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Graduate Handbook - Gerontology Program

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					           GERONTOLOGY PROGRAM

              GRADUATE HANDBOOK




          College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
        University of North Carolina at Charlotte
            9201 University City Boulevard
               Charlotte, NC 28223-0001


Dr. Dena Shenk, Program Director & Graduate Coordinator
                      Barnard 222
                Telephone: (704) 687-4349
                    dshenk@uncc.edu

              Program Office (704) 687-6205
         Office Assistant, Shannon Zurell, Fretwell 235
                   shannonzurell@uncc.edu
                                                                   1




TABLE OF CONTENTS…………………………………………………………………..1-2

GENERAL INFORMATION……………………………………………………………...3

OBJECTIVES…………………………………………………………………………….. 4

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE…………………………………………………… 5
    Organization of UNC Charlotte………………………………………………....... 6
    Internal Organization of Gerontology Program…………………………………… 7

REQUIREMENTS……………………………………………………………….………..8-13

    MASTER’S PROGRAM………………………………………………………… 8
        Admission requirements………………………………………………..…..8
        General requirements……………………………………………………… 8
        Course requirements………………………………………………………. 9 - 11
    GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM…………………………….............. 12-13

OTHER RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT………………………………….. 14


THE PROCESS OF WORKING WITH YOUR GRADUATE COMMITTEE…….... 15-16

THESIS & APPLIED PROJECT GUIDELINES……………………………………… 17-18

GRADUATE COMMITTEE…………………………………………………………….. 19

RECOMMENDED PROGRESSION THROUGH MA………………………………... 20-21
        Full-time…………………………………………………………………… 20
        Part-time…………………………………………………………………… 21

PRACTICUM……………………………………………………………………………... 22

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION…………………………………………………. 22

ADMINISTRATION……………………………………………………………………... 23-24

NMR GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP…………………………………………………… 25-26

GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS……………………………………………………….. 27

CALENDARS……………………………………………………………………………... 28-29
                                                                                    2


CAMPUS INFORMATION……………………………………………….……………... 30-31

            Activities Center (see Creation Station)…………………………………… 30
            Audiovisuals (see Media Services)………………………………………… 30
            Career Services…………………………………………………………….. 30
            Creation Station……………………………………………………………. 30
            Counseling Center…………………………………………………………. 30
            Disability Services…………………………………………………………. 30
            Evening Services…………………………………………………………… 30
            Graduate Student Association…………………………………………….. 30
            Gym………………………………………………………………………… 31
            Health Center………………………………………………………………. 31
            Housing…………………………………………………………………….. 31
            In-State Tuition…………………………………………………………….. 31
            Learning Center……………………………………………………………. 31
            Library……………………………………………………………………… 31
            Printing……………………………………………………………………... 31
            Writing Assistance…………………………………………………………. 31

FACULTY…………………………………………………………..…………………….. 32-37

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY………………………………………………………………. 38

APPENDIX A……………………………………………………………………………... 39
  Checklist of requirements for Gerontology MA Students…………………………….. 40-41
  Checklist of requirements for Gerontology Graduate Certificate Students…………… 42

APPENDIX B……………………………………………………………………………... 43
  Application for Thesis or Applied Project Option…….……….………………………. 44
  Application for Admission to Candidacy (MA).…………………………….…….…... 45
  Application for Admission to Candidacy for Graduate Certificate……………………. 45
  Application for Degree……………………………………………………………........ 45
  Thesis/Applied Project Topic Approval……………………………………………….. 45
  Report of Comprehensive Examination, Project or Thesis Defense ………………….. 45
                                                                                                3



                              GENERAL INFORMATION

Welcome to the Graduate Program in Gerontology at the University of North Carolina at
Charlotte. This Handbook is designed as a supplement to the general University Catalog.
Information in the general catalog is relevant to all students at UNC Charlotte, and you should
familiarize yourself with that information. We further recommend that you read this Handbook
as you begin your graduate career and keep it as a reference for the future. If you have questions
that are not answered by the general catalog or this Handbook, please consult with the
Gerontology Program Director.


The Gerontology Program is an interdisciplinary program in the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences.

                           Gerontology Office: Fretwell 235
                       Gerontology Phone Number: 704-687-6205



Dr. Dena Shenk, Director of the Gerontology Program and Graduate Coordinator, is a Professor
in the Department of Anthropology. Her office is in that Department (Barnard 222) and she can
be reached at 704-687-4349.


Other faculty members are located in their home departments. (see list beginning on page 32).




         Please visit the program’s home page at http://www.gerontology.uncc.edu
                                                                                                 4



                                       OBJECTIVES


The Master of Arts in Gerontology is designed to prepare graduates with the knowledge and the
skills to fill a wide variety of positions in the developing field of aging. We currently offer the
Planning and Administration concentration which will best meet the needs of those planning to
direct programs for older adults, and those interested in the development and administration of
programs.

General objectives of the MA in Gerontology are:

      to prepare graduates with the knowledge and skills to fill a wide variety of positions
              in the developing field of aging;

      to provide both a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary understanding of the processes of
              normal aging of the rapidly growing and diverse population of older adults in
       North Carolina, the U.S. and internationally;

      to provide students with a background in current theory and research in the field of
               Gerontology;

      to provide students with an understanding of the formal and informal systems of support
               through which we address the needs of older adults.



The Graduate Certificate Program in Gerontology was designed to provide supplementary
graduate education in Gerontology for those who already have a graduate degree in another field
or those completing a graduate degree in another field, who are interested in working with older
adults. It requires the completion of a set of core and elective courses related to the study of
aging.



The Graduate Programs are both interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary. Interdisciplinary
Gerontology courses will integrate materials from various disciplines. Multidisciplinary courses
will also be included, requiring students to study aging from a variety of disciplinary
perspectives. The core of essential material included in the required course sequence will be
augmented by selection of elective courses in an individually designed program for each graduate
student.
                                                                                                5



                         ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE


The Graduate Program in Gerontology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte is an
interdisciplinary program of the College of Arts and Sciences. The Dean of the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences is, in turn, responsible to the Provost and Vice Chancellor for
Academic Affairs. The University is headed by a Chancellor, responsible to the Board of
Trustees for the University and to the President of the entire University of North Carolina system
and the system’s Board of Governors.

The Director of the Gerontology Program administers the Undergraduate and Graduate Programs
in Gerontology. The Director of the Gerontology Program is also the Graduate Coordinator.
Another faculty member is the Undergraduate Coordinator. Full-time faculty who teach in the
Gerontology Program are housed in discipline-based departments throughout the university. In
addition, adjunct faculty with particular subject expertise will teach courses on an occasional
basis.

The Gerontology Advisory Committee works with the Program Director to develop procedures
and standards for the graduate programs in Gerontology.

The affiliated faculty includes faculty from across campus with interests and expertise related to
aging. Faculty teach in the program and are available to work with Gerontology Graduate
students, student representatives and professionals from the community.
                                                                                   6



ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
                 AT CHARLOTTE



                  Organization of the University of North Carolina


                           BOARD OF GOVERNORS
                       University of North Carolina System


                             BOARD OF TRUSTEES
                       University of North Carolina Charlotte


                                  CHANCELLOR
                       University of North Carolina Charlotte


                             VICE CHANCELLOR
                           FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS


        ASSOCIATE VICE CHANCELLOR                          DEAN
         FOR GRADUATE PROGRAMS              College of Liberal Arts and Sciences


         GRADUATE COORDINATOR                           DIRECTOR
            Gerontology Program                     Gerontology Program


                                           UNDERGRADUATE COORDINATOR
                                                Gerontology Program
                                                                                                                                                                  7



INTERNAL ORGANIZATION OF THE GERONTOLOGY
                PROGRAM




                                                        Dean College of
                                                      Dean College Arts and Sciences
                                                                        of Liberal Arts
                                                             and Sciences




                                                          Director and
                                                          Director Graduate Coordinator
                                                                       and Graduate
                                                                 Gerontology Program
                                                                                                                   Affiliated Faculty
                                                                                                         Gerontology Faculty & Affiliated
     Gerontology
  GerontologyAdvisory
                 Advisory                                         Coordinator
         Committee                                                                                                    Faculty
      Committee                                           Gerontology Program




                 Graduate Admissions Committee
                 Graduate Admissions                                                        NMR NMR Scholarship Committee
                                                                                                Scholarship Committee
                       Committee
                                                                                          Dean College of Arts and Sciences
                                                                                          Dean College of Arts and Sciences




                                                          Undergraduate
                                                      UndergraduateCoordinator
                                                                         Coordinator
                                                            Gerontology Program
                                                        Gerontology Program
                                                                                          Director and Graduate Coordinator                       Affiliated Faculty
                                 Gerontology Advisory Committee
                                                                                                 Gerontology Program
                                                                                          Director and Graduate Coordinator
                                 Gerontology Advisory Committee                                                                                   Affiliated Faculty
                                                                                                 Gerontology Program




                                                    Graduate Admissions Committee                                               NMR Scholarship Committee
                                                    Graduate Admissions Committee                                               NMR Scholarship Committee




                                                                                             Undergraduate Coordinator
                                                                                               Gerontology Program
                                                                                             Undergraduate Coordinator
                                                                                               Gerontology Program




    ntology Advisory Committee
    ntology Advisory Committee
                                                                                                 8



                                    REQUIREMENTS

                                    Master’s Program


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS


Minimal requirements for admission to the Master’s Program in Gerontology include:

       1.     Completed application accompanied by a non-refundable application fee.
       2.     Possession of a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university.
       3.     Two official transcripts of all previous academic work attempted beyond high
              school.
       4.     Appropriate scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or Miller
              Analogies Test (MAT).
       5.     An overall grade point average of at least 2.75 on applicant’s previous
              work beyond high school. The average of the major or basic courses
              prerequisite to the area of proposed graduate study should be 3.0 or higher.
       6.     At least three evaluations from persons familiar with the applicant’s
              personal and professional qualifications.
       7.     An essay describing the applicant’s experience and objectives in
              undertaking graduate study in Gerontology.
       8.     Prerequisites:
                          Completion of at least one broad-based undergraduate course in
                          Gerontology or completion of the Professional Development Program
                          previously offered by the Office of Continuing Education, Extension
                          and Summer Programs at UNC Charlotte.

                         Statistics and appropriate background in research methods is required
                         as a prerequisite for GRNT 6201. (STAT 1222, Elementary Statistics
                         for the Social Sciences or the equivalent is recommended).



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

The Gerontology Master’s Program requires 36 hours of graduate course work. In general, a
maximum of six graduate hours earned prior to admission to the graduate program may be
applied to the program requirements, subject to approval of the Director of the Gerontology
Program. In addition to course work, each student must successfully complete an oral
comprehensive exam, a Practicum and either a thesis or applied project (see either Option (a) or
Option (b) on page 10.)
                                                                                                     9



COURSE REQUIREMENTS

The Master's Program in Gerontology is structured into three parts:

   I. Courses
   II. Either the thesis or non-thesis option and
   III. Electives Coursework.

Both options require a total of 36 semester hours of graduate credit for completion of the degree.



I. CORE COURSES
The following 21 credits of common core courses are required:

        + Gerontology 6600. Current Issues in Gerontology (3G credits). Study of current
        issues and topics in the field of aging from an interdisciplinary perspective; an ethical
        framework will be used to examine the issues. (Fall).

        + Sociology 6130. Sociology of Aging: Theories and Research (3G credits).
        Application of stratification theories and demography are applied specifically to the
        older population. Issues of race, gender, socio-economic status, age, and geographic
        distribution are examined in order to investigate the diversity of the older age group and
        their access to resources. (Spring)

        + Psychology 6124. Psychology of Aging (3G credits). Particular emphasis on issues
        related to community/clinical psychology and industrial/organizational psychology.
        Topics include myths and stereotypes about aging, problems faced by older workers,
        retirement, mental health and normal aging, counseling the older adult, and
        psychological disorders in later life. (Fall)

        + Nursing 6275. Health Promotion and Wellness for Older Adults (3G credits).
        Self-care measures and health promotion practices to promote a healthy lifestyle are
        discussed. Included are principles of teaching and learning adapted to the elderly client
        needed by health care and other professionals who teach and plan programs for the older
        client. Common barriers to health care for the elderly are examined.

   OR
        Kinesiology 5232. Physiology of Human Aging (3G credits). This course focuses on
        the normal physiological alterations that occur as the human progresses from a young
        adult to the latter stages of life. Special attention is given to interventions commonly
        promoted to combat the physiological changes that result from aging.
                                                                                               10


       + Gerontology 6201. Research and Methods in Aging I (3G credits). Prerequisite:
       Statistics. Examination of the variety of qualitative and quantitative methods used in
       research on aging and analysis of Gerontology research from a range of disciplines.
       Students will develop a working draft of their thesis/applied project proposal. (Fall)

       + Gerontology 6202. Research and Methods in Aging (3G credits). Prerequisite:
       GRNT 6201. Examination of the variety of qualitative and quantitative methods used in
       evaluation research in applied settings. Students will develop an evaluation project plan.
       Students will also refine their thesis/applied project proposal. (Spring)

       + Gerontology 6400. Practicum (3G credits). Completion of a field-based educational
       experience which relates to the student's career goals and objectives. (Summer)

After completion of the required core courses, all students must successfully complete an
oral comprehensive examination. For both thesis and applied project students, this will
occur at the same time as the defense of their thesis or project.


II. EITHER OPTION (A) OR (B)

In addition to these core courses students will complete either:


(a) the thesis option

       This entails nine hours of elective credits chosen with the advice and approval of the
       student's academic advisor and six hours of thesis credits and an oral defense.

       Thesis students will develop a working draft of their proposal as part of the course
       requirements for GRNT 6201. (See thesis/applied project guidelines, page 16)

       Students must apply for admission to the thesis option before completing GRNT 6201
       (form in Appendix B).

       The Thesis involves a major project, usually an original research project. It will be
       coordinated with the student's major interests and practical experience to allow the
       development of an area of specialization. The Thesis must conform to the University
       Guidelines for Master’s Theses.


(b) or the non-thesis option (Applied Project)

       This entails 15 hours of elective courses chosen with the advice and approval of the
       student's academic advisor. Three elective credits will generally be earned for the Applied
       Project, taken as GRNT 6800 – Independent Research Study.
                                                                                               11




       The Applied Project involves an original project that addresses a specific problem in the
       applied field. It will be coordinated with the student’s major interests and practical
       experience to allow the development of an area of specialization. The audience of an
       Applied Project is generally others in the applied field.

       This option requires that students design a working draft of an Applied Project proposal
       in conjunction with GRNT 6201 and 6202. Topics developed with the support and
       approval of the student’s Graduate Committee. (See thesis/non-thesis applied project
       guidelines, page 17).

       Students must apply for admission to the applied project option before completing GRNT
       6201 (form in Appendix B).



III. ELECTIVE COURSES

Students will select elective courses with the advice and approval of their advisor and the
Program Director.


Elective choices include:

GRNT 5050.            Topics in Gerontology                                           (1-4G)

GRNT 5250.            Programs and Services for the Aging                              (3G)

GRNT 6800.           Independent Research Study                                         (3G)
                     (can be repeated, up to 6 credits can be counted towards MA electives)

KNES 5232             Physiology of Human Aging                                         (3G)

MPAD/GRNT 6210. Aging and Public Policy                                                 (3G)

MPAD/GRNT 6211. Administration of Aging Programs                                        (3G)

NURS 6115.            Health Planning in the Health Care System                         (3G)

NURS 6276.            Common Illnesses Associated with Older Adulthood                  (3G)

MPAD 6172.            Administration of the Health Care System                          (3G)

SOCY 5134.            Families and Aging                                                (3G)
                                                                                                12



                            Graduate Certificate Program

The Graduate Certificate Program in Gerontology requires the completion of a minimum of 15
semester hours of graduate course work related to aging and older adults including:

      - a required course

      -   a choice of primary and secondary electives.



I. REQUIRED COURSE

   + Gerontology 6600. Current Issues in Gerontology (3G credits). Study of current issues
   and topics in the field of aging from an interdisciplinary perspective; an ethical framework
   will be used to examine the issues. (Fall)


II. PRIMARY ELECTIVES

Choose 2-3 from the following:

   + Kinesiology 5232. Physiology of Human Aging (3G credits). This course focuses on
   the normal physiological alterations that occur as the human progresses from a young adult
   to the latter stages of life. Special attention is given to interventions commonly promoted to
   combat the physiological changes that result from aging. OR

   + Nursing 6275. Health Promotion and Wellness for Older Adults (3G credits). Self-
   care measures and health promotion practices to promote a healthy lifestyle are discussed.
   Included are principles of teaching and learning adapted to the elderly client needed by
   health care and other professionals who teach and plan programs for the older client.
   Common barriers to health care for the elderly are examined.

   + Psychology 6124. Psychology of Aging (3G credits). Particular emphasis on issues
   related to community/clinical psychology and industrial/organizational psychology. Topics
   include myths and stereotypes about aging, problems faced by older workers, retirement,
   mental health and normal aging, counseling the older adult, and psychological disorders in
   later life. (Fall)

   + Sociology 6130. Sociology of Aging: Theories and Research (3G credits). Application
   of stratification theories and demography are applied specifically to the older population.
   Issues of race, gender, socio-economic status, age, and geographic distribution are examined
   in order to investigate the diversity of the older age group and their access to resources.
   (Sociology)
                                                                                          13




III.   SECONDARY ELECTIVES

Choose 1-2 from the following:


GRNT 5050.                Topics in Gerontology                                  (1-4G)

GRNT 5250.                Programs and Services for the Aging                    (3G)

MPAD/GRNT 6210.           Aging and Public Policy                                (3G)

MPAD/GRNT 6211.           Administration of Aging Programs                        (3G)

MPAD 6218.                Public Policy Analysis & Program Evaluation             (3G)

NURS 6115.                Health Planning in the Health Care System              (3G)

NURS 6276                 Common Illnesses Associated with Older Adulthood        (3G)

SOCY 5134.                Families and Aging                                      (3G)




Secondary electives may also be chosen from other appropriate courses as offered, with the
   approval of the Gerontology Graduate Program Coordinator.
                                                                                           14



         OTHER RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STUDENT INCLUDE:


______      1) Furnish program with current mailing address, email address and telephone
            number (each time it changes).

______      2) Remove any conditions of admission and confer with the Gerontology Program
            Director when these conditions have been met.

______      3) Satisfy prerequisite requirements before enrolling in courses (e.g. Statistics
            before GRNT 6201).

______      4) Confer with Program Director or advisor before advance registration each
            semester. (We will try to work with students in the Gerontology Graduate
            Programs to get you admitted to required courses.)

______      5) Select a graduate committee by the completion of GRNT 6201, Research and
            Methods in Aging I. Your individually-designed graduate committee will
            supervise your program of study.

______      6) Complete application for thesis or applied project form and have it signed by
            your Advisor and submitted to the Graduate Coordinator before completing
            GRNT 6201.

______      7) Seek Human Subjects approval by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) before
            undertaking thesis or applied project research.

______      8) Complete oral comprehensive examination in conjunction with your thesis or
            applied project defense.

______      9) File application for "Admission to Candidacy" form no later than the end of the
            semester before expected graduation. Check course schedule for the exact
            deadline. Forms are available on line on the Graduate School Website and should
            be turned into the Gerontology Program office when completed. It will list all
            courses that are to be applied to degree requirements.

______      10) File "Application for a Degree." Check course schedule for the exact deadline.
            Forms are available on line on the Graduate School Website and should be
            returned to the Registrar's office when completed after paying the required fee to
            Student Accounts. It must be filed each semester (i.e., if you filed for May
            graduation and did not graduate, you will have to re-file for an August
            graduation).

______      11) Earn overall GPA of 3.00 and follow all Graduate School guidelines.
                                                                                                  15




       THE PROCESS OF WORKING WITH YOUR GRADUATE COMMITTEE


Having formed your Graduate Committee during the semester you are enrolled in Research and
Methods I, you will work with these individuals through the development of your applied project
or thesis proposal and completion of your applied project or thesis. The Chair of your Graduate
Committee will serve as your Adviser throughout the process of planning and completing your
applied project or thesis. Open communication with your committee Chair is essential.


Working with Your Graduate Committee:
Typically, you will meet with your Graduate Committee Chair and your Chair will review drafts
of your proposal and later your project or thesis. Your Chair may suggest that you confer with
other members of your Graduate Committee regarding specific issues or aspects of your project
or research. You can, of course, choose to confer with other committee members, but should
inform your committee Chair that you plan to do so. This is intended to make the process
smoother and ensure effective communication.

Preparing for a Defense:
When your committee Chair believes that your Applied Project or Thesis Proposal (and later
your Applied Project or Thesis) is ready to defend, she/he will suggest that you give a copy to
each member of your Graduate Committee. This version of your Proposa1 project or thesis will
be the "defense version" and you should not make changes after you have given a copy to the
members of your committee. It is important that each individual be working with the same
version of your proposal/thesis or project. Changes can be made, with the advice of your
Graduate Committee, and, in fact, are likely to be required.

Scheduling a Proposal, Applied Project or Thesis Defense:
Your committee Chair will suggest possible days and times for your committee to meet and you
should then contact the other members of your committee to determine the most convenient time
for the meeting. You are responsible for scheduling the meeting and reserving a conference
room.

What to expect at your Proposal or Applied Project/Thesis Defense:
The members of your Graduate Committee will gather at the time and place you have
arranged. The Chair of your Graduate Committee will ask you to begin by giving an oral
presentation of your proposal, project or thesis. You should discuss this with your committee
Chair in advance to be sure you understand what is expected. The members of your Graduate
Committee will then discuss your proposed or completed project. You will be asked to leave-
room at the end of your defense to allow the members of your committee a chance to discuss
their recommendations and the outcome. When you return, you will be advised of the outcome.
A plan will be presented for the completion of any changes or further work that is being required.
                                                                                               16




Human Subjects Review Board:
Be sure to determine whether your applied project or thesis research requires review by the
Human Subjects Review Board. Forms and guidelines are available on the University's
website. Questions should be discussed with your committee Chair who will often advise
you to confer with Ms. Cat Runden in the Office of Research. IRB approval of your project or
thesis is required before your committee can approve your proposal.

Comprehensive Exam:
The Gerontology Program requires oral comps that are generally scheduled along with the
Applied Project or Thesis Defense. After your Defense, you will return to the room and complete
your comps during the second hour. The members of your Graduate Committee will take turns
asking you questions that will allow you to demonstrate your knowledge of the field of
gerontology in relation to your Applied Project or Thesis research. You cannot study for your
comps, but should prepare by thinking about your project in the context of what you have learned
throughout the MA program

Expectations:
Please be reasonable in your expectations of your Graduate Committee and sensitive to other
demands on faculty members' time. Remember that you should typically give faculty two weeks-
to review a proposal, project or thesis. Exceptions can be made, and the members of your
committee will work with you, but you should never expect or assume a quicker turn around. It
is helpful to inform your committee Chair when you are preparing to turn something in,
particularly during the busiest times of the semester. Typically, for example, the end of the
semester is a particularly intense time (you are probably not the only person racing to meet a
deadline)- and effective communication becomes even more essential.
                                                                                             17



                                         THESIS

Description:     A Master's Thesis is a demonstration of your ability to apply the knowledge
                 and skills you have learned in graduate school to a concrete empirical
                 problem. A thesis requires you to develop an argument and support your main
                 points with some form of evidence. The evidence may be empirical data that
                 you collect (either quantitative or qualitative) or secondary data that already
                 exist. The audience is your professional colleagues, and your thesis should
                 add to the existing body of knowledge in the gerontological literature and
                 include a review of the literature. The thesis should have the potential to be
                 presented at a professional conference and/or published in an academic
                 gerontology journal. You must apply and be admitted to the thesis option; this
                 process must be completed during the semester you are enrolled in Research
                 and Methods I.

Objectives:

   1.     To demonstrate an ability to conduct independent research (either a quantitative or
          qualitative study).
   2.     To demonstrate an ability to articulate an empirical research problem and
          methodology appropriate to the investigation of that problem.
   3.     To defend an argument using appropriate factual information, and to demonstrate an
           ability to interpret these facts.
   4.     To demonstrate good writing and communication skills. You must follow a
          standard format; the APA guidelines are recommended.
   5.     To complete a final product (thesis) with the potential for presentation at a
           professional conference and/or publication in an academic gerontology journal.


Assessment:    The successful completion of your thesis will be determined by:

   1. timely completion of the objectives listed above, (beginning with the development of a
      thesis committee with whom you will establish your timeline for completion)*; and

   2. Oral defense of your completed work to your thesis committee, which must pass by a
      majority vote that includes the vote of the committee chairperson.

   3. You must also refer to the Graduate School Thesis Guidelines and meet the requirements
      of the UNC Charlotte Graduate School.
.
Reminders:
You must apply and be admitted to the thesis option before you complete GRNT 6201.
 All work completed towards a degree program must be completed within six years. This
   includes all coursework and the thesis.
                                                                                              18




                  NON-THESIS/APPLIED PROJECT OPTION

Description:     The non-thesis, applied project option allows you to demonstrate your ability to
                   apply the knowledge and skills you have learned in graduate school to a
                   problem/issue related to the practice of gerontology. This option requires
                   you to articulate a problem/issue in the field of aging and to develop an
                   argument and plan for the investigation of the problem/issue. The audience
                   is the professional group for whom you are designing your project. The
                   product of the non-thesis option should have the potential to be presented at
                   a professional conference and/or published in a professional gerontology
                   journal.

Objectives:

   1. To demonstrate an ability to articulate a problem or an issue within the field of
      aging (i.e., organizational, practical, ethical, etc..).
   2. To determine the methodology appropriate to the investigation of the chosen
      problem/issue.
   3. To develop a proposal to address the investigation of the chosen problem/issue
      incorporating both the relevance of the problem /issue and the potential benefit of its
      investigation.
   4. To demonstrate good writing and communication skills.
   5. To complete a final product (i.e., a final report, a teaching module, an informational data
      base, a small-scale community organization or focus group, etc.) appropriate to the
      project. The format of the final product is determined through careful consideration and
      intensive interaction with your graduate committee.
   6. To complete a project with the potential for presentation at a professional conference
      and/or publication in a professional gerontology journal.

Assessment: The successful completion of the non-thesis option will be determined by:
   1. timely completion of the objectives listed above, (beginning with the development of a
      graduate committee with whom you will establish your timeline for completion)*; and

   2. oral defense of your completed work to your graduate committee, which must pass by a
       majority vote that includes the vote of the committee chairperson.

   3. You must also meet the requirements of the UNCC Graduate School.

Reminders:
* All work completed towards a degree program must be completed within six years. This
   includes all coursework and projects.
You must apply and be admitted to the Applied Project option before you complete GRNT 6201.
                                                                                                19



           DEVELOPMENT OF YOUR GRADUATE COMMITTEE


Whether you choose the thesis option or the non-thesis option, you are expected to develop
a graduate committee to assist you and to oversee your progress. Working with your advisor, you
should establish your committee during the semester you are enrolled in Research and Methods I.

A graduate committee generally includes three individuals who are all members of the UNC
Charlotte Graduate Faculity. In most cases, each of the members of your committee will be a
member of the Gerontology faculty (see list in the Graduate Handbook). In certain cases and
with the approval of your advisor, you may seek a committee member with a particular area of
expertise who is not affiliated with the Gerontology Program.

All three committee members have an equal vote in assessing your thesis or non-thesis product.
Hopefully, there will be consensus regarding the “passing” of your final product. In any case,
your completed work must pass by a majority vote that includes the vote of the committee
chairperson.


       Chair:

                This is the person who you will work with most closely as you meet the
                objectives of your option and accomplish necessary related tasks. This
                individual will chair meetings of your committee. Future publications based on
                your thesis or applied project will generally include your chairperson as a co-
                author.


       Other Committee Members:

                These individuals will also work with you as you meet the objectives of
                your option and accomplish the necessary related tasks. Although not
                chairing your committee, their input will have weight and must be taken into
                consideration. Input should be sought from each of your committee members as
                appropriate, during the process of completing your work.

                In most cases, each of the members of your committee will be a member of the
                Gerontology faculty (see list in Graduate Handbook). In certain cases, you may
                seek a committee member with a particular area of expertise who is not affiliated
                with the Gerontology Program.
                                                                                                  20



 RECOMMENDED PROGRESSION THROUGH MA IN GERONTOLOGY

                                        FULL-TIME


Year 1

FALL                                           SPRING
GRNT 6600. Current Issues in Gerontology       SOCY 6130. Sociology of Age: Theories &
                                                         Research
PSYC 6124. Psychology of Aging                 NURS 6275. Health Promotion and Wellness for
                                                         Older Adults
KNES 5232. Physiology of Human Aging

(Elective)                                     (Electives)


                                               SUMMER
                                               GRNT 6400. Practicum*
                                               (Elective)


Year 2

FALL                                           SPRING
GRNT 6201. Research and Methods I              GRNT 6202. Research and Methods II
Elective                                       GRNT 6999. MA Thesis (3-6 cr) OR
(Elective)                                     GRNT 6800. Independent Research Study (3 cr)
                                                 (Applied Project)




Notes: If each of the recommended courses is not available during a given semester, you will be
       assisted in selecting an appropriate elective.

       You are encouraged to take advantage of summer and other occasional offerings in order
       to move through the program in a timely fashion.

       * Required 150 hours may be completed over a varying period of time and when you
       register for these credits will be determined with your Faculty Supervisor.
                                                                                                    21



 RECOMMENDED PROGRESSION THROUGH MA IN GERONTOLOGY

                                          PART-TIME

If you can take only one course each semester, you will generally select the course listed first.

Year 1

FALL                                              SPRING
GRNT 6600. Current Issues in Gerontology          SOCY 6130. Sociology of Age: Theories &
PSYC 6124. Psychology of Aging                              Research
KNES 5232 Physiology of Human Aging OR            NURS 6275. Health Promotion and Wellness for
                                                            Older Adults

                                                  SUMMER
                                                  (Elective)

Year 2

FALL                                              SPRING
Elective                                         (Elective)
(Elective)

                                                 SUMMER
                                                 GRNT 6400. Practicum*


Year 3

FALL                                             SPRING
GRNT 6201. Research and Methods I               GRNT 6202. Research and Methods II
                                                GRNT 6999 or GRNT 6800
(Elective)                                       (Elective)


Notes: If each of the recommended courses is not available during a given semester, you will be
       assisted in selecting an appropriate elective.

       You are encouraged to take advantage of summer and other occasional offerings in order
       to move through the program in a timely fashion.

         *Required 150 hours may completed over a varying period of time and when you register
                    for these credits will be determined with your Faculty Supervisor.
                                                                                           22



                                        PRACTICUM


Each student in the Gerontology Master’s Program is required to complete a professional field
experience in the aging field. This experience is meant to provide additional hands-on
experience for those who are relatively new to the field or to broaden the experience of those
with extensive practical experience working with older adults. Each student will work with
his/her advisor to design a Practicum which will meet his/her specific needs.


Please refer to the Gerontology Graduate Practicum Handbook for complete guidelines.




                          COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

This oral exam will be held in conjunction with the PROPOSAL defense of the thesis or
non-thesis/applied project. For students writing a thesis, the Comprehensive Examination
will take place at the same time as the Thesis PROPOSAL Defense. For completing a non-
thesis/applied project, the Comprehensive Examination will take place at the same time as
the applied project PROPOSAL defense. The exam will be held DURING THE SECOND
PORTION OF THE MEETING during which you defend your thesis or applied project
PROPOSAL. While the Defense is open to “the public,” only the student and his/her
Graduate Committee will be present for the Comprehensive Exam. You will be told the
results of the exam at the conclusion of your Defense/Comprehensive Exam session. The
grading options are “high,” “Pass,” “Low-pass,” “Fail.” You must pass each of the exam
questions in order to earn your Master’s degree. In the case of failure of one or more
questions, YOU MAY BE REQUIRED TO COMPLETE ADDITIONAL COURSEWORK
OR PROJECT(S) BEFORE SCHEDULING another session with your Graduate
Committee to retake any failed question(s). YOU MAY RETAKE THE QUESTIONS
ONCE.


Be sure to talk with your Graduate Committee Chair in advance of your PROPOSAL
Defense date about your preparation for the Comprehensive Exam.
                                                                                            23



                                 ADMINISTRATION


ADVISOR

The Gerontology Program Director will serve as initial advisor to each student admitted to the
Graduate Program in Gerontology. She will assist the student in development of a program of
study. In addition, she will evaluate any requests for transfer credit and determine if other
courses should be required.


GRADUATE COMMITTEE (MA students only)

Each student in the MA Program will establish a graduate Committee while s/he is enrolled in
GRNT 6201. The Chair of the Graduate Committee will serve as the student’s advisor for the
duration of the graduate program. You will work with your Graduate Committee to complete the
requirements of either Option (a) or (b).


ELECTIVE AND TRANSFER CREDIT

If the Gerontology Program Director judges the course appropriate to the student's program of
study, credit from the following sources may be applied, with written approval, toward the 36
hour requirement. A total of six hours may be transferred.

1. Course(s) eligible for graduate credit from other UNC Charlotte programs.

2. Transfer credit from other universities will be accepted in accordance with University
regulations. Generally, the Gerontology Program will accept up to six semester hours of
graduate work from other accredited institutions for which the student received a B or better.
Such credits will be accepted at the discretion of the Gerontology Program Director and must be
consistent with the student's overall program of graduate study.


TIME LIMIT FOR COMPLETION OF THE MA DEGREE

All work offered for the master’s degree, including accepted transfer credit, must be completed
within a six-year period. The six-year period begins with enrollment in the first course to be
applied towards the Gerontology Master’s degree.
                                                                                             24




POST BACCALAUREATE STATUS

With permission from the Gerontology Program Director, students will receive credit for courses
taken as a post baccalaureate student while seeking admission to the Graduate Program in
Gerontology. A maximum of six credits can be taken as a post baccalaureate student before being
admitted to a graduate program.
                                                                                             25



NMR GERONTOLOGY GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP


The UNC Charlotte Gerontology Program is pleased to announce the annual NMR Gerontology
Graduate Scholarship. A $1,000 scholarship will be awarded each year to a student in the
graduate program in Gerontology at UNC Charlotte.

The NMR Gerontology Graduate Scholarship is named for three women...
      Nora Bell Crum Nelms (1881-1958)
      Willie Minerva Davis Wimberly (1884-1969)
      Ruth Katherine Drummond Dorminey (1901-1991)

These three women lived in a time and place where the idea of graduate education did not exist.
Had they lived today, it is likely they would have attained advanced degrees. Because they were
extraordinary women who graced their ordinary worlds with their talents and intelligence, who
reared their children to value education just after God and family, and who contributed a legacy
of highly educated descendants to the world, this scholarship is named in their honor. They
would have been pleased at the thought of helping other people obtain an education that would
make our ordinary world better.


Criteria for Awarding the Scholarship

The NMR Gerontology Program Graduate Scholarship Committee will take all of the following
into consideration: applicant's academic and professional achievement and goals that reflect
dedication to the field of Gerontology; and financial need.

To be eligible, the student must be admitted to the Graduate Program in Gerontology (either the
MA or Graduate Certificate Program) at the time of application.

The scholarship recipient must complete a minimum of six credits during the academic year of
   the award and remain active in the program.


Instructions to Applicants

The deadline for submission of the completed application is June 1.

All materials must be received before the application deadline.

A completed application consists of the following materials:

1) Cover sheet with full name, address, telephone number (fax number and e-mail address
   optional), student ID number and the names, titles, addresses and telephone numbers of the
   people from whom you have requested letters of reference.
                                                                                               26


2) Personal essay of 300-500 words describing your academic and professional achievements
   and goals that reflect dedication to the field of Gerontology; (both paid and unpaid activities
   are relevant), your plans for the scholarship year if you are awarded the scholarship, what the
   scholarship would enable you to accomplish and why you are the best candidate.

3) Three letters of reference. At least one should be from a faculty member at UNC Charlotte
   (who is not on the Scholarship Committee). These letters should evaluate your academic
   achievement, interest and involvement in Gerontology, and other strengths.

4) A completed financial aid form. The applicant should apply for Financial Assistance by
   completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and mail the form in the
   envelope included with the application. The forms can be obtained from the Office of
   Financial Aid, 110 King Building.

All items must be typed. Items 1 and 2 should be submitted by you to the Gerontology Program
Office (Barnard 222). Item 3 should be sent by the letter-writers directly to the Gerontology
Program Director. Item 4 should be mailed in the envelope included with the Financial
Assistance application. All items must be received by June 1.

The NMR Gerontology Graduate Scholarship Committee will evaluate the applications and make
the final decision regarding the awardee.


Submit application materials to:
Dr. Dena Shenk
Director and Graduate Coordinator, Gerontology Program
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
9201 University City Blvd.
Charlotte, NC 28223
                                                                                             27



GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS


A number of opportunities for employment are available on and off campus including those
available through the Gerontology Program. Check the Graduate School website for a listing of
available Graduate Assistantships:

http://www.uncc.edu/gradmiss/gs_assistantships.


Graduate Assistantships require that you complete the "APPLICATION FOR GRADUATE
ASSISTANT" form which can be obtained in the Gerontology Office, the Graduate School
Office (Admissions Building), or online. Include your resume with this form. Before beginning
work as a graduate assistant, the student's application is approved by the Office of the Dean of
the College of Arts and Sciences. "THE RECOMMENDATION FOR APPOINTMENT TO A
GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP" must be filled out by the supervisor who is hiring you.
                                                                                                                                                 28


                            Fall 2009-Spring 2010 Graduation Deadline Calendar

Wednesday, September 2:                                  DEADLINE to apply for December 2009 graduation
Saturday, August 22:                                     Graduate School Graduate Student Orientation
                                                         at ______in __________________
Monday, August 24:                                       First Day of Classes
Tuesday, August :                                        Gerontology Orientation, ________________________
Wednesday, August 27:                                    Last Day to pay Fall 2009 tuition and fees
Monday, August 31:                                       Last day to drop all courses with a $25 withdrawal fee
Wednesday, September 2:                                  DEADLINE to file candidacy forms for December 2009 graduation
             th                          th
October 12 – October 13 :                                Student Recess – no classes
Monday, November 10:                                     Last day to schedule a Gerontology thesis or applied project proposal
                                                         defense this semester
Monday, November 10:                                     Last day to schedule a Gerontology thesis or applied project defense
                                                         this semester
                  th          th
November 25            - 28                              Thanksgiving break-no classes
Friday, November 20:                                     DEADLINE to deposit Master’s thesis with Graduate School
Friday, November 20:                                     DEADLINE to deposit Applied project with Gerontology Program
Wednesday, December 9:                                   Last day of classes
Saturday, December 19:                                   December Commencement
                                                                           Spring, 2010 *
Thursday, January 21:                                    DEADLINE to apply for May 2010 graduation
Monday, January 11:                                      First day of classes
Monday, January 12:                                      Last Day to pay Spring 2010 tuition and fees
Friday, January 15:                                      Last day to drop all courses with a $25 withdrawal fee
Thursday, January 21:                                    DEADLINE to file candidacy forms for May 2010 graduation
        th                         th
March 8 – March 13 :                                     Spring Break – no classes
Monday, March 23:                                        Last day to schedule a Gerontology thesis or applied project proposal
                                                         defense this semester
Monday, March 23:                                        Last day to schedule a Gerontology thesis or applied project defense
                                                         this semester
                  nd
Friday April 2 :                                         Spring Recess – No Classes
Friday, April 16:                                        DEADLINE to deposit Master’s thesis with Graduate School
Friday, April 16:                                        DEADLINE to deposit Applied project with Gerontology Program
                       th
Tuesday, May 4 :                                         Last day of classes
Saturday, May 15th:                                      May Commencement
                                   *This calendar will be updated as dates are received for other activities from other University departments
                                                     and the Graduate School. Be sure to check the website for updates*
                                                                                                         29


                                                                             Spring 2010

Last day to drop all classes (100% refund)                                                 January 10
First day of classes                                                                       January 11
Last day to drop all courses with a $25 withdrawal fee                                     January 15
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day - University Closed                                         January 18
Saturday classes begin                                                                     January 19
Last day to drop a course on the web                                                       January 21
Last day to drop a course with no record (w.cont. enrollment) with 100% refund             January 21
Last day to register, add, or change grade type to P/NC or Audit                           January 21
Deadline to apply for May 2010 graduation                                                  January 21
Deadline for graduate students to file candidacy forms for May 2010 degree                 January 21
Last day to withdraw from all courses with 'W' and $75 withdrawal fee                      January 21
Last day to submit a grade replacement form                                                January 21
Deadline for compliance with NC Immunization Law                                           January 25
Census date for Spring Enrollment                                                          January 25
Unsatisfactory web grading access available                                                February 15
Unsatisfactory grades due on the web by midnight                                           February 22
Unsatisfactory Grade letters emailed to students                                           February 24
Spring Break - No Classes                                                                  March 8-13
Fall 2010 Schedule of Classes available on web                                             March 8
Student registration appointment times available on web                                    March 8
Last day to submit graduate dissertation to the Graduate School for May 2010 degree        March 19
Last day to withdraw from a course with a 'W' grade                                        March 22
Registration for Summer 2010 and Fall 2010 begins                                          March 29
Spring Recess - No Classses                                                                April 2-3
Deadline to withdraw from all courses with a 'W' grade                                     April 12
Last day to submit graduate thesis to the Graduate School for May 2010 degree              April 16
Faculty Final web grading access available                                                 April 30
Saturday classes final examinations                                                        May 1
Last day of classes                                                                        May 4
Reading Day                                                                                May 5
Final Examinations                                                                         May 6-7
Final Examinations continued                                                               May 10-13
Ceremony Day                                                                               May 14
Commencement                                                                               May 15
Academic Year ends                                                                         May 16
Grades due on web by midnight                                                              May 17
Spring 2010 Probation/Suspension letters sent to students                                  May 19
                                                                                                  30



CAMPUS INFORMATION

Activities Center - (see Cone University Center)

Audiovisuals - Media Services provides help to students with a wide variety of audio and visual
communications services, including drymounting, transparencies and films. Stop by J. Murray
Atkins Library or call 687-2435.

Career Center - The University Career Center assists in developing job seeking skills (resume
writing, interviewing techniques, etc.) Obtaining internships, and full-time career positions.
Special programs and workshops are offered throughout the year; call 687-2231 (150 Atkins), for
more information.

Creation Station - The hours of operation are 10:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday
with location in the Cone Center breezeway. Offers a service to the students, faculty and staff.
Stocks a selection of balloons for campus delivery as well as offers banner making, buttons,
posters, graphic work, mat cutting, laminating, etc. Call 687-2923 for further information.

Counseling Center - Counseling Center (158 Atkins, 687-2105) provides personal and career
counseling as well as a variety of educational workshops, such as Assertiveness Training,
Building Self-Esteem, Career and Life Planning, Stress Management, coping as a Minority, etc.
These services are free to any student faculty or staff member. Go to the Counseling Center to
register for workshops.

Disability Services - Office of Disability Services (230 Fretwell, 687-4355) provides a broad
range of services for students who have disabilities. Documentation is required for permanent
and temporary disabilities and accommodations are determined based on the student's
documentation, course work and academic needs and goals.

Evening Services (OASES) - Evening services (106 Barnard, 687-2596) are provided after 5:00
p.m. Services are provided from offices of the Registrar, Admission, Learning Center, Academic
Advising, Disability Services and many other offices on campus.

Graduate and Professional Student Association - The GPSA is chartered by the Student
Government Association (SGA), and it serves as the official organization for all UNC Charlotte
graduate students. The purposes of the GPSA include: 1) establishment of an appropriate voice
for graduate students; 2) assistance with their special emotional, intellectual and physical needs;
and 3) liaison with the administration and faculty. All graduate students are welcome to attend
the monthly meetings held in the Cone Center. A free meal is always provided. The GPSA has
some funds to assist graduate students with travel expenses when the student is presenting a
paper at a scholarly or professional meeting. If you have any questions or want to get involved,
contact The SGA at 687-4606.
                                                                                                31




Gym - The Gymnasium is open for student use throughout the week at night, and on weekends. It
has basketball courts, an Olympic size swimming pool, handball and Squash courts, weight and
training rooms and lockers. Call 687-4800 (facilities) or 687-2448 (Equipment Checkout) for
more information.

Health Center - Brocker Health Center (located across the street from the Gym, 687-4617) offers
comprehensive medical services, including routine medical services, health education, birth
control, orthopedic consultation and a sports medicine clinic. In most cases, services are free or
require only a nominal fee. Open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, during regular school term. Full
service 9 am to 5 p.m. weekdays. Health Center services are available only during semesters in
which you are actually enrolled for a source credit. For example, if you don't take a course during
a summer session, you cannot get health care during that session.

Housing - Most graduate students live off campus, but Residence Life identifies a building of
eight apartments in Hunt Village which will be set aside for the assignment of graduate students.
This space will be held until June 1. After that date, space in the building that has not be
requested by a graduate student will be assigned to a non-graduate. Interested students will need
to contact Residence Life for a housing contract as early in the academic year as possible. Call
687-2585.

In-state tuition - It may be worthwhile for out-of-state students to carefully examine the
University Catalog and the regulations and practice of the Admissions Office regarding
Residence Status for tuition purposes to determine possible eligibility for in-state tuition.

Learning Center – Offers preparation workshops for GRE and many other types of workshops.
Located in Fretwell, 3rd Floor, 687-2162.

Library - The Library has an on-line book check-out system and public service terminals. Private
study carrels are available.

Printing - Printing and duplicating can be done on campus. Call 687-2054.

Writing Assistance - Writing Resources Center (Fretwell, Room 220) is a service provided by the
English Department to help students develop and refine their writing abilities. Call 687-4357.
                                                                                                            32



                                                 FACULTY

             (The Gerontology Office is located in Fretwell 235 and the telephone number is 704-687-6205)

This is a listing of the current Gerontology Graduate faculty, along with their primary
areas of research and teaching in Gerontology.

Anita Blowers, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice, 109 King, 687-6074,
anblower@uncc.edu

       Ph.D. State University of New York at Albany,

       Areas of interest: Criminal justice policy, criminal courts, organizational theory, crime
       and the elderly.

William Brandon, Metrolina Medical Foundation Distinguished Professor of Public Policy on
Health and Professor of Political Science, Fretwell 455-D, 687-3886, wilbrand@uncc.edu

               B.A., Johns Hopkins University; M.Sc., University of London;
               M.P.H., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Duke University

Maren Coffman, Assistant Professor of Nursing, RN, MSN, 423 CHHS, 687-7979,
mjcoffma@uncc.edu

       PhD, Nursing, University of Connecticut, Storrs

       Teaching and Research Interests: adult health nursing, cultural care in nursing

Boyd H. Davis, Bonnie E. Cone Professor of Teaching, Professor of English, 255-A Fretwell,
687-4209, bdavis@uncc.edu

       PhD University of North Carolina

       Areas of Interest: Sociohistorical linguistics, Narrative and discourse analysis, Language
       across the lifespan , Corpus analysis. Director of Project MORE (DOE/OELA).

Christine S. Davis, Assistant Professor, Departmetn of Communication Studies, 5004 Colvard,
687-6638, Christine.s.davis@uncc.edu

       PhD University of South Florida

       Areas of Interest: Health communication, communication and aging, end-of-life
       communication, family disability.
                                                                                               33


Mark Faust, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology Colvard 4041,687-3564
mefaust@uncc.edu

       PhD University of Oregon.

       Areas of Interest: Cognitive processes, with a focus on the role of cognitive control
       processes in attention, language, and memory.

Meredith Flood, Assistant Professor, College of Health and Human Services, School of
Nursing, 444-B CHHS, 687-7973, mflood@uncc.edu.

       Ph.D. University of South Carolina at Columbia

       Areas of Interest: Successful aging, psychiatric mental health of older adults, health
       promotion of older adults, creativity in older adults

Paul Foos, Professor of Psychology and Undergraduate Coordinator, Colvard 4015, 687-4731,
pwfoos@uncc.edu

       Ph.D. Bowling Green State University

       Teaching and Research Interests: psychology and aging; aging and memory.

Cynthia Hancock, Lecturer and Service Learning Coordinator for the Gerontology Program,
Department of Sociology, 460-F Fretwell, 687-4080, chancock@uncc.edu.

       Ph.D. in Sociology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
       Teaching and Research interests: Family Sociology, Gender Studies, Intergenerational
       Relations, Qualitative Methods

Martin Kane, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and Adjunct Associate Professor of
Gerontology, 140 Cameron Applied Research, 687-4890, mrkane@uncc.edu.

       B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State University

James N. Laditka, Associate Professor, Health Services Research, 481 CHHS, 687-6122,
   jladitka@uncc.edu.

       Ph.D., M.P.A., Syracuse University

       Areas of Interest: Access to health care for people in vulnerable groups, long-term care,
       healthy life expectancy, health disparities.
                                                                                               34


Sarah B. Laditka, Associate Professor, Public Health Sciences, 427E CHHS, 687-8926,
   sladitka@uncc.edu.

       Ph.D., M.A., M.B.A., Syracuse University

       Areas of Interest: Formal and informal long-term care, healthy life expectancy for older
       people, public health preparedness for frail and disabled older populations, and access to
       primary health care for people in vulnerable groups.

JoAnn Lee, Associate Professor of Psychology, 4036 Colvard, 687-4753, jolee@uncc.edu

       Ph.D. University of Georgia

       Research and Teaching Interests: older workers and retirement, eldercare

Julie McLaughlin, Assistant Professor Sociology, 490-H Fretwell, 687-4615,
jkmclau2@uncc.edu.

       PhD, Rutgers University

       Teaching and Rearch interests: Aging and the life course, mental health, family, research
       methods, social problems

Linda Moore, Associate Professor of Adult Health Nursing, 2029 Colvard, 687-4669
lmoore@uncc.edu

       MSN, EdD, University of Virginia

Trudy Moore-Harrison, Postdoctoral Fellow, 239 Belk, 687-6030, tlmoore2@uncc.edu.

       Ph.D., University of Georgia

       Areas of interest: Physical Activity and Genetics, community-based exercise for older
       adults, physical function of older adults.

Louise Murray, Adjunct professor, UNC Charlotte Gerontology Program, lmmurray@uncc.edu

       MA Gerontology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

       Research Interests: Alzheimer’s disease and the family, Clinical education; Informal
       caregiving and long term care
                                                                                                  35


Jane Neese, Associate Dean, College of Health and Human Services, 476 CHHS, 687-8645,
jbneese@uncc.edu

      Ph.D. University of Virginia

      Research Interests: gerontological nursing; medically ill and vulnerable elderly; rural
      elders and health outcomes of various models of service delivery.

Amy Peterman, Associate           Professor    of   Psychology,     4028     Colvard,    687-4764,
ahpeterm@uncc.edu

      Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh

      Research Interests: Quality of life in chronic and terminal illness, impact of illness on life
      goals, age differences in death and dying issues.

Blanca Ramos, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, 481D CHHS, 687-7928,
bramos@uncc.edu

      Ph.D., MSW, State University of New York at Albany

      Areas of Interest: Cultural diversity, immigrants, domestic violence, health disparities,
      older Latinos, and international social work

Dorothy Smith-Ruiz, Associate Professor of African-American and African Studies, 130
   Garringer, 687-2367, dsruiz@uncc.edu

      Ph.D. Michigan State University at East Lansing

      Research Interests: minority aging; health and social behavior of older adults.

Rachel Seymour, Director, Aging Research Services, Adjunct Faculty, Gerontology Program,
215 Barnard, 828-478-2213, rbseymou@uncc.edu
      Ph.D., University of Illinois, Chicago

      Teaching and Research Interests: Community-based health promotion, outcome
      evaluation, physical activity, psychosocial mediators of behavior change, longitudinal
      data analysis, psychometric analysis.
                                                                                                     36


Dena Shenk, Director and Graduate Coordinator of the Gerontology Program and Professor of
Anthropology, Barnard 222, 687-4349, dshenk@uncc.edu
       Ph.D. University of Massachusetts, Amherst

       Teaching and Research Interests; aging in cultural and environmental context, women and
       aging, direct care workers, and people with dementia.

Jamie Stickland, Lecturer in Geography and Earth Sciences, 446 McEniry, 687-5971,
jstrickl@uncc.edu

       MA, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, PhD candidate, University of North
       Carolina Charlotte

Rosie Tong, Mecklenburg County Medical Society Distinguished Professor of Health Care
Ethics, Professor of Philosophy, and Director of the Center for Professional and Applied
Ethics, 105-A Winningham, 687-2850, rotong@uncc.edu
       B.A., Marygrove College; M.A., The Catholic
       University of America; Ph.D., Temple University

Michael J. Turner, Associate Professor of Kinesiology, 240-B Belk Gymnasium, 687-4698,
miturner@uncc.edu

       Ph.D. University of Tennessee-Knoxville

       Teaching and Research interests: The cardiovascular and metabolic alterations that occur
       in the healthy and diseased older adult population.

Jennifer Troyer, Associate Professor of Economics, Adjunct Faculty of Public Health Sciences,
   240C Friday, 687-7599, jtroyer@uncc.edu

       Ph.D. Florida State University

       Areas of interest: Long-term care quality, skilled nursing facility regulation and costs,
       long-term care reimbursement policy.

Jan Warren-Findlow, Assistant Professor, College of Health and Human Services, Department
of Health Behavior and Administration, 427-B CHHS, 687-7908, jwarren1@uncc.edu
   Ph.D. University of Illinois, Chicago, MBA Lehigh University.

   Research Interests: aging, health disparities, chronic illness self-care, older women’s health,
   cardiovascular disease, illness beliefs, qualitative research methods, feminist perspective
                                                                                                37


Diane Zablotsky, Associate Dean for Student Services and Professor of Sociology, 430 Fretwell,
687-3384, dlzablot@uncc.edu
       Ph.D. University of Maryland

       Research and Teaching Interests: aging and the family; healthcare and aging; impact of
       HIV on the elderly and social support networks in retirement communities.
                                                                                                38



       ACADEMIC INTEGRITY


From the UNCC Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog

The UNCC Code of Student Academic Integrity governs the responsibility of students to
maintain integrity in academic work, defines violations of the standard, describes procedures for
handling alleged violations of the standard, and lists applicable penalties. The following conduct
is prohibited in the Code as violating those standards:

   A. Cheating. Intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information,
   notes, study aids or other devices in any academic exercise. This definition includes
   unauthorized communication of information during an academic exercise.

   B. Fabrication and Falsification. Intentional and unauthorized alteration or invention of any
   information or citation in an academic exercise. Falsification is a matter of altering
   information, while fabrication is a matter of inventing or counterfeiting information for use in
   any academic exercise.

   C. Multiple Submission. The submission of substantial portions of the same academic work
   (including oral reports) for credit more than once without authorization.

   D. Plagiarism. Intentionally or knowingly presenting work of another as one's own (i.e.,
   without proper acknowledgment of the source). The sole exception to the requirement of
   acknowledgment sources is when the ideas, information, etc., are common knowledge.

   E. Abuse of Academic Materials. Intentionally or knowingly destroying, stealing or making
   inaccessible library or other academic resource material.

   F. Complicity In Academic Dishonesty. Intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to
                     help another to commit an act of academic dishonesty.
             39



APPENDIX A
                                                                     40



             MASTER’S PROGRAM IN GERONTOLOGY
                        CHECKLIST

Name                                            Student ID:

Begin Program

Core:                                                  Semester   Grade

GRNT 6600 Current Issues in Gerontology

NURS 6275 Health Promotion and Wellness

PSYC 6124 Psychology of Aging

SOCY 6130 Sociology of Aging

GRNT 6201 Research and Methods in Aging I

GRNT 6202 Research and Methods in Aging II

GRNT 6400 Practicum



Electives:




                                Cont’d Page 2
                                                                     41



                                    MASTER’S CHECKLIST
                                          Page 2


Student ID


Option (1)

Admitted to Thesis Option

Thesis Proposal Defense

Oral Comprehensive Exams

Thesis Defense

                                      Semester     Credits   Grade
GRNT 6999
GRNT 6999/7999
plus 9 hours of electives


Option (2)
Admitted to Applied Project Option

Applied Project Proposal Defense

Oral Comprehensive

Applied Project Defense

                                      Semester     Credits   Grade
GRNT 6800
plus 12 hours of elective credits

Graduate Committee:

_________________________________________Chair
                                                               42




                GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN GERONTOLOGY
                            CHECKLIST


Name                                       Student ID

Begin Program


Core:                                            Semester   Grade

GRNT 6600 Current Issues in Gerontology



Primary Electives (2-3):

NURS 6275 Health Promotions and Wellness

PSYC 6124 Psychology of Aging

SOCY 6130 Sociology of Aging


Secondary Electives (1-2):




Checked by:

Approved:
             43




APPENDIX B
                                                                             44



                         Master’s Program in Gerontology

                  Application for Thesis or Applied Project Option

Name                                                      Date

Social Security




Courses Completed                                  Semester          Grade

GRNT 6600 Current Issues in Gerontology

SOCY 6130 Sociology of Aging

PSYC 6124 Psychology of Aging

NURS 6275 Health Promotion & Wellness




Proposed Focus




Thesis                                      Applied Project

Graduate Coordinator                                      Date
                                                                        45


The following forms are available online:

Application for Admission to Candidacy for Graduate Certificate
Application for Degree


These will be provided by the Committee Chair at the time of defense:

Thesis/Applied Project Topic Approval
Report of Comprehensive Examination, Project or Thesis Defense

				
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