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									    GETTYSBURG
     COLLEGE




ELECTRICIAL SAFETY
           &
Energy Control Guidelines
                                               TABLE OF CONTENTS


Electrical Safety .................................................................................................................. 3
RESPONSIBILITY: ........................................................................................................... 3
Definitions: ......................................................................................................................... 4
Workplace Electrical Safety Tips ....................................................................................... 6
  Extension Cord Guidelines ............................................................................................. 7
Resident Hall Safety ........................................................................................................... 8
Energy Control Procedure .................................................................................................. 8
  REFERENCE .................................................................................................................. 8
  The “Fatal Five” Main Causes of Lockout/Tag out Injuries........................................... 8
  Hazardous Energy Sources Found in the Workplace ..................................................... 8
  Types of Lockout Devices .............................................................................................. 9
  Applying Lockout/Tag Out Devices ............................................................................... 9
  Removing Lockout/Tag Out Devices ........................................................................... 10
  Temporarily Reactivating Equipment ........................................................................... 10
  Special Situations .......................................................................................................... 11
Energy Control Training Guideline ................................................................................. 11
  GOAL ........................................................................................................................... 11
  OBJECTIVES ............................................................................................................... 11
  TRAINING PROGRAM ELEMENTS......................................................................... 11
High-Voltage Procedures .................................................................................................. 12
                                 Electrical Safety
        Electrical Safety is important in every work and living environment. The danger
of injury through electrical shock is possible whenever electrical power is present. When
a person's body completes a circuit and thus connects a power source with the ground, as
electrical burn or injury is imminent. Most fatal injuries result from high-voltage
exposure; however, people can sustain severe injuries from low voltage power if it has a
high current flow.
        Employees require protection from unintended release of energy or machine
motion that could cause injury during set up, adjustment, repair, service, installation, or
maintenance work on equipment, machinery or processes. Employees who are
responsible for repairs, installation and maintenance if electrical and hydraulic equipment
must receive training, know safe work practice procedures, and have available protective
equipment and devices to insure their safety.
        Students who live in campus resident halls must be aware of safe electrical
practices, how to avoid creating hazards within the resident hall and report any hazards.

RESPONSIBILITY:

       Directors and Department Heads, supervisors and empower individuals who are
responsible for the implementation of this program is responsible for the following:

   1. Ensure an environment where principal supervisors and other personnel are
      encouraged to follow this Guideline.
   2. Principal Supervisors must train employees on the specific equipment they will be
      working with, how to properly de-energize and lock it out.
   3. Provide employees with locks, tags and other equipment necessary under this
      Guideline.
   4. Conduct inspections periodically to assure the procedures outlined below are
      properly implemented.
   5. Follow reporting and documentation procedures if there is an accident or injury.
   6. Contact Safety and Security to request technical assistance.

Employees are required to follow the procedures outlined in this Guideline whenever:

   1.   Servicing or maintaining machines or equipment.
   2.   Conduct assigned tasks in a safe manner,
   3.   Wear appropriate personal protective equipment
   4.   only use equipment for which they have been formally trained.
   5.   Report any job related injuries or illnesses, questions on health and safety,
        or any unsafe or unhealthy work conditions to their principal supervisor.
Definitions:

The following definitions help clarify general electrical safety:

Affected Employee: one whose job requires him/her to operate or use a machine or
equipment on which servicing or maintenance is being performed under lockout, or
whose job requires him/her to work in an area in which such servicing or maintenance is
being performed

Amps: The standard unit for measuring electrical current.

Authorized Employee: one who locks out machines or equipment in order to perform
the servicing or maintenance on that machine or equipment

Watt: A unit of electrical power, equal to the power developed in a circuit by a current of
amp flowing through a potential difference of one volt.

Voltage: Electromotive force expressed in volts.

Circuit Breaker: A device that automatically interrupts the flow of an electrical current.

Breaker Box: An insulated box on which interconnected circuits are mounted.

Electrical Panel: An insulated panel on which electrical wires are mounted.

Current Flow: The rate of flow of an electrical charge, generally expressed in amps.

Electrical Load: The amount of power delivered by a generator or carried by a circuit. A
device to which the power is delivered.

Energy Control Procedure: Safety program adopted by the employer that includes
energy control procedures plus provisions for inspecting the procedures and training
employees for lockout/tag out

Energy Isolating Device: A mechanical device that physically prevents the transmission
or release of energy

Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI): Detects grounding problems and shuts
electricity off to prevent a possible accident.

High Voltage: Applies to electrical equipment that operates at more than 600 Volts (for
terminal to terminal operation) or ore than 300 Volts (for terminal to ground operation).
Low voltage, high current AC or DC power supplies are also considered to be high
voltage.
Hazardous Energy Sources: Stored or residual energy such as that in capacitors,
springs, elevated machine members, rotating flywheels, hydraulic systems, and air, gas,
steam, or water pressure.

Lockout: The placement of a tag on an energy-isolating device. This act prevents
workers from operating a piece of equipment until the lock is removed.

Tag Out: The placement of a tag on an energy-isolating device. A tag out device is a
prominent warning device of a lockout.

Energy-Isolating Device: A mechanical device that prevents the transmission or release
of energy.

Authorized Employee: A person who locks out or tags out equipment for service or
maintenance. Authorized employees have been formally trained in proper lockout/tag out
procedures.
Workplace Electrical Safety Tips
Adapt this list of reminders to your working environment. Be sure to consider company
policies and local, state, and Federal codes before establishing a written electrical
safety program.

       Plan every job and think about what could go wrong.
       Use the right tools for the job.
       Use procedures, drawings, and other documents to do the job.
       Isolate equipment from energy sources.
       Identify the electric shock and arc flash, as well as other hazards that may be
     present.
       Minimize hazards by guarding or establishing approach limitations.
       Test every circuit and every conductor every time before you touch it.
       Use personal protective equipment (PPE) as a last line of defense in case
     something goes wrong.
       Be sure you are properly trained and qualified for the job.
       Work on electrical equipment and conductors only when de-energized, unless
     procedures and safeguards have been established to ensure zero exposure for the
     worker and other people in the area.
       Lockout/tag out and ground (where appropriate) before working on equipment.
       Treat de-energized electrical Ý equipment and conductors ÝÝ as energized until
     lockout/tag out, test, and ground procedures (where appropriate) are implemented.
       Wear protective clothing and equipment and use insulated tools in areas where
     there are possible electrical hazards.
       De-energize and visibly guard (where possible) whenever contact with un-
     insulated overhead power lines is possible.
       Check and double check safety regulations when a ladder or parts of any vehicle
     or mechanical equipment structure will be elevated near energized overhead power
     lines. Call your local electric utility for assistance. People standing on the ground
     may be particularly vulnerable to possible injury.

Cords, Equipment, and Tool Grounding

       Make sure all equipment and extension cords bear the mark of an independent
     testing laboratory such as UL, CSA, ETL or MET Labs.
       Protect flexible cords and cables from physical damage. Check cords for cut,
     broken, or cracked insulation.
       Keep slack in flexible cords to prevent tension on electrical terminals.
       Make sure the insulating qualities of a splice are equal to or greater than the
     original cord.
       Extension cords are for temporary use. Install permanent wiring when use is no
     longer temporary.
       Verify that all three-wire tools and equipment are grounded.
     Water, electrical equipment, and power cords do not mix! Use GFCI protection in
     wet or damp environments.
     Ground exposed parts of fixed equipment that could be energized.
     Use non-conductive tools whenever possible.
     Always double check the operation of your voltage testers by testing a live circuit.

Extension Cord Guidelines

EXTENSION CORDS SHOULD BE:

       For temporary use pending the installation of permanent outlets
       For applications where equipment is not routinely used
       For temporary or portable equipment
       Energized from a permanent outlet
       Grounded 3-wire type

EXTENSION CORDS SHOULD NOT:
     Run through openings in walls, ceilings, or doorways
     Be draped over light, ceiling, wall fixtures, etc.
     Be attached or fixed to any surface
     Run across aisles or walkways
     Run under carpets or flooring

MULTI-OUTLET ASSEMBLIES SHOULD BE:
     Properly secured to a permanent surface
     Equipped with fuse or circuit breaker
     Energized from a permanent outlet
     Grounded 3-wire type
     UL approved



Other Considerations

      Verify location of all buried or embedded electrical circuits before digging or
     cutting.
      Determine the reason that a fuse operated or circuit breaker tripped before
     replacing or resetting.
      Know where your over current devices are (i.e. circuit breakers and fuses) so they
     can be easily and quickly reached in case of emergency.
      When replacing lamps and bulbs, verify that the replacement matches fixture
     requirements
Resident Hall Safety


        Gettysburg College routinely conducts safety inspections and audits of it’s
resident hall facilities to identify any electrical safety hazards and take corrective action.
Outlet covers and switch plates are replaced if found in poor condition. The college
supplies light bulbs for all residential rooms thus ensuring a standard and safe light bulb
use policy. Residents are prohibited from altering light bulbs and installing any electrical
devices. Residential Rooms and apartments are inspected before each academic semester
and during the Thanksgiving and Spring Breaks.
         Certain electrical appliances are prohibited within the resident halls to enhance
the safety of all occupants. These prohibited items can be found in the Residential
Guidebook produced by Resident Life Office. Safety and Security and Facilities Services
assists the Resident Life Office with the information regarding electrical safety in this
guidebook.


Energy Control Procedure

      Energy Control procedures are to be used to isolate hazardous energy sources
   from electrical, hydraulic, or pneumatic machinery. Furthermore, when service or
   maintenance work is required, lockout and tag out devices help ensure personal safety
   from possible energy releases.

REFERENCE

      The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) for General
REGULATIONS: Industry (29 CFR Part 1910.147 and MIOSHA Part 85 Rule
408.18501).



The “Fatal Five” Main Causes of Lockout/Tag out Injuries

      Failure to stop equipment
      Failure to disconnect from power source
      Failure to dissipate (bleed, neutralize) residual energy
      Accidental restarting of equipment
      Failure to clear work areas before restarting



Hazardous Energy Sources Found in the Workplace

    Electrical
         Generated
         Static
    Mechanical
         Transitional
         Rotational
    Thermal
         Machines or Equipment
         Chemical Reactions
    Potential
         Pressure
                Hydraulic
                Pneumatic
                Vacuum
         Springs
         Gravity

Types of Lockout Devices

      Plug Locks
      Ball Valve Lockout
      Gate Valve Lockout
      Group Lockout Hasp
      Electrical
      Hydraulic, pneumatic, and other pressurized systems



All employees whose work involves hazardous energy sources must be trained in
lockout/tag out




Applying Lockout/Tag Out Devices

Only authorized employees may apply lockout/tag out devices. The following steps
provide a brief outline of approved application procedures.

1. Notify employees that the equipment requires service or maintenance and is scheduled
for shutdown and lockout/tag out.

2. Use established procedures to identify the type, magnitude, and hazards of the
equipment's energy source. Make sure you know the proper methods for controlling the
energy source.
3. If the equipment is currently operating, shut it down using normal shutdown
procedures.

4. Isolate the equipment from its energy source by activating the energy-isolating
device(s). Either lockout or tag out the energy isolating device(s).

5. Dissipate or restrain stored and residual energy using methods such as grounding,
repositioning, blocking, bleeding, etc. (Capacitors, springs, hydraulic systems, and
air/gas/water pressure system may contain stored or residual energy).

6. Ensure that all employees are removed from the equipment. Then, test the equipment
for successful isolation by attempting to operate it.

IMPORTANT: After verifying isolation, return the controls to neutral or off.



Removing Lockout/Tag Out Devices


When service and maintenance are complete, authorized employees may remove
lockout/tag out devices and return equipment to normal operations. The following steps
provide a brief outline of approved removal procedures.

1. Inspect the work area and remove any non-essential items. Make sure the isolation
equipment is intact and in good working condition.

2. Ensure that all employees are safely removed from the equipment.

3. Verify that the equipment controls are in neutral or off.

4. Remove the lockout/tag out devices and re-energize the equipment.

NOTE: The removal of some forms of blocking may require the equipment to be re-
energized before safe removal.

5. Notify employees that the equipment is ready for operation.

Temporarily Reactivating Equipment

    Remove unnecessary tools from the work area and make sure everyone is clear of
     the equipment
    Remove lockout/tag out devices and re-energize the system
    As soon as the energy is no longer needed, isolate the equipment and re-apply
     lockout/tag out, using the six step procedure.
Special Situations

    Servicing lasts longer than one shift.
    Contractors are performing service or maintenance at your workplace
    Worker who applied lock is not available
    Never attempt lockout/tag out procedures unless you have been trained and
     certified by your employer under an approved Energy Control Program
    Never loan or share your lock, combination, or key with anybody else.
    Always be sure all lockout/tag out devices are compatible with the environment in
     which they will be used i.e. corrosive, humid, etc.

Energy Control Training Guideline

GOAL:

       To ensure the purpose and function of Gettysburg College’s Electrical Safety and
Energy Control Program is understood and followed by employees, students and other
involved campus community, and reduce the risk of injuries and/or death associated with
poor electrical practices.

OBJECTIVES:

        Employees will obtain the knowledge and skills required for safe application,
usage, and removal of the energy controls.

TRAINING PROGRAM ELEMENTS:

       Safety and Security Services will offer yearly training to all employees who’s job
responsibilities are directly effected by this guideline. This training session will provide
each employee with a copy of the and an explanation of the guidelines.

           I.        Review of Gettysburg College’s Electrical Safety and Energy Control
                     Guidelines by Power Point
           II.       Video
High-Voltage Procedures

In addition to the guidelines association with general electrical safety and lockout/tag out
procedures, there are more stringent safety requirements for high voltage procedures.

The following list provides high-voltage safety tips. For more information, refer to Title
29 CFR Section 1910.269 or NFPA 70 (National Electric Code).

   1. Ensure that only authorized employees work around high voltage equipment.
   2. Label entrances with a High voltage Sign.
   3. Ensure that terminal voltage ratings can withstand surges caused by electrical
      faults or switching transients.
   4. Be careful around output circuits even when the input power is off. Parallel power
      sources and energy storage devices can still be dangerous.
   5. Do not work alone near high voltage.
   6. Label equipment to identify power sources. Label input power sources to identify
      connected power supply loads.
   7. Attach emergency shutdown instructions and phone numbers to equipment that is
      remotely controlled or unattended while energized.
   8. Before entering a power supply or associated equipment enclosure to work on
      hazardous energy sources, complete the following:
          o De-energize the equipment.
          o Open and lockout the main input power circuit breaker.
          o Check for auxiliary power circuits that could still be energized.
          o Inspect automatic shorting devices for proper operation.
          o Short the power supply with grounding hooks

								
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