Evolving the Herd Mentality Wall Street Journal Bans Embargoes by Brian Solis

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					Evolving the Herd Mentality: Wall Street Journal Bans Embargoes
By Brian Solis, blogger at PR 2.0 and principal of FutureWorks PR, Co-Author Putting the Public Back in Public Relations and Now Is Gone

Credit: Nick Brandt, Available for sale here

According to Rafat Ali, The Wall Street Journal today amended its editorial policy to no longer participate in embargoed news herds and will only consider exclusives from this point on. In March, The WSJ introduced a new plan to grade journalists based on the stories they break for the newswires.

For those who need a bit of clarification, embargoes are a form of PR where journalists and bloggers work on a story prior to official release with the understanding that the story can not publish until a fixed day and time. An exclusive is a story that is placed with only one publication or blog, with an implied or explicit promise that the story won’t go to anyone else until after it’s published. While this is an ambitious move intended to establish dominance and competitive edge, other blogs and publications have instituted such policies due to the actions of over zealous PR pros who would employ a “quantity over quality” methodology. Essentially, these PR shepherds would herd a-listers into a corral of pre-briefings an hold them under embargo until a fixed point in time. In these cases,

(cc) Brian Solis, www.briansolis.com - Twitter, @briansolis

someone would always break the embargo as a way of scooping the others, thus leaving everyone else angered and embittered.

I fully expect this to be a public-facing trend for a short while, and not necessarily enforced in the back channel where reporters, bloggers and sources maintain proven, trusted relationships. Eventually, these publications will realize that their competition is willing to honor embargoes. This will draw a majority of major PR attention as it’s easier to appease the “more is more” publicity mentality of pitching and placing stories in bulk over a more strategic and effective “less is more” methodology.

Do you think this will lead to a reduction in the volume of embargoed stories it receives from PR or increase its leadership as the primary, exclusive source for breaking news?

Deirdre Breakenridge and I talk about embargoes and exclusives in the age of new media extensively in ournew book. In the meantime, please feel free to download, “The Art and Science of Blogger Relations.”

(cc) Brian Solis, www.briansolis.com - Twitter, @briansolis

Brian Solis is globally recognized for his views and insights on the convergence of PR, Traditional Media and Social Media. He actively contributes his thoughts and experiences through speaking appearances, books, articles and essays as a way of helping the marketing industry understand and embrace the new dynamics fueling new communications, marketing, and content creation. Solis is Principal of FutureWorks, an award-winning PR agency in Silicon Valley. Solis blogs at PR2.0, bub.blicio.us, TechCrunch, and BrandWeek. Solis is co-founder of the Social Media Club and is a founding member of the Media 2.0 Workgroup. Solis has been actively writing about new PR since the mid 90s to discuss how the Web was redefining the communications industry – he coined PR 2.0 along the way. Solis is considered an expert in traditional PR, media relations, and Social Media. He has dedicated his free time to helping PR professionals adapt to the new fusion of PR, Web marketing, and community relations. PR 2.0 has earned a position of authority in the Technorati blog directory and currently resides in the top 1.5% of indexed blogs. BrianSolis.com is also ranked among the most influential blogs in the Ad Age Power 150 listing of leading marketing bloggers. Working with Geoff Livingston, Solis was co-author of “Now is Gone,” a new book that helps businesses learn how to engage in Social Media. He has also written several ebooks on the subjects of Social Media, New PR, and Blogger Relations. His next book, co-authored with Deirdre Breakenridge, “Putting the Public back in Public Relations,” is now available from FT press. Connect with Solis on: Twitter, FriendFeed, LinkedIn, Tumblr, Plaxo, Plurk, Identi.ca, BackType, Social Median, or Facebook --Subscribe to the PR 2.0 RSS Feed

(cc) Brian Solis, www.briansolis.com - Twitter, @briansolis


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: According to Rafat Ali, The Wall Street Journal today amended its editorial policy to no longer participate in embargoed news herds and will only consider exclusives from this point on. In March, The WSJ introduced a new plan to grade journalists based on the stories they break for the newswires.