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					Making Meaning of SchoolPLUS
in the Context of Community




A Resource Binder for Facilitators



    Saskatchewan
    Learning
Organizing Your Workshop
Included
Items for Consideration ........................................................................................Page 1

Module Overview .................................................................................................Page 2

Facilitator Notes .................................................................................................Page 9

Table and Seating Arrangement .............................................................................Page 10

Welcome and Day Overview ...................................................................................Page 11

Introductory Activity – Partner Introductions...........................................................Page 12

Opening Activity About SchoolPLUS ...........................................................................Page 15

Creating Norms ...................................................................................................Page 16

Developing Awareness of Each Other ......................................................................Page 17

Alternate Activity For Developing Awareness of Each Other........................................Page 19

Shared Leadership ...............................................................................................Page 21

Creating a Context for SchoolPLUS.............................................................................Page 25

Making Meaning of SchoolPLUS .................................................................................Page 27

The 3 Rs of SchoolPLUS ...........................................................................................Page 29

Understanding the Community Education Philosophy ................................................Page 32

Focus on Change .................................................................................................Page 35

Identifying Needs ................................................................................................Page 37

Addressing Needs ................................................................................................Page 44

Developing An Action Plan ...................................................................................Page 51

The Two Functions of Schools................................................................................Page 55

Creating Authentic Partnerships.............................................................................Page 58

Appendix ...........................................................................................................Page 60




March, 2006                                                                                                                   i
ii
Items for Consideration
The first decision to be made by a facilitator will be to choose sessions for the workshop based
on the purpose for the workshop, the mix of participants, and the context of the particular
community. Three one-day menus have been developed to support facilitators with their
choices. A purpose and audience is suggested for each menu. Facilitators are encouraged to
build their workshop in collaboration with those who will be participating.

Depending on the purpose for the session, the facilitator may need to consider whether the
participants should be placed in mixed groups or in friendship groups. If participants are from
a variety of sectors, it would be advisable to mix them so that they come to know one another
and have greater opportunities for networking. One way of doing this is explained in the
Facilitator Notes section.

The role of the facilitator is to support participants as they develop the capacity to become
leaders, rather than to be an expert. All sessions are built with this expectation. Sessions are
also built to complement current research on adult learning theory.

Some aspects of adult learning theory are:

    •   Adults learn best when the learning is connected to their background knowledge and
        experience.
    •   Adults learn best when they have the opportunity to learn in a variety of ways such as
        overheads and charts for visual learners, partners and small group work for auditory
        learners, and hands-on experiences for kinesthetic learners.
    •   Adults learn most effectively when engaged collaboratively with peers.
    •   Adult learners need opportunities to think and reflect about their learning.
    •   Adult learners need to be involved in the learning process.




                                                                                                   1
    Module Overview
    Timelines:

    Timelines are dependent upon the number of participants present and are a guideline only. The
    timelines suggested here are approximate indicators for a group of 20 – 25 using a skilled
    facilitator.

    Modules:

    Partner Introductions                                                          20 - 30 minutes

    This module is a general icebreaker meant for groups where participants do not know each
    other. In this activity, participants are asked to choose a partner, interview this partner to find
    out certain information, and then introduce this partner to the group. Depending on the
    number of participants, the facilitator could have all participants introduced to the large
    group, or could suggest that introductions just occur at each table.


    Opening Activity                                                                     30 minutes

    This module could be used as an opening activity with participants who already know each
    other well. It requires some background knowledge of SchoolPLUS. It could also be used as the
    opening activity for a second session, when the first session has contained some SchoolPLUS
    information. In this activity, participants are asked to identify what they know about SchoolPLUS
    and what questions they might have.


    Creating Norms                                                                       20 minutes

    This module is a requirement for all workshops. As participants in this workshop may be from a
    variety of different workplaces, and because some of the issues that will be dealt with might
    be sensitive for some of the participants, it is important that a positive climate be developed
    early in the workshop. This activity will create conditions that the group agrees to abide by
    regarding how they will treat each other.

    The facilitator might like to remind participants of the norms created by the group at certain
    points throughout the day, or immediately prior to the Identifying Needs module. If a two-day
    session is being used, it might be helpful to have the group review the norms on day two, and
    assess whether these were followed or need to be adjusted.


    Developing Awareness of Each Other                                                   40 minutes

    This module is a team-building activity and works best when members do not know each other
    well. It provides an opportunity for members to recognize that as a group, we have access to
    more skills than we do as individuals. This will be very useful if the group is going to become
    a working group that will work together over time. In this activity, participants are asked to
    identify their own skills and experiences, and to share these with others. They are also asked
2
    to share their interest in this committee or group.
Alternate Activity for Developing Awareness of Each Other                          40 minutes

This module is also a team-building activity, but works best when individuals know and are
comfortable with each other. It would work well with professional groups, but might not work
well for community members, as those who do not have work experience might find some parts
of the activity intimidating. In this activity, participants are asked to identify a time when
they were successful, or achieved a difficult goal.


Shared Leadership                                                                  40 minutes

This module aims to develop a deeper understanding of leadership, and can be done in
conjunction with either of the two above modules: Developing Awareness of Each Other. The
aim of the activity is to illuminate the fact that anyone can be a leader, and that this role is
not dependent on the job that one might hold. The module aims to develop capacity at the
ground-roots level. Participants are asked to identify qualities that they associate with
leadership.


Creating a Context                                                                 30 minutes

This module will be necessary for any individuals who have little or no background in
SchoolPLUS. It is a preparation for the module to follow called Identifying Needs. The module
provides background information about the roots of SchoolPLUS, and also reflects initiatives in
other sectors that are based on the recognition that community understanding and
involvement are necessary for the continued successful growth of children, youth, families and
communities. It would not be necessary for an audience of educators.


Making Meaning of SchoolPLUS                                                       30 minutes

This module is meant for groups who already have some background knowledge of SchoolPLUS
and could replace the Creating a Context module above.

The activity also provides a way for groups to develop a common meaning of SchoolPLUS.
SchoolPLUS is a concept, rather than a process, so this making of meaning may not look the
same in all communities or contexts. This activity could be used in conjunction with The Two
Functions of Schools to develop a deeper understanding of SchoolPLUS, or could be used prior
to any of the additional modules, such as Identifying and Addressing Needs.


The 3 Rs                                                                           40 minutes

This module provides a way for groups to develop a deeper meaning of SchoolPLUS as a concept
with a focus on the 3 Rs that Saskatchewan Learning is using to guide SchoolPLUS, particularly
in a school context, or with Local School Association or Division School Board members. This
activity encourages participants to make meaning of the 3 Rs in the context of their
responsibilities and/or work life.

The activity would possibly not have much meaning for community groups without a SchoolPLUS
background.
                                                                                                   3
    Understanding the Community Education Philosophy                                  60-70 minutes

    This module helps to create an understanding of the need for a process such as SchoolPLUS.
    Participants are asked to consider and define the word “community”, and to relate this concept
    to education.


    Focus on Change                                                                      30 minutes

    This module encourages participants to recognize that the world our children are living in is
    very different from the world that they grew up in. Participants are asked to generate a list of
    changes that they believe might have an impact on their community. The activity provides an
    opportunity for participants to consider change prior to moving into the Identifying Needs
    module. It also could be used to help participants understand the need for community
    collaboration in general.


    Identifying Needs                                                              30 – 40 minutes

    This module is a required preliminary activity to the following two, Addressing Needs and
    Developing an Action Plan. It enables participants to identify some of the factors that are
    affecting schools and communities today, and to develop a plan for action. It is these factors
    that have established the need for sectors to work together in an integrated manner. Due to
    the nature of this activity and the opportunity for raising awareness about community issues,
    the facilitator will need to consider the timeline as more flexible than most. He or she may
    need to circle the room and “listen in” on conversations to see where the groups are in terms
    of completing the activity or in having meaningful conversations, and adjust the timeline
    accordingly. It is possible to use this activity and the Addressing Needs module just to
    address awareness, without going on to develop a plan to start action, although it is hoped
    that action will be the result.


    Addressing Needs                                                                     45 minutes

    This module follows directly from Identifying Needs above. It provides an opportunity for
    participants to identify which supports are already present in their community in order to
    address some of their identified needs. This activity leads directly into the Developing an
    Action Plan module.


    Developing an Action Plan                                                            90 minutes

    This module builds directly onto Identifying and Addressing Needs and uses the forces
    identified earlier as a starting place for an action plan. In this activity, the group will develop
    an action plan that addresses the needs in their community. This module would only be used
    with a group that intends to continue to build community supports, rather than with a group
    that intends to build awareness of local issues.




4
The Two Functions of Schools                                                     30 minutes

This module provides a way for groups to develop a deeper meaning of SchoolPLUS as a concept,
and could be used as an alternative to Developing an Action Plan, or as a conclusion to the
Identifying and Addressing Needs modules. Groups are encouraged to consider barriers that
might prevent the different sectors from working together cooperatively. The factors that are
raised during these discussions could become an action plan based on addressing barriers that
could prevent successful human service integration, and/or addressing implementation issues.


Creating Authentic Partnerships                                                  40 minutes

This module addresses the ways in which we work with other sectors. It could be used in place
of the Two Functions of Schools module, or as a follow-up from the Developing an Action
Plan module. The activity encourages participants to consider what we mean by the words
“authentic collaboration”. This activity could be followed up in a number of ways depending on
the needs of the particular group or community:

•   The facilitator could ask the large group to brainstorm all the possible ways in which
    partnerships could be developed in their community(ies) in order to support the school
    and/or students in their learning goals. The group could then be directed to choose one
    goal and develop an action plan.

•   The facilitator could ask the group to consider how they could involve themselves in
    authentic collaboration with the school in their community.

•   If the group contains school personnel and community members, groups could work
    together to develop an action plan that supports the needs of students and the school.

•   The group could identify the partnerships that are already in place in their community and
    determine how this group can support these partnerships.

Outlines for the above are not included in this resource.




                                                                                                 5
    Possible Pathways or Menus for Modules
    Although some menus are included, facilitators may alter modules as they wish in order to
    address their needs.



                                         Outline Map

      Purpose: Raising Awareness                                     Times

      Audience: Community or Mixed

      Partner Introductions OR Opening Activity                      9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

      Creating Norms                                                 9:30 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.

      Developing Awareness of Others                                 9:50 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

      BREAK                                                          10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

      Creating a Context                                             10:45 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

      Making Meaning of SchoolPLUS                                   11:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

      LUNCH                                                          11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

      Understanding the Community Education Philosophy               12:45 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.

      BREAK                                                          1:55 p.m. – 2:10 p.m.

      Focus on Change                                                2:10 p.m. – 2:40 p.m.

      Creating Authentic Partnerships OR Two Functions of Schools    2:40 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.

      Wrap Up and Closure                                            3:20 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.




6
                                   Outline Map

Purpose: To develop a Community Action Plan      Times

Audience: Community/mixed but non-educator

Partner Introductions OR Opening Activity        9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Creating Norms                                   9:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.

Developing Awareness of Others                   9:50 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

BREAK                                            10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Shared Leadership                                10:45 a.m. – 11:25 a.m.

Creating a Context                               11:25 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.

LUNCH                                            11:55 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Focus on Change                                  12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Identifying Needs                                1:00 p.m. – 1:40 p.m.

Addressing Needs                                 1:40 p.m. – 2:25 p.m.

BREAK                                            2:25 p.m. – 2:40 p.m.

Developing An Action Plan                        2:40 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.




                                                                           7
                                       Outline Map

    Purpose: To develop a SchoolPLUS Action Plan            Times

    Audience: Educators and other professionals
    presently collaborating in schools

    Opening Activity                                        9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

    Creating Norms                                          9:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.

    Alternate Activity for Developing Awareness of Others   9:50 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    BREAK                                                   10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

    The 3 Rs                                                10:45 a.m. – 11:25 a.m.

    Focus on Change                                         11:25 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.

    LUNCH                                                   11:55 a.m. – 12:55 p.m.

    Identifying Needs                                       12:55 p.m. – 1:35 p.m.

    Addressing Needs                                        1:35 p.m. – 2:20 p.m.

    BREAK                                                   2:20 p.m. – 2:35 p.m.

    Developing An Action Plan                               2:35 p.m. – 4:05 p.m.




8
Facilitator Notes
Preparation for the workshop
  •   Table and seating arrangement: a chart with an example for a large group is included.
      For smaller groups, the most effective arrangement is a series of small tables that
      allow 4-6 people to sit and work together comfortably. Tables may be arranged in a
      “classroom” design where all tables face the front, if that is where the facilitator
      intends to stand. There needs to be room for participants to move around easily
      between tables as groups may be changed during the day. An opportunity for work
      groups to move to another space while doing group work is also desirable, if at all
      possible.

  •   The facilitator will need a table on which to arrange speaking notes, water, handouts,
      charts, etc. that might be needed while facilitating.

  •   A registration table needs to be set up close to where participants will enter with a
      participant list, name tags, agenda, and any handouts needed for the day.

  •   If the facilitator wishes to mix people to provide opportunities to make new
      connections, s/he should pre-mix participants as applications are received to establish
      a balance of sectors. Each group will be designated a color. Place a colored dot on
      each name tag to represent these groups and give these to participants as they
      register. Each table can then have an item in that color on it for easy reference.

  •   Audio visual requirements (wireless microphones, overhead projector, charts, CD player)
      will need to be ordered and set up.

  •   Handout materials and/or agendas will need to be prepared.

  •   Chart paper, tape or fun-tack for posting chart paper on the walls, markers, hi-lighters,
      etc. for facilitator and participants will need to be assembled.

  •   Prepare chart headings for workshop activities if needed.

  •   Arrange for coffee, juice, water, nibbles, etc.

  •   Make or share lunch arrangements if necessary.




                                                                                                  9
     Table and Seating Arrangement
                                          Screen
           Table                                                                     Table

                      Chart                                          Chart




                                             Table
           Chart                                                                     Chart



                              Transparency Projector




     Table groups can be 4-6 participants. Please check spacing so that chairs can be
     moved in and out easily, and there is room between tables, ideally, for
     presenters to move about.

                              From: Data-Driven Dialogue: A Facilitator’s Guide to Collaborative Inquiry
                                                                   By Bruce Wellman and Laura Lipton
10
Welcome and Day Overview
 •   The facilitator will welcome everyone to the session and will introduce him/herself.
     S/he will also mention any housekeeping items that might be relevant for the
     particular occasion, such as bathroom locations, break times, and lunch possibilities.

 •   The facilitator will briefly explain the purpose of the day/session based on the specific
     context. The purpose could be to raise awareness of SchoolPLUS, to develop a community
     action team, or to develop a school-based action team. A possible script is:

         “SchoolPLUS is a concept that sees schools fulfilling two primary roles: to educate
         children and youth and to be centers of support and services for children, youth,
         and their families. You have been invited here today so that we can provide
         support for you as you begin to work in a SchoolPLUS environment”.

 •   The facilitator may make mention of the fact that there are people here from a variety
     of sectors and could mention what these are.

 •   The facilitator may mention that we all have different skills and backgrounds that we
     have developed through our own work and life experiences, and that we are bringing
     these together so that we can work collaboratively to improve the lives of children,
     youth and their families in Saskatchewan.

 •   The facilitator may make reference to agenda, timelines, etc.




                                                                                                 11
     Partner Introductions
     Goals
         •   To act as an ice-breaker
         •   To learn who is present at the session


     Preparation
     The facilitator will need to determine whether pairs will introduce each other to their table
     groups, or to the large group, depending on the number of participants. If the total number is
     in the 20 – 25 range, it will be easy to accommodate introductions to the whole group within
     the time limit. This latter option is most helpful in allowing everyone to come to know each
     other.

     The facilitator will then choose four of the questions below, or may develop other questions
     that are more reflective of the group. The facilitator will need to chart the questions chosen,
     or can use the sheets provided.

         •   What is your name?
         •   Where are you from?
         •   What brings you here today?
         •   What is one thing that nobody knows about you?
         •   What is one thing that you would like others to know about you?
         •   What is one thing that you have in common with your activity partner?
         •   What is one thing that you are passionate about?


     Activity
     The facilitator will give the following instructions:

        Please choose a partner that you do not know well for this activity. You are going to
        interview each other using the questions on the chart or the sheet provided. You will have
        8 minutes to complete both interviews, and then you will each introduce your partner to
        the (large or table) group.

     Pairs will have 5-8 minutes to complete their interviews.




12
Activity Sheet
Partner Introductions

Choose a partner.

Interview your partner to gather the information on the chart:



•




•




•




•




When you have finished, switch roles to gather the same information.




                                                                       13
     Activity Sheet
     Partner Introductions

     Choose a partner.

     Interview your partner to gather the following information:



     •   What is your name?




     •   Where are you from?




     •   What brings you here today?




     •   What is one thing that you are passionate about in your life?




     When you have finished, switch roles to gather the same information.




14
Opening Activity
Goals
    •   To   act as an ice-breaker
    •   To   allow full participation
    •   To   create shared knowledge about SchoolPLUS
    •   To   share background knowledge about SchoolPLUS
    •   To   ask questions about SchoolPLUS
    •   To   recognize that there are different levels of awareness about SchoolPLUS


The facilitator gives the following instructions to the group.

   With the person sitting next to you, or with your table group, take about 15 minutes to
   generate a list of what you know about SchoolPLUS, and what questions you have about
   SchoolPLUS. Write these down on the chart paper provided.

The facilitator will then ask groups to share what they know and their questions, and will post
their charts on the wall.

The facilitator will then ask all participants to consider the posted charts and talk to their
table groups about what they are noticing. If not brought forward by the group, the facilitator
could comment that there is a variety of information and questions listed and that the intent
of this workshop is to answer questions that participants may have.

The facilitator could end the day by returning to these lists to see how knowledge has grown
over the day.




                                                                                                  15
     Creating Norms
     Goals
         •   To create a positive climate for the workshop
         •   To develop awareness of communication courtesies
         •   To foster inclusion, respect, comfort and confidentiality


     The Facilitator will give the following instructions:

        As we will be spending some time together, let us take a few moments to think about how
        to make this day a productive one for all of us. First, think about a time when you felt
        excluded or not involved when you were with a working group. What conditions existed on
        that occasion that created a barrier for you? What conditions would have made you feel
        comfortable and would have enabled you to become involved? As members of a group,
        what do we need to do to show respect for each other? At your tables, develop a list of
        conditions or norms that will create a positive and productive environment for all of us.
        These might be things such as: no put-downs, listen attentively, etc.

        After 10 minutes, I am going to ask each table to share their list and we will make a
        master list for all of us to adhere to.

     When the list is made and agreed to, the facilitator will post it on the wall in a prominent
     position so that everyone can see it easily.




16
Developing Awareness of Each Other
Goals
    •   To share experiences and skills
    •   To develop trust and rapport
    •   To identify the strengths of the group


The facilitator will give the following instructions and the information will also be given to the
participants on a handout sheet.

   The purpose of this activity is to identify the strengths that are present in this group so
   that we can work together as a team.

   Individually, think about your life experiences with children and youth. What is important
   to you about children, youth and communities?

   What have you learned through your own family experiences? What opportunities or
   experiences have you had through volunteering or working with children, youth, and school
   or community groups? What have you experienced through your work life? What interests
   you about being a part of this group?

   When you have thought about these questions individually, share your thoughts with your
   partner.

The facilitator will then instruct the group to develop a list of everyone’s information on chart
paper. The group could also develop a group name. The group does not need to identify who
has done what.

When finished, groups will be asked to post their chart paper on the wall with the group name
as a heading. When all groups have finished, ask all participants to take a Gallery Tour of the
charts with group members.

Then groups will return to their tables and the facilitator will ask them to discuss what they
are noticing about the large group. Each group will be asked to share one point that they
noticed.




                                                                                                     17
     Participant Reflection Sheet
     Individually, think about your experiences with children and youth.

     •   What is important to you about children, youth and communities?




     •   What have you learned about children and youth through your own family experiences?




     •   What opportunities or experiences have you had through volunteering or working with
         children, youth, and school or community groups?




     •   What skills or knowledge have you gained because of your experiences?




     •   What interests you about being a part of this group and what would you like to offer?




18
Alternate Activity for
Developing Awareness of Others
Goals
    •   To   share experiences and skills
    •   To   develop trust and rapport
    •   To   identify the strengths of the group
    •   To   use a strength-based approach


The facilitator gives the following instructions to the group:

   Individually, think about a time when you were successful, had a positive experience, or
   achieved a difficult goal. What made this experience a meaningful one for you? What did
   you do that helped to make you successful? What skills or knowledge did you bring to this
   experience? What did you learn about yourself because of this experience?

   When you have thought about these questions and have completed the Reflection Sheet,
   please share your information with a partner. Then share your information with your table
   group and together, develop a chart of your group’s skills and experiences.

The facilitator will then ask each group to post their charts on the wall, and visit the charts
posted by the other table groups.

Then groups will return to their tables and discuss what they are noticing about the large
group. Each group will be asked to share one point that they noticed about the skills and
experience present in the room.




                                                                                                  19
     Participant Reflection Sheet
     Individually, think about a time when you were successful, had a
     positive experience, or achieved a difficult goal.

     •   What made this experience a meaningful one for you?




     •   What did you do that helped to make you successful?




     •   What skills or knowledge did you bring to this experience?




     •   What did you learn about yourself because of this experience?




20
Shared Leadership
Goals
    •   To   understand that leadership is a shared responsibility
    •   To   recognize that we all have leadership skills and abilities
    •   To   develop a shared leadership approach in our schools and communities
    •   To   build capacity at the “ground-roots” level


Preparation
Blank index cards will need to be placed on all tables, as well as writing tools such as pens
and/or markers. Also, some of the Leadership Quotations will need to be placed on individual
cards and posted on the wall. The facilitator can choose which ones to use for the activity. It
would be helpful if such cards could be laminated for repeated use. The facilitator might like
to write the instructions on chart paper so that participants can refer back to them as they
progress through the activity.

The facilitator will give the following instructions:

   On your tables, you will see blank index cards. Individually, generate as many traits or
   behaviors as you can associated with leaders. Use a separate card for each trait or
   behavior. Some examples might be “good listener” or “motivates others.” It might help
   you to think of a leader you admire or know of. Generate as many leadership traits as you
   can in 3 minutes. Once you have finished, share your cards with the other members of
   your table group. Together, sort your cards into categories and choose a heading for each
   category. For example, you might have several traits falling under the heading of
   “communication”. Place your cards on the table so others can see the headings you have
   and the traits under each heading.

Once the initial part of the activity has been completed, the facilitator can add these further
instructions:

   When you have finished, take a tour of all the other displays with your table group. Look
   to see the headings others have developed, and the traits placed under them. When you
   have visited all of the displays, return to your table and talk about what you noticed.
   Choose one point to share with the large group.




                                                                                                  21
     The next part of this activity requires participants to move around the room and look at a
     series of quotations that will have been placed there in advance. The facilitator will give the
     following instructions:

        Individually, get up and read the quotations on the wall. Decide which quotation
        resonates with you (or speaks to you) the most. Stand beside that quotation and discuss
        with the other people there why you chose that particular one. I will ask someone from
        each group to share their reasons for the choice with the large group.

     The facilitator will ask for one person from each group to share. Participants will then be sent
     back to their tables with the following instructions:

        Now I want you to return to your table to create a matchbox definition of leadership. A
        matchbox definition is a short definition of no more than 25 words. You will be asked to
        share your definition with the large group.

     The facilitator will then debrief by asking the participants what they are learning about
     leadership. If not brought out, the facilitator could mention that the skills identified are ones
     this group shares and that by using these skills all of us have the capacity to be leaders in a
     SchoolPLUS environment.




22
Leadership Quotations
The growth and development of people is a leader’s highest calling.
Maxwell, 1995.




Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world.
Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.
Margaret Mead




Just because you can’t do everything, doesn’t mean that you can’t do anything.
Anonymous




Leadership is an affair of the heart, not of the head.
Warren Bennis




You cannot teach a man anything. You can only help him discover it within himself.
Galileo




Any growth requires a temporary loss of security.
Madeline Hunter




There are two ways of spreading light; to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.
Edith Wharton




Only those who risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.
T.S. Eliot




                                                                                          23
     You don’t get harmony when everyone sings the same note.
     Douglas Floyd




     We find comfort among those who agree with us – growth among those who do not.
     Frank Clark




     Real leaders are ordinary people with extraordinary determination.
     Anonymous




     Leadership is action, not position.
     Anonymous




     The greatest of all mistakes is to do nothing because you can only do a little. Do what you
     can.
     Sydney Smith




     No head, no foot, everyone is equal – even the king.
     Arthur of the Round Table




     Watch your thoughts; they become words. Watch your words; they become actions. Watch your
     actions; they become habits. Watch your habits; they become character. Watch your character;
     it becomes your destiny.
     Frank Outlaw




     We must be the change we wish to see in the world.
     Gandhi


24
Creating a Context
Goals
    •   To provide a context for SchoolPLUS
    •   To build background knowledge about SchoolPLUS
    •   To develop relationships between sectors


Preparation
Individual copies of the handout Background Information are needed for this activity.

The facilitator will give the following instructions:

   As communities, we are coming to understand that the best way to be successful and grow
   is to support each other. Communities in Saskatchewan have a long history of supporting
   families and individuals in difficult times. Possibly, you have been involved yourself by
   fighting a fire, providing shelter, or by supporting a family when one of the members has
   been ill. Communities in Saskatchewan are being asked to provide support for each other
   once again, but now in situations where we have traditionally not been involved.

   Individually, please read the handout that has been placed on your table.

   When you are finished, look up and have a discussion with the first person at your table
   you make eye contact with regarding the information you have just read.

   Then, discuss with your table group how schools might benefit by collaborating with other
   sectors or groups.

The facilitator will give the groups approximately 15 – 20 minutes for this discussion and will
then ask each table group to share one point with the large group.




                                                                                                  25
     Background Information
     The Task Force on the Role of the School was established in May of 1999. Its task was to
     examine the role of the school in society today. The Task Force did this by holding a series of
     public meetings, and by inviting submissions from groups and organizations. This group held
     meetings all around the province, from August 1999 to December 2000, and also received over
     100 submissions from a variety of individuals, organizations and groups.

     The Saskatchewan Government developed a response to the Task Force and produced a
     document in February of 2002 titled Securing Saskatchewan’s Future: Ensuring the Wellbeing
     and Educational Success of Saskatchewan’s Children and Youth. This document outlines
     goals, a plan of action, and processes necessary to meet the goals.

     Several other initiatives also share some of the core principles and objectives of SchoolPLUS.
     For example, having clear outcomes, providing appropriate and timely service, and placing an
     emphasis upon collaboration. Some of these initiatives are:

         •   Enhancing Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Primary Health Care
             (EICP) This initiative is focused on identifying the most effective and efficient ways
             for health care providers in Canada to work together to produce the best health
             outcomes for patients and clients.
             (website: www.eicp-acis.ca)

         •   The Canadian Collaborative Mental Health Initiative
             This initiative seeks to strengthen the delivery of mental health care in primary health
             care settings through collaboration with other areas.
             (website: www.ccmhi.ca)

         •   The Youth Services Model
             This initiative prepared the ground for the introduction of The Youth Criminal Justice
             Act in 2003. It sought to reduce an over-reliance on the youth justice system by
             connecting the developmental needs of young persons to agencies where they can best
             be met in collaboration with other areas.

         •   Child Welfare Redesign
             This initiative identified that some families were being served by an intrusive child
             protection service when they merely needed support and guidance, rather than
             protection. Through collaboration with other agencies, this initiative seeks to clarify
             where appropriate service responses come from and to improve the timeliness of those
             responses.




26
Making Meaning of SchoolPLUS
Goals
    •   To share the provincial vision of SchoolPlUS with participants
    •   To build knowledge and background in participants
    •   To make meaning of these new ideas in the context of a variety of human service areas
        and communities
    •   To develop group skills




Preparation
The background information in Creating a Context might be helpful for the facilitator in this
activity.



The SchoolPLUS Vision – Making a Circle Map
The facilitator will chart the following statements which are the SchoolPLUS vision and goal as
articulated by the Government of Saskatchewan.



Vision
Schools serve as centres of learning, service delivery and community where the needs of
all Saskatchewan children and youth are met by working closely with their families,
community and other human service providers.



Goal
The goal of SchoolPLUS is to create conditions whereby every school is relevant to children
and youth, responsive to family and community and results oriented.




                                                                                                  27
     The facilitator will then give the following instructions to the groups.

     In your table groups, you are going to develop a Circle Map that will help you to come to a
     common understanding of the vision and goal of SchoolPLUS.

     You will proceed in the following way:

         •   Select one person at each table to draw a large circle on a piece of chart paper with a
             smaller circle inside (an example will be provided).

         •   Individually, think about any words, phrases or questions that come to mind when you
             read the vision and goal and write them in the large circle.

         •   Think about what this vision and goal might look like when they are realized in our
             communities.

         •   After writing individually, share your words with the group and add any new words that
             come to mind as you talk together about the meaning you are making.

         •   Now look at all the words and phrases or questions that you have contributed. Are there
             any themes or common ideas becoming apparent?

     The facilitator will then encourage groups to respond to the following questions:

         •   What are you learning about the meaning we are making of SchoolPLUS?

         •   What questions is this raising for you?

     The facilitator may need to answer questions or provide some clarification at this point.




28
The 3 Rs of SchoolPLUS
Goals
    •   To   share the 3 Rs of SchoolPLUS with participants
    •   To   build understanding of the new directions of SchoolPLUS
    •   To   make meaning of these new ideas
    •   To   develop group skills


Preparation
The facilitator will need to have the Background Information sheet ready to hand out for this
activity, plus chart paper and markers for each group. There will also need to be several index
cards prepared with the words Relevant, Responsive and Results-oriented written on them.

The facilitator will place one of the index cards on each table, ensuring that all Rs are utilized
as equally as possible. More than one table could be looking at each R, depending on the
number of participants.

The facilitator will then give the following instruction:

   In your groups, please identify people who will take the following roles for this activity: A
   scribe who will do your writing, a time-keeper who will watch the time, a reporter who will
   share with the large group, and a facilitator who will ensure that everyone has the
   opportunity to participate, and that the group stays on topic.

The facilitator should wait for a few moments while these arrangements are being made and
then ask all the time-keepers to identify themselves by putting up their hands, followed by the
scribe, reporter and facilitator. This ensures that everyone is clear about the task.

The facilitator will then continue by saying:

   SchoolPLUS is guided by a new set of 3 Rs to position schools to deal with the needs and
   challenges of students and society today and tomorrow. These are the words Relevant,
   Responsive and Results-oriented.

Each table has been given one of these Rs on an index card.

    1. In table groups, take the R that you have been given (Relevant, Responsive, Results-
       oriented), and generate as many words or phrases as you can that either have the same
       meaning as this word, or can help you to understand the meaning of this word.




                                                                                                     29
        2. Think of examples from your life experiences that relate to your R word. For example,
           what initiatives or organizations do you know of that you would call responsive to
           community or individual needs? What experiences have you had with decisions that are
           made based on results? What would a learning program look like if it was relevant to
           the lives of students?

            Keep going until you run out of words. Write these on chart paper.

        3. Now try to pull all your information together into a metaphor, an analogy, a drawing, a
           concept map or a diagram so that you can explain your word to the large group. You will
           need to put this information onto a chart that we can post for everyone to see.

     This activity should take 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, the facilitator could check with the
     groups to see if the task is complete or if they need more time. One way of doing this is to
     ask the time-keeper from each group to raise a fist if they do not need any more time, and
     one, two, three, four or five fingers denoting the number of minutes needed to complete the
     task. The facilitator will then ask the reporters from each group to share the information
     collected with the large group and to give a brief explanation of their thinking as they
     developed their final product.

     The facilitator will then hand out the Background Information from Saskatchewan Learning and
     ask groups how these definitions extend their understanding.

     Groups will be asked to share one point from this discussion.




30
Background Information
SchoolPLUS is guided by a new set of 3 Rs to position schools to deal with the needs and
challenges of students and society today and tomorrow:

• Relevant
Learning programs focused on targeted learner needs to ensure that all Saskatchewan’s
children and youth make successful transitions within Pre-K to Grade 12 and into post-
secondary education and/or employment and active citizenship.

• Responsive
Schools attending to the needs of children and youth, families and communities including
increased attention to the needs of Aboriginal students.

• Results-Oriented
Schools focused on results and improved learner outcomes.




                                                                                           31
     Understanding the
     Community Education Philosophy
     Goals
         •   To   develop understanding of the principles underlying SchoolPLUS
         •   To   create common understanding
         •   To   share experiences and skills
         •   To   build capacity


     Preparation
     For this activity, all groups should contain six participants.

     This activity uses a handout called Community Education. A copy can be printed from the
     Saskatchewan Learning website at www.sasked.gov.sk.ca at the Community Education Unit, and
     a copy is also included here (Appendix – page 60).

     The facilitator will write the word Community as a heading on a piece of chart paper and will
     list the questions below, in preparation for this activity.

     The facilitator will ask the participants:

        In your table groups, please discuss the word Community in relation to the following
        questions:

             •     How would you define community?
             •     What does community mean to you?
             •     What is the importance of community?




32
After their discussion, the facilitator will ask participants:

   Now please write the word Community in the centre of a piece of chart paper. Then, draw
   several lines out from this word and add the most important words or phrases from your
   discussion to these lines to make a web of your thoughts.

An example on chart paper would be helpful.

The groups will then be asked to compare their definition with the following one used by
Saskatchewan Learning:

Community(ies) – group(s) of people bound together by mutual interests or destiny, and/or a
geographic location. Community can be defined by geography – town, rural area, or
neighborhood. There are also communities of shared interest or destiny – senior’s community,
arts community or cultural/ethnic community. Community can also be the “dynamic of people
being together” in an organization, classroom, workplace, or among a group of friends.
(Saskatchewan Learning, 2003)

The facilitator will then ask:

   In what ways are your understandings of Community similar and in what ways are they
   different from this definition?

Now that the groups have developed an understanding of community, they will develop an
understanding of Community Education.

The facilitator will place a copy of the Saskatchewan Learning document, Community Education
on each table.

The facilitator will ask the group members to divide into 3 pairs. The task of each pair is to
read and identify the main points on one of the first three pages in the Saskatchewan Learning
document, Community Education, and then share their information with the others at their
table. Once pairs have identified themselves, they will determine which page they will read.
Pairs will be given 10 – 15 minutes to read and discuss their page, and then 5 minutes for
each pair to share.




                                                                                                 33
     The facilitator will give the following instructions:

        Please divide yourselves into 3 pairs at your table. Each pair will take one of the first three
        pages from the document on your table to read and discuss with your partner. Once you
        are comfortable with your section of the document, I will ask you to share your
        information with the other pairs.

     After sharing the information, tables will be asked to discuss in their table groups:

         •   How does this information connect to your understanding of community that was
             discussed earlier?
         •   How does a community education philosophy deepen your understanding of SchoolPLUS?

     The facilitator will then debrief by asking each table to share one point from their discussion
     about the connection between a community education philosophy and SchoolPLUS. The
     facilitator will then ask the large group to comment on the following:

         •   What will schools gain from a community education philosophy?

     In this discussion, the facilitator will highlight the role of community in education.




34
Focus on Change
Goals
    •   To recognize that communities, families and schools will become stronger as they
        provide support for each other
    •   To recognize that we all have leadership skills and abilities
    •   To develop a shared leadership approach in our schools and communities
    •   To build group capacity and skills


Preparation
Index cards will need to be placed on all tables, and some writing tools such as pens and/or
markers.

The facilitator will give the following instructions:

   I would like you to think about the following question:

   What major changes do you anticipate will happen in society over the next 20 years that
   could affect your community and the people in your community?

   Individually, write down your ideas on index cards. Place one idea on each card. You will
   have 5 minutes to generate all the ideas that you can.

   Now that you have your own ideas, share them with your table group. See if there are any
   common themes or ideas. Please put your ideas into categories and give a name to each
   category.

   Now take a tour of all the tables so that you can see the ideas that the other groups have
   identified. When you return to your table, I will ask you to discuss what you noticed.




                                                                                                35
        Now that you have identified possible changes that could affect your community, I would
        like you to think about what supports need to be in place so that the young people of this
        community can successfully adapt to these changes. Choose the one change that you think
        is the most likely and which could have the greatest effect as you identify possible
        supports. Once you have finished, please decide how you will share your information in a
        visual way with the large group. You might like to make a diagram, or to develop a
        concept map of ideas, or a word collage. Choose a reporter who will share your discussion
        with the large group.

     Debrief
     After all have shared, the facilitator could identify common themes, or ask the following
     questions:

         •   Why is this change important to us?
         •   What do we need to do to prepare for future change?

     In this discussion, the facilitator can summarize by making the connection between changes in
     society and the need for schools and community to adapt to these changes.




36
Identifying Needs
Goals
    •   To   provide a context for SchoolPLUS
    •   To   build background knowledge about SchoolPLUS
    •   To   build capacity
    •   To   develop working relationships between involved agencies


Preparation
The facilitator will need to have cards with the “significant forces” prepared in advance.
Facilitators are encouraged to add any additional forces that they believe are present in their
community.

As this activity leads directly into the Addressing Needs activity, facilitators will need to
make a decision about the make up of table groups and ask themselves:

    •   What do we hope will be the outcome of this session?
    •   Will we have better outcomes if groups are chosen strategically?
    •   Do we want groups to be from different sectors or the same sectors?

Facilitators will also need to make a decision regarding the number of forces to be covered by
each group. All forces should be covered by the whole group, but this can be broken down into
3 or 4 per table group, depending on numbers present.

Participant activity sheets are available for this activity and should be placed on tables prior
to instructions being given.

The facilitator will then show the overhead of the Significant Forces as the following
instructions are given:

    •   The Task Force on the Role of the School identified 14 significant forces that were
        affecting schools and communities at that point in time

    •   In your groups, look at the cards on your table and read the information about some of
        these factors

    •   Discuss the extent to which each of these factors might impact student learning in your
        school and community. Identify these factors as: “significant”, “not significant” or
        “don’t know”

    •   Add any additional factors you are aware of that may be having an impact in your
        community onto the blank cards on your table

    •   You will be asked to share your findings with the large group

The facilitator will ask the groups to share their information and will let groups know that
                                                                                                   37
this information will be needed for the second part of the activity.
     Activity
     Identifying Needs
     In your table groups, complete the following:

        •   Look at the cards on your table and read the information about them




        •   Discuss the extent to which each of these forces has an impact on student learning in
            your school or community




        •   Identify each force as Significant, Not Significant or Do Not Know




        •   Develop a pile of cards under each of the above headings




        •   Identify any additional factors that may be having an impact in your community not
            shown here and make a card for it from the blank cards on your table




        •   You will be asked to share your findings with the large group




38
Significant Forces
Adapted from the Task Force on the Role of the School (2001)




                                                              demographic shift




                                                                                                                      nd
                                                                                                                    ya
                                           pupil mobility
   in




                                                                                                                 iet
     div for




                                                                                                          ion soc
        idu al
           ali l st




                                                                                                     liz on
              ze




                                                                                                   ba ati
                                                                                                        at
                d en




                                                                                                        s
                                                                                                glo form



                                                                                                      ge
                 ne ts




                                                                                                   an
                   ud
                    ed




                                                                                                  in



                                                                                                 ch
                      s
                       po




                                                                                             ily
                         ve




                                                                                          fam
                           rty




                                 Schools and Communities


                      es                                                                      ch
                                                                                                 an
                issu                                                                               ge
             al            s                                                             vio         si
         ltur            rm                                                                 len        n
                                          career concerns

                                                            human services integration




                       fo                                                                                so
      cu             re                                                                         ce         cie
   ss-            ol                                                                                          ta
cro           ho                                                                                                l
            sc                                                                                                             va
        in-                                                                                                                  lue
                                                                                                                                s




                                                                                                                                    39
     Significant Forces
     These forces are significant in our school or community:
     (Include any forces that you have identified yourselves)




     These forces are not significant in our school or community:




     We do not know if these forces are significant at this time or not:




40
Individualized Needs For All Students
Today we recognize that all children have differing abilities and disabilities that we need to
accommodate in the classroom. These accommodations might be for physical, emotional,
behavioral, cultural or academic needs. All students in Saskatchewan must have an equal
opportunity to do their best with the individualized supports that teachers and schools can
offer.



Demographic Shift
There are several significant examples of demographic shift in Saskatchewan. One is rural
depopulation. Rural populations have been decreasing steadily and the school-age population
has been particularly affected. Another demographic shift is that of the “baby boom”
generation who are moving into their 50s and 60s and retirement. Also, there is a significant
growth in the numbers of school-aged children of First Nations and Métis ancestry being born.
It is estimated that by the year 2016, First Nations and Métis children will make up over 40%
of all children in school in Saskatchewan.



The Information Society And Globalization
Our society has undergone, and is still in the process of undergoing, a large scale change in a
number of areas. One of these is in the area of technology. Modern technology is rapidly
affecting many aspects of our lives from agriculture to communication. Also, the amount of
knowledge that exists is rapidly expanding. Some say that we are now living in the Knowledge
Age. These factors affect the way we “do” school. We need to ensure that children are prepared
for a future that we have not seen and possibly cannot even imagine.



Poverty
Poverty has always been a concern in Saskatchewan. However, we are now seeing a bigger gap
than ever between the “haves” and the “have nots”, and poverty in Saskatchewan is growing.
Saskatchewan has the second highest incidence of children receiving food from food banks in
Canada. Even though poverty is a large concern in and of itself, we now know that poverty has
many negative effects on child development physically, behaviorally, and educationally.




                                                                                                  41
     Pupil Mobility
     It has become apparent that some students either are not in school or are moving frequently
     between schools. In many cases, no one knows who these children are. In extreme
     circumstances, none of the students who registered in the fall are still present in June;
     however, additional students may have entered. This greatly affects student success, and also
     has an impact on the work of the school in general and the teacher in particular.



     Family Changes
     Family structure has changed within society recently. Although the structure of a family in
     itself has no bearing on success at school, many single parent homes also experience poverty,
     or move frequently, thus multiple issues are at play. There is often a need for additional
     support for families as they struggle through changes in their circumstances.



     Cross–Cultural Issues
     As Saskatchewan becomes a more diverse society and includes people from a variety of cultural
     backgrounds, it becomes important to ensure that all children feel at home in our schools. This
     means that we need to recognize the contributions of all cultures in our curricula and in our
     schools. It is important, too, that issues of racism are addressed and understood, as are issues
     of communication, body language and new perspectives. It is particularly important that First
     Nations and Métis content and perspectives are taught to all Saskatchewan students so that as
     a province, we can grow in harmony.



     Human Services Integration
     At one time, all the human services operated separately from each other. Nowadays, there is a
     lot of integration. Nurses and a variety of other health professionals, counselors, and police
     officers come into schools to attend to the needs of students. It is important that we find
     ways in which we can all work together and communicate regularly for the benefit of all.



     In-School Reforms
     Saskatchewan schools have been through many changes over the last two decades. One of
     these is in the area of curriculum and new curricula are now in place in all subject areas. Also,
     the focus of teaching and learning has moved towards a goal of life-long learning for students
     with the processes and skills necessary for this achievement, away from a content focus.
     Furthermore, teachers now adapt for student learning needs on a daily basis, and a movement
     towards resource-based learning has decreased the reliance on class texts. All of these issues
     have contributed to making teaching a complex task.

42
Career Concerns
One result of the many changes taking place in society is that that there are many more
options for careers available today than there were in the past. Also, we know that young
people today will most likely change their jobs two or three times in their careers. Because of
these factors, students need to be aware of the many possibilities open to them, as well as
those not yet identified. They also need to be aware of the skills needed in the work place,
and recognize that these will probably change. Students therefore need to become life-long
learners and need to learn how to manage their careers. This calls for a new approach to career
education in schools.



Violence
Without a doubt, the issue of school violence is a very troubling one. However, it is also a
reflection of attitudes in society which extend into communities. Not all schools face the huge
problems that we read about in the papers, but most schools have to deal with issues of
physical, verbal, and relational bullying. Schools need to address these issues in order to not
only make school a safe place to be, but also to ensure that young people have conflict
management skills and anger management skills prior to going out into the wider world.



Changes In Societal Values
Due to many of the other forces at play in society today such as poverty, violence, and family
changes, teachers today play a larger role in meeting children’s needs than they used to. Many
more students are dealing with mental health issues such as depression, which is indicated by
the high levels of suicide that we are seeing in our young people. As well as this, schools are
also dealing with issues such as values and character formation. For many children, school is a
safe place for them to be, where they experience a level of support that they may not find at
home. Many schools are feeling under stress as they deal with issues such as these that they
may not feel prepared for.




                                                                                                  43
     Addressing Needs
     Goals:
         •   To   develop an action plan for communities
         •   To   understand forces affecting local schools and communities
         •   To   form working relationships between different sectors
         •   To   provide a context for SchoolPLUS
         •   To   build background knowledge about SchoolPLUS
         •   To   build capacity


     Preparation
     This activity requires some preparation in terms of setting up stations prior to the arrival of
     the participants. All material will be included with the binder; however, the facilitator might
     like to add services or agencies that are available in the local community, and remove those
     that are not applicable to the group. It is helpful to have these stations in different areas, or
     quite apart to allow for easy movement of people. Alternatively, the facilitator could suggest
     that no more than 4 people be at a station at one time. If there are a large number of
     participants, it might be helpful to duplicate the supports and have two stations for each
     support function. Consider visibility and where possible, post the support headings above the
     stations.

     The facilitator will need to consider the number of participants at the session when deciding
     how to divide the task between the group members. Tasks could be given to pairs or to table
     groups, depending on the numbers present.

     Each table group will be asked to divide the cards they have identified as Significant in the
     last activity between the pairs in each group. They should also review the cards identified as
     Do Not Know and consider how they might find out if these factors are indeed significant
     ones.

     When participants have received their cards, they will be asked to complete the following
     steps:

         •   Write your factors from the cards on the sheet provided.

         •   In pairs, take a tour of the five stations placed around the room. These stations are
             “Health Supports”, “Community Supports”, “Education Supports”, “Justice
             Supports”, and “Other Supports”. At each of these stations is a selection of cards with
             the names of organizations or agencies in each of these support areas. Select any of the
             organizations or agencies at each station which could provide support for each of your
             identified forces. List these on the sheet provided. Spend no more than 10 minutes at
             each station.




44
   •   When finished, each pair will return to their table and share with the others the supports
       that they identified for the forces affecting their community. Each group will then take
       turns sharing their information with the large group.

The facilitator will then lead a discussion with the large group around where the most and
least supports are, how we can access those supports available, and how we can develop
awareness about those that are not available.

If available, the facilitator can access the Community Supports document currently under
development by the Community and Youth SchoolPLUS table.




                                                                                                    45
     Activity
     Addressing Needs
     Complete the following:

        •   In your table groups, divide the cards that you have labeled as Significant equally
            amongst all members.




        •   Discuss again the cards that you have labeled as Do Not Know and consider how you
            might find out this information. If they might be significant, please add them to that
            group of cards.




        •   In pairs, take your cards and visit the stations labeled as Supports.




        •   Using the Feedback sheet, list any organizations or agencies that could provide
            support for each force that you are responsible for.




        •   Spend no more than 10 minutes at each station.




        •   When you are finished, return to your table and share the information with your group.




        •   You will be asked to share with the large group.




46
Feedback Sheet

Significant Forces:




Health Supports:




Community Supports:




School Supports:




Justice Supports:




Other Supports:




                      47
     Supports
     Health Supports
     Child and Youth Services
     Teen and Young Parent Program
     Aids to Independent Living Program
     Parent Education Program
     Mental Health Services
     Community Living
     Addiction Services
     Prescription Drug Plan
     Family Health Benefits
     Local Hospital
     Local Medical Clinic
     Local Health Care Providers
     Calder Centre (Addictions)
     Bridgepoint (Eating Disorders)
     Alcoholics Anonymous
     Planned Parenthood Programs
     Suicide Crisis Program
     Health Education and Drug Awareness Programs
     Nutrition Programs
     Kids Help Line
     Speech Language Pathology Services

     Community Supports
     Saskatchewan Lotteries Community Grant Program
     Saskatchewan Abilities Council
     Saskatchewan Brain Injury Association
     SaskCulture Inc.
     Sask Sport Inc.
     Service Clubs ie Kinsmen
     Junior Achievement
     Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Canada
     Kidsport
     Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD Canada)
     Local Heroes or Resource People
     Local Churches
     Community Sports: hockey, dance, etc.
     Community or Church Youth Groups
     Town Councils
     Local Daycare
     Local Emergency Measures Organization (EMO)
     Food Banks
     Fire and Protection Services
48
Local Businesses:
    Coop
    Credit Union
    Local Store
    Local Library
    Community Coaches
    Local Pharmacy
Community Based Organizations

School Supports
Life Skills Program
Teacher Assistants
Guidance Counsellors
Work Experience and Career Education Programs
Home and School Associations
Adult and Family Education in Community Schools
Non-Traditional Schooling Programs
Tutoring Services
After School Extra Curricular Programs
Teachers
Local School Board
Division School Board
Special Education Teachers
Teacher Librarians
School Student Representative Council (SRC)
School Committees
Saskatchewan Learning
    Instructional Resources Unit
    Curriculum and Instruction
    Aboriginal Education Unit
    Evergreen Curriculum
Saskatchewan Professional Development Unit

Justice Supports
Police Liaison Officers
Saskatchewan Justice
Legal Aid
RCMP or Local Police
Local courts
Local Lawyers
Justice Workers
Community Justice Programs
Crime Prevention Programs
Alternative Measures Program
Public Legal Education Association
Family Violence Services
Victim Services
                                                  49
     Other Supports
     Office of the Treaty Commissioner
     Children’s Advocate Office
     Department of Community Services & Resources (Social Services)
     Provincial Parks
     Post-Secondary Institutions
     Provincial Ombudsman
     Saskatchewan Arts Board
     Local MP
     Local MLA
     Financial Services
     Regional Colleges
     Employment Services
     Child & Family Benefit Services
     Arts, Culture & Heritage Department
     Aboriginal Elders Program
     Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG)
     Block Parent Program
     Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations (FSIN)




50
Developing an Action Plan
Goals
    •   To   identify local strengths
    •   To   identify local needs
    •   To   support students and their families
    •   To   actualize SchoolPLUS in the community
    •   To   build bridges between agencies


Preparation
The participants will need to be given three colored dots each for this activity. These can be
bought in packages from any business supply store such as Staples.

The facilitator will give the following instructions:

   Earlier, we looked at the many factors that are affecting students and their families in our
   communities which consequently impact upon student learning. One of our main goals
   today is to find ways in which we can begin to build supports for these factors. You have
   already identified some of the factors that are visible in your community. Now you need to
   decide which of these factors, or group of factors, you would like to begin to work on.

   Take a look at the factors that you identified as Significant or Do Not Know. For now,
   let’s assume that the Do Not Know group is also Significant.

   Spread the cards out on the table in front of you and think about them for a few
   moments. Are there some forces that are connected or inter-related? Is there a way that
   you can categorize these forces that will help you to see connections? Is there one force
   that you feel if improved, would also lead to improvements in other areas? Does one force
   stand out as a major need? Are you more comfortable prioritizing all forces than just
   choosing one? Do you want to work with the force that you see as the greatest need, or
   one that only needs some work but that might be an easier starting place?

   Discuss these questions with your group and come to an agreement about the area(s) that
   you want to target.

Give the groups 15 – 20 minutes to discuss and come to a decision. Ask groups to share their
target areas with each other. Groups that may have chosen the same target area might like to
connect with each other as they go through the action plan development process.




                                                                                                  51
     Analyzing the Situation
     The facilitator will ask the groups to choose one area or need for the next part of the activity.

        Individually, brainstorm all the possible actions that could be taken to support children,
        youth and their families in order to improve student learning.

     The facilitator could include this as an example – Poverty: develop a lunch program, provide
     snacks during the day, develop a community food bank, etc.

        After individual brainstorming, combine all your ideas and write them on chart paper with
        spaces left in between each idea.

        Now individually, take the three colored dots that have been placed in front of you and
        place them on the chart beside the three actions that you believe are the most critical.

        Add up the dots beside the actions and list them in order of most dots to least. You now
        have a selection of actions that you can begin to organize. For each action, complete the
        following:



      Who we plan to involve           How we will involve them          When we will involve them




52
 Activity      Start & end date       Lead person         Outcome           Evidence to
                                                          expected        support outcome




The facilitator should encourage the group to develop their own chart if those provided here do
not meet their needs.




                                                                                                  53
     The facilitator should also share the following example with participants and encourage
     participants to find ways in which they will be able to see if their actions are having the
     desired effect.


      Activity           Start/end date      Lead person        Outcome            Evidence to
                                                                expected           support
                                                                                   outcome

      To develop a        September          Susan              Students will be   Improved
      lunch program       30th/05                               more successful    attendance
                                                                in school due      Improved
                                                                to good            homework
                                                                nutrition          completion
                                                                                   Less discipline
                                                                                   problems in the
                                                                                   afternoons


     After an appropriate amount of work time, groups will share their ideas and plans with the
     large group. Groups should be encouraged to look to each other for support if they find a
     challenge and need resources to overcome the challenge. Groups could also be encouraged to
     identify where they can find support for their plans if it is needed, or to work on issues that
     they have some control over, or can influence themselves.

     Follow up plans
     Groups should be encouraged to set meeting dates for follow up sessions either as a large
     group or as small groups in order to develop and work on their action plan.




54
The Two Functions of Schools
Goals
    •   To share the two roles of schools with participants
    •   To build knowledge and background in participants
    •   To make meaning of these new ideas in the context of a variety of human service areas
        and communities
    •   To develop group and organizational skills




   Background Information
   The Saskatchewan Government developed a response to the Task Force and produced a
   document in February of 2002 titled Securing Saskatchewan’s Future: Ensuring the
   Wellbeing and Educational Success of Saskatchewan’s Children and Youth. This
   document outlined goals, a plan of action, and processes necessary to meet the goals.
   As work has progressed towards SchoolPLUS, the direction of the SchoolPLUS process has
   been refined and clarified.



The facilitator will share the following:

SchoolPLUS is a concept that sees schools fulfilling two primary roles. These are:

    1. to educate children and youth – nurturing the development of the whole child
       intellectually, socially, spiritually, emotionally and physically

    2. to support service delivery – serving as centers at the community level for the delivery
       of appropriate social, health, recreation, culture, justice and other services for children
       and their families

   In your table groups, please identify someone who will be a scribe to keep notes of the
   discussion, a reporter to share your discussion with the large group, a time-keeper to
   remind group members of how much time is available, and a facilitator to ensure that
   everyone has the opportunity to take part in the discussion, that everyone stays on topic,
   and that the scribe is able to write down what is said.

Once this is decided, in your groups, please discuss the following questions:

    •   What would it look like if all human service sectors were participating in a SchoolPLUS
        environment to achieve these two functions?

    •   What preparations might we have to make?



                                                                                                     55
         •   Are there any barriers we need to identify that might prevent all sectors working
             together?

         •   How might we remove any barriers that might exist?

     Groups will be given 20 minutes for this discussion, with the option of extending the time if
     necessary.

     Once the 20 minutes has passed, the facilitator should check with the groups to see if the task
     is complete or if they need more time. One way of doing this is to ask the time-keeper from
     each group to raise a fist if they do not need any more time, and one, two, three, four or five
     fingers to denote the number of minutes needed to complete the task. The facilitator will then
     ask the reporters from each group to share the information collected with the large group.

     Facilitators will then ask table groups to briefly discuss what they have heard from all groups
     and to be prepared to share one point that struck them.




56
Role Sheet

Scribe: this person’s job will be to keep notes of the discussion held at your table




Reporter: this person’s job will be to share your discussion with the large group




Time-keeper: this person’s job will be to remind group members of the amount of time
available




Facilitator: this person’s job will be to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to take part
in the discussion, that everyone stays on topic, and that the scribe is able to write down what
is said




                                                                                                  57
     Creating Authentic Partnerships
     Goals
         •   To   recognize that authentic partnerships evolve over time
         •   To   develop an understanding of the components of authentic partnerships
         •   To   recognize that we all have leadership skills and abilities
         •   To   develop a shared leadership approach in our schools and communities
         •   To   identify where and how authentic partnerships can develop


     Preparation
     The facilitator will write the phrase Authentic Collaboration as a heading, and then the
     words: Involve, Inform, Engage on chart paper with a large circle around each word so that
     the page is full. Participants will be directed to copy these onto a piece of chart paper
     themselves and will then be given the following instructions:

        Each of these words represents ways in which we collaborate with groups and individuals,
        but each also requires a different level of collaboration. Into each of the circles, write as
        many words and phrases as you can that explain the word you are working with. For
        example, the circle with Involve might contain “ask for feedback”, or “invite to a meeting”.

     When all circles have been completed, the facilitator will ask:

        Now, please develop a specific example for each of these words, relating to a school
        environment. For example – To Involve could be to invite parents to a meeting at the
        school to discuss a new dress code. Also, consider when it is most appropriate to inform,
        involve or engage others in school-related events.

     Groups will be asked to share their examples and criteria.




58
Finally groups will be asked to develop a definition of authentic collaboration and to either
draw a picture or diagram, or to develop an analogy to share with the large group.

Their visuals will then be posted on the wall.

The facilitator could continue in a variety of ways from here:

    1. The facilitator could ask the large group to brainstorm all the possible ways in which
       partnerships could be developed in their community(ies) in order to support the school
       and/or students in their learning goals. The group could then be directed to choose
       one goal and develop an action plan.
    2. The facilitator could ask the group to consider how they could involve themselves in
       an authentic collaboration with the school in their community.
    3. If the group contains school personnel and community members, groups could work
       together to develop an action plan that supports the needs of students and the school.
    4. The group could identify the partnerships that are already in place in their community
       and determine how this group can support these partnerships.




                                                                                                59
     Appendix
     Community Education                                                    Where Did Community
     Schools and Communities Working Together                               Education Originate?
                                                                            Community education is not a new
                                                                            concept. The basic aspects of community
     What is Community Education?                                           education can be traced back to early
                                                                            human development and tribal life - what
                                                                            a child learned was fundamentally
     •   Community education is an educational philosophy based on          connected to the family, village and
         community involvement and lifelong learning.                       surroundings.

     •   Community education is based on the belief of inclusion and        It is rooted in the idea that the school is
         respect: that everyone in the community has a voice. It requires   a centre for community activities - it is
         collaboration and the involvement of families, community           vital to community life.
         members, organizations, teachers, staff and students in problem
         solving and decision making.                                       Community education as a specific
                                                                            educational philosophy and process began
                                                                            in the 1930s in the United States.
     •   Community education is a belief that schools are not alone in
         helping children and youth achieve success in school.              In Canada, the philosophy began drawing
         Community education values the important relationship between      interest in the 1960s, with the first
         the school and the family, and the school and the community.       Community School created in Toronto in
         The community is involved in the school and the school is          1966. This may be correlated with the
         involved in the community.                                         increase in urban populations.

     •   Community education is active in community development and         Saskatchewan has become a leader in
         improvement. Children and youth are better able to learn and       community education in Canada because
         achieve success in school when they feel their community is        of its well-developed programs, policies
                                                                            and networks.
         safe, caring and offers diverse opportunities for citizens.

     •   Community education promotes the involvement of schools in a
         community network that offers a range of learning opportunities
         – academic, recreational, social, health, and cultural – for
         citizens from birth to the senior years.

     •   Community education is based on the belief that a school is a
         fundamental part of the community. The school and its facilities
         are open after regular school hours, on weekends and during the
         summer to address diverse community needs. This bulletin
         describes the philosophy of community education.




                     This bulletin describes the philosophy of community education.
                                        For more information visit
           http://www.sasked.gov.sk.ca/branches/children_services/community_ed/ceindex.shtml
60
Principles of Community Education
Self-Determination
•    Community members are involved in identifying local needs,
     issues and solutions.
•    Parents, as their child’s first and most important teacher, play a              Task Force on the Role of the
     vital role in their child’s education.                                          School
Self-Help                                                                            Recommendation 1.1 That a Community
•    Independence is encouraged.                                                     School philosophy be adopted for all
•    Community education helps build the capacity of students,                       public schools in the province.
     parents and community members to identify needs and plan how
                                                                                     •    school is part of the community
     they will address those needs.
Leadership Development                                                               •    whole community is a resource for
                                                                                          the school
•    Local leaders are identified and their input is sought.
•    Leadership skills are developed among students, parents and                     •    parents are valued as partners
     community members.
                                                                                     •    student and community culture is
Maximum Use of Resources                                                                  strongly reflected
•    Community resources, financial, physical and human, are used to
     the fullest to meet the diverse needs of students and their                     •    education program is adapted to
                                                                                          meet student needs
     families.
Decentralization                                                                     •    school takes a developmental rather
                                                                                          than deficit approach to children
•    Services, events and activities are provided in the community, in
     easily accessible locations.                                                    •    pupil consultation at all levels
Integrated Services                                                                  •    school facilities are a resource for
•    Organizations and agencies collaborate to deliver services                           the community
     targeting students and their families.
•    Whenever possible, services and programs are offered at the                     Page 47, 48, Task Force on the Role of the
     school.                                                                         School: SchoolPLUS: A Vision for Children and
                                                                                     Youth: Toward a New School, Community
Inclusiveness                                                                        and Human Service Partnership in
                                                                                     Saskatchewan: Final Report (2001).
•    Programs, services and activities involve a broad cross-section of
     community residents.
•    People from all age, income, gender, ethnic, religious and racial
     groups participate in activities.
Responsiveness
•    Services and programs respond to the changing needs of the
     community.
Lifelong Learning
•    Learning begins at birth and continues throughout life.
•    Learning opportunities are available throughout the community
     for residents of all ages.




Source: Decker, L.E & Romney V.A (eds.) (1992). Educational restructuring and the

                                                                                                                                 61
community education process. Virginia: National Coalition for Community Education,
University of Virginia.
     Community Education in Saskatchewan
     Many of the province’s schools are an integral part of community life
     and display some or all aspects of the philosophy of community
     education. These schools develop strong community partnerships and
     implement community education practices. The examples below             Government Response to the
     illustrate community education practices in action.                     Task Force Report
     •   Families and community members are meaningfully involved            Government strongly endorses the
         inthe school – Parents and community members are asked to           concept of adopting the Community
         participate in designing and evaluating the school program. They    Schools philosophy for all schools.
         are involved in decision making and problem solving. Members        Through the Strengthening Educational
         of the local board of trustees, school council, advisory            Capacity process, all schools will be
                                                                             encouraged to become more open and
         committee or parent group are representative of the community
                                                                             inclusive and able to meet the learning
         population. Volunteers, staff and students work together to         needs of all students. As centres of
         create effective conditions for learning.                           community, schools will be assisted in
                                                                             establishing or strengthening partnerships
     •   School staff, students and board members are involved in            with families, community organizations
         community development, as representatives of the school,            and youth.
         and as community members – They seek to understand
         community strengths and needs. Through their roles, they create     Page 11, Securing Saskatchewan’s Future:
         an environment for community development to occur and               Ensuring the Wellbeing and Educational
         mobilize the school in addressing those needs.                      Success of Saskatchewan’s Children and
                                                                             Youth: Provincial Response – Role of the
                                                                             School Task Force Final Report (2002).
     •   The learning program is responsive - Education programs are
         child-focussed and of the highest quality. They are responsive
         and culturally affirming. They are delivered in a safe and caring
         school environment that encourages all students to reach their
         potential. The community is a resource for educators, with its
         strengths and needs integrated into the learning program.

     •   The school’s facilities are used by the community –
         Community activities such as meetings, recreational activities
         and adult education classes may take place at the school during
         the days, evenings and weekends. Community agencies may
         deliver services at the school. The school is used and valued by
         all in the community.

     •   Local businesses and community organizations actively
         contribute to the education of the children and youth in the
         community –Businesses and organizations participate in work-
         experience programs, give tours of their offices and facilities,
         prepare in-class presentations and make in-kind and financial
         contributions to the school. They become mentors and role
         models for students.

     •   Human service agencies offer services in conjunction with
         the school – Social workers, youth workers and health
         professionals collaborate with the school staff to provide
         integrated services for children, youth and their families. These
         agencies and the school may plan special initiatives, such as a
         summer recreation program for vulnerable children or anti-
         smoking activities targeting teens.


62
Meeting Diverse Needs
A founding principle of our education system is the commitment to
equity and to building an understanding among diverse groups,
interests and needs. A commitment to equity in education means
that the unique potential and capabilities of each child, young           Meeting the diverse needs of
person and adult are respected and affirmed. It requires practices        Saskatchewan children and youth is a
that are responsive to, and respectful of, social, cultural, spiritual,   shared responsibility in which
physical and environmental learning influences.                           students, families, teachers, and
                                                                          community members work together to
Community education, with its underlying belief in inclusion and          help all students learn. This requires
community development, can help create the conditions for all             coordinated/integrated efforts and
children and youth to succeed. For example:                               supports for and within the
                                                                          classroom, school and community.
•   school personnel believe strong family and community
    partnerships are crucial for student success;                         Page 5, Strengthening Supports:
                                                                          Minister’s Response to the Report of
•   the school creates a culture and climate that welcomes diversity      the Special Education Review
    and values the input of all in the community;                         Committee (2000).
•   school and community resources are combined to provide
    supports and services;

•   children, youth, families and community members play a critical
    role in developing and realizing the school vision; and,

•   groups that may not have traditionally played a leadership role,
    such as the Aboriginal community, are included in designing and
    evaluating educational programs and supports.

Online Resources
Community Education Unit of Saskatchewan Learning
    http://www.sasked.gov.sk.ca/k/pecs/ce/index.html
National Community Education Association
    http://www.ncea.com/
National Center for Community Education
    http://www.nccenet.org/
Coalition for Community Schools
    http://www.communityschools.org/
Community Education at Florida Atlantic University
    http://www.leadership.fau.edu/CommunityEducation/index.htm            “…people realize that communities
Community Schools: Linking Home, School and Community                     as well as schools educate, and that
    http://eric-web.tc.columbia.edu/npinpdfs/cschools.pdf                 the education of children is the
                                                                          responsibility of the entire
Need More Information?                                                    community.”

A detailed information package is available from the Community            Decker and Associates (1990)
Education Unit. Arrangements can also be made for a presentation
ata board, staff or community meeting. For more information
contact:
Community Education Unit
Ph: (306) 787-3938 Fax: (306) 787-0277

                                                                                                                 63

				
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