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Accuracy In Media 3rd qtr 2010

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					Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Public Relations Report
   1. Media impact
            a) 1 radio interview, 32 AIM media mentions, 12 AIA, and 77 staff
           media mentions.
           b) Notable media placements this quarter include the following:
           ● Examiner.com ● Newsmax.com
           ● Pajamas Media.com ● SF Bay Times.com
           ● The Fox Nation.com ● World Net Daily
           ● National Review Online ● Mission America Radio
           ● Newsbusters .org
   2. “AIM in the News” AIM Report column
       a) Important tool for communicating success to AIM’s donors.
           b) Short column highlighting AIM’s interviews and news stories in every
           AIM Report.
   3. AIM website and social media
       a) Average monthly web traffic for this quarter: 93,436 visits.
       b) Average visitors during third quarter: 68,096.
       c) Average page views during third quarter: 145,180.
       d) Twitter followers: 7,796; Facebook fans: 1,485; YouTube: 384.
   4. “Take AIM” Blog Talk Radio show and Podcasts
           a) Roger Aronoff’s BTR interviews: Erik Rush, Caroline Glick, Gigi
           Gaston, Ray Lahr, John Clarke, Cory Andrews, Michael Pack and Adam
           Thierer.
           b) Don Irvine’s “Media Monitor” podcasts: Zev Chafets and Ben Wilker.
   5. Bloggers’ Briefings and Don Irvine’s DC Conversations
           a) Mick Mulvaney,Karen Harned, James Sherk, Nicholas Loris, Peter
           Roff, David Keene, Anita Moncrief, Ed Feulner, Michael Franc, Terence
           Jeffrey, Michael New, Rep. Rob Bishop (R-Utah), Luke Frans, John
           Felmy, David Kreutzer, Tabitha Hale, and Brendan Steinhauser.

6. Radio interviews
a) Aug.19, 2010: Cliff Kincaid on Mission America Radio.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
SPEECHES GIVEN: This Quarter and 2010 Total
Speaker Speeches, Third Quarter Total
• Don Irvine 0 1
• Roger Aronoff 3 10
• Alan Korwin 2 11
• Charles Wiley 28 107
Grand Totals 33 129
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: ROGER ARONOFF
Date: 21 July 2010
Place: The Churchill Hotel in Dupont Circle, Washington, DC
Subject: Freedom of expression and accountability
in U.S. media, and the role of Media watchdogs in identifying and correcting
the misperceptions resulting from bias
Speech: Group of 21 journalists from 15 African countries
                               Speech Summary
I followed the pattern of my speeches to groups of journalists. I began by
describing the history and mission of Accuracy in Media, and then gave
details on how the organization operates and what we do. I observed that our
criticism may be directed at government news releases as well as those from
commercial media. I talked to them about the support that AIM receives from
various sources, and I specifically talked about the Allied Educational
Foundation, and some of the important cases they had been working on. I
then completed my presentation with a discussion of a few of the major stories
with which AIM is identified. I concluded with a Q&A session.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: ROGER ARONOFF
Date: 15 September 2010
Place: The After Words Cafe in Dupont Circle, Washington, DC
T
Subject: The role of Media watchdogs in identifying and correcting the
misperceptions resulting from bias
Speech: Mr. Numchai Oovanit, Editor, Chiang Mai Magazine, Thailand
                               Speech Summary
This was a fairly informal presentation, in which I talked to Mr. Oovanit
about the recent history of the media in the U.S., and about how AIM came
about, and its role as a media watchdog. After some brief comments, we spent
nearly an hour in Q&A.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: ROGER ARONOFF
Date: 29 September 2010
Place: Offices of Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC
Subject: Ideological bias in U.S. media, and the role of Media watchdogs in
identifying and correcting the misperceptions resulting from bias
Speech: Group of 16 journalists from 13 Latin American countries
                               Speech Summary
I shared the podium with a speaker from Media Matters for America. We
each presented our view of media bias. I further gave a brief history of
modern media in this country. This was followed by a lively Q&A that lasted
about 45 minutes, at which time we covered many topics. I discussed some of
the major stories that AIM has been involved with over the years.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: ALAN KORWIN
                                Date: 1 September 2010
Place: Days Inn
Phoenix, Arizona
Subject: Free speech and gun rights
Organization: American Citizens United
Speech Summary
Although these folks are philosophically aligned with the values we hold, this was
a tough crowd because they were somewhat depressed over the state of affairs in
politics. Their numbers were shrinking they said, in this chapter at least, part of
which they attributed to the summer heat and hiatus. The nation is being destroyed
by a clique that sees America as the great oppressor, or that was the general sense
of the crowd (a sentiment with way too much evidence supporting it).

I abandoned my prepared remarks (outline actually), and gauging the crowd,
leaned on the idea that as Americans we can accomplish anything and will prevail.
It was easy enough to get support for the obvious fact that the news media has
become one of the greatest challenges the nation faces. No one, on this side of the
fence at least, has any faith in the media anymore. This ought to translate into
dynamic support for AIM, but I fear that connection isn’t solidly made. Would that
I could resolve that riddle and have them standing in line, cash in hand.

It’s hard, no, impossible, when I book an event to guess how it will turn out. The
combination of ghastly heat this day, a somewhat run-down venue, and a less than
enthusiastic crowd (I’m being nice about that) made for a tough evening.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: ALAN KORWIN
                                  Date: 13 September 2010
Place: Marie Calendars Meeting Room
Phoenix, Arizona
Subject: New Arizona laws and media coverage of them
                                  Organization: North Scottsdale Tea Party
Speech Summary
An exciting presentation about social media and its effect on politics got the crowd
stirred up before my presentation, and set the stage for an exciting evening. This
audience knows me, I attend many of their meetings because they get first-rate
politicos and they’re less than two miles from my home. I get to crack wise,
sprinkle insight and omitted information during the nights, and after badgering the
host for a while, got to hold the audience in the palm of my hand.

I had them laughing, clucking their tongues, held in rapt attention, as I bounced
around the topic universe from the true nature of the political game, the importance
of ousting democrats in the election but the futility of hoping for salvation from
republicrats or the present political system, so unlikely to shrink itself or somehow
readopt the lost principles of America we all desperately hope for.

Many speakers seek to illuminate, and I do too, but that’s not enough. Action plans
that are easy to implement, really make you feel like you’re accomplishing, and
can be done by anyone are essential. I encourage people to build their email lists,
because that’s how word gets around these days. Can you imagine trying to launch
and run a tea-party movement by stuffing envelopes and using the mails? Keep an
eye peeled and add to your lists all the media eddresses you see all the time. And
go out and exercise liberty’s teeth, the right to keep and bear arms.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 16 July 2010
Place: Orange, California
Subject: Media Bias; Vietnam (home front)
Organization: Youth Leadership Conference (1 of 2)
Speech Summary
I gave a routine talk on the power of news media—and explained how
some reporters slant news stories.

I used the Vietnam War as a prime example of how the news media can
change public perception—and create false history.

I concentrated on the coverage of events on the home front.
The negative image of our veterans who served in the Southeast Asian
conflict is completely false. The record shows the absolute opposite—that
they are among the most successful people in our society.

I went over the general perception of these veterans, after their return to
the United States, that has been created by the news and entertainment
media. I included an opinion poll of Americans aged 18 to 35 which offered
two descriptions of our vets. 11% chose a positive, favorable description;
71% believed they were “emotionally or psychologically troubled people.”
I reported on the carefully researched massive statistics of these veterans
by the Veterans Administration and others. They show conclusively that
virtually every generally believed negative image is 100% wrong.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 16 July 2010
Place: Orange, California
Subject: Media Bias; Lessons for a Good Life
Organization: Youth Leadership Conference (2 of 2)
Speech Summary
I explained the importance of news media in their future—and the need for them to
understand how it works.

In addition, I talked about life lessons. I stressed the great importance of gaining
knowledge and developing character.

I urged the students to think about what they do. I pointed out that actions have
consequences and that even small decisions, in large numbers, set up conclusions.
I went over suggestions on how to best insure successful, productive and happy
lives. My major stress was on the importance of building character and amassing
knowledge—not just as keys to a successful career, but as the critical factors to
success as a person.

I advised that these accomplishments bring many everyday advantages—including
having more real fun.

Among my suggestions on how to better insure successful, productive and happy
lives: “Life is tough. And, it’s tougher when you’re stupid.—Don’t be stupid!”
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 19 July 2010
Place: College Station, Texas
Subject: Media Bias; Sensationalism=Propaganda
Organization: Lions
Speech Summary
I discussed the need to get many sources of information—and pointed out the
importance of Americans breaking the habit of hard-wiring their brains by self
propagandizing themselves. We need informed citizens who have a broad picture
of reality. Getting most information from the same sources makes it very difficult
to achieve balanced judgments of events.

I spoke about the endless fear-mongering by the news media. I pointed out that the
   st
21 Century was welcomed by a barrage of dire warnings about the Y2K
Catastrophe. And, before the horrible threat of “Global Warming,” we had the
terrible threat of “Global Cooling.” Newsweek, in a hyped special feature, said that
the Earth was already one-sixth of the way toward another Ice Age!

I quoted a recent headline story “Huge Ice Chunk Breaks Away From
Antarctica.” The lead underscored the seriousness of the event: “In less than a
Day, a chunk of ice bigger than Rhode Island broke away from Antarctica and
shattered into many pieces this week.” After a photograph of ice and details on
how the “disintegration of this mass of ice” was covered by NASA satellites, the
story concluded: “This particular ice bridge breaks up and reforms regularly. Even
though the images show a routine event, they provide a spectacular view.”
In other words, there was no news.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 20 July 2010
Place: College Station, Texas
Subject: Media Bias; Advocate Journalists
Organization: Kiwanis
Speech Summary
I described the tremendous power of the news media. It has the ability to set the
agenda—and to decide the problems that are be solved and the order of their
importance. Plus, after deciding the issues and priorities, it often establishes the
framework for the public discussion about the problems—in effect, deciding the
premises that we base our thinking

I discussed the two basic types of reporters who produce the news stories. I
excluded columnists, commentators, editorial writers, talk show hosts, et al.—and
concentrated on working reporters.

There are objective reporters, who are very professional and have a high standard
of ethics. They gather information and pass it on to the public—what we call news.
And, they leave their opinions out of the mix. They inform.

Advocate journalists have a different aim. In many of their stories they attempt to
influence the public. They are often trying to pull our strings so that we’ll support
the people and the causes that the journalist favors—and oppose those that they
disapprove.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 20 July 2010
Place: College Station, Texas
Subject: Media Bias; Power of the Press
Organization: International Assn of Admin Professionals
Speech Summary
I spoke about news media power, slanted stories and the decline of
journalistic standards. I gave many examples of top figures in the
mainstream who have acknowledged that the big media has, for decades,
been giving a one-sided picture in the coverage of many major issues.
I described the power of the news media to establish what Americans think
about and discuss with their friends & fellow workers; to decide what
problems we need to tackle as a community & nation; to determine the
order in which we give our attention to these problems.

In addition to setting the agenda and priorities, the press often sets up the
framework within which the media, our people and our political leaders discuss the
issues. They frequently decide the premises which are used to guide the public
debate. Unfortunately, the premises are often wrong—sometimes 180 degrees
incorrect. And, it is very difficult to come up with the right answer when the
premise is wrong. I discussed the need to get many sources of information—and
pointed out the importance of Americans breaking the habit of hard-wiring their
brains by self propagandizing themselves. We need informed citizens who have a
broad picture of reality. Getting most information from the same sources makes it
very difficult to achieve balanced judgments of events.
    Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 21 July 2010
Place: Bryan, Texas
Subject: Media Bias; Sensationalism as Propaganda
Organization: Rotary
Speech Summary
I discussed the need to get many sources of information—and pointed out the
importance of Americans breaking the habit of hard-wiring their brains by self-
propagandizing themselves. We need informed citizens who have a broad picture
of reality. Getting most information from the same sources makes it very difficult
to achieve balanced judgments of events.

I spoke about the endless fear-mongering by the news media. I pointed out that the
   st
21 Century was welcomed by a barrage of dire warnings about the Y2K
Catastrophe. And, before the horrible threat of “Global Warming,” we had the
terrible threat of “Global Cooling.” Newsweek, in a hyped special feature, said that
the Earth was already one-sixth of the way toward another Ice Age!

I quoted a recent headline story “Huge Ice Chunk Breaks Away From
Antarctica.” The lead underscored the seriousness of the event: “In less than a
Day, a chunk of ice bigger than Rhode Island broke away from Antarctica and
shattered into many pieces this week.” After a photograph of ice and details on
how the “disintegration of this mass of ice” was covered by NASA satellites, the
story concluded: “This particular ice bridge breaks up and reforms regularly. Even
though the images show a routine event, they provide a spectacular view.”
In other words, there was no news.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 21 July 2010
Place: College Station, Texas
Subject: Media Bias; Life Lessons
Organization: Youth Leadership Conference
Speech Summary
I described the great responsibilities the students would soon assume. They will be
making the decisions that will guide their communities and our nation. It is
therefore crucial that they understand the news media.

I explained that the media will have more influence on their lives than anything
except their own decisions. Their lifestyles and standard of living could be changed
dramatically in the near future if the United States makes the wrong judgments.
Their freedoms could be curtailed or even lost completely.

I discussed the ways that some reporters slant the news in an effort to influence the
opinions and actions of their readers, viewers and listeners.
In addition, I talked about life lessons. I stressed the great importance of gaining
knowledge and developing character.

I urged the students to think about what they do. I pointed out that actions have
consequences and that even small decisions, in large numbers, set up conclusions. I
went over suggestions on how to best insure successful, productive and happy
lives. My major stress was on the importance of building character and amassing
knowledge—not just as keys to a successful career, but as the critical factors to
success as a person.
    Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 22 July 2010
Place: College Station, Texas
Subject: Media Bias; How News is Slanted
Organization: Rotary
Speech Summary
I pointed out that, according to nearly every opinion survey during the past quarter
century, the American public has believed that the news is slanted. However, there
is a great misunderstanding on how stories are often turned into propaganda.

Many—even including a large percentage of the media critics—believe that the
main problem is that many reporters tell lies. But, there isn’t much outright lying.
In an open, free society, it is foolish for journalists to tell falsehoods. They’ll
eventually get caught—and lose their credibility. And, often, their jobs and careers.
(See Dan Rather and his alleged letter that was designed to unseat the President of
the United States.)

Most propaganda is achieved by manipulating the coverage so that the image of
reality is changed. And, if the image is changed for any length of time, the reality
itself is changed. And, often, so is history.

I spoke about the methodology used to slant news stories without actually lying.
The most frequent way—plus the easiest and safest for a reporter—is to leave out
selective important information.

I quoted Robert SHAPIRO, the lead defense attorney for OJ Simpson, who said
that a major aim of a lawyer is to manipulate the press into using terminology that
will help their clients.
    Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 22 July 2010
Place: College Station, Texas
Subject: Media Bias; Speaking Tips
Organization: Toastmasters
Speech Summary
I described the tremendous power of the news media. It has the ability to set the
agenda—and to decide the problems that are be solved and the order of their
importance. Plus, after deciding the issues and priorities, it often establishes the
framework for the public discussion about the problems—in effect, deciding the
premises on which we base our thinking. I discussed the two basic types of
reporters who produce the news stories. I excluded columnists, commentators,
editorial writers, talk show hosts, et al.—and concentrated on working reporters.

There are objective reporters, who are very professional and have a high standard
of ethics. They gather information and pass it on to the public—what we call news.
And, they leave their opinions out of the mix. They inform.

Advocate journalists have a different aim. In many of their stories they attempt to
influence the public. They are often trying to pull our strings so that we’ll support
the people and the causes that the journalist favors—and oppose those that they
disapprove.

I also gave tips on successful public speaking. I stressed the need to talk with
people, not at them.

I explained the importance of including stand-up comedy in a presentation. It is
against human nature to sit quietly and listen to a speech. Those in the audience
want to move around in their chairs, cough, talk to the person next to them, etc.
During a laugh, people can “let loose” for a short time.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 27 July 2010
Place: New Brunswick, New Jersey
Subject: Media Bias; Journalism & Other Careers
Organization: Rutgers University
Speech Summary
Communications students were the bulk of my audience. They are studying public
relations and other alternatives to working as reporters after completing an
education based on journalistic skills.

I gave my routine talk about news media bias and passed on thoughts about a
journalism career. I described the many dreams that I had as a child and teenager—
and, thanks to working as a reporter, all but one of them have been fulfilled. (I
have yet to make a parachute jump.)

But, I pointed out the difficulties of duplicating my experience in the current state
of journalism—and discussed the serious problems faced by the fourth estate.
I predicted that technology and social changes have insured tremendous changes in
news media.

A joke best describes the situation. Q. “What’s the easiest way of becoming a
millionaire?” A. “Start with a billion dollars and buy a newspaper.”
I also spoke about public relations, including a list of rules of do’s and don’t’s in
dealing with the press.

I gave examples of organizing large public activities.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 27 July, 2010
Place: Edison, NJ
Subject: Media Bias; Vietnam
Organization: Soldier’s Home
Speech Summary
(The Soldier’s Home is run by the state of New Jersey for handicapped and older
veterans.)

After part of my routine talk about news media power and slanted journalism, I
concentrated on the coverage of events on the home front during and after the war
in Vietnam.

I explained how the belief of widespread hostility to our GI’s during the war in
Vietnam was established. A handful of anti-Americans (as differentiated from
those who were anti-war, opposed to U.S. involvement in the conflict) were able to
project a false image – with the help of the news media.

I explained the totally false picture that was projected of the public’s attitude
toward those in uniform during the war in Vietnam.
While there was endless widespread reporting of anti-war activity, huge pro-GI
events were almost completely ignored by the press.

I showed film of the Support Our Men in Vietnam parade – a quarter of a
million who marched for almost nine hours in the third longest parade in the
history of the United States.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 24 August 2010
Place: Corona, California
Subject: Media Bias; Sinking Standards
Organization: Friendship Connection
Speech Summary
I gave a routine talk about news media influence and bias. I discussed the decline
of standards—and the fact that there is less and less public interest in news. The
limited knowledge of some reporters is matched by a large part of the population.
I discussed the thin coverage of real news and the limited knowledge and
professional ability of many young journalists.

Personal dirt about candidates and the trading of insults may be of marginal
interest, but has no real meaning. Reporters waste much of their questioning on
such unimportant subjects instead of getting candidates to give straight answers to
queries about their policies and where they stand on important issues.

Often, there is little understanding of meaningful subjects during an election
campaign. Too much time is given to what may happen. This includes endless
polls.

I outlined the many problems with our news media today. I pointed out the critical
importance of getting the press to do its job as soon as possible—or risk seeing the
United States go from the top rank in the world to a second rate country.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 8 September 2010
Place: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Subject: Media Bias; World War II
Organization: Lutheran High School (1 of 2)
Speech Summary
I gave some of my standard talk about news media’s power & bias.
I spoke about World War II. I talked about the numbers of men who served in the
armed forces—over sixteen million—and compared the interest in war news to
today, when only a relative handful of Americans and their families have a
personal role in our military activities.

I described the mood and involvement of all Americans on the home front. I
described the shortages, rationing, high tax rates and attitudes.

I talked about civilians having to stand on packed trains that were put on side rails
while troop trains and military equipment sped past on the main line.

I spoke about life, while overseas, for our GI’s. I explained that loneliness was the
biggest curse of service overseas—that we were completely separated from our
normal lives. The only news of family that we received “quickly”—within a few
days—was the death of a very near relative.

I told stories about the characters—the “class clowns”—who kept us amused and,
sometimes, amazed.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 8 September 2010
Place: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Subject: Media Bias; Moving up to Adulthood
Organization: Lutheran High School (2of 2)
Speech Summary
I described the challenges that teen-agers face as they move onto center stage. I
talked about the responsibilities that go with taking over the running of their
communities and our country—even as they take charge of their own lives.
I explained the importance of news media in their future—and the need for them to
understand how it works.

I urged the students to think about what they do. I pointed out that actions have
consequences and that even small decisions, in large numbers, set up conclusions.
No one ever decided that they wanted to spend their life in a cage, within high
walls, their life totally regimented—while being bullied, gang-raped, etc. But a
string of bad decisions has brought about this ending for millions.

I went over suggestions on how to best insure successful, productive and happy
lives. My major stress was on the importance of building character and amassing
knowledge—not just as keys to a successful career, but as the critical factors to
success as a person.

I advised that these accomplishments bring many everyday advantages—including
having more real fun.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 8 September 2010
Place: Wauwatosa, Wisconsin
Subject: Media Power and Bias
Organization: Rotary
Speech Summary
I spoke about news media power, slanted stories and the decline of journalistic
standards. I gave many examples of top figures in the mainstream who have
acknowledged that the big media has, for decades, been giving a one-sided picture
in the coverage of many major issues.

I described the power of the news media to establish what Americans think about
and discuss with their friends and fellow workers; to decide what problems we
need to tackle as a community and nation; to determine the order in which we give
our attention to these problems.

I gave examples, including the illegal immigration issue. Virtually ignored by both
political parties and leading politicians, it suddenly became a super big story—with
every politician explaining their position. (Or, waffling on the issue while trying to
make it appear that they were actually saying something.)

In addition to setting the agenda and priorities, the press often sets up the
framework within which the media, our people and our political leaders discuss the
issues. They frequently decide the premises which are used to guide the public
debate. Unfortunately, the premises are often wrong—sometimes 180 degrees
incorrect. And, it is very difficult to come up with the right answer when the
premise is wrong.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 9 September, 2010
Place: Waukesha, Wisconsin
Subject: Media Bias; Killing with PC
Organization: Learning In Retirement
Speech Summary
I went over some basic information about news media power and bias. I discussed
the terrible cost of Political Correctness (PC). The threat goes far beyond the loss
of free speech, which would be bad enough; PC curtails serious investigation of
problems and often eliminates the possibilities of developing answers and
solutions. This has killed multitudes of people—very likely, millions.

I gave, as an example, the failure to move quickly when it was obvious that Africa
was facing a catastrophe that could become the worst tragedy in all history. I
pointed to the reports, a few years, by the World Health Organization and the
United States government that described the dreadful AIDS situation on that
continent—and how the news media excused the lack of preventive action on the
grounds that it was not possible for anyone to see the problem that was developing.
I showed the news report of a speech I gave to the Capetown Press Club that
predicted precisely what was happening—and also questioned why the news media
was silent on the subject. That speech was given in 1988. It was based on
information that was open to anyone who wanted to ask for it. The story was not
reported because it was politically incorrect to write or talk about Africans and
AIDS.

During this same period, I also warned about the danger to those in our Inner Cities
from a second wave of AIDS. This peril was also largely ignored because of
political correctness.
    Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 9 September 2010
Place: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Subject: Media Bias; Speaking Tips
Organization: Toastmasters
Speech Summary
This was repeat appearance at a club where I spoke two years ago, so I updated my
basic talk—then discussed major stories that are under-covered or not reported at
all.

I quoted the Time editor who recently called for less objective reporting and more
advocacy journalism.
I discussed the two basic types of reporters who produce the news stories. I
excluded columnists, commentators, editorial writers, talk show hosts, et al.—and
concentrated on working reporters. There are objective reporters, who are very
professional and have a high standard of ethics. They gather information and pass
it on to the public—what we call news. And, they leave their opinions out of the
mix. They inform. Advocate journalists have a different aim. In many of their
stories they attempt to influence the public. They are often trying to pull our
strings so that we’ll support the people and the causes that the journalist favors—
and oppose those that they disapprove.

I also gave tips on successful public speaking. I stressed the need to talk with
people, not at them. I explained that good timing is essential to keeping an
audience happy.

I’m not talking about delivery. I mean how long the speech takes.. When I speak
for under 35 minutes, I am frequently told “I could have listened to you all night!”
At 45 minutes, it becomes: “That was a good speech.” Beyond that, a handshake
and a simple “Thanks for coming.”
    Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 9 September 2010
Place: Waukesha, Wisconsin
Subject: Media Bias; Politically Correct can Kill
Organization: Golden K
Speech Summary
This was repeat appearance, so I updated my basic talk—then discussed major
stories that are under-covered or not reported at all.

I discussed the terrible cost of Political Correctness (PC). The threat goes far
beyond the loss of free speech, which would be bad enough; PC curtails serious
investigation of problems and often eliminates the possibilities of developing
answers and solutions. This has killed multitudes of people—very likely, millions.

I gave, as an example, the failure to move quickly when it was obvious that Africa
was facing a catastrophe that could become the worst tragedy in all history. I
pointed to the reports, a few years, by the World Health Organization and the
United States government that described the dreadful AIDS situation on that
continent—and how the news media excused the lack of preventive action on the
grounds that it was not possible for anyone to see the problem that was developing.

I showed the news report of a speech I gave to the Capetown Press Club that
predicted precisely what was happening—and also questioned why the news media
was silent on the subject. That speech was given in 1988. It was based on
information that was open to anyone who wanted to ask for it. The story was not
reported because it was politically incorrect to write or talk about Africans and
AIDS.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 10 September 2010
Place: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Subject: 9/11 Ceremony; ROTC Cadets
Organization: Marquette University
Speech Summary
This was a special event organized by all three ROTC units at Marquette
University—Army, Navy and Air Force.

I said that the cadets were very impressive—especially when compared to many of
our youth. They are well-dressed and groomed, have manners and grace and can
carry on intelligent conversations.

I compared Pearl Harbor’s influence on my generation and 9/11 to theirs.
Both brought our people together and rallied all Americans behind our servicemen
and women.

This support bestows an obligation on every member of our armed forces to
live up the loyalty and pride they receive from their fellow citizens. They must
never behave in a way that will bring shame to their uniform—our uniform.
I strongly urged that they never confuse stupidity for courage. I warned that, with
time, it is easy to become lax—especially when personal security becomes a boring
routine.

I quoted General Norman Schwarzkopf’s advice that character is the most
important factor in good leadership.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 13 September 2010
Place: Chicago, Illinois
Subject: Media Bias; Life Lessons
Organization: John Hersey High School (1 of 3)
Speech Summary
(This was one of two large assemblies. There was also a smaller group.
Altogether, I reached over a thousand students.)

I described the great responsibilities the students would soon assume. They will be
making the decisions that will guide their communities and our nation. It is
therefore crucial that they understand the news media.

I explained that the media will have more influence on their lives than anything
except their own decisions. Their lifestyles and standard of living could be changed
dramatically in the near future if the United States makes the wrong judgments.
Their freedoms could be curtailed or even lost completely.

I discussed the ways that some reporters slant the news in an effort to influence the
opinions and actions of their readers, viewers and listeners.

I described the difference between being Cool and pretending to be Cool—and
went over some of my basic life rules

I pointed out that who they “hang out with” is the best indicator of whether a
young person would become a productive, happy adult. I urged them to avoid the
losers and build their social lives around winners.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 13 September 2010
Place: Chicago, Illinois
Subject: Media Bias; World War II
Organization: John Hersey High School (2 of 3)
Speech Summary
(This was one of two large assemblies. There was also a smaller group.
Altogether I reached over a thousand students.)
I gave a rundown on news media power and bias, with the strong suggestion that
the students should not assume that coverage is necessarily always complete or
even correct.

I spoke about World War II. I talked about the numbers of men who served in the
armed forces—over sixteen million—and compared the interest in war news to
today, when only a relative handful of Americans and their families have a
personal role in our military activities.

I described the mood and involvement of all Americans on the home front. I
described the shortages, rationing, high tax rates and attitudes.

I talked about civilians having to stand on packed trains that were put on side rails
while troop trains and military equipment sped past on the main line.

I spoke about life, while overseas, for our GI’s. I explained that loneliness was the
biggest curse of service overseas—that we were completely separated from our
normal lives. The only news of family that we received “quickly”—within a few
days—was the death of a very near relative.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 13 September 2010
Place: Chicago, Illinois
Subject: Media Bias; Journalism Career
Organization: John Hersey High School (3 of 3)
Speech Summary
Journalism students were the bulk of my audience.

I gave my routine talk about news media bias and passed on thoughts about a
journalism career. I described the many dreams that I had as a child and teenager—
and, thanks to working as a reporter, all but one of them have been fulfilled. (I
have yet to make a parachute jump.)

I gave both positives and the downside of working as a foreign/military
correspondent. The biggest negative: long separation from one’s spouse and
family. Another drawback is that it is not the place for those who have making
money at the top of their want list.

I pointed out the difficulties of duplicating my experience in the current state of
journalism—and discussed the serious problems faced by the fourth estate.

I predicted that technology and social changes have insured tremendous changes in
news media.

I stressed the duties and responsibilities that go with becoming a professional
journalist.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 14 September 2010
Place: Chicago, Illinois
Subject: Media Bias; Youth Culture
Organization: Prospect High School (1 of 3)
Speech Summary
(The school arranged three very large assemblies.)

I gave my basic talk on news media power and slanted journalism—plus comments
on the current youth scene.

I described how we have a breakdown into two groups of young Americans: those
who have prepared to go into the world as productive, successful and happy
adults—and those who leave high school and become twenty-year-old teenagers.
Then, thirty-year-old teenagers. And, we are beginning to get the first of the forty-
year-old teenagers. One can look forward, with awe, at a future where there are
teenage mentalities among our retired.

The worst influence on American youth is a lack of adult involvement. Millions of
our teen-agers have never had a meaningful conversation about serious subjects
with an adult. They live in a teenage world of childish trivia and misinformation.
In place of responsible parents and wise mentors, they get their training for life
from the “entertainment” industry and other adolescents. Meaningful knowledge
and character building are not part of their curricula.

I talked about binge drinking and questioned the benefits of throwing up on your
shoes and/or peeing in your pants.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 14 September 2010
Place: Chicago, Illinois
Subject: Media Bias; Misbehaving in Class
Organization: Prospect High School (2 of 3)
Speech Summary
During my basic talk on journalism and slanted news, I had a very moving
experience.

When a girl began giggling and talked to a fellow next to her, I stopped my lecture
and, without identifying the culprits, talked about students who misbehave.
I pointed out that those who distract guest speakers and their own teachers are
cheating many people—starting with the working stiffs, retired old folks, et al.,
that pay heavy taxes to finance the education system. They also burn out their
teachers—most who come on the school scene with a strong dedication to helping
young men and women better their lives. Those who don’t pay attention kill the
enthusiasm of those who had dreamed of a career to help others. And, above all,
they cheat all those students who are determined to become well educated.

At the end of the period, many in the audience came up to say “Thank You”
and pass on comments or ask questions. When all but one had left, I asked the
remaining young man what I could do for him. He reached out his hand —and
apologized. “I was the guy who was laughing. I’m very sorry. I shouldn’t have
done that. I got your message ‘loud and clear’.”

I commended him on his courage in coming to me and for taking responsibility for
making a mistake. I patted him on the back and told him he was my hero of the
day—and would be successful in life.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 14 September 2010
Place: Chicago, Illinois
Subject: Media Bias; Making it as an Adult
Organization: Prospect High School (3 of 3)
Speech Summary
I described the great responsibilities the students would soon assume. They will be
making the decisions that will guide their communities and our nation. It is
therefore crucial that they understand the news media.

I explained that the media will have more influence on their lives than anything
except their own decisions. Their lifestyles and standard of living could be changed
dramatically in the near future if the United States makes the wrong judgments.
Their freedoms could be curtailed or even lost completely.

I discussed the ways that some reporters slant the news in an effort to influence the
opinions and actions of their readers, viewers and listeners. I discussed the need to
get many sources of information—and pointed out the importance of Americans
breaking the habit of hard-wiring their brains by self- propagandizing themselves.
We need informed citizens who have a broad picture of reality. Getting most
information from the same sources makes it very difficult to achieve balanced
judgments of events.

I went over suggestions on how to best insure successful, productive and happy
lives. My major stress was on the importance of building character and amassing
knowledge—not just as keys to a successful career, but as the critical factors to
success as a person.

I advised that these accomplishments bring many everyday advantages—including
having more real fun.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 15 September 2010
Place: Chicago, Illinois
Subject: Media Bias; Making Life Work
Organization: Lane Tech High School (1 of 3)
Speech Summary
I described the challenges that teen-agers face as they move onto center stage. I
talked about the responsibilities that go with taking over the running of their
communities and our country—even as they take charge of their own lives.

I explained the importance of news media in their future—and the need for them to
understand how it works.

In addition, I talked about life lessons.

I urged the students to think about what they do. I pointed out that actions have
consequences and that even small decisions, in large numbers, set up big
conclusions. No one ever decided that they wanted to spend their life in a cage,
within high walls, their life totally regimented while being bullied, gang-raped, etc.
But a string of bad decisions has brought about this ending for millions.

I went over suggestions on how to best insure successful, productive and happy
lives. My major stress was on the importance of building character and amassing
knowledge—not just as keys to a successful career, but as the critical factors to
success as a person.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 15 September 2010
Place: Chicago, Illinois
Subject: Media Bias; Life Lessons
Organization: Lane Tech High School (2 of 3)
Speech Summary
I explained the power of the news media—and warned that many reporters are
trying to manipulate the public through slanting stories

In addition, I talked about life lessons. I stressed the great importance of gaining
knowledge and developing character

I pointed out that who they “hang out with” is the best indicator of whether a
young person would become a productive, happy adult. I urged them to avoid the
losers and build their social lives around winners.

I described the difference between being Cool and pretending to be Cool—and
went over some of my basic life rules.
Among my suggestions on how to better insure successful, productive and happy
lives: “Life is tough. And, it’s tougher when you’re stupid.—Don’t be stupid!”

I talked about binge drinking and questioned the benefits of throwing up on your
shoes and/or peeing in your pants.
Accuracy In Media/Allied Educational Foundation
Speakers Bureau
Speakers Bureau Report – 3rd Quarter 2010
Speaker: CHARLES WILEY
Date: 15 September 2010
Place: Chicago, Illinois
Subject: Media Bias; Youth Culture
Organization: Lane Tech High School (3 of 3)
Speech Summary
I gave a basic talk on the power of news media—and the continuous attempts to
propagandize the public with slanted news coverage.

I discussed the need to get many sources of information—and pointed out the
importance of Americans breaking the habit of hard-wiring their brains by self-
propagandizing themselves. We need informed citizens who have a broad picture
of reality. Getting most information from the same sources makes it very difficult
to achieve balanced judgments of events.

I described the breakdown into two groups of young Americans: Those who have
prepared to go into the world as productive, successful and happy adults—and
those who leave high school and become twenty-year-old teenagers. Then, thirty-
year-old teenagers. And, we are beginning to get the first of the forty-year- old
teenagers. One can look forward, with awe, at a future where there are teenage
mentalities among our retired.


The biggest influence on American youth is a lack of adult involvement. Millions
of our teen-agers have never had a meaningful conversation about serious subjects
with an adult. They live in a teenage world of childish trivia and misinformation.
In place of responsible parents and wise mentors, they get their training for life
from the “entertainment” industry and other adolescents. Meaningful knowledge
and character building are not part of their curricula.

				
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