Brighton High School by KNaemNFc

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Brighton High School
   Course Offering
       Guide
     2011-2012
                         Mission Statement:

         The mission of BHS is to provide a student
   dedicated community characterized by rigor, relevance,
 and relationships to empower life-long learners and leaders.



WELCOME!

It is our commitment to maximize student achievement and success.
Each student can and will learn at Brighton High School. It is the
responsibility of each student to actively and appropriately engage in
the learning process in each class. The BHS Staff is committed to
working together to support the success of each student. Research
indicates that there are several “characteristics of successful
students.” The academic and activity program at Brighton High School
provides the opportunity to acquire those characteristics and develop
students who:

   1.   Integrate information and apply it.
   2.   Inquire and seek answers.
   3.   Solve problems and organize time effectively.
   4.   Write to persuade, inform, and communicate experience and
        meaning.
   5.   Seek new learning experiences.
   6.   Act as compassionate people and cooperate with others.
   7.   Are competent in the use of technology as a tool for learning.
   8.   Treat themselves and others with respect.

In selecting your course work for the upcoming year, you are laying the
foundation for your Personal Education Plan. Please, take advantage
of the many wonderful learning opportunities that exist at BHS. Be
ambitious!!! It is YOUR future and you will get out of it what you put
into it. Each of you can and will accomplish your dreams.

Sincerely,

Mr. John L. Biner
Principal, Brighton High School




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                       BHS
                    HOME OF THE
                     BULLDOGS
                                  Table of Contents
Registration Guide .................................................................. Page 4
English ..................................................................................... Page 8
English Language Acquisition .............................................. Page 12
Fine Arts ................................................................................ Page 14
World Language .................................................................... Page 17
Mathematics ......................................................................... Page 19
Music ..................................................................................... Page 22
Physical Education ............................................................... Page 25
Science ................................................................................. Page 28
Social Studies ....................................................................... Page 31
Special Areas ........................................................................ Page 49
Special Education ................................................................. Page 50
Student Aides........................................................................ Page 51
Career and Technical Education
Agricultural Technology ....................................................... Page 37
Automotive Technology........................................................ Page 39
Building Trades ..................................................................... Page 41
Business Education and Information Technology ............... Page 34
Engineering Graphics Technology ....................................... Page 42
Family and Consumer Sciences ........................................... Page 43
Marketing Education/DECA .................................................. Page 45
Medical Preparation Program .............................................. Page 46
Welding Technology ............................................................. Page 47




                                                 3
                                                 Brighton High School
                                                    270 S. 8th Avenue
                                               Brighton, Colorado 80601
                                                     (303) 655-4200
                                              2011-2012 Registration Guide
High School Administration
John Biner ....................................................... Principal
Shelly Genereux ............................... Assistant Principal
Greg Gotchey ................................... Assistant Principal
Scott Vanderzyden ............................. Dean of Students
Richard Affleck ......................... District Athletic Director


High School Counselors
Linda Nabours ........................................................ A-Er
Marcia Manz .......................................................... Es-Ll
Jill Woodford ........................................................ Lo-Rh
Vicki Powell ............................................................ Ri-Z



Introduction
This guide is designed to assist you, the student, and your parents in planning your individual course of study. It contains
graduation requirements, course descriptions, and other useful information. READ THIS GUIDE CAREFULLY AND
GIVE CAREFUL CONSIDERATION TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SIX-YEAR PLAN THAT WILL REFLECT YOUR
EDUCATIONAL GOALS.

The graduation requirements listed are designed to give you a well-balanced program which will help you develop the
skills and understanding necessary to become a well-educated person. Know these, for the primary responsibility for your
program planning rests with you.

The following are steps to follow when planning your individual program:
     1. Set (or evaluate) educational goals.
     2. Study the course description carefully.
     3. Select courses leading to your goals and interests.
     4. Develop a plan of courses you wish to take for your four years of high school.
     5. In developing your program, seek the assistance of your counselor, teachers, curriculum coordinators,
          administrators, and parents.
     6. Students who need assistance of a counselor should schedule an appointment with the counselor.
     7. Check your list of courses against graduation requirements.
     8. Seniors are required to take six (6) classes first semester.



Student Course Information
Semester Tests

All students will take a culminating assessment at the end of each semester.

Advanced Placement (AP)/Honors Classes

Advanced Placement/Honors classes at BHS are very rigorous, academically challenging classes available to highly
motivated students. Ninth graders who desire to enroll in honors classes must complete a selection process during pre-
registration. Tenth, eleventh, and twelfth graders who desire to enroll in honors classes need instructor permission. For
more information contact the counseling office. Please note, when you register for an AP or Honors class, you are making
a commitment to a rigorous, year-long class. The school commits staff and resources based on student requests, and you
may not be allowed to drop or change these classes during the school year.




                                                                                 4
                                   BHS Graduation Requirements
Required Semester Credits

English............................................. 7 Semester Credits
Mathematics .................................... 6 Semester Credits
Science............................................ 4 Semester Credits
Social Studies .................................. 6 Semester Credits
Computers .........................................1 Semester Credit
Physical Education .......................... 2 Semester Credits
Health ................................................1 Semester Credit
Humanities....................................... 2 Semester Credits
Practical Arts ................................... 2 Semester Credits

Required Credits - 31 Semester Credits

Elective Semester Credits

Elective Choices - 15 Semester Credits

Total Credits for Graduation - 46 Semester Credits

Credits Required for Grade Promotion

10 Credits = Sophomore
22-Credits = Junior
32 Credits = Senior

College Admission Requirements

Beginning with the graduating class of 2008, the State of Colorado has established standardized college admissions
requirements for those students planning to attend a 4-year college or university. We would encourage all students to take
a college preparatory curriculum to keep open the option of attending college.




College-Bound Students should take:

            English- 4 years (8 Semesters)
            Science- 3 years (6 Semesters)
            Math- 4 years (8 Semesters) Must include a minimum of Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II
            Social Science- 3 years (6 Semesters)
            World Language- 2 years (4 semesters)
            Academic Electives- 2 years (4 Semesters) This would include additional World Language, English, Math,
             science, and social studies classes.

Please note, individual universities and majors may have many different graduation requirements. Students should
carefully check entrance requirements for schools they are considering before registering for classes.




                                                                           5
Post Secondary Enrollment Options

Juniors and seniors who are on track with graduation requirements may be enrolled to take college classes while in high
school. Students may apply for a tuition reimbursement program, whereby they can be reimbursed for college tuition if
they complete the course with a grade of ―C‖ of higher. Applications for this program are due 60 days before the beginning
of the semester (April 15th for fall semester and November 15th for the spring semester). Students are eligible to receive
reimbursement and high school credit for a maximum of 8 college classes. Career and Technical classes taught through
Community Colleges, such as Advanced Welding, may be included in Post Secondary Enrollment Options. See your
counselor for more information.

College Entrance

Students planning to attend college should be aware that colleges place great importance on the academic record
achieved by students. Most colleges or universities require a minimum number of academic units (12-16 year credits in
grades 9 - 12). Students should check current catalogs/bulletins of specific colleges/universities for specific requirements.
Catalogs and bulletins are located in the counseling area. Most schools in Colorado require Algebra I, Plane Geometry,
and Algebra II as a requirement for admittance. Many colleges require two years of a foreign language as entrance pre-
requisites. Academic credits can be earned in the areas of English, math, science, social studies, and world language.
Some courses in these areas in the high school curriculum are not considered strictly academic by colleges. These
include all basic skill classes in English, science, and social studies as well as any math class preceding Algebra I.

            FURTHER INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE COUNSELING OFFICE.

Correspondence Courses and Summer School

Only FOUR semester credits may be earned in correspondence courses, off-campus classes, or a combination of the two.
Seniors, who need to repeat a course or choose to take an enrichment course not offered at Brighton High School, may
take correspondence courses during their junior or senior year. Students, who lack more than four semester credits at the
end of the freshman or sophomore year or who need to repeat a required course, may take summer school classes
between the freshman, sophomore, and junior year. Otherwise, off-campus summer school credits will not be accepted
unless approved by the administration before course enrollment.




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                                                                                   Brighton High School
                     Name ________________________________________             Student Credit Check Worksheet                                     Date ________________

    English          English 9         English 9         English 10              English 10              English 11          English 11     English 12 Elective                          Total
      (7)                                                                                                                                                          English 12 Elective
Social Studies       Cultural                           World History           World History            U.S. History        U.S. History      Political Science                         Total
     (6)            Geography
     Math              Math              Math               Math                    Math                    Math                Math             Algebra II +           Algebra II +     Total
      (6)                                                                                                                                   (Strongly              (Strongly
                                                                                                                                            Recommended)           Recommended)
   Science        Physical Science     Physical            Biology                 Biology               Lab Science       Lab Science                                                   Total
     (4)                               Science
                  Fundamentals of                      Fundamentals             Fundamentals
                       PS            Fundamentals        of Biology              of Biology
                                        of PS
                      Physics                            Chemistry               Chemistry
                                       Physics

  Humanities        Humanities        Humanities      World Language          World Language           World Language      World Language                                                Total
      (2)                                             (Recommended)           (Recommended)            (Recommended)       (Recommended)
   Physical            P.E.              P.E.                                                                                                                                            Total
  Education
      (2)
 Practical Arts    Practical Arts    Practical Arts                                                                                                                                      Total
      (2)
  Computers         Computers                                                                                                                                                            Total
     (1)
    Health            Health                                                                                                                                                             Total
     (1)
   Electives               2               2                  2                       2                         2                 2                   2                      1           Total
     (15)


 Community           2.5 hours        2.5 hours           2.5 hours               2.5 hours               2.5 hours           2.5 hours           2.5 hours             2.5 hours
   Service
  20 Hours

              Humanities                                     Practical Arts                                           Computers                                         Minimum Credits
Art, English Electives,                         Auto, Building Trades, Business,                                      Computer Application, Computer Programming 10 Sophomore
Foreign Language, Music,                        Family and Consumer Sciences, DECA, Engineering                         Technology Lab, Web Design               22 Junior
Social Studies Electives                        Graphics, Newspaper, Digital Photography, Jazz Band, Yearbook                                                    32 Senior
                                                                                                                                                                    Total:_________/46
Italics Represent Spring 2008-Spring 2009 College Admission Requirements
Bold Line Represents BHS Required Classes for Graduation
         Students effectively communicate in written form.
         Students read and comprehend a variety of printed materials to enhance thinking and understanding.
                                                             English
          Students read and recognize literature as an expression of human experience.
         Students find and use appropriate resources.



     Guidelines for Selecting English Courses
     Eight English credits are required for graduation from Brighton High school. These required credits
     will be met through Introduction to Literature & Composition, World Literature & Composition,
     American Literature & Composition, and Modern Life and Literature. All English classes beyond
     those required satisfy the humanities elective.


English Communication Skills (LC715A & LC715B)
Grade level: Severe Needs                    Semester Credit: 2                                           Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: IEP

This individualized English class is for students who need significant literacy interventions and functional literacy skills. Students
learn oral communication skills, how to use literacy as applied to real life, employment and activities of daily living. Students develop
an appreciation of literature, reading, writing and self expression. Students develop thinking, oral problem solving, decision making,
self advocacy, organizational and social skills through literacy learning activities. The curriculum follows the English Standards set
by the State of Colorado.


Introduction to English (LC720A & LC720B)
Grade level: 9                                          Semester Credit: 2                                Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: IEP

This class is designed for students who need extra support with reading, writing, vocabulary and study skills. Basic classes are
generally smaller in size allowing more teacher-student interaction. The regular curriculum is taught with some modifications,
different pacing, and more student-teacher interaction. This class is designed for the student who needs some extra help to be
successful.


Reading Strategies I (LC725A & LC725B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 2                                Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Recommendation

Reading strategies I provides an integrated approach to literacy instruction, it accelerates learning so students can access grade-
level content. Designed specifically for struggling learners—English language learners (ELLs) and students in special education or
general education—This is the first level of instruction that leads to improved reading comprehension and written expression.


Reading Strategies II (LC727A & LC727B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 2                                Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Recommendation

Reading strategies II is the second level class that provides an integrated approach to literacy instruction, it accelerates learning so
students can access grade-level content. Designed specifically for struggling learners—English language learners (ELLs) and
students in special education or general education—Reading strategies II leads to improved reading comprehension and written
expression.


Reading Strategies III (LC729A & LC729B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 2                                Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Recommendation
Need course description.



Basic Introduction to Literature and Composition (Reading & Composition) (EN111A & EN111B)
Grade level: 9                                 Semester Credit: 2                        Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation

Basic Introduction to Literature and Composition will encompass the curriculum from Introduction to Literature & Composition but is
designed to continue improvement of a student’s basic language skills in the areas of reading, writing, and speaking.




                                                                   8
Introduction to Literature & Composition (EN110A & EN110B)
Grade level: 9                                Semester Credit: 2                                       Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

Intro to Literature & Composition is a comprehensive language arts class that covers the areas of basic composition, review of
language usage, introduction to literary element, basic speech techniques, and literature for adolescents. Students can expect to
work extensively on developing writing skills and vocabulary as well as the study of literature and a research paper.

Honors Literature & Composition (EN115A & EN115B)
Grade level: 9                              Semester Credit: 2                                          Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation

Honors Literature & Composition is a class for students who excel in reading, writing, and analytical thinking skills. This class will
encompass the curriculum from Introduction to Literature & Composition but will also include additional reading, analysis of
literature, more formal writing, more complex grammar lessons, and a formal vocabulary study. Students will be required to
complete both daily and long -range homework assignments. This course requires students to complete both reading and writing
work over the summer previous to enrollment.


World Literature Concepts (LC730A & LC730B)
Grade level: 10                                        Semester Credit: 2                               Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: IEP and Introduction to English

World Literature Concepts will encompass the curriculum from World Literature & Composition but is designed to continue
improvement of a student's basic language arts skills in the areas of reading, writing, and speaking.


Basic World Literature & Composition (EN222A &EN222B)
Grade level: 10                             Semester Credit: 2                                         Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation

Basic World Literature & Composition will encompass the curriculum from World Literature & Composition but is designed to
continue improvement of a student’s basic language arts skills in the areas of reading, writing, and speaking.


World Literature & Composition (EN220A & EN220B)
Grade level: 10                                  Semester Credit: 2                                    Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Must have successfully completed Intro to Lit & Composition

World Literature & Composition is a comprehensive year long course in language arts. Approximately one half of the time will be
spent in grammar/composition activities with the other half spent in a survey of literature. Students will go through the entire
process of writing a research paper.


Honors World Literature & Composition (EN225A & EN225B)
Grade level: 10                             Semester Credit: 2                                         Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation

Honors World Literature & Composition is a class for students who excel in reading, writing, and analytical thinking skills. This class
will encompass the curriculum from World Literature & Composition but will also include additional reading, analysis of literature,
more formal writing, more complex grammar lessons, and a formal vocabulary study. Students will be required to complete at least
five hours of homework each week. This course requires that students read two books during the summer previous to enrollment
and that written work be completed.


Survey of American Literature (LC740A & LC740B)
Grade level: 11                                      Semester Credit: 2                                 Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: IEP and Introduction to English and World Literature Concepts

Survey of American Literature will encompass the curriculum from American Literature & Composition but is designed to continue
improvement of a student's basic language arts skills in the areas of reading, writing, and speaking.


Basic American Literature & Composition (EN333A & EN333B)
Grade level: 11                             Semester Credit: 2                                         Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation

Basic American Literature & Composition will encompass the curriculum from American Literature & Composition but is designed to
continue improvement of a student’s basic language arts skills in the areas of reading, writing, and speaking.




                                                                  9
American Literature & Composition (EN330A & EN330B)
Grade level: 11                                   Semester Credit: 2                                Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Must have successfully completed Intro to Lit & Composition and World Lit & Composition

American Literature & Composition is a comprehensive class that covers the areas of composition and review of language usage
(as needed). Students will also study American Literature from 1600 to 1900 during the first semester and from 1900 to the present
during the second semester. In addition, students can expect to work extensively on developing writing skills and vocabulary
throughout the year.


Advanced Placement English Language & Composition (EN337A & EN337B)
Grade level: 11                           Semester Credit: 2                                             Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation

AP English Language & Composition is a very rigorous course intended to give experience in college level work, particularly in the
analysis of writing techniques and styles. Like other AP courses, a primary goal is preparation for the Advanced Placement exam,
which is given in the spring. Students who successfully master the exam may be able to test out of a required college writing
course. This course requires that students read two books during the summer previous to enrollment and that written work be
completed. During each semester, students will read selections from America’s literary history as well as contemporary works.
Much writing and reading will be assigned. In order to enroll in this class, a student must have two teacher recommendations, one
of which must be from his/her current English teacher.


Basic Modern Life and Literature (EN444A & EN444B)
Grade level: 12                              Semester Credit: 2                                          Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation

Basic Modern Life and Literature will encompass the curriculum from Modern Life and Literature but is designed to continue
improvement of a student’s basic language arts skills in the areas of reading, writing, and speaking.


Modern Life and Literature (EN440A & EN440B)
Grade Level: 12                              Semester Credit: 2                                          Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

Modern Life and Literature is a course designed to prepare students for college and life beyond high school. Students will be
required to demonstrate competency in analytical reading and writing, research skills, interpersonal skills, and critical thinking and
awareness. This class is recommended for college bound students who are not taking Advanced Placement literature. It is also
appropriate for students who are considering alternate options after high school.


Journalism (EN145)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 1                               Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Intro to Lit or interest in publications

Journalism is an introductory class for those interested in working in the news media or communications fields. It is also the pre-
requisite for membership on the staff of the high school newspaper. Journalism students write a news article, a feature story, and
an editorial. Students create an online publication and also learn the basics of journalism ethics and law, page design, and brief
units on news photography and advertising.


Yearbook (EN260A & EN260B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                                  Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation

Students will produce a yearbook, within a limited budget, that reflects all aspects of student life and activities
during the school year. Students will handle all aspects of producing the yearbook including the layout design,
copywriting, editing, photography, advertising, business procedures, record keeping, sales, and distribution. All
staff positions have specific responsibilities and will require extensive time spent in addition to class periods. This
will be a practical arts credit or elective credit.


Newspaper (EN250A & EN250B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                       Semester Credit: 2                                         Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Journalism or Teacher Recommendation

Newspaper is a laboratory class that produces the high school newspaper. Students are responsible for all aspects of the
newspaper’s production: generating story ideas; writing news stories, features, and editorials; selling advertising; taking
photographs; and designing publications. Membership on the newspaper staff, especially editorships, demands extensive work
outside of class time. A student may take the newspaper class repeatedly, from one to four years, for credit. Credit may be applied
to either practical arts or as an elective credit.




                                                                   10
Creative Writing (EN490)
Grade level: 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Must have successfully completed Intro to Lit & Composition and World Lit & Composition

Students will write their own poetry, fiction, and drama. The poetry units include both contemporary free verse and more traditional
forms. The fiction units require a variety of writing assignments that develop character, setting, and dialog, and culminate in the
completion of a short story. The drama unit requires the creation of a dramatic scene.


Mythology (EN 0115)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 1                                   Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation

Myths of many cultures throughout the world will be studied with an emphasis on Greek and Roman mythology.
Students will learn how and why myths were developed, ideas common to many cultures, and the continuing
influence of mythology on our contemporary lives in language, art, music, religion, and literature. Course work
includes extensive reading, analyzing films, preparation of a creative research project and a research paper.


Oral Communication (EN497)
Grade level: 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Must have successfully completed Intro to Lit & Composition and World Lit & Composition

Oral Communication is an NCAA certified class which explores strategies used in situations where communication takes place.
Areas of study include debates, arguments, everyday conversation, oral presentations, relationships (work and personal), conflict
resolution and discussions. This class is highly recommended for any student who wishes to enhance his/her communications skills
and is college bound.


Advanced Placement Literature and Composition (EN439A & EN439B)
Grade level: 12                             Semester Credit: 2                                            Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation

This very rigorous course is intended to give experience in college level work, particularly in the experience, interpretation, and
evaluation of literature. The primary goals are for students to enhance their ability to read a text closely, engage in critical analysis,
and articulate their insights in artfully written essays. Deepening these skills will also enhance the likelihood of success on the AP
exam, given in the spring. This course requires that students read two books and complete written work during the summer
previous to enrollment. Students can count on five hours of homework a week. In order to enroll in this class, a student must have
a teacher recommendation from his/her current English teacher.




                                                                   11
                              English Language Acquisition


     Guidelines for Selecting English Language Acquisition Courses
     Students whose primary home language is not English will be given the CELA Placement Test. Those scoring a ―1‖ on the
     Test will be placed in ELA I, a ―2 or 3‖ will be placed in ELA II, and a ―3 or 4‖ in ELA III. Exceptions to this placement will be
     made based on middle school or BHS teacher recommendation.




ELA English I (EA110A & EA110B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                                    Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

This course is designed for students with negligible English proficiency (scoring 1 on the CELA Placement Test). The course
introduces students to basic vocabulary, grammar, reading, writing, and conversational skills in English. Students will be given ELA
credit in ELA language arts.


ELA English II (EA220A & EA220B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                                    Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

This course is designed for students with limited experience in English (scoring 2 or 3 on the CELA Placement Test). Students will
improve their reading, writing, grammar, and listening/speaking fluency skills at the intermediate level. Students will be given ELA
credit in ELA language arts.


ELA English III (EA330A & EA330B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                                    Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

This course is designed for students with limited to proficient English skills (scoring 3 or 4 on the CELA Placement Test). Students
will be taught advanced reading, writing, grammar, research, and listening/speaking skills through authentic English materials.
Students will be given ELA credit in ELA language arts.


ELA Lab (SP190A & SP190B)
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                                    Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation

This course is designed for students who need to improve, develop, and apply English language skills to their content area classes.
We will focus on reading, writing and study skills within the context of science, social studies and math. Students will also have the
opportunity to complete missing assignments/homework from other classes.


Spanish for Native Speakers I (EA140A & EA140B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                               Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Ability to place at a minimum of 6th grade level reading and writing. A placement test will be given to those students
interested in this course.

In this course, native speakers will read and write beginning literature to increase Spanish literacy. Oral presentations or
writings will be created from magazine articles, short stories, plays, poetry, and history. Vocabulary development and grammar
skills will be emphasized in both written and oral work.




                                                                   12
Spanish for Native Speakers II (EA250A & EA250B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                               Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Ability to place at a minimum of 6th grade level reading and writing. A placement test will be given to those students
interested in this course.

In this course, advanced native speakers will read and write advanced literature to increase Spanish literacy. Oral presentations or
writings will be created from magazine articles, short stories, plays, poetry, and history. Vocabulary development and grammar
skills will be emphasized in both written and oral work.



Transitional English for ELL (EA260A& EA260B)

Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                          Semester Credit: 2                                  Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: ELA English I, II, and III

This course will provide sheltered instruction for those ESL students who have progressed beyond what the focused ESL curriculum
teaches, utilizing a similar outline to the Basic Literature and Composition classes. Students will continue to practice compositional
skills—outlines, paragraph organization, paper organization and research skills—while also exploring the thematic, contextual and
literary concepts that are the traditional focus of a mainstream English class. Students will begin to read full novels in English, as
well as short stories and poetry. Upon completion of this course, students will be better prepared to participate fully in a traditional
English course.




                                                                  13
                                                       Fine Arts
     Guidelines for Selecting Visual Arts Courses
     Brighton High School’s Art classes range from instruction for beginners to classes for the more advanced young artist. The
     classes are divided into two areas: flat or 2-dimensional work (such as drawing and painting) and 3-dimensional work (such as
     sculpture, crafts, and ceramics). Each art class is one semester in length and worth one credit toward the elective or
     humanities graduation requirement. All classes, except Studio Art, require the payment of a lab fee for the materials that the
     student will be using during the semester.

     A variety of techniques and media will be introduced in each course to enable the students to experiment as they grow in
     personal expression. Two art classes are offered that require no pre-requisite: Beginning Sculpture, Crafts & Ceramics and
     Beginning Drawing & Painting.




Beginning Drawing & Painting (FA120)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Beginning Drawing & Painting is a one semester introductory class. The primary focus of the class is drawing. Students will be
taught the basics of drawing including perspective, cartooning, lettering, landscapes, color, and realistic rendering techniques.
Simple painting and a brief review of famous artists may also be included in the class outline. If you would like to learn to draw or
draw better, this class is a great starting place to discover your hidden talent.


Beginning Sculpture, Crafts & Ceramics (FA110)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                   Semester Credit: 1                                       Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Beginning Sculpture, Crafts & Ceramics is also a one semester introductory class. Its focus is on the creation of 3-dimensional art
like sculpture and ceramics. Basic drawing techniques are also covered but will be taught in relation to decorative and sculptural
design. The class is designed for the young artist who enjoys constructing with his/her hands. A brief review of famous sculptors
may also be included in the different materials to create art.


Advanced Drawing & Painting (FA235)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                            Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Beginning Drawing & Painting

Advanced Drawing & Painting is a one semester class. It is a continuation of the beginning class, and the primary focus is
advanced drawing using a large assortment of materials. Students will be taught to draw from still life and subjects that are more
complex. All materials (with the exception of a pencil), such as paint, canvas, chalk, and pastels are provided with the lab fee. If
you are serious about improving your drawing skills, this class is for you.


Cartooning & Lettering Techniques (FA280)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                            Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Beginning Drawing & Painting

Cartooning & Lettering is for those art students who wish to concentrate on learning the techniques involved in cartooning and
lettering. Students will be expected to develop their own series of characters and styles during the duration of the class. Students
will be required to keep a notebook showing their progress and a portfolio of their characters. This is a commercial art style class
with the emphasis on possible careers in the area.




                                                                14
Advanced Sculpture, Crafts & Ceramics (FA225)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 1                                   Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Beginning Sculpture, Crafts & Ceramics

Advanced Sculpture, Crafts & Ceramics is a continuation of the beginning course. The main focus of the class will be on sculpture
and clay with a few high level craft projects. Students will refine and improve upon skills and designs. Students will advance their
knowledge of decorating, glazing, hand-building construction and wheel throwing techniques. Individual style development will be
encouraged. Exceptional craftsmanship will be expected. Art history, appreciations, criticism and career choices will be included in
this class.


Digital Photography (FA365)
Grade level: 11, 12                                Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

This course introduces the basic concepts of digital imaging as applied to photography. Students will start by learning the history of
photography and its evolution from film to digital. The fundamentals of composition and image capture, camera operation and proper
exposure will be emphasized. Students will also be introduced to Adobe Photoshop to help them edit and enhance their
photographs.


Digital Photography II (FA370)
Grade level: 12                                    Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Digital Photo I

This advanced photography class will build on the skills learned in Digital Photography I. Students will learn more advanced camera
techniques and picture taking skills. The course will focus on digital photography in terms of design and communication factors
including color, visual design, lighting, graphics, and aesthetics. Students will also be introduced to more extensive Adobe
Photoshop methods as well as additional digital software.


Mixed Media Art lll (FA375)
Grade level: 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 1                                    Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Beginning Drawing, Beginning Sculpture, Ceramics, & Crafts

Juniors and seniors wishing to explore 3-dimensional art projects can take the Art 3 class. Students will do projects such as
enameling, silk screening, plaster or wax sculpture, airbrushing, pen and ink, batik, candle making, and paper making. This class is
an art elective and will fulfill the humanities credit.


Senior Art (FA485)
Grade level: 12                                    Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Senior Art is a semester class for seniors only. Students need not have previous experience in art. A variety of mediums will be
used in this class: clay, paper, wire, aluminum, etc. This class will introduce students to a variety of art including drawing, crafts,
ceramics, and sculpture.


Theater I (FA150)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Theater I is an introductory course to all aspects of drama. Students will participate in improvisations and games, learning the basic
elements of characterization and stage presence. Through reading, writing, creating, and performing students in this class
experience theater. This will be a humanities or elective credit.


Theater II (FA255)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12           Semester Credit: 1            Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Theater I or Theater in Action

Theater II is a class that provides further exploration of acting techniques through scripted
scenes as well as monologues. The goal of this class is to enhance character study and
acting skill. Students will explore and develop higher levels of improvisation and ensemble.
This will be a humanities or an elective credit.




                                                                 15
Theater in Action (FA160)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                          Semester Credit: 1                                Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

This class provides an opportunity for students to put elements related to theater together. Using improvisation and creative
thinking along with hands-on activities and games, students explore the world of theater using eight theatrical roles. This will be a
humanities or elective credit.


Technical Theater I (FA265)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                                     Semester Credit: 1                     Course Length: 1 semester

Pre-requisite: None              Course Length: 1 semester
Set design and construction, lighting design/production and sound design drive the focus of this class intended to support the BHS
drama productions, while teaching about the "backstage" happenings in the theatre. This will be a practical art, humanities or
elective credit.


Auditioned Theater (FA367)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 1                               Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: By audition and currently or previously enrolled in Theater I or Theater in Action

This will be an auditioned theatre performing group. Emphasis will be placed on performing. Students will create performances,
scripted and unscripted, and perform them in a variety of venues. This will be a humanities or an elective credit.




                                                                  16
                                               World Language
Guidelines for Selecting World Language Courses
     Four levels of Spanish, French and German are offered through the world language department. In these courses,
     conversation is stressed as well as the more traditional vocabulary of the culture from which the language originated. All
     students enrolled in a foreign language class are eligible to participate in the world language clubs. All world language classes
     will fulfill the humanities requirements. World language classes are also considered academic units in high school for college
     entrance in specific fields. Check with counselors as to the specific requirements of the college(s) in which you are interested
     in attending.


French I (WL130A & WL130B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                                Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

This is a very basic beginning course in French. French I covers basic speaking, listening, writing, and
reading skills. More emphasis is given to speaking and listening at this level. Students will develop
knowledge and an appreciation of the diverse cultures of the French speaking countries. Students are
expected to speak in the target language.


French II (WL235A & WL235B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                                 Semester Credit: 2                              Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: ―D‖ Average or better in French I, or teacher approval

This course is a continuation of French I. Basic speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills continue to be developed. Cultural
and historical information continues to be introduced throughout the year. Students are expected to speak in the target language.


French III/IV (Combination) (WL340A/340B & WL445A/445B)
Grade level: 11, 12                                      Semester Credit: 2                             Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: ―D‖ average or better in French II, or teacher approval/ French III and teacher approval

French III continues the development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills through situations. The primary objective of
French III is that the student can be understood by a native speaker. Previous learning experiences will be reinforced and reviewed,
and listening and speaking skills are stressed. Students are expected to achieve a high level of fluency.
In French IV, students will use the target language for discussions and writings on selected short stories, novels, drama, or poetry.
Cultural and historical information will be covered in the reading of these materials. Students are expected to speak in the target
language and to report on different topics.


German I (WL150A& WL150B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 2                                  Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

German I: Students will begin to develop proficiency per State Standards of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will
also develop knowledge and an appreciation of German culture. Daily memorizing of vocabulary through conversation and skits as
well as mastery of basic grammatical concepts will be required.


German II (WL255A &WL255B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                             Semester Credit: 2                                 Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: ―D‖ average or better in German I, or teacher approval

German II: German II is a continuation of German I which broadens the study of vocabulary and structure through conversations
and skits. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing continue to be emphasized. Cultural and historical information will be part of the
curriculum as well.


German III/IV (Combination) (WL360A/360B & WL465A/465B)
Grade level: 11, 12                                 Semester Credit: 2                                Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: ―D‖ average or better in German II, or teacher approval/ German III and teacher approval

German III: Students in German III intensify their study of structural elements and develop conversational reading and writing
abilities. Students learn to communicate in more complex oral and written forms. The study of German culture, geography and art
are continued.

German IV: Students in German IV intensify their study of structural elements and develop conversational reading and writing
abilities. Students learn to communicate in more complex oral and written forms. The study of German culture, geography and art
are continued.



                                                                 17
Spanish I (WL110A & WL110B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                                   Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

Spanish I: Using the text Realidades, students will begin to develop proficiency per State Standards of listening, speaking, reading
and writing. Students will also develop knowledge and an appreciation of the diverse cultures of Spanish-speaking countries. Daily
memorizing of vocabulary through conversation and skits as well as mastery of basic grammatical concepts will be required.


Spanish II (WL215A & WL215B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 2                                   Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: ―D‖ average or better in Spanish I, or teacher approval

Spanish II: Spanish II is a continuation of Spanish I which broadens the study of vocabulary and structure through conversations
and skits. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing continue to be emphasized. Cultural and historical information will be part of the
Realidades curriculum as well.


Spanish III (WL320A &WL320B)
Grade level: 11, 12                                   Semester Credit: 2                                  Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: ―D‖ average or better in Spanish II, or teacher approval

Spanish III: Continuing with the text Realidades, students in Spanish III intensify their study of structural elements and develop
conversational reading and writing abilities. By building on knowledge gained in Spanish I and II, students learn to communicate in
more complex oral and written forms. The study of Hispanic culture, geography and art are continued.


Spanish IV (WL425A & WL425B)
Grade level: 12                                      Semester Credit: 2                                   Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Spanish III and teacher approval

Spanish IV: Spanish IV continues with the text Realidades, providing an intense review and extension of materials. Listening,
speaking, reading and writing are further developed through the use of conversation, videos, skits, and readings. Students will
present research-based units on culture.


AP Spanish Literature (WL429A & WL429B)
Grade level: 11, 12                                  Semester Credit: 2                                   Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Teacher approval

AP Spanish Literature is a course designed to introduce students to the major movements of both Peninsular and Latin American
literature, in its original language, beginning with the medieval period and continuing to modern literature on both continents. The
course will be conducted entirely in the target language and will be directed through class discussions of elements of the literature
from the required reading list. Students are encouraged to and expected to participate actively in Spanish solely in order to build
proficiency and competency in their language skills to better prepare them for the level of communication and analysis required of
students at this level. This course will focus on the major literary movements as directed by the required reading list providing both a
literary and historical context for the works that will be covered. The objective of the AP Spanish Literature course will be to foster an
enduring appreciation for the Spanish language, literature and culture as well as to prepare students for the AP Spanish Literature
Exam as a culminating event in this course.


AP Spanish Language (WL427A & WL425B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 2                                        Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Spanish IV and teacher recommendation

Upon completion of this course, students will have the literacy skills at a high quality level to apply in depth comprehension
strategies to novels that will prepare them for continuing their education at the college level. Through the Advanced Placement
Spanish course students will develop their reading, writing, and comprehension skills to think at analytical levels. They will be
prepared to express their ideas with clarity and logic. The course will prepare students to acquire a knowledge and appreciation for
the Latin American and Hispanic novels from the past and present that have contributed cultural values to the world. The class will
also prepare students to take the AP Spanish Language exam that will be given in the spring.




                                                                   18
                                                      Mathematics

     Guidelines for Selecting Mathematics Courses
     A minimum of six Mathematics credits are required for graduation. The courses provided
     through the math department are sequential in nature. Most classes are a year in length. All
     college bound students should be aware that most colleges require that a student have two
     years of Algebra/Geometry as a minimum requirement for admittance. Generally, college
     bound students should plan to take Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II as a minimum
     preparation for college.


Basic Math Skills (LC610A & LC610B)
Grade level: Severe Needs                               Semester Credit: 2                               Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: IEP

This is an individualized Math class for students who need significant modifications and support for Math instruction. This
course builds basic skills according to the Math Standards. Students learn to apply functional math skills to real life situations, learn
math thinking skills and calculation and problem solving strategies.


Pre-Algebra (LC620A & LC620B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                                  Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: IEP and Introduction to Math and Math Concepts

In Pre-Algebra students review key concepts and skills from Intro to math and Math concepts. Students then concentrate on
negative numbers, exponents, properties, and simple algebraic equations. Students learn about ratios, probability, and three-
dimensional geometry; and explore ratios and proportions.


Math Concepts (LC 0351 & LC 2351)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 2                               Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: IEP and Introduction to Math

Math concepts helps students make sense of rational numbers, students first review the key skills from intro to math then students
learn to identify and explain ideas behind formulas; work with fractions, decimals, and percentages; and understand the terms
mean, median, and range. Students also learn about two-dimensional geometry and continuing working on analyzing data.


Algebra I (MA110A & MA110B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                          Semester Credit: 2                                   Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

First course in algebra that delivers algebraic content using a problem-based approach. The content of the course covers
representing functions with a graph, table or rule, collecting and analyzing data, manipulating expressions in order to solve
problems, solving equations, contextual word problems and systems of equations, analyzing the slope of a line multiple ways.
Lessons are structured for students to collaborate actively by working in study teams. Daily assignments are an essential part of this
course.

Geometry (MA220A & MA220B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                          Semester Credit: 2                                   Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Algebra I

This course emphasizes several big ideas in an integrated algebra/geometry context. The key concepts addressed in this course
are transformations and symmetry, relationships between figures, properties of plane figures, measurement of three-dimensional
shapes, tools for analyzing and measuring shapes, investigation and proof, algebra with substantial review of writing and solving
equations and graphing, and probability. Lessons are structured for students to collaborate actively by working in study teams. Daily
assignments are an essential part of this course.

Honors Geometry (MA225A & MA225B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                              Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite Algebra I with a grade of B or higher. Teacher recommendation for grade lower than a B.

This is a rigorous course that will study the concepts of geometry in depth. The key concepts addressed in this course are
transformations and symmetry, relationships between figures, properties of plane figures, measurement of three-dimensional
shapes, tools for analyzing and measuring shapes, investigation and proof, algebra with substantial review of writing and solving
equations and graphing, and probability. Lessons are structured for students to collaborate actively by
working in study teams. Daily assignments are an essential part of this course.




                                                                  19
Algebra II (MA330A & MA330B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 2                                 Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Algebra I and Geometry

This course aims to apply and extend what students have learned in previous mathematics courses. Students will visualize,
express, interpret and graph functions and their inverses, use variables to represent relations from tables, graphs, verbally stated
problems and geometric diagrams and recognize the interconnection between these multiple representations, solve any real or
quadratic equation in one variable and use order and equivalence properties of algebra to rewrite algebraic expressions and
equations. Students will further their knowledge of Algebra concepts using visual and hands on activities in cooperative groups.
Daily assignments are an essential part of this course. course.


Honors Algebra II (MA335A & MA335B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 2                              Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Geometry with a grade of B or higher. Teacher recommendation for grade lower than a B.

This class moves at an accelerated pace with more in-depth investigations of algebra concepts. This course aims to apply and
extend what students have learned in previous mathematics courses. Students will visualize, express, interpret and graph functions
and their inverses, use variables to represent relations from tables, graphs, verbally stated problems and geometric diagrams and
recognize the interconnection between these multiple representations, solve any real or quadratic equation in one variable and use
order and equivalence properties of algebra to rewrite algebraic expressions and equations. Students will further their knowledge of
Algebra concepts using visual and hands on activities in cooperative groups. Daily assignments are an essential part of this course.



Math Topics (MA410A & MA410B)
Grade level: 12                                    Semester Credit: 1                       Course Length: Offered both semesters
Pre-requisite: 2 years of High School Math

This course combines problem solving techniques, critical thinking, as well as written and oral communication. Math Topics is a
rigorous course that requires 2-4 hours per week of homework. Students will be exposed to new ways to solve problems to help
them realize that math is not just a collection of methods to be memorized but a structure which allows many paths to success.


Honors Pre Calculus (MA445A & MA445B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 2                               Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Algebra II, or Math IV with a grade of B or higher. Teacher recommendation for grade lower than a B.

Students will prepare for a rigorous course of study in Calculus. Fundamental concepts of algebra will be reinforced. Polynomial,
rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs will be studied using multiple representations. Trigonometric
measures, functions and identities will be explored. Conic sections and sequences and series will be introduced.



Advanced Placement Calculus (MA467A & MA467B)
Grade level: 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 2                                   Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Grade of A or B in Honors Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus strongly recommended

This course is designed using the College Board guidelines given for a Calculus I course at the college level. The course covers
concepts such as limits, continuity, derivatives (rates of change), and integration (area under a curve, anti derivatives) from three
perspectives (graphical, numerical and algebraic). Students are given the option of taking the AP exam in May to receive college
credit for the course.


Statistics (MA420A & MA420B)
Grade level: 11, 12                                 Semester Credit: 2                                Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II strongly recommended

Topics will include the nature of statistics, sample data, analyzing data, distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing. This is
course strongly dedicated to applying beginning statistics principles. Therefore students can expect to complete many individual and
team projects emphasizing these principles - averaging about a project a week throughout the course. Daily assignments, semester
project, and labs are an essential part of this course.




                                                                20
Discrete Math / Trigonometry (MA430A & MA430B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                        Semester Credit: 2                                    Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II

Topics will include sequences and series, probability and combinatorics, logic, trigonometric functions and their graphs, degree and
radian measure, trigonometric identities and equations, and inverse trigonometric functions. Additional topics of a trigonometric
nature can be discussed if time permits. Daily assignments, semester project, and labs are an essential part of this course.


Advanced Placement Statistics (MA457A & MA457B)
Grade level: 11, 12                            Semester Credit: 2                                    Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing
conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures
from patterns, Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study, Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random
phenomena using probability and simulation, Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.
Students are given the option of taking the AP exam in May to receive college credit for the course.




                                                                21
                                                             Music
     Guidelines for Selecting Music Courses
     A variety of vocal and instrumental music classes are offered at BHS. Students enrolled in bands, choirs, or orchestras have
     required concerts that take place outside of the normal school day. Concerts count as test grades. All music classes fulfill the
     humanities credit requirements. Jazz Band, Extensions, Piano, and Guitar may also fulfill the practical arts requirement.



Orchestra (MU240A & MU240B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                       Semester Credit: 2                                       Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Previous experience on an orchestra instrument

Orchestra is open to all 9th through 12th grade students who are interested in expanding their musical abilities by preparing and
performing a wide variety of orchestral literature. Instruments that make up an orchestra include violin, viola, cello, string bass, and
piano. The orchestra will perform concerts throughout the year and possibly attend a music festival in the spring. Attendance at all
performances is mandatory. Grades will be based on daily behavior, attitude, effort and attendance.


Band 9 (MU110A & MU110B)
Grade level: 9                                    Semester Credit: 2                                      Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Previous experience on a band instrument

This course is offered to all freshmen interested in expanding their musical abilities by preparing and performing a wide variety of
concert literature. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in some pep band activities for athletic events, the Festival
of Lights Parade in December, and possibly a music festival in the spring. Chair placements will take place in the fall. Since
performing is part of the course, attendance at all concerts is mandatory. Grades will be based on daily behavior, attitude, effort,
and attendance.


Symphonic Band (MU320A & MU320B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                                      Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Previous experience on a band instrument

Symphonic Band is open to all 10th through 12th grade students who are interested in expanding their musical abilities by preparing
and performing a wide variety of concert literature. Symphonic Band will participate in marching & pep band activities, perform
concerts, and will attend a festival in the spring. Attendance at all performances is mandatory. Grades will be based on daily
behavior, attitude, effort and attendance.


Jazz I (MU425A & MU425B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                          Semester Credit: 2                                       Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Enrollment in Symphonic Band and audition

Jazz I is open to all 10th through 12th grade students who are interested in expanding their musical knowledge and abilities by
preparing and performing a wide variety of jazz literature. Students interested in this group must be enrolled in Symphonic Band
and need to audition in order to become a member of Jazz I. Auditions for Jazz I will be held at the beginning of second semester.
Piano, guitar, and bass players do not need to be enrolled in Symphonic Band to be a member of Jazz I. This group will perform in
school concerts, in the community, and at festivals during the year. Attendance at all performances is mandatory. Grades will be
based on daily behavior, attitude, effort, and attendance.


Jazz II (MU230A & MU230B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                      Semester Credit: 2                                        Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Enrollment in Symphonic Band or Band 9

Jazz II is open to all students who are interested in expanding their musical knowledge and abilities by preparing and performing a
wide variety of jazz literature. Jazz II members must be enrolled in either Symphonic Band or Band 9. There is no audition
requirement for Jazz II, unless there is an overabundance of a certain instrument. In this case the director may require auditions for
that instrument in order to achieve a more balanced instrumentation. This group will perform in school concerts, in the community,
and at least one festival during the year. Attendance at all performances is mandatory. Grades will be based on daily behavior,
attitude, effort, ant attendance.




                                                                   22
Guitar (MU185)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Interview with Instructor

This is a class of beginning musicians who have little or no guitar skills. Students will learn how to read music through playing an
acoustic guitar. It is encouraged that students have their own acoustic guitar by the start of the course.


Piano (MU135)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 2                                  Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

This class teaches basic keyboard skills, music reading skills and basic music theory. It is intended for students who may play
another instrument and want a piano background, for those preparing for further music study as well as those who want to learn
piano for their own enrichment.




Choir Classes

♪ Students may elect to enroll in a non-auditioned choir: Concert Choir.


Non-Auditioned Choirs 9, 10, 11, 12

♪ No pre-requisite or audition required

♪ No uniform requirements; students will wear school-owned choir robes for performances

Auditioned Choir 10, 11, 12

♪ Students must perform a successful audition for the director(s) including singing scales, sight-singing, singing parts
independently and performing a simple solo such as ―My Country Tis of Thee‖ or ―Happy Birthday‖.

♪ Students are responsible for either purchasing or fund-raising for prescribed uniform choir apparel. (Complete Tuxes – including
shoes - for men, dresses and shoes for women)
♪ Directors will determine from the audition which of the following choirs would be most appropriate for the student for the next
school year.

 ♪ Choirs are yearlong classes. Students must sign an agreement to participate in the choir for the entire year and not to withdraw
at the end of fall semester.




Concert Choir (MU155A & MU155B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 2                                  Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

Concert Choir is a non-auditioned group for male and female singers in grades 9-12 with little or no choral experience, or for those
who have been in choir but choose not to audition for a more advanced choir. All freshmen are required to complete a year in this
choir before moving on in the program. Emphasis is on learning good vocal tone production and music reading skills. Two-, three-
and four-part literature will be chosen from standard choral repertoire.


Women’s Chorale (MU245A & MU245B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 2                                  Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: By Audition

Women's Choir is open by audition to high school women in grades 10-12. This treble choir focuses on vocal development, music
reading and performance of a wide variety of musical styles from all historical periods and other cultures and languages.




                                                                 23
Chamber Singers (MU360A & MU360B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                          Semester Credit: 2                                Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: By Audition

Chamber Singers is an advanced level mixed choir. Emphasis in this choir is on performing a wide variety of advanced high school
choral literature in a stylistically appropriate manner at school, community concerts, and competitions.


Extensions (MU465A & MU465B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                          Semester Credit: 2                                Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: By Audition

This advanced women's ensemble is open to the most musically experienced and knowledgeable singers. Emphasis is on primarily
a cappella ensemble singing in a variety of styles. This class requires a commitment to performances outside of the school concert
schedule. Extensions meets concurrently with Chamber Singers. Members of Extensions are required to meet all expectations of
the Chamber Singers curriculum as well as Extensions. Musical preparation outside of class time is required.




                                                               24
                                           Physical Education
     Guidelines for Selecting Physical Education / Health Classes
     Physical Education courses are designed to develop a student’s physical abilities as well as the ability to perform successfully
     a variety of fundamental skills and to provide knowledge and understanding of the rules and techniques which can be used in
     recreation, now and in later years. All students are required to have one semesters of PE in grade 9. They are required to
     take Fitness Education to meet graduation requirements as well as one additional PE elective. Other elective PE classes are
     also available after the first years’ requirements are completed. Elective classes may be taken more than once through grades
     10 – 12 for credit. For example, a student may take Advanced Weight Training two semesters in the 10 th and 11th grades and
     receive credit for each semester of that class. Also, unless special permission is granted, a student may enroll in no more than
     one PE class per semester.

     Make Up Work Policy
     Physical Education students may make up an absence within the six week grading period. The student must prearrange with
     the instructor a make up time and date. Description of type of make-up work may be obtained from the student’s individual PE
     instructor.


Health (PE158)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Health is a required course designed to help students develop a healthy lifestyle. The emphasis of this course will be focused on
teen health issues. Some topics addressed include wellness, teen suicide, drug and alcohol education, AIDS, violence, nutrition,
tobacco, and sexuality education.


Fitness Education B (Boys) (PE115)
Grade level: 9                                     Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Fitness Education is a required introductory course in Physical Education. Students will explore current trends in exercise and learn
how to make healthy choices. A wide variety of sports and activities will be included with a focus on health, fitness, and skill
awareness and acquisition. All activities will emphasize the importance of life-long learning.


Fitness Education G (Girls) (PE117)
Grade level: 9                                     Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Fitness Education is a required introductory course in Physical Education. Students will explore current trends in exercise and learn
how to make healthy choices. A wide variety of sports and activities will be included with a focus on health, fitness, and skill
awareness and acquisition. All activities will emphasize the importance of life-long learning.




                                                                 25
Fitness Education C (COED) (PE110)
Grade level: 9                                      Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Fitness Education is a required introductory course in Physical Education. Students will explore current trends in exercise and learn
how to make healthy choices. A wide variety of sports and activities will be included with a focus on health, fitness, and skill
awareness and acquisition. All activities will emphasize the importance of life-long learning.


Sports Strength & Conditioning (PE437A & PE437B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 1                                    Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Fitness Education & Varsity Coach Recommendation

This course is designed for athletes to increase speed, strength, and conditioning. The instructor will use the latest research and
techniques to allow our athletes to compete on a level playing field with our opponents. Varsity head coach must recommend
student/athletes for this class.


Aerobics (PE245)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                             Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Fitness Education

This course will focus on improving and increasing cardio vascular endurance, flexibility, muscular strength, and muscular
endurance. Evaluation is based on daily participation and individual as well as group activities and projects.


Recreational Basketball (PE250)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                             Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Fitness Education

Basketball, basketball, and more basketball. Students will focus on games, skills, and drills to develop their skills and their
understanding of all facets of the game. Students will be expected to show improvement in their skills and be able to express their
understanding in several different ways.


Volleyball (PE255)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                             Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Fitness Education

This course will include the basic and advanced techniques used in the game of volleyball. The skills of
serving, passing, setting, hitting, and blocking will be stressed. This course will focus on offensive and
defensive strategies used in the game. All skills and techniques will be enhanced while participating in
competitive game play. Students will also learn how to referee a volleyball game.


Strength and Conditioning (PE230)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                          Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Fitness Education

Students will participate in a personalized weight training program, set personal goals, and take part in a wide variety of exercise
activities. Emphasis will be put on the acquisition of skills that can be utilized throughout one’s lifetime.


Advanced Sports and Activities (PE260)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                          Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Fitness Education

This course will provide students with the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of competitive sports and activities. Enhancing
skills and knowledge while applying advanced strategies and technique will be the focus of this course.


Racquet Sports (PE247)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                          Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Fitness Education

This is an advanced PE class designed to enhance lifetime fitness skills. Emphasis will be put on skills and techniques utilized in
various racquet sports. Activities will include tennis, racquetball, pickleball, badminton, and tennis.




                                                                  26
Leisure Sports and Activities (PE257)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 1                                    Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Fitness Education

This is an upper level course that will provide students an opportunity to participate in a wide variety of sports and activities with less
emphasis on competition and more emphasis on participation and exercise. Lifetime fitness skills will be stressed while participating
in archery, bocce ball, bowling, croquet, fitness/yoga, Frisbee golf, golf, horseshoes, softball, swimming, tsegball, and other
recreational activities.


Adapted PE (PE380)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 1                                    Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Fitness Education

A diversified program of developmental activities, games, sports, and rhythms designed to meet the individual needs of students
with disabilities. The students that would benefit from this class include all the SSN students as well as an equal number of peer
tutors that would also be enrolled in this class for a PE credit.


Athletic Training I (PE270)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 1                                    Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

The Athletic Training I class is designed to provide a theoretical basis of what an athletic trainer does. It also presents valuable
information related to the prevention and management of sport injuries and illnesses. In conjunction with Platte Valley Medical
Center's Sports Medicine, the student will study basic anatomy. A background in anatomy and physiology is helpful but not
mandatory. Current First Aid and CPR certification is mandatory, as it is used in everyday work as an athletic trainer.


Sports Medicine Lab I (PE365)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 1                                    Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Athletic Training II (Concurrent)

This lab gives you the ability to put your knowledge from the sports medicine classes into use. This is a practical hands on lab. You
will work in the training room with athletes. You will put your skills into action in preventative rehabilitation, emergency care,
organizational skills, and time management skills. Current First Aid and CPR is mandatory as it is used in everyday work as an
athletic trainer.




                                                                   27
                                                        Science
     Guidelines for Selecting Science Courses
     The Science Department offers a wide spectrum of science classes for students pursuing a variety of goals. General classes
     are offered as well as those for college bound students. The incoming freshman must earn a minimum of four semester credits
     in Science in order to graduate. A freshman may select from the following class offerings: Honors Biology, Physical Science,
     or Fundamentals of Physical Science

     The Science Department has the following suggestions for incoming students:

          1.   If you have any questions, talk to a teacher in the Science Department.
          2.   Students primarily interested in completing the basic science requirements must take
               Physical Science and Biology.
          3.   Students interested in going on to college should select from the advanced offerings listed.
               Most colleges require three years of a lab science.
          4.   Students interested in a science field at the college level should choose the appropriate
               elective courses listed for 11th and 12th grade levels. Check with teachers in the Science
               Department if you have questions.
          5.   A strong background in Math is also suggested if you intend pursuing an advanced science
               class.
          6.   Students should be aware that a year of Chemistry and Physics is extremely beneficial when preparing to take the
               ACT or SAT tests.

Physical Science (SC110A &SC110B)
Grade level: 9                                     Semester Credit: 2                                 Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

Physical Science is an integrated general science course that will provide a strong background in the areas of physical science
(chemistry and physics) and earth science. This course is designed to work toward meeting both Colorado State and District 27J
Science Standards. Laboratory skills along with the use of the scientific processes will be a focus.


Biology (SC220A &SC220B)
Grade level: 10                                    Semester Credit: 2                                 Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Physical Science

Biology will examine a broad range of topics basic to understanding the concepts of living systems and how they relate to each
other. The structure and function of living things will be studied in depth. Plant and animal diversity, genetics, ecology, and human
anatomy will also be studied. Laboratory exercises are a part of this class. This course is designed to work toward meeting both
Colorado State and District 27J Science Standards.


Honors Biology (SC225A & SC225B)
Grade level: 9, 10                             Semester Credit: 2                           Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Application, Exam and recommendation

Honors Biology is a course designed for the highly motivated student who has a very strong interest or background in
science. Students who successfully complete Honors Biology will be eligible for advanced courses within the science
curriculum. Honors students are expected to demonstrate analytical, critical, and creative thinking skills with
emphasis on problem solving through lab activities, projects, research, and presentations. Students should be
prepared to be involved in reading and writing assignments outside of class. Freshmen who take Honors Biology are
required to take Chemistry or Physics to meet the Physical science requirement for graduation. (This entails agreeing to the math
pre-requisites for those classes as well). The course is designed to work toward meeting both Colorado State and District 27J
Science Standards.


Chemistry (SC330A & SC330B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                            Semester Credit: 2                                 Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Biology & Algebra I/Math I

The first semester of Chemistry begins with an introduction to Chemistry, Atomic Theory, and how to read the Periodic Table. Next,
we’ll begin to study how compounds form, the type of compounds that exist, and the amazing reactions that accompany them.
Second semester deals with a more in depth look at kinetic theory, acids and bases, redox reactions, and a bit of organic chemistry
fun to finish up! Both semesters will include lab experiments and demonstrations that will assist in students’ understanding.




                                                                28
Honors Chemistry (SC335A & SC335B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                             Semester Credit: 2                                 Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Algebra I or Chemistry

This course is for students specifically pursuing careers in health sciences, teaching, or science research and development. First
semester includes the study of measurements, atomic theory, chemical bonding, nomenclature, and stoichiometry. Second
semester includes the study of solutions, acids and bases, gas laws, nuclear chemistry, and a more in depth look at organic
chemistry, and the wide variety of important biological compounds and their pathways. Laboratory experiments will demonstrate all
of the above topics qualitatively. Students also participate in the Rivers of Colorado Water Watch program. They will be responsible
for the collection and analysis of water from the South Platte River.


Advanced Placement Chemistry (SC437A & SC437B)
Grade level: 11, 12                               Semester Credit: 2                        Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Algebra II, Chemistry or Honors Chemistry,

AP Chemistry is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first
college year. The course follows the AP Chemistry curriculum and includes, but is not limited to, the following topics: Thermo
chemistry, Chemical Bonding, Electrochemistry, Kinetics and Equilibrium. A great deal of additional emphasis is placed on the
quantity and the quality of the laboratory work that a student completes. Successful completion may allow students to undertake, as
college freshmen, a second year of work in the chemistry field or to register for courses in other fields where general chemistry is a
prerequisite. For other students, AP Chemistry fulfills the laboratory science requirement and frees time for other courses. Taking
the AP Chemistry exam is a course requirement.


Earth, Space, and Environmental Science (SC350A & SC350B)
Grade level: 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 2                                         Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Two years of science

Earth, Space, and Environmental Science is designed for students interested in geology, hydrology, astronomy, and meteorology
and how these factors and human activity interact with and affect the environment. This course meets the state in the field of earth
and space science and the relationships between science and human activity. The first semester of this class explores geologic
history and processes and celestial bodies and space exploration. The second semester focuses on water, weather, climate and
current environmental issues. The class will identify problems that arise from human interaction with the environment and study the
structure and function of ecosystems with reference to energy flow, population growth, and its effects on planet Earth. Students will
gain an understanding of the interactions between natural and social systems. This class will develop ways of thinking about the
environment that enables students to evaluate the impact of environmental problems on their natural world.


Honors Anatomy & Physiology (SC465A & SC465B)
Grade level: 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 2                         Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Biology, Chemistry and Teacher Recommendation

This course is designed for students interested in health science related fields as they apply to the human body. Study is aimed
toward understanding the structure and function of the systems of the human body. This course includes rigorous lab work in the
areas of cell biology, organ dissections and system physiology. The topics and terminology studied will provide a basis for further
studies in the health science fields. Teacher recommendation is required from a previous science teacher. There is a possibility
that successful completion of this course may lead to college credit. The course may be offered off-site.



Physics (SC440A & SC440B)
Grade level: 11, 12                                Semester Credit: 2                       Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Algebra II or Math III

Physics will concentrate on the concepts learned in mechanics, light and optics, electricity, magnetism and relativity. The class
involves numerous labs, including data collection by computer, and chances to explore experimental design and error analysis.
Students completing this course will have strong communication, teamwork, problem solving, and critical thinking skills along with
the ability to assess and apply their knowledge to a practical situation along with gaining a good foundation for a college physics
class.


Advanced Placement Physics B (SC447A & SC447B)
Grade level: 11, 12                               Semester Credit: 2                       Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Algebra II, Chemistry and Chemistry teacher approval                 Co-requisite: Trigonometry or Calculus

AP Physics is a college level physics course for the student who wants the challenge of an advanced study of physics. The course
includes the following topics: Newtonian mechanics, physics of fluids, wave motion and sound, heat and thermodynamics,
electricity and magnetism, light and wave optics, and relativity and quantum physics. Learning will include computer based
experiments and applications. As part of the course, students will be prepared for the AP Physics exam. Taking the AP Physics B
Exam is a course requirement.




                                                                 29
30
                                                 Social Studies

Basic Cultural Geography (SS111)
Grade level: 9                                     Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: ILP, 504 and Basic English Class, teacher recommendation

This basic class is designed for students who need extra support with reading, writing, vocabulary and study skills. Basic classes
are generally smaller in size allowing more teacher-student interaction. The regular curriculum is taught with some modifications,
different pacing, and more student-teacher interaction. Basic classes are not for students who earn failing grades due to attendance
or behavior problems. It’s designed for the student who needs some extra help to be successful.


Cultural Geography (SS110)
Grade level: 9                                     Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

This course will integrate the skills and concepts of both physical and human geography with
the study of regions outside the United States. Teachers will emphasize two or more of the
following regions: Asia, Central and South America, and Oceania (Australia, New Zealand).
Regions selected will be based on both teacher and student preference. Students will interact
with the people, religions, and cultures of each region studied. Students will be involved with
maps, outside readings, and both individual and group projects. This class will be offered both
first and second semesters to accommodate student needs.


Honors Cultural Geography (SS115)
Grade level: 9                                     Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Placement Process

An Honors level Cultural Geography course with an advanced curriculum is available for those students who have special interest in
geography and related fields. Students who may be interested in going to college should consider this class. Students who are
college bound should be aware that many four-year colleges and universities require a year of high school geography for admission.
This class may be offered both semesters to accommodate student needs.

World History (SS220A & SS220B)
Grade level: 10                                    Semester Credit: 2                                 Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

This course lets you delve into the cultures of ancient societies, explore the development of world religions, and step back into the
Middle Ages. Students will experience the age of chivalry, superstition and plague, as well as the Renaissance, its art, beliefs, and
issues that still create controversy today. Follow the paths of great explorers and the impact they had on the societies they met.
Students will explore the American and French revolutions and see how the ideas of each impact us today. The course concludes
in the early 19th century with the rise of Napoleon and the beginning of the modern era. Special emphasis is placed on the ways in
which history, art, literature, theology, and even music have affected the ways we live today.


Advanced Placement World History (SS227A & SS227B)
Grade level: 10                            Semester Credit: 2                                         Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation

Advanced Placement World History is a very rigorous class that invites students to take a global view of historical processes and
contacts between people in different societies. The course will cover the history of the world from about 1000 BC to the present.
Students will be expected to learn historical factual knowledge as well as the skills necessary to analyze, synthesize, and complete
formal writing tasks such as essays, while using historical documents and resources. Attention will also be given to preparing
students with the skills necessary to be successful on the AP World History Exam that will be given in the spring. Students will not
be required to take the AP World History Exam, but it will be strongly encouraged, as they will have the opportunity to earn college
credit with the successful completion of the exam. The course requires reading and work over the summer in preparation for the fall
semester. Students will participate in debates, seminars, simulations, and various discussion groups throughout the year, as well as
writing weekly essays. All students who plan to attend college should take this course. The ultimate benefits of this course will be
an informed view of how the world has developed, plus stimulating intellectual growth.


U. S. History (SS330A & SS330B)
Grade level: 11                                    Semester Credit: 2                       Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: World History

This is a survey course in American History and is required for graduation. This course will begin with immigration
in the late 1800’s and conclude in the 1960’s. In depth topics covered are the Rise of Our Nation, World War I, the
Great Depression, World War II, Civil Rights, and JFK’s assignation.



                                                                 31
Advanced Placement U. S. History (SS337A & SS337B)
Grade level: 11, 12                            Semester Credit: 2                                        Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: World History, Teacher Recommendation

Advanced Placement U. S. History is a very rigorous course designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual
knowledge necessary to deal critically with U. S. history. Areas of concentration include historical, political, and economic history
coupled with an intense study of cultural and intellectual institutions and their development. The course also serves as a
preparation for taking the Advanced Placement Exam, which is given in the spring. A student successfully passing the exam may
test out of some college history courses. This course requires reading over the summer in preparation for the fall semester. During
each semester, the student will write weekly essays and take multiple choice exams over content under conditions similar to the
Advanced Placement Exam. Debates, seminars, presentations, outside readings, and guest speakers will also be used in the class.
Both students and parents will be made aware of and need to understand the time and effort investment they would be making and
to make a conscious and willing commitment to do so.


Economic Principles (SS250)
Grade level: 11, 12                                 Semester Credit: 1                                   Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

This course will provide an in depth study of the American economic system and its impact on American society. Topics covered
will include, but will not be limited to, market pricing, monetary policy, fiscal policy, international trade, money, and banking.
Students should be prepared to be involved with outside reading and writing assignments, as well as be actively involved in
individual and group projects. Students will develop skills necessary to make sound personal economic decisions. The class will be
offered each semester to accommodate student needs.


Political Science (SS440)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                             Semester Credit: 1                                   Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: World History

This course will provide an in depth study of the American political system covering federal, state, and local governments in the
United States, as well as a comparative study of governmental systems. Students will gain a first hand knowledge of practical
politics, developing skills that will have a positive effect on their role as productive citizens. Students will gain a greater
understanding of their responsibilities within American society, including issues such as voting, jury duty, taxation, social contracts,
local ordinances, legal requirements, and Selective Service. Students should be prepared to be involved with outside reading and
writing assignments, as well as be challenged in both individual and group projects. The class will be offered each semester to
accommodate student needs.


Honors Political Science (SS445)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                       Semester Credit: 1                                         Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: World History Teacher Recommendation

In addition to the core curriculum outline in the Political Science course description, honors students explore the political theories of
Plato, Montesquieu, lock, and Rousseau, and how they contribute to American democracy. Honors students will be expected to
become actively involved within the community. Student involvement may include conducting interviews with community leaders,
shadowing programs, working directly with government agencies, court officials, the police department, judges and lawyers.
Students may also participate in programs such at Teen Court or Youth in Government. This class may be offered every semester
to accommodate student needs.


World Issues (SS117)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

This course designed for those students who have a special interest in geographic issues. Students who are college bound should
also consider this class since many colleges and universities require a year of high school geography for admission. The course will
apply geography standards and concepts to a variety of world locations and issues. The areas of the world studied each semester
may vary depending upon world conditions and/or events.


Psychology I (SS355)
Grade level: 11, 12                                 Semester Credit: 1                                   Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

This is a class about you! No other class has more personal relevance for your life than psychology. The chances are good that
some of the problems you face today are among the topics that we discuss in this class. Topics will include family, friends, dating,
sex, drugs, feelings, emotions, and much, much more. The goal of this class is to present the basic matter of psychology by
encouraging the students to think for themselves through fun and exciting exercises.




                                                                  32
Psychology II (SS356)
Grade level: 11, 12                                Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Psychology I

Mental disorders affect us all. It is impossible to pick up a newspaper without reading about people who are psychologically
disturbed. In Psychology II, we discuss behavioral problems and their therapies. Topics will include schizophrenia, paranoia,
multiple personalities, depression, self-hate, antisocial behavior, hostility and much more. You will find the behaviors discussed in
this class to be interesting, challenging, intriguing, and disturbing!


Sociology (SS260)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Sociology is the study of the social behavior of human beings. This class covers the science of society, the study of human group
life, and the social relationship between people and their institutions. Students will be expected to make outside observations to
supplement the material covered in class. Students will draw conclusions based on their study of sociology and apply them to real
life situations.


Teen Law (SS119)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Teen Law is a law related course that provides practical information that teens need in our society. Students will be confronted with
law related issues, problem solving opportunities, and will develop many of the skills needed for survival in our society. The
curriculum includes case studies, mock trials, role plays, and visual analysis activities. Professionals working within the legal
system (legislators, lawyers, police, etc.) may be involved with various aspects of the course.




                                                                33
         Career & Technical Education: Business and Technology Education

Business and Technology Standards
         Students develop their content and/or performance skills to proficient level.
         Students evaluate and solve problems in a logical manner.
         Students develop an understanding of work ethic and real world expectations.
         Students understand and demonstrate the role of citizenship, leadership, cooperation, and community responsibility.
         Students develop technological literacy and understand the impact of ever evolving technologies.

     Guidelines for Selecting Technology Courses
     The goal of the Technology program is to train technicians who are successfully cross trained, understand new age industry
     demands (such as group effort and cooperation, quality management, and the ability to change within a system), can complete
     and succeed at obtaining employment, and understand that continuing education is not an option but a necessity for our future
     workforce. Technology courses are designed to compliment a student’s area of interest while building marketable skills.

     Guidelines for Selecting Business Courses
     Business Education is a Career and Technical Education program designed to provide students with business skills for
     employment. Students enrolled in a business or technology class have the option to join and participate in FBLA (Future
     business Leaders of America) activities. Credits earned in business education can fulfill the practical arts requirement. Also,
     several of the classes meet the computer credit or math credit requirements.

Information Processing (BU010)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                        Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

This computerized course is an introduction for students interested in developing word processing skills for personal and/or
business use. Course competencies include proper word processing technique, document formatting, vertical and horizontal
centering, tables, memorandums, personal and business letters, outlines, and reports.


Computer Applications (BU120)                                                          FRCC credit granted – CIS 118 – 3 credits
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                          Semester Credit: 1                             Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Information Processing or Instructor Approval

How can the computer be a powerful tool in your life? Learn the most popular software used in the business world today- Windows
and Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, and PowerPoint). Understanding computer concepts and knowing how to apply computer skills
are essential for every student in every career.
Students successfully completing this class will meet the BHS computer credit requirement for graduation.


Business Law (BU270)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Do you really understand our legal system? Emphasis is placed on understanding the legal rights and responsibilities of students as
consumers, citizens, and employees. Students will analyze and argue legal issues such as contractual agreements, societal
responsibilities, minor’s rights and responsibilities, employment law, and landlord/tenant relationships.


Business Principles (BU160)                                                           FRCC credit granted – BUS 115 – 3 credits
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 1                               Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Welcome to the exciting world of business! This course will introduce you to the world of business principles, problems, and
practices. Topics covered will include basic economic concepts, career opportunities in business, credit, and investing.


Accounting 1 (BU280A & BU280B)                                                        FRCC credit granted – ACC 101 – 3 credits
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                               Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

Accounting is a system that all businesses use to process financial data. A background in accounting is valuable no matter what
your life goals may be! This class presents the basic elements and concepts of accounting, with
emphasis on the procedures used for maintaining journals, ledgers, and other related records, and
for the completion of end-of-period reports for small service and merchandising businesses. You
will receive training with workbooks and computerized simulations.




                                                                34
Accounting II (Independent Study) (BU380)
Grade level: 12                                    Semester Credit: 2                                 Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Accounting 1

Accounting II provides more information about business procedures and business records.        Areas to be explored include
partnership accounting, accounting for taxes, notes and drafts, corporate accounting, management use of accounting data, and
computerized accounting.


Business Internship Program (BU440)
Grade level: 11, 12                                 Semester Credit: 1                                Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Currently enrolled in a business course & instructor approval

Earn a paycheck, get experience, and receive school credit at the same time! Employers are consistently turning to the Business
Internship Program for skilled employees. To remain competitive and productive in today’s business world, it is essential for you to
keep up with changing technology. Students will be an employee of a local business to gain computer/business skills in the
information processing, management, accounting and administrative assistant areas. This work experience will help students be
successful in their post-secondary choices as well as in their future careers. Students will receive credits by the semester for this
experience. Maximum number of credits allowed per semester is one with a minimum of 250 work experience hours.


Computer Programming (BU220)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                        Semester Credit: 1                                     Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Computer Apps (highly recommended) or Instructor Approval

This is a beginning course in programming using the Flash Action Script 2.0 and 3.0. Learn commands to create your own
programs and games. Learn how to use Microsoft Excel as a productive problem solving tool. Credit for this class may be used as
a computer, math or elective credit.


Web Design (BU230)                                                                    FRCC         credit
granted – MGD 141 – 3 credits
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                        Semester Credit: 1
          Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Computer Apps (highly recommended) or Instructor Approval

Students will learn how professionals create web sites and will get a chance to create their own. Basic
HTML, web coding, Flash Animation, and Dream Weaver will be used in this class. Here is an opportunity to enhance your Internet
knowledge and skills. Students successfully completing this class will meet the BHS computer credit requirement for graduation.

.

Tech Lab (BU110)                     Tech Lab + first semester of IT Academy = FRCC credits granted – CIS 115 – 3 credits
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                          Semester Credit: 1                       Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Information Processing or Instructor Approval

Feel the thrill of exploring new technologies in the fields of Computers, Networking, Multimedia, Electronics and much more. Each
student will have a "hands-on" experience in several "module" areas which will help in determining future careers and interests.
This not-to-be missed class is designed for students interested in technology. Students successfully completing this class will meet
the BHS computer credit requirement for graduation. See the tech lab for a complete list of modules.




                                                                 35
Video Broadcast Journalism (FA295)
Grade level: 11, 12                               Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Lights, camera, action... Video Broadcasting introduces students to digital video editing and broadcasting. Students will capture,
compress, edit, and manipulate video images using a personal computer. Assembly techniques including media management,
editing tools, titles, transitions, and special effects are explored. Be involved in producing and directing live and taped
programming. Principles and techniques cover camera operation, basic script writing, lighting, and sound. Course curriculum and
study will include writing speeches, storyboard application, video techniques, and broadcast production.




                                                                36
 Career & Technical Education: Agricultural Technology
Agricultural Technology Standards
         Students develop their content and/or performance skills to proficient level.
         Students evaluate and solve problems in a logical manner.
         Students develop an understanding of work ethic and real world expectations.
         Students understand and demonstrate the role of citizenship, leadership, cooperation, and community responsibility.
         Students develop technological literacy and understand the impact of ever evolving technologies.

     Guidelines for Selecting Agricultural Technology Courses
     Agriculture Technology is a program designed to help prepare students to enter the agricultural occupation of their choice or go
     on for further training when they finish the program. It is a four year course beginning with the basics and building upon what
     has been learned during each successive year. The ultimate goal is that the students will develop all the competencies and
     skills that they will need to successfully enter their chosen occupation. So in addition, seniors may enroll in an Agricultural
     Technology Internship for credit which allows them the option of applying skills learned in the classroom to the job. Students
     enrolled in Agricultural Technology also have the option to join and participate in FFA (Future Farmers of America) activities.
     These will include local chapter meetings, recreational activities, public speaking contests, judging contests, state and national
     activities, and individual awards in many areas. There are three components of agricultural education: classroom and
     laboratory instruction, SAE (Supervised Agriculture Experience) program, and FFA. All three mesh well with the basics of
     school-to-career education through school-based learning, work-based learning, and connecting activities.


Agricultural Technology I (AG110A & AG110B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                  Semester Credit: 2                                          Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

This introduction to the agricultural industry is designed to introduce the student to the wealth of opportunities in the number one
industry in the world. Students will develop knowledge and skills in agriculture as a diverse industry, in addition to understanding
the importance and magnitude of agriculture. They will explore the basic principles of plant science, animal science, natural
science, agri-business management, and agriculture mechanics, which include basic welding and woodworking. Students will
examine specific agricultural applications and processes and the underlying science principles explaining or controlling those
applications. This course will use laboratory exercises and other hand-on activities.
The course encourages achievement in SAE through wise management of economic and environmental resources as well as the
human resources of the community. Throughout the experiences in FFA, students will develop interpersonal skills in teamwork,
communication, human relations, and social interaction.


Veterinary Science (AG350A & AG350B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                             Semester Credit: 2                                  Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Ag Tech I

The Vet Science course will continue to expose students to the fundamentals of agriculture. The course will have an emphasis in
the areas of animal health and disease, nutrition and digestion, anatomy and physiology, animal behavior and environment, and
genetics. This course is also a continuation of Agriculture Technology I course.
Through FFA students will expand their knowledge about life skills, including the promotion of cooperative attitudes among all
people and of healthy lifestyles. By learning how to run an efficient meeting, students will also increase their ability to communicate
effectively. Students will further develop entrepreneurial skills through their SAE. Credits earned may count as two third year
Science credits or Practical Arts Credits.


Horticulture Science (AG210A & AG210B)                                   Possible Aims or FRCC credit granted – HLT 101 – 4
                                                                         credits, HLT 125 – 3 credits, HLT 105 – 4 credits, HLT
                                                                         126 – 2 credits, & HLT 180 – 2 credits

Grade level: 10, 11, 12                             Semester Credit: 2                                  Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Ag Tech I

This course introduces students to the principles of plant science as it relates to horticulture. The course emphasizes the
application of plant sciences to the propagation, improvement, culture, and utilization of horticultural plants. This course will
introduce the area of ornamental horticulture and landscape technology.
Through FFA students will expand their knowledge about life skills, including the promotion of cooperative attitudes among all
people and of healthy life styles. By learning how to run an efficient meeting, students will also increase their ability to communicate
effectively. Students will further develop entrepreneurial skills through their SAE. Credits earned may count as third year Science
credits or Practical Arts credits.




                                                                  37
Agricultural Business and Entrepreneurial Development (AG230A & AG230B)
Grade level: 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 2                                       Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Ag Tech II

This course presents the concepts necessary for managing an agri-business in a global environment, including the principles of
organization and management. It covers the effects of good/poor management, economic principles, decision-making, methods for
organizing and planning, getting started in the business, record keeping, and risk management. The course also emphasizes
applied environmental science, soils, fertilizers, agricultural chemicals, surveying, agricultural law, and water and soil management.
Through the FFA students will develop competent and assertive agricultural leadership, increase awareness of global and
technological importance of agriculture, strengthen their confidence in themselves and their work, and promote the intelligent choice
of an agricultural career. Students will develop entrepreneurial skills through their SAE. Through FFA students will expand their
knowledge about life skills including the promotion of cooperative attitudes among all people and of healthy lifestyles. By learning
how to run an efficient meeting, students will also increase their ability to communicate effectively. Students will further develop
entrepreneurial skills through their SAE.


Agriculture Mechanics (AG220A & AG220B)
Grade level: 11, 12                                Semester Credit: 2                                  Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Ag Tech II

This course is for the advanced agriculture students who have an interest in increasing their skills in maintenance, repair, and shop
fabrication. The course will help to further develop their skills in electrification, plumbing, welding, woodworking, metal working,
shop organization, time management, and project planning. The second semester will allow time for students to plan, fabricate, and
market agriculture products.


Agricultural Technology Internship (AG340)
Grade level: 11, 12                                Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Enrolled in Ag Tech II – IV

Students who receive on-the-job experience in animal science, plant science or other agriculture areas should enroll in this
internship. Students will receive credit for this training. Maximum number of credit allowed per semester is one with a minimum of
250 work experience hours.




                                                                 38
         Career & Technical Education: Automotive Technology

Automotive Technology Standards
         Students know how to allocate time, money, materials, space, and staff.
         Students interact socially with other students in a responsible manner.
         Students work on teams, teach others, lead, negotiate, and work with diverse populations.
         Students treat others, materials, and equipment with respect.
         Students acquire and evaluate data, organize and maintain files, interpret and communicate, and use computers to
          process information.
         Students use reference materials.
         Students write reports and summaries and complete forms.
         Students understand social, organizational, and technological systems; can monitor and correct performance, and can
          design or improve systems.
         Students use appropriate vocabulary and grammar.
         Students present information orally and effectively to groups.
         Students follow intent of oral and written instructions.
         Students formulate and ask questions.
         Students recognize the technological evolution of the automobile.
         Students can select equipment and tools, apply technology to specific tasks, and maintain and troubleshoot equipment.

     Guidelines for Selecting Automotive Technology Courses
     The Automotive Technology courses consist of five different classes that are each one semester in length. A certificate of
     completion is awarded in each of the five classes. The first class and pre-requisite to the other four classes is Automotive
     Maintenance, Lube and Tire Tech. Upon successful completion, the student may enter any or all of the remaining four areas of
     study. The program is designed to build the student’s ability to perform the tasks necessary for job entry and to prepare the
     student for ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) certification in the four areas. ASE certification is above and beyond the
     Brighton High School Automotive certificates awarded for successful completion of each automotive area. Successful
     completion is considered finishing the course with a final grade percentage of 70% or better. The automotive instructor is ASE
     certified, holds a Colorado Vocational Credential, and a Colorado teaching license. With 60,000 unfilled jobs nationally and
     3,000 in the state, this is a great career field for a young technically oriented person. Due to the nature of the program, it is
     necessary for the student to be prompt to class and have a minimum number of absences. Tardies and absences are NOT
     tolerated in the industry, and since we are training for industry, we cannot tolerate this type of action.

     Successful completion in the areas of Brakes, Suspension, Electrical, Engine Diagnosis and Steering systems will earn
     articulated college credit at Front Range Community College. Students enrolled in any of the automotive classes are qualified
     to be members of SkillsUSA-VICA. SkillsUSA-VICA is the only organization for students in technical, skilled, and service
     careers. The U. S. Department of Education recognizes the educational programs and philosophies of SkillsUSA-VICA as
     being an integral part of career and technical instruction. All automotive students receive PDP (Professional Development
     Program) training, a five part course that is for development of personal job skills. The PDP training also helps students
     compete in SkillsUSA-VICA competitions.


Basic Automotive Maintenance, Lube, and Tire Tech (AU210)                             FRCC credits granted – ASE 101 – 2 credits
Grade level: 10                                    Semester Credit: 1                               Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None (11th & 12th graders are admitted with instructor approval.)

A must for young car owners! Learn to maintain your car and skills that also make you employable. This is where you start, if you
are interested in taking care of your car or exploring the many career paths that are related to the automotive industry. This course
covers the basics of automotive maintenance and gives you the skills to perform the job. Some advanced job skills are also taught,
that prepare a person seeking entry-level employment. This class is taught at BHS only. Students wishing to enroll in this class
must be able to travel to BHS in order to attend class.


Basic Automotive Maintenance, Lube, and Tire Tech for Women (AU220)                   FRCC credits granted – ASE 101 – 2 credits
Grade level: 10                                    Semester Credit: 1                               Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None (11th & 12th graders are admitted with instructor approval.)

A must for young women car owners! Learn to maintain your car and skills that also make you employable. This is where you start,
if you are interested in taking care of your car or exploring the many career paths that are related to the automotive industry. This
course covers the basics of automotive maintenance and gives you the skills to perform the job. Some advanced job skills are also
taught, that prepare a person seeking entry-level employment. This class is taught at BHS only.
Students wishing to enroll in this class must be able to travel to BHS in order to attend class.




                                                                 39
Automotive Brake Systems (AU310)                                                FRCC credits granted – ASE 110 – 3 credits
Grade level: 11, 12                             Semester Credit: 2                              Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Auto Maintenance (Must have passed Auto Maintenance with a 70% or better and have instructor approval.)

This course is an in depth study and preparation for ASE certification in this area. It covers basic operation of automotive break
systems. It includes the operation, diagnosis and basic repair of disc brakes, drum brakes, basic hydraulic systems, anti-lock
brakes and their components. Successful completion is a final grade percentage of 70% or better.


Automotive Suspension Systems (AU320)                                           FRCC credits granted – ASE 140 – 3 credits
Grade level: 11, 12                             Semester Credit: 2                              Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Auto Maintenance (Must have passed Auto Maintenance with a 70% or better and have instructor approval.)

This course focuses on laboratory experiences in the diagnosis, service, adjustment, and repair of various automotive suspension
and steering systems. Wheel and Tire advanced diagnosis is also covered. This course is an in-depth study and preparation for
ASE certification in this area.


Automotive Engine Diagnosis (AU430)
Grade level: 11, 12                            Semester Credit: 2                     Course Length: 1 semester (2 periods)
Pre-requisite: Auto Maintenance (Must have passed Auto Maintenance with a 70% or better and have instructor approval.)

This course is an in-depth study and preparation for ASE certification in this area. This course focuses on the automotive engine
fuel, ignition, emission systems and drivability diagnosis and tuning. Lecture and laboratory experiences in the disassembly,
diagnosis and testing of the automotive engine. The testing and repair of the automobile systems and the engine are covered in-
depth.


Automotive Electrical Systems (AU340)                                          FRCC credits granted – ASE 120 – 2 credits
Grade level: 11, 12                            Semester Credit: 2                   Course Length: 1 semester (2 periods)
Pre-requisite: Basic Auto Maintenance (Must have passed Auto Maintenance with a 70% or better and have instructor approval.)

This course introduces automotive electricity and includes basic electrical theory, circuit design and wiring methods. The class
focuses on multi-meter usage and wiring diagrams. It covers the operation, testing, and servicing of automotive battery, and the
starting and changing systems. This course also includes voltage and amperage testing of the starter and generator, starter and
generator overhaul, and load testing and maintenance of a battery. It focuses on lecture and related laboratory experiences in the
diagnosis and necessary corrective actions of automotive engine performance factors. This course is an in-depth study and
preparation for ASE certification in this area.


Automotive Technology Internship (VO330)
Grade level: 11, 12                               Semester Credit: 1                               Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Enrolled in Auto Maintenance & one or all of the other four classes

Students who want credit for an internship experience in Automotive Technology should enroll in Automotive Technology Internship.
Students will receive credit for this training. Maximum number of credit allowed per semester is one with a minimum of 250 work
experience hours.




                                                                 40
         Career & Technical Education: Building Trades

Building Trades Standards
         Students develop their content and/or performance skills to proficient level.
         Students evaluate and solve problems in a logical manner.
         Students develop an understanding of work ethic and real world expectations.
         Students understand and demonstrate the role of citizenship, leadership, cooperation, and community responsibility.
         Students develop technological literacy and understand the impact of ever evolving technologies.

     Guidelines for selecting Building Trades
     The goal of the program is to involve students in the construction of building components. The program will develop a strong
     work ethic, responsibility, and the importance of pride in the student’s work. Building Trades also offers students an
     introduction to the occupational possibilities of the construction trades. Students will participate in a work-based learning
     experience. Students will develop skills, knowledge, attitudes, and judgments necessary for entry level employment or a career
     in a variety of construction fields. Students will explore trade schools, apprenticeship programs, and post secondary
     institutions within Colorado and surrounding areas. Upon completion of the Building Trades program, students will be prepared
     for entry level employment in the following occupations: carpentry, drywall installer, painter, roofer, cabinetry, finish carpentry,
     and building maintenance.


Building Trades I CO110)                                                     Aims CC possible credit granted –
CAR 100 – 1 credit Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12          Semester Credit: 1         Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Building Trades I focuses on the basic operation of hand and power tools including stationary tools. This course
emphasizes a hands-on approach to proper and safe use of these tools as it applies to the construction industry.
It also develops skills through tool utilization to pass competency and safety tests for each tool. A basic
introduction to construction work will be provided for all crafts. Students complete several basic projects during
the semester.


Building Trades II (CO220A & CO220B)                          Aims CC possible credit granted – CAR 101 – 1 credit, 102 – 1
credit, & 156 – 4 credits Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                  Semester Credit: 1         Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Building Trades I

Building Trades II focuses on basic framing methods and materials utilizing a hands-on framing lab. The course covers floor, wall,
and roof framing and introduces residential wiring and plumbing. Students will complete several class projects during the semester.
PVHS students will focus more on large framing and electrical while students at BHS will learn advanced cabinet making and
finishing work.


Building Trades III-IV (CO330A & CO330B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                             Semester Credit: 1                                   Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Building Trades II

Building Trades III & IV enhance carpentry and cabinetmaking skills learned in pre-requisite classes. Students have a chance to
explore advanced techniques for rough and finish carpentry, residential wiring, and plumbing.


Building Trades Internship ()
Grade level: 11, 12                                  Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Building Trades 1 & 2

Students who want credit for an internship experience in construction related fields should enroll in this Internship. Students will
receive credit for this training. Maximum number of credit allowed per semester is one with a minimum of 250 work experience
hours.




                                                                  41
    Career & Technical Education: Engineering Graphics Technology

Engineering Graphics Technology Standards
         Students develop their content and/or performance skills to proficient level.
         Students evaluate and solve problems in a logical manner.
         Students develop an understanding of work ethic and real world expectations.
         Students understand and demonstrate the role of citizenship, leadership, cooperation, and community responsibility.
         Students develop technological literacy and understand the impact of ever evolving technologies.

Engineering Graphics Internship (IA 0311 & 2311)
Grade level: 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 1                                         Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Building Trades 1 & 2

Students who want credit for an internship experience in Drafting/Architectural related fields should enroll in this Internship.
Students will receive credit for this training. Maximum number of credit allowed per semester is one with a minimum of 250 work
experience hours.


Introduction to Engineering Design (PL210A & PL210B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 2                                         Course Length:          2
Semesters
Pre-requisite: Concurrently enrolled or completed Algebra I

This course teaches problem-solving skills using an engineering design development process. Solutions to problems are created,
analyzed and communicated using the 3-D solid modeling computer design software, Autodesk Inventor. The course will emphasize
the design development process of a product and how a model of that product is produced, analyzed and evaluated using a
Computer Aided Design System. The course includes STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) related career pathway
topics.


Principles of Engineering (PL310A & PL310B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                                 Semester Credit: 2                                      Course Length:          2
Semesters
Pre-requisite: Concurrently enrolled or completed Geometry

This course is a hands-on course where students explore a variety of technology systems and engineering processes. Students
create solutions to problems by utilizing their math, science and technology skills while incorporating engineering problem solving
processes. Students design and construct working models interfacing with computer, mechanical, or electrical control systems.


Civil Engineering/Architecture (PL320A & PL320B)
Grade level: 9,10,11,12                                    Semester Credit: 2                                      Course Length:          2
Semesters
Pre-requisite: Concurrently enrolled or completed Geometry

The major focus of the Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA) course is a long-term project that involves the development of a
local property site. Students learn about various aspects of civil design and development of this property. The course requires
students to develop the property as a simulation that models the real-world experiences that civil engineers and architects
experience when developing a property. Students learn to use state of the art 3-D design software to help them design and develop
the property. Students work in teams, exploring hands-on projects and activities to learn the characteristics of civil engineering and
architecture. Students learn about documenting their project, solving problems, and communicating their solutions to their peers
and members of the professional community of civil engineering and architecture. The course is structured to enable all students to
have a variety of experiences that will provide an overview of both fields


Digital Electronics (PL330A & PL330B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                            Semester Credit: 2                                           Course Length:          2
Semesters
Pre-requisite: Concurrently enrolled or completed Geometry

Digital Electronics is a course of study in applied digital logic. Students will be introduced to digital circuits found in video games,
switches, digital cameras, calculators, and thousands of other devices. Students will study the application of digital logic and digital
devices that are used to control automatic equipment. The course utilizes state of the art, virtual electronic circuitry design
software. This course is similar to a first semester college course and is an important course of study for a student exploring a
career in engineering or engineering technology.




                                                                  42
         Career & Technical Education: Family and Consumer Sciences
                                               Family and Consumer Science Standards

Family and Consumer Sciences Standards
         Students develop their content and/or performance skills to proficient level.
         Students evaluate and solve problems in a logical manner.
         Students develop an understanding of work ethic and real world expectations.
         Students understand and demonstrate the role of citizenship, leadership, cooperation, and community responsibility.
         Students develop technological literacy and understand the impact of ever evolving technologies.

     Guidelines for Family and Consumer Sciences Courses
     The Department of Family and Consumer Sciences offers a variety of classes designed to enhance personal understanding
     and strengthen one’s skills and knowledge related to relationships, parenting, home and family living, food preparation, and
     catering. Throughout the Catering program, students will gain knowledge and skills in the food lab, learning proper measuring
     and cooking procedures as well as learning about how to prevent food borne illnesses when preparing food. Students will gain
     knowledge and first-hand experience running a Catering Business. Enrollment in any Family and Consumer Sciences course
     allows students an opportunity to develop leadership skills by being involved in Family, Career and Community Leaders of
     America (FCCLA).


Teen Choices (FC190)
Grade Level: 9 & 10                                  Semester Credit: 1                                    Course Length: 1 semester
Pre Requisite: None

What are the problems that you have to face as a ninth or tenth grade student? How can you know what would be the best
decisions for your life? Here is an opportunity to examine challenges and options that teenagers face in developing relationships
and making healthy choices. The following topics will be emphasized: personal wellness, stress in our lives, wise decision-making
skills, healthy lifestyles, maturity, citizenship and leadership qualities, relationships with others, basic consumer needs. The class is
a chance to compare your ideas, thoughts and experiences with other students and experts in the community.


Nutrition and Wellness (FC110)                                                                     Possible FRCC credit – HWE 100
Grade Level: 9, 10, 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

This course enables students to realize the components and lifelong benefits of sound nutrition and wellness practices and
empowers them to apply these principles in their everyday lives. This course is designed to improve and increase the knowledge of
good nutrition, menu planning, food budgeting, and introduce students to a variety of basic cooking skills and food preparation.
Techniques are taught in the preparation of fruit, vegetables, desserts, breakfast foods, lunches, and dinners. Topics include: impact
of daily nutrition and wellness practices on long-term health and wellness; planning for wellness and fitness; selection and
preparation of nutritious meals and snacks based on USDA Dietary Guidelines including the Food Guide Pyramid; safety, and
sanitation. Laboratory experiences which emphasize both nutrition and wellness practices are required components of this course.


Catering 1 (FC210)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 1                                    Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

It doesn’t matter if you’re an experienced cook or if you have no experience at all. If you want to learn to cook and be a part of an
actual catering business, this is the class for you! You will explore professions in the food service industry, as well as get hands-on
experience on what it’s like to have a catering business. You’ll even get to do a ―mock‖ catering business experience where you’ll
plan out a catered meal of your choosing in a business plan. You’ll learn the basics of food preparation, how to read a recipe, how
to use utensils and equipment properly and how to measure ingredients properly. There will be plenty of cooking experience. You
will acquire skills in quantity food preparation and you’ll be able to participate in some of our catering events. In addition, there is a
heavy emphasis in this course on safe food handling procedures in order to prevent food borne illness. Both Catering I and
Catering II students can gain valuable experience involving themselves in catering events, while earning community service credit
for catering jobs we have that are outside of the regular school day.


Catering II: (FC310)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 1                                    Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Catering 1

This course is for the more serious minded cook who has enjoyed and done well in Catering I. One might be thinking about a future
in the food service industry or even be thinking about owning their own catering business some day. Catering II students are
involved in most of the cooking for catering events. There are food presentations in class and visits from professional culinary
demonstrators and experts in post secondary education and training in the food service industry. In addition, we have ―Iron Chef‖
cooking competitions where you’ll be competing against others in class. Lastly, at the end of the semester, you can choose to
compete in the Gourmet Food Presentation Competition, possibly earning a trophy with your name engraved on it. Both Catering I
and Catering II students can gain valuable experience involving themselves in catering events, while earning community service
credit for catering jobs we have that are outside of the regular school day.

                                                                   43
Catering Assistant: (FC320)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                            Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Catering I & II

This course offering is designed to keep interested catering students connected and involved in the catering program at BHS.
Students in this course would be in a leadership position, being given more decision making opportunities and challenging
experiences than they had in Catering I or II. This course may involve doing cost analysis for catering jobs, grocery shopping and
pricing, class demonstrations for students, independent food preparation, and involvement in the various catering events. This class
may be taken in subsequent semesters.


Life Management (FC360)
Grade level: 11, 12                                Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

This is a semester course which provides students with concepts and principles which will improve and impact their future in many
areas. Some of the topics the students will learn more about include stress management, money management, principles of
banking, saving and investing money, becoming a smart consumer, smart use of credit, automobile and housing choices, cost and
financing, insurance, career choices and considerations and more. Do you want to be smarter about money than most of your
parents were when they were your age?


Relationships: (FC350)
Grade Level: 11, 12                                Semester Credit: 1                                 Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

Everyone’s relationships are important to them…especially your friends and family. Come explore how you can have better
relationships with the people in your life. We talk about personality types, self-esteem, goal setting, friend relationships, love
relationships, parent relationships, communication, conflict resolution and many more topics important to teenagers. We’ve added
the ―OPP‖ (Other People’s Problems‖) segment to class where class members write anonymously about a problem they or a friend
of theirs is having and the whole class can brainstorm solutions for them.


Honors Teacher Cadet (FC340A & FC340B )
Grade Level: 11 & 12                               Semester Credit: 2 (full year course)              Course Length: 1 year
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (completion of application process)

Interested in teaching as a possible profession? Interested in the role education plays in society? If so, this is the class for you!
Students will be involved in a fast-paced, innovative, hands-on curriculum where they will gain knowledge about teaching and
learning. Teacher Cadets will develop skills that are helpful in college and beyond, such as presentation, public speaking, writing,
communication and reasoning. Students will experience the rewards of teaching through a ―mini-teaching‖ field experience as a part
of the course work. This is a yearlong, sequential honors elective course with college credit options. Teacher Cadet is aligned with
the Colorado Teacher Licensure Standards. Teacher Cadet is a CCHE academic elective.




                                                                44
                    Marketing Education / DECA
     Career & Technical Education: Marketing Education / DECA

Marketing Education / DECA Standards
         Students develop their content and/or performance skills to proficient level.
         Students evaluate and solve problems in a logical manner.
         Students develop an understanding of work ethic and real world expectations.
         Students understand and demonstrate the role of citizenship, leadership, cooperation, and community responsibility.
         Students develop technological literacy and understand the impact of ever evolving technologies.

     Guidelines for Selecting Marketing Education Courses
     Marketing Education is a career and technical education program designed to provide students with marketing and business
     skills for employment. Students desiring to enroll in this program should plan to take the two year sequential program in
     grades 11 & 12; however, seniors may enroll in ME II. Credits earned in ME can fulfill the practical arts requirement. Several
     options are available to students enrolled in ME: junior internship which allows credit for on-the-job training in an approved
     work station, senior internship which allows both credit and release time for on-the-job training in an approved work station, ME
     lab which allow juniors/seniors in ME classes to gain experience and credit working in the school store, membership in the
     DECA Club for grades 11 & 12.


Marketing Education 1/DECA (BU310A & BU310B)                                      FRCC credits granted – MAR 111 – 3 credits
Grade level: 10,11                       Semester Credit: 2                                         Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

An entry level career and technical education retailing program that deals with the understanding of our business system. Course
content is marketing, advertising, salesmanship, law, job application, and other related subjects.


Marketing Education 2/DECA (BU410A & BU410B)           FRCC credits granted – MAR 117 - 3 credits & 216 – 3 credits
Grade level: 12                          Semester Credit: 2                          Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: None

This is a senior level program of study. The primary objective is the training of students for gainful marketing and business
employment. Course content includes sales technique, marketing, inventory control, and starting your own business using the
project methods as well as computer simulations. (Other areas of business will be covered as time permits.) Internship and DECA
Club organization activities are provided. This class also provides for individual emphasis in your chosen career business field.
Seniors who did not take Marketing Education I may enroll in Marketing Education II.


Marketing Education Practicum (DECA Store) (BU320)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                     Semester Credit: 1                                         Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Enrollment in ME 1 or ME 2

Students will work one period per day in the school store. Students will manage, operate, and control the entire operation of the
school store and the school store for one period daily under the direction of the ME department. Students must be enrolled in the
Marketing Education program.


Senior Marketing Education Lab / DECA (BU430A & BU430B)
Grade level: 12                             Semester Credit: 2                                         Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Enrollment in ME 12

This course is designed to be combined with the MKT II class and provides learning while doing concept. This class will be the
management section for the school store. Course content will be promotion, advanced salesmanship, store operations, shrinkage
control, buying, pricing, inventory, and other related subjects. Internships as well as the DECA club program will be provided.


Marketing 1 or 2 Education Internship (BU420)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                       Semester Credit: 1                                       Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Enrollment in ME 1 or ME 2

All junior and senior ME students who are placed in an approved Marketing Education training station may receive credit for work
experience. Students can be registered for this credit throughout the school year. Grading is pass/fail and the maximum credit
allowed per semester is one with 250 work experience hours.


ACE/WES I,II,III (AC610A/AC610B, AC620A/AC620B, AC630A/AC630B)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 2                                Course Length: 1 Year
Pre-requisite: 10th grade or 11th and 12th with teacher recommendation

Class curriculum covers entry level to basic skills development needed now and in the future. Subjects taught are school success
skills, career exploration, job seeking skills, employee skills, communication skills, job shadow experience and life skills.


                                                                 45
     Career & Technical Education: Medical Preparation Program

These classes are taught at BHS only.
Medical Prep Standards
         Students comprehend health promotion and disease prevention concepts.
         Students analyze the impact of culture, media, technology, and other factors on health.
         Students demonstrate the ability to practice health enhancing behaviors and reduce health risks.
         Students demonstrate the ability to use effective interpersonal communication skills which enhance health.
         Students demonstrate goal setting and decision making skills which enhance health.
         Students demonstrate the ability to advocate awareness of individual, family, and community commitment towards
          violence prevention.


Health Sciences 1:Health Careers Exploration (VO 0951)                          Possible FRCC credits granted – HPR 104 – 1 credit
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                    Semester Credit: 1                                      Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None

The course will focus on introducing the wide variety of possible careers within the health care field. The curriculum will revolve
                        around guest speakers from the various areas of expertise as well as representatives from various post
                        secondary educational institutions. Students will examine the educational requirements to pursue a career
                        in many different fields. The shortage of personnel to fill jobs in the medical field is huge and growing.
                        Concentration will be placed on helping the students develop a can-do attitude with regard to their pursuit
                        of a health care career and post secondary education, in general. Possible FRCC credits granted – HPR
                        104 – 1 credit. This class is taught at BHS only. Students wishing to enroll in this class must be able to
                        travel to BHS in order to attend class.


First Responder / CPR (VO 0950)                       Possible FRCC credits granted – EMS 115 – 3 credits & HPR 102 .5 credits
Grade level: 11, 12                                  Semester Credit: 1                          Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Health

This course provides basic first aid and CPR instruction through the use of demonstrations, videos, and instructor led practice
sessions. Topics include wound care, shock, poisoning, burns, fractures, and sudden illness. This course provides the student with
core knowledge and skills to function in the capacity of a first responder arriving at the scene of a medical emergency and providing
care until advanced EMS help arrives. Students will also learn emergency procedures for respiratory, obstructed airway, and
cardiac arrest victims of all ages. Students who successful complete all course requirements will be eligible to take the exams to
become certified as a First Responder and the American Heart Association certification for CPR.


Nurse Assistant Training (taught at BHS only) (MD310)     Possible FRCC credits granted – NUA 101 – 4 credits & 170 – 1
credit
Grade level: 11, 12                            Semester Credit: 2                 Course Length: 1 semester (2 periods)
Pre-requisite: Health Career Explorations

This course will prepare the student to perform the fundamental skills of the nurse aide. Basic nursing skills, restorative services,
personal care skills, safety, and emergency care issues are covered in the theory lessons and practice lab. The student will learn
skills that address the mental health needs as well as patient/resident/client rights. The student will also apply knowledge gained
from the theory portion of the class in an on-site clinical setting (total of 24 hours of clinicals). This is a one semester, two period
class. Students who successfully complete all course requirements will be eligible to take the written and practical exam given by
the Colorado State Board of Nursing to become a Certified Nurse Assistant. Students can earn dual credit with this class (2 BHS
credits and 5 credits at Front Range Community College). Some fees may apply. See your counselor for details.


Phlebotomy /Blood Drawing( taught at BHS only) (MD410)         Possible FRCC credits granted – HPR 112 – 4 credits
Grade level: 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 2                           Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: CNA Training

This course is offered as a follow up to the CNA training. The focus of this class will be to offer additional training for various skills
that would have great benefit in many different health care settings. The skills to be covered in this class include Certification in
Phlebotomy. Possible FRCC credits granted – HPR 112 – 4 credits. This class is taught at BHS only. Students wishing to enroll in
this class must be able to travel to BHS in order to attend class.




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         Career & Technical Education: Welding Technology

Welding Technology Standards
         Students develop their content and/or performance skills to proficient level.
         Students evaluate and solve problems in a logical manner.
         Students develop an understanding of work ethic and real world expectations.
         Students understand and demonstrate the role of citizenship, leadership, cooperation, and community responsibility.
         Students develop technological literacy and understand the impact of ever evolving technologies.

     Guidelines for Selecting Welding Technology Programs
     The Welding Technology Program is designed to provide students with marketable job skills which will enable him/her to either
     enter the job market with a saleable skill or enter into further education in a post secondary program. Good hand-eye
     coordination is needed to master this trade. Welding skills cross into many occupations including welding foreman, weld
     inspector, welding technician, job shop welder, welding supply person, welding instructor, or welding engineer. Students
     enrolled are eligible and encouraged to join the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA).
     The Welding Technology Program is comprised of six available certificates. They are

          Shielded Metal Arc Welding – ARC                              Advanced Shielded Metal Arc Welding – ARC
          Gas Metal Arc Welding - MIG                                   Advanced Gas Metal Arc Welding – MIG
          Gas Tungsten Arc Welding – TIG                                Advanced Gas Tungsten Arc Welding – TIG

     Students completing this program are expected to obtain at least two certificates, but may complete all six. The maximum time
     expected to complete two certificates is four semesters; however, depending on student progress, this time may be shortened.
     This means that most students will be involved in the Welding program for a minimum of two years. Students completing the
     Welding program will be eligible to continue at Aims Community College through an articulation agreement allowing students to
     complete college course requirements while still in high school. Further, all students completing the Welding program will carry
     with them their certificates and a portfolio with all competencies listed at the level they were completed.


Welding Technology I ( VO 0911)
Grade level: 10, 11                                Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: None                                Lab Fee: $5.00 – Gloves, $7.00 – Glasses

The Welding Technology program is comprised of six available certificates (as listed under Welding program description) and
associated skills. Students will have the opportunity to begin a certificate program in one of the six certificate areas listed.
Certificates may be continued or additional certificates may be earned by furthering welding skills, as well as allowing them to
expand into upper level competencies and skills. The student will learn basic skills in ARC, MIG, and TIG welding, and oxy-
acetylene welding and cutting. The student will learn and be heavily involved with shop safety. Students are expected to furnish
their own protective clothing and footwear. For maximum benefit, students are encouraged to take complimentary coursework such
as Mechanical Drawing, Principles of Technology, Applied Math, and Modern Life and Literature.


Welding Technology II (WE210A/210B)            FRCC Granted – WEL 103 – 4 credits, 104 – 4 credits, 113 – 2 credits & 114 – 2
                                                                                                    credits (12 credits total)
Grade level: 10, 11                              Semester Credit: 2                              Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Welding Technology I

Students will continue from Welding I toward earning certificates (as listed in the program description). Further, students are
expected to complete at least one certificate in this course; however, depending on ability, skill, and experience, they may complete
more. Students will become familiar with oxy-acetylene welding, brazing, and cutting. Students will also learn welding terminology,
metal identification, metal working equipment, and hand tools. For maximum benefit, students are encouraged to take
complimentary coursework such as Mechanical Drawing, Principles of Technology, Applied Math, and Modern Life and Literature.


Welding Technology III (WE310A/310B))           FRCC granted 0 WEL 106 – 4 credits, 110 – 4 credits, 124 – 4 credits & 125 – 4
                                                                                                      credits (16 credits total)
Grade level: 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 2                              Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Welding Technology II

The Welding Technology III portion of this program is a continuation of Welding Technology II. Students will continue in their pursuit
of competencies through earning additional certifications in additional areas. For maximum benefit, students are encouraged to take
complimentary coursework such as Mechanical Drawing, Principles of Technology, Applied Math, Applied Communications, and
Tech Lab. As stated in the Welding Technology II course description, students completing this program are eligible to earn transcript
credits in specific programs at Aims Community College.(See Welding On-the-Job Training for "OJT"-Work Based Learning
options.)
Welding III is offered at PVHS only. Student wishing to enroll in this class must be able to travel to PVHS in order to attend.




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Welding Internship (WE320)
Grade level: 10, 11                             Semester Credit: 1                               Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Welding Technology II

Students wishing to participate in the work based learning segment of the Welding Technology program are encouraged to register
for a welding internship. Students must have accumulated a minimum of 250 hours of training in one semester to receive credit.
Maximum number of credits per semester is one. Students may participate in shadowing, interning, or mentoring experiences as a
work based learning activity without earning credit.




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                                                  Special Areas




Student Government (SP270A & SP270B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                         Semester Credit: 2                                  Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Elected to office

Student Government is a yearlong course. Elections, which are held during spring semester, determine who will serve their class
for the upcoming year. Homecoming, graduation, parking lot, student planner, and prom are a few of the activities that are planned
and carried out by Student Government. Often, Student Council members serve on building and district committees representing
the student body on such issues as graduation requirements, grading system guidelines, and other issues that affect BHS students
on a daily basis. There is a substantial amount of time spent outside the classroom planning and carrying out activities. Students
will also have the opportunity to improve their leadership skills through workshops and conferences.




AVID (Advancement VIA Individual Determination) 9th (SP110A & SP110B), 10th (SP210A & SP210B), 11th (SP310A &
SP 310B 12th (SP410A & SP410B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                    Semester Credit: 2                          Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: Teacher Recommendation

AVID is a class for students who have the desire to go to college and the willingness to work hard. This class teaches
organizational and study skills, critical thinking, and reading and writing strategies. Through a mentoring program, students receive
academic support which enables them to enroll in accelerated, college preparatory classes.




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                                              Special Education
          The following Special Education programs are for students who have specific, identified learning problems. These
          classes meet the regular graduation requirements of the high school and will be designed to meet the Individualized
          Education Plan (IEP) needs of each student.


Life Skills Program
Pre-requisite: IEP                                   Course Length: 1 semester

This program offers core classes for students who learn best with individual or small group instruction and support. Courses focus
on academic benchmarks and functional living skills, with students taking electives and/or core classes in general education classes
with modifications, accommodations and support as determined by the IEP.


Core & Learning Center Classes
Pre-requisite: IEP                                   Course Length: 1 semester

These programs offer classes to special education students of all grade levels who are in need of smaller group settings for English,
Science, Math, Social Studies, and Health credit.


Transition Program
Pre-requisite: IEP                                   Course Length: 1 semester

This program offers continued education and support in accessing higher education and/or post-secondary options for students who
choose through the IEP to continue their education to age 21. Courses are individualized to focus on self-determination,
community, social, and employment goals. A student who chooses this option must notify their counselor by January 15th of their
senior year and must write a Transition Program goal in the IEP. Students who choose this option walk through graduation
ceremony with the senior class to receive an undated diploma. The diploma is dated and signed when the student attains the age of
21 and exits the school district.


Learning Lab (LC830A & LC830B)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                              Semester Credit: 2                                Course Length: 1 year
Pre-requisite: IEP

This course provides students with instruction in study strategies, learning strategies, organizational, social and self advocacy skills.
Students also are provided with instructional modifications and support to learn how to complete core requirements.


Seminar (LC840A & LC840B)
Grade level: 9                                          Semester Credit: 1                                Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: IEP

This class enhances a ninth grader’s chances for academic success at BHS. This class enables ninth graders to master five critical
areas for academic success: effective goal setting, effective organizational skills, effective problem solving, effective
communications, and effective social skills. Students will receive additional academic support in the areas of writing, career
exploration and developing a six year plan.




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                                                 Student Aides
     Guidelines for Selecting Student Aide Courses
         A student will only be allowed one period as an aide for each semester.
         Students taking these classes will receive a letter grade and earn one semester credit.
         Exceptions may be granted by an Administrator, as school needs demand.




Library / Media Aide (SP245)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                            Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Approval of Librarian

Library aides are the backbone of our well functioning library. They check materials in and out, shelve, and help process new
materials. Students must have permission of librarian before registering and are encouraged to register for both semesters.


Office Aide (SP255)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                            Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Approval of Secretary

Student office aides will deliver passes for administration and secretaries and help as needed. Good attendance and a positive,
helpful attitude are needed for this course.


Teacher Aide (SP260)
Grade level: 10, 11, 12                            Semester Credit: 1                                  Course Length: 1 semester

Pre-requisite: Approval of Teacher         All aides are approved by individual teachers. If interested, contact that teacher prior to
registration. Applications for teacher aides may be obtained in the counseling office. Teachers are allowed a maximum of one aide
per period.




Elementary / Middle School Aide (ESA) (SP240)
Grade level: 11, 12                           Semester Credit: 1                                       Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Approval of Counselor

The ESA program is open to juniors and seniors in high school who complete an application for an assignment. The purpose of this
program is to give students a chance to become involved in the teaching-learning process, and also to help elementary/middle
school teachers in their classrooms. Students will be evaluated by the teacher and/or ESA coordinator. Students need to make
arrangements to work with a cooperating teacher and coordinate with their counselor.


Diner Aide (SP2)
Grade level: 9, 10, 11, 12                        Semester Credit: 1                                   Course Length: 1 semester
Pre-requisite: Approval of Dawg Diner Manager or Marketing Education teachers.

Students will work one hour in the Dawg Diner. Students will prepare and sell food items to the students of BHS. Additional duties
will include stocking shelves, food preparation and the necessary cleaning for a sanitary food establishment.

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Notes




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Notes




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