Number
                   ID     Bill Sali                             District 1
                   ID     Michael K. Simpson                    District 2
                   IL     Bobby L. Rush                         District 1
                   IL     Jesse L. Jackson Jr.                  District 2
                   IL     Daniel Lipinski                       District 3
                   IL     Luis V. Gutierrez                     District 4
                   IL     Rahm Emanuel                          District 5
                   IL     Peter J. Roskam                       District 6
                   IL     Danny K. Davis                        District 7
                   IL     Melissa L. Bean                       District 8
                   IL     Janice D. Schakowsky                  District 9
                   IL     Mark Steven Kirk                      District 10
                   IL     Jerry Weller                          District 11
                   IL     Jerry F. Costello                     District 12
                   IL     Judy Biggert                          District 13
                   IL     Bill Foster                           District 14
      4            IL
                   IL
                          Timothy V. Johnson
                          Donald A. Manzullo
                                                                District 15
                                                                District 16
                   IL     Phil Hare                             District 17
                   IL     Ray LaHood                            District 18
                   IL     John Shimkus                          District 19
EITC STATISTICS




                   IN     Peter J. Visclosky                    District 1
                   IN     Joe Donnelly                          District 2
                   IN     Mark E. Souder                        District 3
                   IN     Steve Buyer                           District 4
                   IN     Dan Burton                            District 5
                   IN     Mike Pence                            District 6
                   IN     André Carson                          District 7
                   IN     Brad Ellsworth                        District 8
                   IN     Baron P. Hill                         District 9
                   IA     Bruce L. Braley                       District 1
                   IA     David Loebsack                        District 2
                   IA     Leonard L. Boswell                    District 3
                   IA     Tom Latham                            District 4
                   IA     Steve King                            District 5
                   KS     Jerry Moran                           District 1
                   KS     Nancy E. Boyda                        District 2
                   KS     Dennis Moore                          District 3
                   KS     Todd Tiahrt                           District 4
                   KY     Ed Whitfield                          District 1
                   KY     Ron Lewis                             District 2
                   KY     John A. Yarmuth                       District 3
                   KY     Geoff Davis                           District 4
                   KY     Harold Rogers                         District 5




      98
Total Returns        EITC Returns       Share EITC       Total EITC Amount ($)    Average EITC ($)
           329,747             53,183           16.1%                98,141,157                1,845
           293,210             50,132           17.1%                92,906,298                1,853
           263,470             72,853           27.7%               170,110,418                2,335
           265,943             75,936           28.6%              173,523,615                 2,285
           294,031             48,670           16.6%                98,585,199                2,026
           222,255             57,648           25.9%              121,736,861                 2,112
           308,182             43,565           14.1%                72,170,989                1,657
           315,761             26,419            8.4%                45,488,130                1,722
           289,635             66,417           22.9%              151,323,090                 2,278
           346,076             29,882            8.6%                52,714,722                1,764
           305,234             35,686            11.7%               60,130,355                1,685
           305,167             23,537            7.7%                40,664,734                1,728
           343,442             42,983           12.5%                81,431,360                1,895
           294,230             55,871           19.0%              108,782,034                 1,947
           363,171             25,891            7.1%                45,416,050                1,754
           346,324             37,022           10.7%                69,414,426                1,875
           298,365
           336,576
                               44,697
                               43,134
                                                15.0%
                                                12.8%
                                                                     83,150,373
                                                                     81,335,760
                                                                                               1,860
                                                                                               1,886
                                                                                                       4
           296,755             50,083           16.9%                93,591,723                1,869
           311,861             45,287           14.5%                84,958,709                1,876
           308,461             44,696           14.5%                80,671,881                1,805




                                                                                                       EITC STATISTICS
           319,117             51,586           16.2%              106,267,595                 2,060
           309,533             52,082           16.8%                98,557,351                1,892
           327,321             47,125           14.4%                86,316,777                1,832
           341,602             42,845           12.5%                76,456,228                1,784
           358,899             39,418            11.0%               70,428,304                1,787
           302,256             48,300           16.0%                87,029,202                1,802
           307,880             71,042           23.1%              144,442,715                 2,033
           308,412             48,889           15.9%                86,821,722                1,776
           326,247             48,665           14.9%                85,598,188                1,759
           269,454             37,724           14.0%                67,832,276                1,798
           273,755             36,395           13.3%                61,639,416                1,694
           289,103             34,186            11.8%               59,150,435                1,730
           263,981             31,748           12.0%                53,682,067                1,691
           258,238             37,265           14.4%                66,097,592                1,774
           295,465             46,317           15.7%                83,924,830                1,812
           306,450             46,748           15.3%                83,801,827                1,793
           339,745             36,092           10.6%                64,647,629                1,791
           311,188             48,651           15.6%                91,230,641                1,875
           279,088             61,884           22.2%               118,761,860                1,919
           311,467             60,026           19.3%               112,968,591                1,882
           327,811             58,985           18.0%              109,987,816                 1,865
           313,625             51,592           16.5%                95,478,982                1,851
           234,557             66,168           28.2%               130,324,711                1,970




                                                                                                          99
                  State                       Representative                 District Number
                   KY     Ben Chandler                         District 6
                   LA     Steve Scalise                        District 1
                   LA     William J. Jefferson                 District 2
                   LA     Charlie Melancon                     District 3
                   LA     Jim McCrery                          District 4
                   LA     Rodney Alexander                     District 5
                   LA     Donald J. Cazayoux Jr.               District 6
                   LA     Charles W. Boustany Jr.              District 7
                  ME      Thomas H. Allen                      District 1
                  ME      Michael H. Michaud                   District 2
                  MD      Wayne T. Gilchrest                   District 1
                  MD      C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger            District 2
                  MD      John P. Sarbanes                     District 3
                  MD      Donna F. Edwards                     District 4
                  MD      Steny H. Hoyer                       District 5
                  MD      Roscoe G. Bartlett                   District 6
      4           MD
                  MD
                          Elijah E. Cummings
                          Chris Van Hollen
                                                               District 7
                                                               District 8
                  MA      John W. Olver                        District 1
                  MA      Richard E. Neal                      District 2
                  MA      James P. McGovern                    District 3
EITC STATISTICS




                  MA      Barney Frank                         District 4
                  MA      Niki Tsongas                         District 5
                  MA      John F. Tierney                      District 6
                  MA      Edward J. Markey                     District 7
                  MA      Michael E. Capuano                   District 8
                  MA      Stephen F. Lynch                     District 9
                  MA      William D. Delahunt                  District 10
                   MI     Bart Stupak                          District 1
                   MI     Peter Hoekstra                       District 2
                   MI     Vernon J. Ehlers                     District 3
                   MI     Dave Camp                            District 4
                   MI     Dale E. Kildee                       District 5
                   MI     Fred Upton                           District 6
                   MI     Tim Walberg                          District 7
                   MI     Mike Rogers                          District 8
                   MI     Joe Knollenberg                      District 9
                   MI     Candice S. Miller                    District 10
                   MI     Thaddeus G. McCotter                 District 11
                   MI     Sander M. Levin                      District 12
                   MI     Carolyn C. Kilpatrick                District 13
                   MI     John Conyers Jr.                     District 14
                   MI     John D. Dingell                      District 15
                  MN      Timothy J. Walz                      District 1




      100
Total Returns        EITC Returns       Share EITC       Total EITC Amount ($)    Average EITC ($)
           315,143             54,048           17.2%                98,749,588                1,827
           279,150             58,659           21.0%              128,718,762                 2,194
           173,212             58,326           33.7%              132,397,828                 2,270
           263,398             70,835           26.9%              163,264,290                 2,305
           267,502             78,753           29.4%              177,971,344                 2,260
           251,590             83,055           33.0%              196,722,698                 2,369
           291,317             76,396           26.2%              184,960,448                 2,421
           274,213             70,056           25.5%              154,752,289                 2,209
           328,748             38,465            11.7%               62,387,859                1,622
           294,519             49,329           16.7%                85,707,534                1,737
           335,559             38,688            11.5%               70,176,232                1,814
           327,631             51,627           15.8%                96,925,998                1,877
           328,074             39,756           12.1%                72,522,571                1,824
           327,424             50,137           15.3%                92,867,422                1,852
           347,819             38,270            11.0%               69,076,097                1,805
           335,743             32,886            9.8%                55,942,999                1,701
           278,148
           339,207
                               58,334
                               31,630
                                                21.0%
                                                 9.3%
                                                                    115,618,415
                                                                     54,700,814
                                                                                               1,982
                                                                                               1,729
                                                                                                       4
           297,796             35,979           12.1%                60,905,163                1,693
           306,943             39,955           13.0%                71,078,125                1,779
           304,315             30,932           10.2%                53,259,526                1,722




                                                                                                       EITC STATISTICS
           303,580             27,059            8.9%                45,229,705                1,672
           303,567             34,655            11.4%               63,795,906                1,841
           312,546             24,781            7.9%                41,357,016                1,669
           309,599             23,668            7.6%                35,621,354                1,505
           290,000             41,468           14.3%                68,493,506                1,652
           310,308             31,290           10.1%                52,478,601                1,677
           330,691             25,480            7.7%                37,741,458                1,481
           304,475             46,554           15.3%                80,590,721                1,731
           311,375             45,195           14.5%                82,618,993                1,828
           308,693             44,806           14.5%                83,855,328                1,872
           305,368             45,708           15.0%                81,250,709                1,778
           294,479             57,333           19.5%               113,138,051                1,973
           302,896             47,885           15.8%                89,094,656                1,861
           306,629             43,728           14.3%                80,359,006                1,838
           315,972             34,965            11.1%               60,666,354                1,735
           321,186             26,499            8.3%                45,092,635                1,702
           338,048             36,840           10.9%                64,372,108                1,747
           337,211             30,394            9.0%                51,837,267                1,706
           319,212             43,991           13.8%                79,895,327                1,816
           208,387             66,292           31.8%              155,862,325                 2,351
           234,512             67,890           28.9%              156,958,359                 2,312
           306,140             39,417           12.9%                73,628,790                1,868
           305,010             36,201            11.9%               59,848,695                1,653




                                                                                                       101
                  State                       Representative                 District Number
                  MN      John Kline                           District 2
                  MN      Jim Ramstad                          District 3
                  MN      Betty McCollum                       District 4
                  MN      Keith Ellison                        District 5
                  MN      Michele Bachmann                     District 6
                  MN      Collin C. Peterson                   District 7
                  MN      James L. Oberstar                    District 8
                  MS      Travis W. Childers                   District 1
                  MS      Bennie G. Thompson                   District 2
                  MS      Charles W. ``Chip'' Pickering        District 3
                  MS      Gene Taylor                          District 4
                  MO      Wm. Lacy Clay                        District 1
                  MO      W. Todd Akin                         District 2
                  MO      Russ Carnahan                        District 3
                  MO      Ike Skelton                          District 4
                  MO      Emanuel Cleaver                      District 5
      4           MO
                  MO
                          Sam Graves
                          Roy Blunt
                                                               District 6
                                                               District 7
                  MO      Jo Ann Emerson                       District 8
                  MO      Kenny C. Hulshof                     District 9
                   MT     Dennis R. Rehberg                    At-Large
EITC STATISTICS




                   NE     Jeff Fortenberry                     District 1
                   NE     Lee Terry                            District 2
                   NE     Adrian Smith                         District 3
                   NV     Shelley Berkley                      District 1
                   NV     Dean Heller                          District 2
                   NV     Jon C. Porter                        District 3
                   NH     Carol Shea-Porter                    District 1
                   NH     Paul W. Hodes                        District 2
                   NJ     Robert E. Andrews                    District 1
                   NJ     Frank A. LoBiondo                    District 2
                   NJ     Jim Saxton                           District 3
                   NJ     Christopher H. Smith                 District 4
                   NJ     Scott Garrett                        District 5
                   NJ     Frank Pallone Jr.                    District 6
                   NJ     Mike Ferguson                        District 7
                   NJ     Bill Pascrell Jr.                    District 8
                   NJ     Steven R. Rothman                    District 9
                   NJ     Donald M. Payne                      District 10
                   NJ     Rodney P. Frelinghuysen              District 11
                   NJ     Rush D. Holt                         District 12
                   NJ     Albio Sires                          District 13
                  NM      Heather Wilson                       District 1
                  NM      Stevan Pearce                        District 2




      102
Total Returns        EITC Returns       Share EITC       Total EITC Amount ($)    Average EITC ($)
           335,833             25,832            7.7%                43,399,065                1,680
           346,277             25,224            7.3%                42,748,193                1,695
           290,876             35,171           12.1%                61,268,578                1,742
           293,538             39,008           13.3%                66,606,433                1,708
           336,705             28,953            8.6%                47,733,381                1,649
           293,565             40,147           13.7%                70,395,910                1,753
           302,361             42,266           14.0%                71,509,025                1,692
           315,424             90,458           28.7%              196,049,179                 2,167
           270,058            118,826           44.0%              297,779,321                 2,506
           304,548             90,716           29.8%              208,247,531                 2,296
           291,972             80,623           27.6%              176,014,177                 2,183
           272,573             68,325           25.1%              145,479,306                 2,129
           332,447             23,582            7.1%                39,224,593                1,663
           303,929             42,377           13.9%                78,152,598                1,844
           285,206             51,715           18.1%                96,303,579                1,862
           285,426             52,631           18.4%              101,078,123                 1,921
           306,330
           303,492
                               42,667
                               59,234
                                                13.9%
                                                19.5%
                                                                     76,584,408
                                                                    111,698,157
                                                                                               1,795
                                                                                               1,886
                                                                                                       4
           268,481             63,056           23.5%              123,739,392                 1,962
           297,711             46,585           15.6%                84,700,358                1,818
           455,197             72,045           15.8%              125,823,689                 1,746




                                                                                                       EITC STATISTICS
           275,802             35,135           12.7%                61,852,500                1,760
           284,711             38,122           13.4%                70,285,551                1,844
           252,970             38,944           15.4%                71,359,592                1,832
           344,713             63,541           18.4%              121,233,507                 1,908
           364,117             47,509           13.0%                83,869,522                1,765
           439,872             57,023           13.0%                98,509,213                1,728
           326,982             31,661            9.7%                51,582,107                1,629
           321,716             31,629            9.8%                51,117,577                1,616
           313,517             46,120           14.7%                87,892,303                1,906
           322,595             51,034           15.8%                97,304,725                1,907
           334,377             27,402            8.2%                45,512,646                1,661
           327,862             30,558            9.3%                56,868,603                1,861
           317,196             15,829            5.0%                24,581,997                1,553
           310,417             33,016           10.6%                58,116,670                1,760
           323,026             18,620            5.8%                30,193,264                1,622
           307,628             50,921           16.6%                99,947,441                1,963
           314,999             36,627            11.6%               62,970,811                1,719
           276,775             71,770           25.9%              144,436,255                 2,012
           327,464             14,648            4.5%                22,050,968                1,505
           325,840             23,267            7.1%                38,848,490                1,670
           300,318             66,067           22.0%              131,528,020                 1,991
           308,810             55,752           18.1%              101,235,394                 1,816
           258,937             70,056           27.1%              143,371,056                 2,047




                                                                                                       103
                  State                       Representative                 District Number
                  NM      Tom Udall                            District 3
                   NY     Timothy H. Bishop                    District 1
                   NY     Steve Israel                         District 2
                   NY     Peter T. King                        District 3
                   NY     Carolyn McCarthy                     District 4
                   NY     Gary L. Ackerman                     District 5
                   NY     Gregory W. Meeks                     District 6
                   NY     Joseph Crowley                       District 7
                   NY     Jerrold Nadler                       District 8
                   NY     Anthony D. Weiner                    District 9
                   NY     Edolphus Towns                       District 10
                   NY     Yvette D. Clarke                     District 11
                   NY     Nydia M. Velázquez                   District 12
                   NY     Vito Fossella                        District 13
                   NY     Carolyn B. Maloney                   District 14
                   NY     Charles B. Rangel                    District 15
      4            NY
                   NY
                          José E. Serrano
                          Eliot L. Engel
                                                               District 16
                                                               District 17
                   NY     Nita M. Lowey                        District 18
                   NY     John J. Hall                         District 19
                   NY     Kirsten E. Gillibrand                District 20
EITC STATISTICS




                   NY     Michael R. McNulty                   District 21
                   NY     Maurice D. Hinchey                   District 22
                   NY     John M. McHugh                       District 23
                   NY     Michael A. Arcuri                    District 24
                   NY     James T. Walsh                       District 25
                   NY     Thomas M. Reynolds                   District 26
                   NY     Brian Higgins                        District 27
                   NY     Louise McIntosh Slaughter            District 28
                   NY     John R. ``Randy'' Kuhl Jr.           District 29
                   NC     G. K. Butterfield                    District 1
                   NC     Bob Etheridge                        District 2
                   NC     Walter B. Jones                      District 3
                   NC     David E. Price                       District 4
                   NC     Virginia Foxx                        District 5
                   NC     Howard Coble                         District 6
                   NC     Mike McIntyre                        District 7
                   NC     Robin Hayes                          District 8
                   NC     Sue Wilkins Myrick                   District 9
                   NC     Patrick T. McHenry                   District 10
                   NC     Heath Shuler                         District 11
                   NC     Melvin L. Watt                       District 12
                   NC     Brad Miller                          District 13
                   ND     Earl Pomeroy                         At-Large




      104
Total Returns        EITC Returns       Share EITC       Total EITC Amount ($)    Average EITC ($)
           292,908             69,447           23.7%              134,650,539                 1,939
           330,486             28,170            8.5%                46,208,989                1,640
           318,709             34,957            11.0%               62,598,652                1,791
           321,552             23,677            7.4%                38,483,753                1,625
           314,526             37,993           12.1%                69,465,439                1,828
           297,108             52,585           17.7%                89,976,591                1,711
           264,142             65,495           24.8%              125,376,873                 1,914
           283,412             69,783           24.6%               134,001,118                1,920
           334,634             47,759           14.3%                86,903,880                1,820
           297,413             49,269           16.6%                88,481,598                1,796
           260,660             80,968           31.1%              166,601,498                 2,058
           268,909             74,807           27.8%              145,756,612                 1,948
           280,374             79,457           28.3%              153,691,215                 1,934
           288,296             40,892           14.2%                75,524,766                1,847
           359,623             34,836            9.7%                53,131,809                1,525
           285,106             86,462           30.3%              175,681,931                 2,032
           267,146
           288,344
                              126,128
                               60,729
                                                47.2%
                                                21.1%
                                                                   290,940,256
                                                                   127,732,868
                                                                                               2,307
                                                                                               2,103
                                                                                                       4
           316,635             26,140            8.3%                45,857,926                1,754
           313,754             24,297            7.7%                43,313,684                1,783
           316,362             37,639            11.9%               64,055,166                1,702




                                                                                                       EITC STATISTICS
           318,420             44,199           13.9%                79,414,551                1,797
           300,230             44,551           14.8%                78,388,450                1,760
           281,519             49,898           17.7%                91,708,908                1,838
           287,098             47,152           16.4%                85,744,131                1,818
           309,186             41,946           13.6%                77,264,358                1,842
           312,001             33,787           10.8%                57,544,018                1,703
           289,640             43,913           15.2%                79,475,147                1,810
           276,225             58,891           21.3%               115,530,549                1,962
           300,032             40,933           13.6%                73,093,774                1,786
           260,922             80,738           30.9%              176,753,074                 2,189
           282,775             65,436           23.1%              135,847,320                 2,076
           288,644             62,596           21.7%              127,685,476                 2,040
           340,497             39,242            11.5%               72,509,882                1,848
           292,129             49,140           16.8%                90,951,170                1,851
           304,182             53,518           17.6%              103,528,701                 1,934
           288,517             71,466           24.8%              151,368,034                 2,118
           283,558             70,672           24.9%              149,660,980                 2,118
           352,886             47,180           13.4%                90,993,451                1,929
           285,249             58,065           20.4%               112,490,369                1,937
           297,911             53,086           17.8%                95,982,871                1,808
           300,948             75,260           25.0%              157,222,786                 2,089
           315,223             57,708           18.3%               112,541,067                1,950
           309,827             39,533           12.8%                67,444,629                1,706




                                                                                                       105
                  State                       Representative                 District Number
                  OH      Steve Chabot                         District 1
                  OH      Jean Schmidt                         District 2
                  OH      Michael R. Turner                    District 3
                  OH      Jim Jordan                           District 4
                  OH      Robert E. Latta                      District 5
                  OH      Charles A. Wilson                    District 6
                  OH      David L. Hobson                      District 7
                  OH      John A. Boehner                      District 8
                  OH      Marcy Kaptur                         District 9
                  OH      Dennis J. Kucinich                   District 10
                  OH      Marcia L. Fudge                      District 11
                  OH      Patrick J. Tiberi                    District 12
                  OH      Betty Sutton                         District 13
                  OH      Steven C. LaTourette                 District 14
                  OH      Deborah Pryce                        District 15
                  OH      Ralph Regula                         District 16
      4           OH
                  OH
                          Tim Ryan
                          Zachary T. Space
                                                               District 17
                                                               District 18
                   OK     John Sullivan                        District 1
                   OK     Dan Boren                            District 2
                   OK     Frank D. Lucas                       District 3
EITC STATISTICS




                   OK     Tom Cole                             District 4
                   OK     Mary Fallin                          District 5
                  OR      David Wu                             District 1
                  OR      Greg Walden                          District 2
                  OR      Earl Blumenauer                      District 3
                  OR      Peter A. DeFazio                     District 4
                  OR      Darlene Hooley                       District 5
                   PA     Robert A. Brady                      District 1
                   PA     Chaka Fattah                         District 2
                   PA     Phil English                         District 3
                   PA     Jason Altmire                        District 4
                   PA     John E. Peterson                     District 5
                   PA     Jim Gerlach                          District 6
                   PA     Joe Sestak                           District 7
                   PA     Patrick J. Murphy                    District 8
                   PA     Bill Shuster                         District 9
                   PA     Christopher P. Carney                District 10
                   PA     Paul E. Kanjorski                    District 11
                   PA     John P. Murtha                       District 12
                   PA     Allyson Y. Schwartz                  District 13
                   PA     Michael F. Doyle                     District 14
                   PA     Charles W. Dent                      District 15
                   PA     Joseph R. Pitts                      District 16




      106
Total Returns        EITC Returns       Share EITC       Total EITC Amount ($)    Average EITC ($)
           280,391             53,022           18.9%              106,158,063                 2,002
           317,566             38,087           12.0%                69,881,881                1,835
           303,289             46,057           15.2%                88,194,788                1,915
           296,389             44,477           15.0%                81,707,782                1,837
           306,643             38,836           12.7%                68,296,473                1,759
           273,201             47,438           17.4%                86,631,994                1,826
           302,731             47,894           15.8%                89,455,594                1,868
           309,654             42,111           13.6%                77,298,235                1,836
           290,894             47,387           16.3%                89,821,609                1,895
           303,014             42,521           14.0%                79,542,217                1,871
           249,680             63,062           25.3%              132,640,177                 2,103
           342,447             49,536           14.5%                95,377,640                1,925
           313,612             42,771           13.6%                79,185,243                1,851
           324,221             30,091            9.3%                51,154,976                1,700
           317,563             44,267           13.9%                81,949,774                1,851
           307,284             40,971           13.3%                73,166,797                1,786
           284,367
           290,882
                               47,084
                               51,033
                                                16.6%
                                                17.5%
                                                                     87,179,218
                                                                     93,796,923
                                                                                               1,852
                                                                                               1,838
                                                                                                       4
           318,735             56,661           17.8%              109,372,675                 1,930
           274,610             71,446           26.0%              146,057,035                 2,044
           288,116             55,722           19.3%              106,997,967                 1,920




                                                                                                       EITC STATISTICS
           310,522             60,743           19.6%               117,484,276                1,934
           305,753             65,171           21.3%              131,613,891                 2,020
           346,149             35,355           10.2%                59,509,719                1,683
           326,348             53,899           16.5%                97,228,485                1,804
           330,890             47,831           14.5%                80,645,382                1,686
           314,156             47,288           15.1%                79,950,124                1,691
           319,185             40,866           12.8%                73,584,239                1,801
           250,227             81,012           32.4%              167,340,222                 2,066
           256,342             68,057           26.5%              135,370,920                 1,989
           295,540             44,969           15.2%                79,550,469                1,769
           319,430             30,850            9.7%                50,589,367                1,640
           286,566             41,820           14.6%                69,915,235                1,672
           344,459             30,037            8.7%                52,651,749                1,753
           327,508             27,046            8.3%                45,411,005                1,679
           338,129             24,112            7.1%                37,785,962                1,567
           306,707             42,869           14.0%                73,062,914                1,704
           309,459             41,753           13.5%                72,528,659                1,737
           315,773             46,439           14.7%                81,768,848                1,761
           296,230             43,610           14.7%                73,537,708                1,686
           318,172             35,181            11.1%               63,007,375                1,791
           281,289             45,416           16.1%                79,703,320                1,755
           346,225             43,005           12.4%                79,691,261                1,853
           334,192             39,924            11.9%               74,176,289                1,858




                                                                                                       107
                  State                        Representative                 District Number
                   PA     Tim Holden                            District 17
                   PA     Tim Murphy                            District 18
                   PA     Todd Russell Platts                   District 19
                   RI     Patrick J. Kennedy                    District 1
                   RI     James R. Langevin                     District 2
                   SC     Henry E. Brown Jr.                    District 1
                   SC     Joe Wilson                            District 2
                   SC     J. Gresham Barrett                    District 3
                   SC     Bob Inglis                            District 4
                   SC     John M. Spratt Jr.                    District 5
                   SC     James E. Clyburn                      District 6
                   SD     Stephanie Herseth Sandlin             At-Large
                   TN     David Davis                           District 1
                   TN     John J. Duncan Jr.                    District 2
                   TN     Zach Wamp                             District 3
                   TN     Lincoln Davis                         District 4
      4            TN
                   TN
                          Jim Cooper
                          Bart Gordon
                                                                District 5
                                                                District 6
                   TN     Marsha Blackburn                      District 7
                   TN     John S. Tanner                        District 8
                   TN     Steve Cohen                           District 9
EITC STATISTICS




                   TX     Louie Gohmert                         District 1
                   TX     Ted Poe                               District 2
                   TX     Sam Johnson                           District 3
                   TX     Ralph M. Hall                         District 4
                   TX     Jeb Hensarling                        District 5
                   TX     Joe Barton                            District 6
                   TX     John Abney Culberson                  District 7
                   TX     Kevin Brady                           District 8
                   TX     Al Green                              District 9
                   TX     Michael T. McCaul                     District 10
                   TX     K. Michael Conaway                    District 11
                   TX     Kay Granger                           District 12
                   TX     Mac Thornberry                        District 13
                   TX     Ron Paul                              District 14
                   TX     Rubén Hinojosa                        District 15
                   TX     Silvestre Reyes                       District 16
                   TX     Chet Edwards                          District 17
                   TX     Sheila Jackson-Lee                    District 18
                   TX     Randy Neugebauer                      District 19
                   TX     Charles A. Gonzalez                   District 20
                   TX     Lamar Smith                           District 21
                   TX     Nick Lampson                          District 22
                   TX     Ciro D. Rodriguez                     District 23




      108
Total Returns        EITC Returns       Share EITC      Total EITC Amount ($)    Average EITC ($)
           334,857             42,669           12.7%               74,182,768                1,739
           325,621             29,934            9.2%               47,607,561                1,590
           353,208             37,278           10.6%               64,239,352                1,723
           247,361             32,434           13.1%               58,048,831                1,790
           256,679             34,948           13.6%               65,662,991                1,879
           372,556             68,012           18.3%             133,607,381                 1,964
           335,130             65,729           19.6%             131,994,896                 2,008
           289,296             66,311           22.9%             133,559,527                 2,014
           317,701             62,919           19.8%             124,357,856                 1,976
           309,632             82,595           26.7%             171,912,354                 2,081
           276,358             91,634           33.2%             199,048,455                 2,172
           372,011             56,137           15.1%               99,557,452                1,773
           287,468             60,474           21.0%              110,811,442                1,832
           306,895             51,647           16.8%               94,974,905                1,839
           290,166             58,743           20.2%              113,060,246                1,925
           280,935             61,738           22.0%              118,668,093                1,922
           316,163
           324,623
                               58,169
                               58,421
                                                18.4%
                                                18.0%
                                                                  108,577,901
                                                                  108,844,828
                                                                                              1,867
                                                                                              1,863
                                                                                                      4
           323,703             52,174           16.1%             101,592,693                 1,947
           275,691             73,050           26.5%             151,931,016                 2,080
           275,035             93,657           34.1%             216,650,045                 2,313




                                                                                                      EITC STATISTICS
           284,447             67,182           23.6%             142,593,738                 2,122
           315,546             61,967           19.6%             130,316,257                 2,103
           424,124             45,596           10.8%               90,837,573                1,992
           319,650             63,103           19.7%             128,764,584                 2,041
           284,145             63,596           22.4%             132,263,475                 2,080
           317,739             64,508           20.3%             135,557,368                 2,101
           343,283             45,273           13.2%               89,585,130                1,979
           314,321             58,384           18.6%             121,251,961                 2,077
           272,776             86,309           31.6%             193,718,108                 2,244
           372,600             54,142           14.5%             106,544,706                 1,968
           289,306             64,932           22.4%             134,367,988                 2,069
           320,062             61,762           19.3%             127,769,145                 2,069
           268,456             58,280           21.7%              119,313,464                2,047
           305,069             61,027           20.0%             128,409,724                 2,104
           264,055            113,831           43.1%             294,881,823                 2,591
           279,663            107,299           38.4%             257,944,189                 2,404
           285,921             60,873           21.3%             127,202,439                 2,090
           270,685             85,327           31.5%             193,948,050                 2,273
           273,720             69,692           25.5%             146,343,346                 2,100
           289,857             89,923           31.0%             198,099,127                 2,203
           354,531             53,044           15.0%             103,432,236                 1,950
           357,158             54,878           15.4%              112,448,948                2,049
           317,370             94,163           29.7%             215,581,349                 2,289




                                                                                                      109
                  State                       Representative                     District Number
                   TX     Kenny Marchant                           District 24
                   TX     Lloyd Doggett                            District 25
                   TX     Michael C. Burgess                       District 26
                   TX     Solomon P. Ortiz                         District 27
                   TX     Henry Cuellar                            District 28
                   TX     Gene Green                               District 29
                   TX     Eddie Bernice Johnson                    District 30
                   TX     John R. Carter                           District 31
                   TX     Pete Sessions                            District 32
                   UT     Rob Bishop                               District 1
                   UT     Jim Matheson                             District 2
                   UT     Chris Cannon                             District 3
                   VT     Peter Welch                              At-Large
                   VA     Robert J. Wittman                        District 1
                   VA     Thelma D. Drake                          District 10
                   VA     Robert C. ``Bobby'' Scott                District 11
      4            VA
                   VA
                          J. Randy Forbes
                          Virgil H. Goode Jr.
                                                                   District 2
                                                                   District 3
                   VA     Bob Goodlatte                            District 4
                   VA     Eric Cantor                              District 5
                   VA     James P. Moran                           District 6
EITC STATISTICS




                   VA     Rick Boucher                             District 7
                   VA     Frank R. Wolf                            District 8
                   VA     [Tom Davis--resigned November 4, 2008]   District 9
                  WA      Jay Inslee                               District 1
                  WA      Rick Larsen                              District 2
                  WA      Brian Baird                              District 3
                  WA      Doc Hastings                             District 4
                  WA      Cathy McMorris Rodgers                   District 5
                  WA      Norman D. Dicks                          District 6
                  WA      Jim McDermott                            District 7
                  WA      David G. Reichert                        District 8
                  WA      Adam Smith                               District 9
                  WV      Alan B. Mollohan                         District 1
                  WV      Shelley Moore Capito                     District 2
                  WV      Nick J. Rahall II                        District 3
                   WI     Paul Ryan                                District 1
                   WI     Tammy Baldwin                            District 2
                   WI     Ron Kind                                 District 3
                   WI     Gwen Moore                               District 4
                   WI     F. James Sensenbrenner Jr.               District 5
                   WI     Thomas E. Petri                          District 6
                   WI     David R. Obey                            District 7
                   WI     Steve Kagen                              District 8
                  WY      Barbara Cubin                            At-Large


      110
Total Returns        EITC Returns       Share EITC       Total EITC Amount ($)    Average EITC ($)
           335,828             54,509           16.2%              109,730,316                 2,013
           320,823             59,373           18.5%               114,172,614                1,923
           356,450             59,393           16.7%              123,779,596                 2,084
           276,066             98,286           35.6%              237,202,320                 2,413
           286,893            113,436           39.5%              292,921,577                 2,582
           235,817             76,975           32.6%              178,624,800                 2,321
           268,014             85,645           32.0%              191,193,790                 2,232
           340,088             64,879           19.1%              129,245,347                 1,992
           279,629             49,758           17.8%              104,138,899                 2,093
           351,472             47,534           13.5%                87,556,617                1,842
           350,221             42,755           12.2%                76,483,781                1,789
           340,020             50,313           14.8%                95,814,630                1,904
           314,838             38,389           12.2%                60,318,477                1,571
           337,838             43,867           13.0%                82,159,976                1,873
           379,281             29,083            7.7%                50,056,714                1,721
           343,515             28,157            8.2%                49,796,019                1,769
           288,584
           291,362
                               49,228
                               74,893
                                                17.1%
                                                25.7%
                                                                     93,017,572
                                                                   154,288,703
                                                                                               1,890
                                                                                               2,060
                                                                                                       4
           314,637             54,081           17.2%              107,244,022                 1,983
           289,435             55,296           19.1%              105,460,408                 1,907
           304,937             46,770           15.3%                84,097,613                1,798




                                                                                                       EITC STATISTICS
           345,373             37,139           10.8%                66,250,241                1,784
           348,778             27,886            8.0%                46,706,719                1,675
           259,998             49,210           18.9%                87,301,868                1,774
           336,168             25,030            7.4%                39,260,971                1,569
           333,866             38,721            11.6%               65,419,185                1,690
           327,983             43,027           13.1%                76,529,120                1,779
           291,095             54,507           18.7%               110,227,097                2,022
           302,926             47,507           15.7%                84,587,099                1,781
           306,613             44,576           14.5%                78,125,224                1,753
           345,699             30,355            8.8%                42,300,313                1,394
           350,968             25,803            7.4%                42,726,119                1,656
           327,541             44,857           13.7%                80,779,147                1,801
           259,583             46,459           17.9%                82,337,482                1,772
           276,760             48,838           17.6%                87,314,208                1,788
           226,058             50,124           22.2%                91,700,128                1,829
           345,048             36,347           10.5%                64,785,093                1,782
           358,780             33,584            9.4%                54,203,583                1,614
           331,871             39,325            11.8%               65,457,786                1,665
           286,883             65,511           22.8%              137,263,650                 2,095
           355,016             22,450            6.3%                35,834,572                1,596
           337,645             33,753           10.0%                55,289,288                1,638
           330,930             42,475           12.8%                71,450,231                1,682
           344,961             38,454            11.1%               64,501,042                1,677
           252,557             31,750           12.6%                54,584,815                1,719



                                                                                                       111
                  COMMUNITY VOLUNTEER INCOME TAX ASSISTANCE
                  Source: Internal Revenue Service, SPEC Returns Database.


                                 State           Total Returns       Refund Amount          EITC Returns      EITC Amount
                      United States                       811,737            $987,358,688           270,054      $399,756,246
                      Alaska                                2,928              $3,760,646             1,027        $1,524,424
                      Alabama                               4,243              $5,516,070             1,052        $1,732,067
                      Arkansas                              6,210              $7,168,949             1,590        $2,319,144
                      Arizona                              13,773             $17,779,463             4,599        $7,287,466
                      California                           58,761             $70,713,165            21,161       $33,423,751
                      Colorado                             12,359             $13,448,186             3,648        $4,851,304
                      Connecticut                          14,208             $18,641,041             4,769        $6,983,579
                      Washington, D.C.                      5,446              $5,911,514             1,776        $2,146,249
                      Delaware                             11,641             $16,618,525             4,085        $6,441,426
                      Florida                              41,451             $57,794,703            13,646       $21,712,853
      4               Georgia
                      Hawaii
                                                           10,765
                                                            2,250
                                                                              $12,920,803
                                                                               $2,033,066
                                                                                                      2,681
                                                                                                       634
                                                                                                                   $4,262,712
                                                                                                                    $931,298
                      Iowa                                  5,286              $6,130,832             1,699        $2,406,183
                      Idaho                                 2,253              $2,568,212              530          $821,205
                      Illinois                             38,749             $49,781,883            14,815       $21,463,317
EITC STATISTICS




                      Indiana                              13,430             $13,159,497             3,459        $4,479,413
                      Kansas                               11,211              $8,956,654             2,765        $2,905,794
                      Kentucky                             16,039             $20,458,954             4,907        $7,022,082
                      Louisiana                            15,033             $22,947,696             5,675       $10,400,241
                      Massachusetts                        20,046             $24,828,036             7,344       $10,403,721
                      Maryland                             12,217             $14,740,921             4,195        $6,336,400
                      Maine                                 1,394              $2,237,332              670         $1,140,262
                      Michigan                             24,365             $17,856,399             7,601        $9,023,907
                      Minnesota                            15,041             $16,260,233             5,320        $6,930,125
                      Missouri                             21,460             $21,152,183             6,636        $8,854,839
                      Mississippi                           6,672             $10,416,221             2,636        $5,080,846




      112
RESULTS BY STATE, TAX YEAR 2006

                State      Total Returns      Refund Amount      EITC Returns        EITC Amount
     Montana                          5,109         $4,629,420             1,457          $1,691,963
     North Carolina                  19,890        $19,678,640             5,114          $6,925,988
     North Dakota                     3,225         $3,573,236             1,106          $1,350,929
     Nebraska                         7,223         $8,075,846             1,970          $2,840,937
     New Hampshire                    1,369         $1,770,421              413            $627,975
     New Jersey                       8,558        $10,204,176             1,611          $2,257,787
     New Mexico                      19,299        $16,700,764             5,990          $7,178,399
     Nevada                           3,322         $4,040,419              746           $1,042,151
     New York                        83,169       $108,035,648            34,743         $50,448,864
     Ohio                            25,605        $30,010,572             8,343         $11,367,214
     Oklahoma                        27,898        $34,663,333            10,761         $16,439,376
     Oregon
     Pennsylvania
                                       187
                                     41,006
                                                     $117,769
                                                   $47,143,077            12,333
                                                                                30          $15,750
                                                                                         $18,521,360
                                                                                                       4
     Puerto Rico                       321           $457,322                    0           $2,747
     Rhode Island                     4,344         $5,688,072             1,511          $2,412,119
     South Carolina                   9,035         $8,122,783             2,292          $2,855,960




                                                                                                       EITC STATISTICS
     South Dakota                     2,711         $3,366,580              640            $819,905
     Tennessee                       22,000        $30,039,470             5,739          $9,061,912
     Texas                           71,163       $109,299,710            26,714         $45,899,431
     Utah                            13,208        $14,402,610             3,430          $5,064,217
     Virginia                         9,756        $10,190,391             2,372          $3,363,283
     Vermont                          1,853         $2,188,809              745            $987,303
     Washington                      10,852        $14,542,573             3,444          $4,885,663
     Wisconsin                       17,429        $18,059,648             5,457          $7,121,733
     West Virginia                   11,922        $14,190,376             3,385          $4,643,431
     Wyoming                          2,541         $2,702,427              517            $646,801
     International/Other              1,511         $1,663,412              271            $398,440




                                                                                                       113
Chapter 5
 EITC
 RESOURCES
 AND
 CONTACTS
                               THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTION (WWW.BROOKINGS.EDU)
                               The Brookings Institution is an independent, nonpartisan organization devoted to research,
                               analysis, education, and publication focused on public policy issues in the areas of economic, for-
                               eign policy, and governance. Their online EITC section provides detailed data on EITC partici-
                               pation data for states, metro areas, counties, cities, and state legislative and congressional
                               districts.

                                              Contacts: Alan Berube
                                              202-797-6075
                                              Aberube@brookings.edu

                                              Elizabeth Kneebone
                                              (202) 797-6108
                                              EKneebone@brookings.edu


                               CENTER ON BUDGET AND POLICY PRIORITIES (WWW.CBPP.ORG)
                               The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities works at the federal and state level on fiscal policy
                               and public programs that affect low- and moderate-income families and individuals. The Center
                               conducts research and analysis to inform public debates over proposed budget and tax policies
                               and to help ensure the needs of low-income families and individuals are considered in these de-
                               bates. Numerous EITC publication materials are available.
            5
                                              Contact: John Wancheck
                                              Coordinator of the Center's Earned Income Tax Credit Outreach Campaign
                                              202-408-1080
                                              Wancheck@cbpp.org
EITC BRESOURCES AND CONTACTS




                                              Nick Johnson
                                              Director, State Fiscal Analysis Initiative
                                              202-408-1080
                                              Johnson@cbpp.org


                               CENTER FOR ECONOMIC PROGRESS (WWW.CENTERFORPROGRESS.ORG)
                               The Center for Economic Progress increases economic opportunities for low-income families,
                               children, and individuals by improving access to public, private, and non-profit programs and
                               services. Through advocacy, community services, outreach, and training, the Center challenges
                               barriers facing its constituency, thus promoting economic empowerment and encouraging self-
                               sufficiency.




            116
The NATIONAL COMMUNITY TAX COALITION, led by the Center for Economic Progress, seeks
to improve the economic well being of low- and moderate-income individuals, families, and
communities by building a movement to dramatically increase access to tax credits and benefits
and asset-building opportunities. The Coalition will improve the effectiveness and impact of af-
filiates providing tax outreach and assistance and asset-building opportunities, and will work to
meet its mission through advocacy, coalition-building, outreach, and capacity-building support
to affiliates.


WORKFORWARD: THE NATIONAL COMMUNITY TAX COALITION BLOG
(WWW.WORKFORWARD.ORG)

              Contact: David Marzahl
              312-252-0280
              dmarzahl@centerforprogress.org

              Lucy Mullany
              312-252-0280 x. 270
              lmullany@economicprogress.org


THE HATCHER GROUP (WWW.THEHATCHERGROUP.COM)
The Hatcher Group is a full-service communications and public policy firm dedicated to advanc-      5
ing social change by helping progressive foundations, research groups and nonprofit organiza-
tions communicate effectively with policymakers, the media and the public at large.

              Contact: Ed Hatcher




                                                                                                    EITC RESOURCES AND CONTACTS
              301-656-0348
              ed@thehatchergroup.com

              Amy Battjer
              301-656-0348
              amy@thehatchergroup.com

              Laura Hayes
              301-656-0348
              laura@thehatchergroup.com




                                                                                                      117
                               INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE (WWW.IRS.GOV)
                               The IRS provides a range of information on the Earned Income Tax Credit on their website. In
                               addition, the IRS is in charge of the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program, which runs free
                               tax preparation sites nationwide. To find a VITA site in your region, contact the IRS at: 1-800-
                               829-1040

                               STATE EITC ONLINE RESOURCE CENTER (WWW.STATEEITC.COM)
                               Sponsored by the Charles Stewart Mott and Annie E. Casey Foundations, StateEITC.com seeks
                               to provide easy access to research and resources about state EITCs and efforts to enact, expand,
                               or make a state EITC refundable.

                               EITCBLOG: A FORUM ON FEDERAL AND STATE EITCS (WWW.EITCBLOG.COM)

                                             Contact: Amy Battjer
                                             301-656-0348
                                             amy@thehatchergroup.com




            5
EITC BRESOURCES AND CONTACTS




            118

				
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