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					                                         THE ACT

What is the ACT?

The ACT assessment, or A-C-T as it is more commonly known, is a national college admission
examination that consists of tests in English, Math, Reading, and Science Reasoning.

What is the Test Like?

The ACT consists of 215 multiple-choice questions and takes approximately 3 hours and 30
minutes to complete, including breaks. Actual testing time is 2 hours and 55 minutes.
The ACT consists of 5 sections: English, Math, Reading, Science, and Writing.

The English Section

Time            Content                                           Item Types
45 min.         Punctuation, grammar, and usage,                  75 multiple choice questions
                Sentence structure, and rhetoric skills

The Math Section

Time            Content                                           Item Types
60 min.         Pre-Algebra, coordinate geometry,                 60 multiple choice questions
                elementary algebra, intermediate
                algebra, plane geometry, and trigonometry

The Reading Section

Time            Content                                           Item Types
35 min.         Determine main idea of passage,                   40 multiple choice questions
                locate and interpret significant
                details, understand sequences of
                events, comprehend cause-effect
                relationships, and draw generalizations

The Science Section

Time            Content                                           Item Types
35 min.         Data representation, research sum-                40 multiple choice questions
                maries, conflicting viewpoints related
                to the natural sciences

The Writing Section (Optional)

Time            Content                                           Item Types
30 min.         Organize and express ideas                        Written essays to develop
                clearly, develop and support                      a point of view on an issue
                the main idea, use appropriate word
                choice and sentence structure

How is the ACT scored?
For each of the four multiple-choice tests, the raw score is the number of correct responses. Raw
scores are converted to scale scores through statistical equating procedures to ensure that scores
reported across test forms have a constant meaning. Scale scores range from 1 (low) to 36 (high)
for each of the four multiple-choice test scores, rounded to an integer. Fractions of .5 or higher
are rounded up to the nearest whole number.

Why should I take the ACT?

There are at least 4 reasons to consider taking the ACT:
    The ACT tests are universally accepted for college admission. The ACT is now accepted
        by virtually all colleges and universities in the U.S., including all of the Ivy League
        schools.
    The ACT assessment test is curriculum based. It is not an aptitude or IQ test. Instead, the
        questions on the ACT are directly related to what you have learned in your high school
        courses in English, Math, and Science. Because the ACT is based on what is taught in the
        high school curriculum, students are generally more comfortable with the ACT than they
        are with the traditional aptitude tests or tests with narrower content.
    The ACT is a bargain. As private, nonprofit organization governed by educators, ACT is
        committed to providing services at the lowest possible cost.
    You maintain control over which scores colleges will see. You may take the ACT more
        than once and you can choose which test date scores will be sent to colleges.


When should my child take the ACT?
Most students take the ACT during their junior and senior year in high school.
            Six-Point Holistic Scoring Rubric for the ACT Writing Test
Papers at each level exhibit all or most of the characteristics described at each score
                                         point.

Score=6
Essays within this score range demonstrate effective skill in responding to the task.
The essay shows a clear understanding of the task. The essay takes a position on the issue and
may offer a critical context for discussion. The essay addresses complexity by examining
different perspectives on the issue, or by evaluating the implications and/or complications of the
issue, or by fully responding to counterarguments to the writer’s position. Development of ideas
is ample, specific, and logical. Most ideas are fully elaborated. A clear focus on the specific issue
in the prompt is maintained. The organization of the essay is clear; the organization may be
somewhat predictable or it may grow from the writer’s purpose. Ideas are logically sequenced.
Most transitions reflect the writer’s logic and are usually integrated into the essay. The
introduction and conclusion are effective, clear, and are well developed. The essay shows a good
command of language. Sentences are varied and word choice is varied and precise. There are
few, if any, errors to distract the reader.

Score=5
Essays within this score range demonstrate competent skill in responding to the task.
The essay shows a clear understanding of the task. The essay takes a position on the issue and
may offer a broad context for discussion. The essay shows recognition of complexity by partially
evaluating the implications and/or complications of the issue, or by responding to
counterarguments to the writer’s position. Development of ideas is specific and logical. Most
ideas are elaborated, with clear movement between general statements and specific reasons,
examples, and details. Focus on the specific issue in the prompt is maintained. The organization
of the essay is clear, although it may be predictable. Ideas are logically sequenced, although
simple and obvious transition may be used. The introduction and conclusion are clear and
generally well developed. Language is competent. Sentences are somewhat varied and word
choice is sometimes varied and precise. There may be a few errors, but they are rarely
distracting.

Score=4
Essays within this score range demonstrate adequate skill in responding to the task.
The essay shows an understanding of the task. The essay takes a position on the issue and may
offer some context for discussion. The essay may show some recognition of complexity by
providing some response to counterarguments to the writer’s position. Development of ideas is
adequate, with some movement between general statements and specific reasons, examples, and
details. Focus on the specific issue in the prompt is maintained throughout most of the essay.
The organization of the essay is apparent but predictable. Some evidence of logical sequencing
of ideas is apparent, although most transitions are simple and obvious. The introduction and
conclusion are clear and somewhat developed. Language is adequate, with some sentence variety
and appropriate word choice. There may be some distracting errors, but they do not impede
understanding.

Score=3
Essays within this score range demonstrate some developing skill in responding to the task.
The essay shows some understanding of the task. The essay takes a position on the issue but does
not offer a context for discussion. The essay may acknowledge a counterargument to the writer’s
position, but its development is brief or unclear. Development of ideas is limited and may be
repetitious, with little, if any, movement between general statements and specific reasons,
examples, and details. Focus on the general topic is maintained. The organization of the essay is
simple. Ideas are logically grouped within parts of the essay, but there is little or no evidence of
logical sequencing of ideas. Transitions, if used, are simple and obvious. An introduction and
conclusion are clearly discernible but underdeveloped. Language shows a basic control.
Sentences show a little variety and word choice is appropriate. Errors may be distracting and
may occasionally impede understanding.

Score=2
Essays within this score range demonstrate inconsistent or weak skill in responding to the
task.
The essay shows a weak understanding of the task. The essay may not take a position on the
issue, or the essay may take a position but fail to convey reasons to support that position, or the
essay may take a position but fail to maintain a stance. There is little or no recognition of a
counterargument to the writer’s position. The essay is thinly developed. If examples are given,
they are general and may not be clearly relevant. The essay may include extensive repetition of
the writer’s ideas or of ideas in the prompt. Focus on the general topic is maintained, but focus
on the specific issue in the prompt may not be maintained. There is some indication of an
organizational structure, and some logical grouping of ideas within parts of the essay is apparent.
Transitions, if used, are simple and obvious, and they may be inappropriate or misleading. An
introduction and conclusion are discernible but minimal. Sentence structure and word choice are
usually simple. Errors may be frequently distracting and may sometimes impede understanding.

Score=1
Essays within this score range show little or no skill in responding to the task.
The essay shows little or no understanding of the task. If the essay takes a position, it fails to
convey reasons to support that position. The essay is minimally developed. The essay may
include excessive repetition of the writer’s ideas or of ideas in the prompt. Focus on the general
topic is usually maintained, but focus on the specific issue in the prompt may not be maintained.
There is little or no evidence of an organizational structure or of the logical grouping of ideas.
Transitions are rarely used. If present, an introduction and conclusion are minimal. Sentence
structure and word choice are simple. Errors may be frequently distracting and may significantly
impede understanding.

No Score
Blank, Off-Topic, Illegible, Not in English, or Void
Frequently Asked Questions
About the ACT
Q. What is the ACT?
A. The ACT is a national college admission examination that consists of tests in English,
   mathematics, reading, and science-and an optional Writing Test.
   The ACT includes 215 multiple-choice questions.
   The ACT is prepared according to the:
    Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, American Educational Research
      Association, American Psychological Association, and the National Council on
      Measurement in Education. (1999).
    Code of Professional Responsibilities in Educational Measurement, National Council on
      Measurement in Education. (1995).
    Code of Fair Testing Practices in Education, Joint Committee on Testing Practices.
      (2004).

Q. How long does the test take?
A. Just over four hours for the ACT without the Writing Test, including administration
    instructions and breaks. Actual testing time is 2 hours and 55 minutes, broken down as
    follows:
     English: 45 minutes; Math: 60 minutes;
     Reading: 35 minutes; Science: 35 minutes
    The ACT Writing Test adds 30 minutes to the testing time.

Q. Why should students take the ACT?
A. There are at least four good reasons to take the ACT:
   1. The ACT tests are universally accepted for college admission. All four-year colleges
      and universities in the United States, including all of the Ivy League schools, accept the
      ACT.
   2. The ACT tests are curriculum based. The ACT is not an aptitude or an IQ test.
      Instead, the questions on the ACT are directly related to what is taught in high school
      courses in English, mathematics, and science. Because the ACT tests are based on what
      is taught in the high school curriculum, students are generally more comfortable with the
      ACT than they are with aptitude tests or tests with narrower content.
   3. The ACT is more than a test. In addition to the academic tests, the ACT also provides a
      unique interest inventory that provides valuable information for career and educational
      planning and a student profile section that provides a comprehensive profile of high
      school work and future plans.
   4. The ACT is a good value. As a private, not-for-profit organization governed by
      educators, ACT is committed to providing services at the lowest possible cost.
      Accordingly, the ACT provides a comprehensive package of educational assessment and
      career planning services at a modest fee.

Q. When are the test dates?
A. In the United States, U.S. Territories, Puerto Rico, and Canada, the ACT is administered on
   five national test dates: in October, December, February, April, and June. In selected states,
   the ACT is also offered in September.

Q. What is an ACT student Web account and why does a student need one?
A. ACT encourages all students to establish a free student Web account. The student will be
   required to provide identifying information in order to set up an account. Once they do, they
   will be able to do all of the following 24/7, anywhere they have internet access:
      Register online to take the ACT
      Print a copy of their admission ticket
      Make changes to their registration
      Update their student profile and view their account history
      Request additional score reports, if needed
      Order test preparation materials

Q. How often can a student take the ACT?
A. A student may take the ACT as often as he or she wishes. Many students take the test twice,
   once as a junior and again as a senior.
   There are no limitations on how many times a student can take the ACT, but there are some
   restrictions on how frequently they can test.
                                                ACT TEST DATES
                                                   2010-2011
                                 Test Dates in the U.S., U.S. Territories, and Canada
          Test Date                    Registration Deadline                          (Late Fee Required)

    September 11, 2010*                      August 6, 2010                             August 7 – 20, 2010

      October 23, 2010                    September 17, 2010                     September 18 – October 1, 2010

     December 11, 2010                     November 5, 2010                           November 6 – 19, 2010

     February 12, 2011**                    January 7, 2011                            January 8 – 21, 2011

         April 9, 2011                       March 4, 2011                              March 5 – 18, 2011

        June 11, 2011                          May 6, 2011                               May 7 – 20, 2011
 * The September 2010 test date is offered only within the 50 United States and D.C.
 ** No test centers are scheduled in New York for the February test date.

                                     2010-2011 ACT Fees and Services
 All fees are nonrefundable unless otherwise noted.
 Basic registration fee (per test option)
                                             ACT ( No Writing)                                                 $33.00
 Includes reports for you, your high school (if you authorize reporting), and up to four college choices (if valid codes are
 provided when you register).

                                            ACT Plus Writing                                                   $48.00
 Includes reports for you, your high school (if you authorize reporting), and up to four college choices (if valid codes are
 provided when you register). The $15.00 Writing Test fee is refundable, on written request if you are absent on test day
 or switch to the ACT (No Writing) before you begin testing.


Additional registration fees and services
Add to the basic fee for your test option

                              5th and 6th college choices                                    add $10.00 each
 Requested online before the test date; refundable on written request, if you do not test. Find out how much
                                   it costs to send your scores after you test.

                                   Telephone re-registration                                            add $12.00

                      Late registration fee (U.S. or Canada only)                               add $21.00
          For registration or test date change submitted during the late period for a national test date.

 Standby testing on test day (U.S. or Canada) or Late Test Date Change (outside the U.S. or Canada)
                                              add $41.00

                                         Test date change                                              add $20.00
    For different date only if absent or unable to test on original date. If you request a test date change after the
                          regular deadline for the new date, you must also add the late fee.

                                         Test center change                                               add $20.00
                                                  For same test date.

                                        Viewing scores online                                                  Free

				
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