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THE ART INSTITUTE OF TORONTO PART A ORGANIZATION

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					THE ART INSTITUTE OF TORONTO

          PART A
    ORGANIZATION REVIEW
Part A – Organization Review


1.0 ORGANIZATION OVERVIEW


 Full Legal Name of Organization: Art Institute of Vancouver, Inc.

 Operating Name of Organization: The Art Institute of Toronto

 Common Acronym of Organization, if applicable: AITO

 URL for Organization Homepage, if applicable: http://www.AiTO.artinstitutes.edu/

 Date of Submission: September 21/2005

                                     Contact Information:
 Legal Address of organization:
 655 Bay Street, Suite 200, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2K4
 Telephone: (416) 351-7273
 Fax: (416) 351-1579
 E-mail:

                            Legal representative of organization:
 Last name: Trainor
 First name: Royden
 Department or Unit: Regulatory Affairs and Compliance, Assistant Corporate Secretary
 Address: 655 Bay Street, Suite 200, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2K4
 Telephone: (416) 351-7273 or (902) 441-0363
 E-mail: trainorr@aii.edu

 Official Function within organization: Regulatory Affairs and Compliance

 Contact person to liaise with the Organization Review Panel:
 Name: Lisa Delorme                              Name: Royden Trainor
 Title:   Campus President                       Title:    Regulatory/Compliance Counsel
 Address: 655 Bay Street, Suite 200, Toronto,    Address: 655 Bay Street, Suite 200, Toronto,
          Ontario M5G 2K4                                  Ontario M5G 2K4
 Telephone: (416) 351-7273                       Telephone: (416) 351-7273
 E-mail: ldelorme@edmc.edu                       E-mail: trainorr@aii.edu

 Program Information:
 How many programs are being submitted to the Minister for consent at this time: Two (2).




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Part A – Organization Review


1.2 Proposed Programs
      Location / Address       Street Address:       655 Bay Street, Suite 200
      where Proposed           City:                 Toronto
      Program to be            Province:             Ontario
      Delivered                Postal Code:          M5G 2K4
                               Telephone:            (416) 351-7273

                                                                     Does the organization
                                                                     already have
                                                   Indicate Degree   Ministerial Consent to
                                                   Level and Type    offer this program at
                               Proposed Degree     to be awarded     another location in
      Proposed Degree          Nomenclature        for program or    Ontario? If yes, please
      Title                                        part of program   attach a copy of the
                                                                     terms and conditions
                                                                     of consent to this
                                                                     appendix.

1     Bachelor Graphic         Bachelor, Graphic   Baccalaureate     No
      Design                   Design              Degree with an
                                                   Applied Focus

2     Bachelor Media Art &     Bachelor, Media     Baccalaureate     No
      Animation                Arts & Animation    Degree with an
                                                   Applied Focus




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Part A – Organization Review


Table of Contents

1.0 ORGANIZATION OVERVIEW ........................................................................2
         1.2 Proposed Programs ........................................................................................ 3

2.0 ORGANIZATION INFORMATION ..................................................................7
         2.1 Information About the Organization and its Operations ................................. 7

3.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..............................................................................10
         3.1 Executive Summary ..................................................................................... 10

4.0 SYNOPSIS....................................................................................................19
         4.1 Program Abstracts....................................................................................... 19

5.0 MISSION STATEMENT AND ACADEMIC GOALS .....................................20
         5.1 History, Mission and Academic Goals.......................................................... 20
         5.2 Relationship of Programs to Mission............................................................ 23
                                5.2.1 Current Degree Programs..........................................................23
                                5.2.2 Proposed Program(s) Mission/Goals .............. ..........................25
         5.4 Academic Policies ........................................................................................ 29
         5.5 Policy Documents......................................................................................... 29

6.0 ADMINISTRATIVE CAPACITY ..................................................................43

         6.2 Governance Structures ................................................................................. 44
                                6.2.1 Organization Chart......................................................................44
                                6.2.2 Responsibilities and Authority.....................................................45
                                6.2.3 Reporting Structure Chart ...........................................................55
         6.3 Administrative Staff ...................................................................................... 56
                                6.3.1 Administrative Positions..............................................................56
                                6.4.1 Academic Plan ............................................................................77
          6.5 Participation in Standards and Policies ......................................................... 79




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7.0      ETHICAL CONDUCT ..............................................................................99

         7.2 Ethical Standards .......................................................................................... 99

8.0 STUDENT PROTECTION .........................................................................103
         8.1 Student Recruitment Policies ..................................................................... 103
                                8.1.1 Art Institute of Toronto Academic Calendar.............................105
         8.2 Policy Awareness ........................................................................................ 105
                                8.2.1 Academic Calendar..................................................................105
                                8.2.2 Policy Awareness.....................................................................105


9.0 ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AND FREEDOM .................................................107
         9.1 Academic Freedom .................................................................................... 107
                                9.1.1 Academic Freedom Policy ........................................................107
                                9.1.2 Academic Freedom Constraints................................................108
         9.2 Intellectual Products .................................................................................... 108
                                9.2.1 Intellectual Products Policy .......................................................108
         9.3 Policy on Ethical Research Practices.......................................................... 109
         9.4. Academic Honesty ..................................................................................... 109
                                9.4.1 Academic Honesty Policy .........................................................109
                                9.4.2 Academic Honesty Procedure ..................................................110


10.0 FINANCIAL ...............................................................................................111

         10.2 Financial Audit Policy ................................................................................ 113

  11.0 DISPUTE RESOLUTION ..........................................................................114
         11.1 Dispute Resolution Policies...................................................................... 114
         11.2 Policy Implementation and Awareness .................................................... 123

12 .0 ORGANIZATION EVALUATION .............................................................125
         12.1 Periodic Review Policy and Schedule ...................................................... 125




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Part A – Organization Review


13.0 OTHER INFORMATION RELEVANT TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF
THE ORGANIZATION ......................................................................................149




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Part A – Organization Review


2.0 ORGANIZATION INFORMATION

2.1 Information About the Organization and its Operations
                    The Art Institute of Toronto
Location:           655 Bay Street, Suite 200
                    Toronto, ON M5G 2K4
                    Telephone: (416) 351-7273
                    Fax: (416) 351-1579

Address             The Art Institute of Toronto
where               655 Bay Street, Suite 200
proposed            Toronto, ON M5G 2K4
programs will       Telephone: (416) 351-7273
be delivered:       Fax: (416) 351-1579

Identify type       Incorporated Company
of ownership:
                    The Art Institute of Toronto is the operating name of the Art Institute of
                    Vancouver Inc., a Canadian incorporated and Ontario registered company.

                    The Art Institute of Toronto is wholly owned by The Art Institutes International,
                    Inc. The Art Institutes International, Inc. (“Art Institutes”) is a wholly owned
                    subsidiary of Education Management Corporation, also known as “EDMC” or
                    “Education Management”.

                    Education Management is among the largest providers of private post-
                    secondary education in North America, based on student enrolment and
                    revenue, with over 72,000 students at over 72 campus locations in 24
                    states and two Canadian provinces. EDMC's education institutions offer a
                    broad range of academic programs in the media arts, design, fashion, culinary
                    arts, behavioural sciences, health sciences, education, information technology
                    and business, culminating in the award of associates through doctoral degrees.
                    EDMC has provided career-oriented education for over 40 years.

                     “ART INSTITUTE OF TORONTO,” REGISTERED OPERATING NAME OF THE
                     ART INSTITUTE OF VANCOUVER INC.




                       Incorporated:        REGISTRATION # 120626924, (Ontario)
                       Directors:           John R. McKernan, Jr.
                                            J. William Brooks, Jr.
                                            Robert T. McDowell
                    ADDRESS AND CONTACT FOR DIRECTORS:
                    All Directors can be reached through the Art
                    Institutes International/Education Management Corporation office at 210
                    Sixth Avenue, 33rd Floor, and Pittsburgh, PA 15222. Telephone: 412-562-
                    0900. Fax: 412-562-0934.



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Part A – Organization Review


3.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

3.1 Executive Summary

Overview

The Art Institute of Toronto (“AiTO”), previously ITI Information Technology Institute (“ITI”), a

career college registered with the Ontario Ministry of Training Colleges and Universities, opened

at its current location in Toronto in 1997. More than 10,000 students graduated from ITI’s post

bachelor programs in applied information technology and some continuing their studies by

accessing credit transfer agreements allowing for graduate credits towards MBA or Masters of

Education Programs. Similar to the Art Institutes, ITI’s programs focused on outcome driven,

quality career relevant education and the success of its graduates. In 2001, ITI became part of

the Art Institutes and renamed “The Art Institute of Toronto” (“AiTO”). This combined

the strengths, missions and capacities of both organizations.            Education Management

Corporation (“EDMC”), parent of the Art Institutes, is among the largest providers of private post-

secondary education in North America with more than 72 campus locations in 24 states

and two Canadian provinces. Education Management Corporation’s education institutions offer a

broad range of academic programs in the media arts, design, fashion, culinary arts, behavioral

sciences, health sciences, and education and information technology. Education Management

Corporation through The Art Institutes has been a provider of quality applied post-secondary

education for more than 40 years. It is an outstanding education organization with a proven track

record of dedication to student success, building institutional capacity, quality education and

organizational integrity.



The Art Institute of Toronto’s mission is focused on providing quality postsecondary education in

the applied arts that prepares students for career entry. AiTO applies best practices, policies,

organizational structures and systems appropriate for a post-secondary education institution,

including accountability and validation processes that ensure adherence to its mission academic

goals and quality assurance.     The relationships of the academic goals to the programs are


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Part A – Organization Review

demonstrative, direct, integrated and inseparable from the mission and academic goals.

Reporting structures and systems are well developed and based on extensive experience and a

dedication to organizational and educational excellence. The Art Institute of Toronto

organizational structure creates a stimulating learning environment where committed and talented

students can develop their creativity and acquire the knowledge and skills required to pursue

careers in their chosen field.



This proposal is consistent with a proven capacity of the Art Institutes to establish, develop and

deliver quality regionally degree programs in the applied arts and design fields. Past performance

demonstrates success establishing entirely new or “start-up” organizations that were developed

from green-field sites. The locations are both regionally and nationally accredited degree granting

institutions. Four recent examples of these new starts institutions include The Art Institutes of

Washington DC, Phoenix and California (Los Angeles and Orange County). These institutions

have combined enrollment in excess of 5,000 students, including students enrolled in Media

Arts & Animation and Graphic Design degree programs. In other cases the Art Institutes have

acquired smaller intuitions, not unlike the Art Institute of Toronto, and invested, developed and

grown these institutions into highly successful regionally and nationally accredited degree-

granting institutions. The Art Institute of Portland, the Miami International University of Art &

Design, and The Illinois Institutes of Art at Chicago and Schaumburg are examples of such

acquisitions. Today these institutions have combined enrollment that exceeds 6,000 students.

While every academic community has its own special nature and every environment different, the

Art Institutes’ proven track proven past performance confirms the capacity and demonstrative

success in establishing and maintaining the success of new or acquired institutions.    Across the

Art Institute system there are more than 12,000.00 students enrolled in degree level programs in

Media Arts & Animation and Digital Design. This proven track record of success provides confidence

and significant strength to this proposal.




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Part A – Organization Review




Mission Relationship to the Organization

AiTO’s approach to education is based on effective and appropriately tested post-secondary

education organizational structures, models and processes. The organizational and reporting

structures of The Art Institute of Toronto reflect sound established principles of organizational

capacity building, accountably reflective of a high quality post secondary education institution.

While the organizational and reporting structures reflect the uniqueness of the Toronto school, it

benefits from the experience and capacities of sophisticated and well-developed organizational

models and process systems of the Art Institutes.



Students in Art Institute programs learn by doing. Programs incorporate a blend of theory and

practice intended to develop and demonstrate the student’s readiness for employment in the

occupational field. Programs of study offer a competency based, outcome focused and market

driven core curriculum that prepare students for the performance requirements in the applied arts

and design fields. Current industry and employment outcomes determine the design of the core

curriculum, including expected learning outcomes for each course. The programs proposed will

continue the Art Institute of Toronto’s dedication and success in student employment placement

after graduation.



Ongoing curriculum evaluation and industry input ensures that the skills taught are those

necessary to meet community and industry needs. The curriculum promotes the educational

goals and reflects sound academic practice in higher education for determining length, credit

value, assessment, learning outcomes and promotion of post-secondary education values and

objectives.



Curriculum committees, together with system-wide processes, ensure the integrity of programs

and processes for curriculum review and revision. Curricula development draws on the expertise




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Part A – Organization Review

of faculty, Program Advisory Committees, system-wide curriculum capacities and recognized

curriculum development models. Systematic qualitative and quantitative analyses assess

institution and program effectiveness and student success. Feedback processes involve regular

input from faculty alumni, students, employers and industry advisors.



The programs proposed are consistent with the trend towards increased international

harmonization in post-secondary education standards and are expected to be able

able to articulate with existing Art Institutes. The curriculum includes technical courses

complemented by a liberal arts “breadth” education component. Programs reflect what Industry

Canada, Conference Board of Canada, the Ontario Royal Commission on Post Secondary

Education and others describe as essential skills sets: numeric, writing, oral communication,

teamwork, lifelong learning, and thinking and computer competency.            The programs are

demonstratively consistent with programs currently taught at AiTO and subject areas of strength

of the Art Institutes system.



Organizational and Reporting Structures – Supporting the Mission

The organizational structure promotes quality education, accountability and robust organizational

practices.    Integrity driven practices are a core value of the institution and EDMC.         The

organizational structures, processes and polices are based on the mission and purpose, including

continuous improvement, quality assurance and the contributions of faculty, students and staff.

The Art Institute of Toronto organization includes clear lines of accountability and description of

role, responsibilities and performance evaluation.



The Art Institute of Toronto is dedicated to quality, applied career relevant, postsecondary

education. The Art Institute of Toronto adheres to stringent policies, processes and accountability

systems for quality assurance, compliance, validation and ethical business practices on an




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Part A – Organization Review

institute and system basis. These processes include systematic regular reporting, auditing,

compliance as well as outcomes assessment for the institution, programs, students and staff.

The organization and structures incorporate sound business and academic practice that support

its mission, academic goals and strengths.       Outcome and performance metrics for student

success, institutional effectiveness and all areas of key performance are measured against

expectations, employer and student satisfaction. These tools are used to assess institutional

and student success and are integrated into ongoing planning and key performance strategies.

Complementary Ai system and AiTO processes promote institutional and program effectiveness,

accountability and evidence based decision-making. The Art Institute of Toronto capacities include

sophisticated systems, operations models, management procedures and processes that are

proven effective in demanding post secondary educational environments. Established processes

include robust financial and operational models that provide objective and rigorous attention to

operations, internal controls and auditing requirements that meet rigorous internal and externally

validated measures.



Dedication to “doing things right” and business ethics is an uncompromising value and reflected

in the organizational structures. Reviews of business practices include the business practice

evaluations of all materials and policies before they are approved for publication. Every element

of the organization pays careful attention to ethical business practices. Compliance and business

practice assessments take place of policies, publications and procedures to ensure compliance

with applicable laws, regulations and business practice standards.         Rigorous accountability

processes are in place including business practice and compliance reviews, ethical business

practice policies and training and dedicated personnel supporting this function.




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Part A – Organization Review

The President is appointed by the Board of Directors and is the chief administrative office of

AiTO. An executive team, with clearly defined responsibilities and duties, supports the President.

The relationship among the Board, administration, faculty and staff is predicated on a shared

sense of purpose, open communication integrity, respect and quality. The executive team is

composed of The Dean of Academic Affairs, Director of Financial and Administrative Services,

Director of Admissions, and Director of Career and Student Services. Students and faculty

contribute and participate in decision-making process through Student Advisory and Faculty

Council’s.    Additional quality assurance, operational oversight and validation processes are

provided by a system wide Policy and Coordinating Board has an external oversight function with

The Art Institute of Toronto.



Academic operations are led by the Dean of Academic Affairs, is the chief academic

officer . The Dean of Academic Affairs helps coordinate academic decision-making, including

admission standards and program design, reflects the decision-making process involving the

faculty and the faculty committees. With the Faculty the Dean is responsible for policy and

curriculum development, delivery, assessment, evaluation and program revisions. Under the

leadership of the Dean of Academic Affairs, the Program Directors deliver learning-centered,

industry-relevant, and competency-based instruction, imbued with goals of higher learning. Like

the President, the Dean of Academic Affairs accesses additional expertise from across the Art

Institutes system.       These resources include quality assurance processes, subject matter

expertise,    curriculum       development,   self-study,   institutional   effectiveness   planning   and

assessment, student success models, faculty development and the use of system–wide best

practices and standards.



AiTO is committed to highly qualify academic personnel who possess the professional, academic

credentials and experience appropriate to an institution of higher education offering applied

degree level programs.          Faculty planning includes an assessment of each faculty member’s




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Part A – Organization Review

academic credentials and professional history relative to the courses he or she currently teaches

and may teach in the future. The commitment to highly qualified faculty includes support for

professional development and access additional learning opportunities. The Dean of Academic

Affairs is responsible for the overall supervision, coordination and development of instructional

policies, programs and personnel.      Credentialed faculty are responsible for the delivery of

effective classroom instruction of the programs. In fulfilling this responsibility and in support of

the mission and goals, faculty members contribute -- individually and collectively -- to an ongoing

process of curriculum development and revision. Review and revision of curricula is a

responsibility shared among the faculty, Program Directors, Dean of Academic Affairs, Curriculum

Committee and Program/Industry Advisory Committees (“PAC”). The Industry led PACs play a

critical role in curriculum development and supports the mission of the programs and the

institution.



AiTO organizational and operational structures of the Art Institute of Toronto recognize the need

to support the whole student, beginning with the admission process and continuing through

enrolment and following graduation. Student support services are integrated throughout multiple

departments including the Admissions, Student Financial Services, Academic Affairs, Student

Affairs and Career Services, all play an important role in student success.    AiTO’s mission and

program design integration can be seen its investment in career and employment support

services for students. This investment when integrated with professional and employment skills

built into curriculum design is an important feature of AiTO programs and a reflection of the

priority we place on student success and achieving the mission of the institution and programs.



The budgeting, organizational and strategic planning processes are an inclusive exercise

involving the President, faculty and staff and are linked to the institute’s strategic plan mission

and goals.      An annual strategic plan, which includes development and delivery of degree

programs, involves the ongoing assessment of institutional operations and key performance




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Part A – Organization Review

indicators. Throughout this process, President, faculty and staff utilize both internal and external

tools of assessment. Budgeting includes the resources necessary to meet the mission and goals

including the delivery of degree-granting programs, which is an established priority of the AiTO

strategic plan. The Art Institute organization and administrative capacities includes robust quality

assurance processes dovetailed with student protection.




Conclusion

With over forty years of experience and success, the Art Institutes is a leader in postsecondary

education particularly in the areas of art and design. The learner centered approach to education

and committed to the success has been instrumental in the success of the Art Institutes. The Art

Institute of Toronto and the Art Institutes are committed to supporting the successful development

and growth of The Art Institute of Toronto and this proposal to offer degree level programs.



The Art Institute of Toronto recognizes that its programs are highly applied and technical in nature

and that it is necessary to provide access to program specific technology-related resources such

as computers, software, video and audio equipment, imaging equipment and printing services.

The career relevant nature of the programs requires significant resources to support student

career planning and placement. These investments are essential for students and are linked to

the mission and academic goals.        Classrooms and lab facilities will be equipped with the

appropriate industry hardware and software as required by the curricula. Library resources will

provide access to learning resources such as relevant texts, journals and research for all

programs, including liberal arts education.




The Art Institute of Toronto has proposed bachelor programs in areas of degree strength that are

successful in the Art Institutes and in the same subject areas The Art Institute of Toronto currently

delivers advanced diploma level programming. The Art Institute of Toronto is committed to this



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Part A – Organization Review

proposal which, among other things, will increase the opportunity for qualified Ontario students to

access high quality, recognized, applied, postsecondary education that can open door for them

and launch their careers.



The Art Institute of Toronto is confident in its plan and capacity to deliver the quality degree

programs proposed. The Art Institutes system has extensive experience with the development

and delivery of degree level programming, institutional effectiveness and the development and

delivery of quality post-secondary education programs available to support this proposal. The Art

Institutes have a proven track record and capacity to support the development and success of

The Art Institute of Toronto as they demonstrated with the growth of outstanding Art Institutes

through various stages of development.



The business and academic plans provide additional detail on the capacity and commitment to

develop and deliver the necessary human, administrative and academic resources and facilities

referred to in this proposal. From a financial perspective the Art Institutes have the capacity and

commitment to support the success of the Art Institute and this proposal and are confident in the

success of both. This commitment and capacity includes insuring the Art Institute of Toronto can

withstand the financial pressures anticipated with delivering two new bachelor’s programs. The

Art Institutes have a proven track record of successfully developing and delivering high quality

recognized bachelor programs in Graphic Design and Media Arts and Animation including the

institutional, faculty and organizational capacities necessary. The Art Institute of Toronto is

excited about and committed to this proposal and the ongoing growth and success of the Art

Institute of Toronto. This proposal can open new doors and opportunities for Ontario students to

access high quality, recognized, innovative, career relevant, applied bachelor level programs that

meet recognized program quality assurance and institutional capacity standards and benchmarks.




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Part A – Organization Review


4.0 SYNOPSIS

4.1 Program Abstracts
Graphic Design - The Art Institute of Toronto’s Graphic Design program is intended to prepare
students for careers as graphic designers and as prepress technicians. The program requires a
level of conceptual sophistication, specialized knowledge and intellectual autonomy similar to that
in a specialist degree program but with the disciplinary content oriented to an occupational field of
practice. More specifically, outcomes of the program are linked to employment-specific outcomes
and require that students will be able to:

1.   Utilize conceptual and visual skills in service of commerce to elicit a specific action;
2.   Develop a message that is clear, credible and focused;
3.   Understand and produce work using the design process;
4.   Accomplish technical implementation of design for multiple media; and
5.   Develop an understanding of and be able to apply history of graphic design, professional
     knowledge, process skills and business and legal knowledge to solve working-world
     problems with reasonable expectations that match clients’ needs.

Publishing, broadcasting and communications are the largest industries for graphic designers,
and many designers work in specialized design services, newspaper, book and directory
publishing, advertising and related services, printing and related support activity and architectural
and engineering services. The faculty will develop programs and initiatives relevant to these
industries. In addition to developing expertise in graphic design, graduates of the program will
develop an awareness of the modes of analysis of at least one discipline outside their main field
of study and of the society and culture in which they live and work. The program will focus on
preparing a student to enter the professional graphic design field and to understand a blend of
theory and practice. A senior portfolio designed to demonstrate the student’s readiness for
employment is also a requirement of the program.

Media Arts & Animation - The Media Arts & Animation program provides graduates with art,
design, technical, business and life skills for employment in the field. The program requires a
level of conceptual sophistication, specialized knowledge and intellectual autonomy similar to that
in an honours or specialist degree program but with the disciplinary content oriented to an
occupational field of practice. Students will be able to:

1.   Develop visual thinking skills;
2.   Learn fundamental and advanced concepts and skills of animation process including
     animating characters and objects; and
3.   Acquire sufficiently broad skills to be versatile as the field evolves and have a strong grasp
     of the business aspects of the field.

Graduates of the program may work in animation studios, film, television or video production,
game companies and corporate communications. They could hold positions as Artist or Digital
Artist (for generalists), Modeler or Rigger, Texture Mapper, Animator – specializing in Set,
Character, or Object Image, or as a Retouch Artist, Lighting and/or Set Specialist. In addition to
developing expertise in Media Arts & Animation, graduates of the program will develop an
awareness of the modes of analysis of at least one discipline outside their main field of study and
of the society and culture in which they live and work. The program will focus on preparing a
student begin their professional career in the Media Arts & Animation field and to understand a
blend of theory and practice. A senior portfolio, designed to demonstrate the student’s readiness
for employment, is also a requirement of the program.




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Part A – Organization Review


5.0 MISSION STATEMENT AND ACADEMIC GOALS

5.1 History, Mission and Academic Goals
Introduction

The Art Institute of Toronto is a private career college registered with the Minister of Training
Colleges and Universities. AiTO’s predecessor, “ITI”, began in 1982 and delivered quality post-
bachelor’s and professional development programming focusing on information technology for
business application. The post-bachelor’s programs benefited from articulation agreements with
U.S. and Canadian graduate institutions for graduate credit. ITI was acquired by Education
Management through the Art Institutes International in September 2001. The acquisition of ITI by
EDMC was approved by the Ministry of Training Colleges and Universities of Ontario, as required
under Ministry and OSAP policies and regulations.

Education Management began in 1962 and is headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. EDMC
is a post-secondary system. All but the Canadian schools are U.S. accredited degree-granting
institutions. The Art Institutes and Education Management are among North America’s largest
systems of post-secondary education with an established track record of more than 40 years of
delivery of high quality post secondary education. Education Management operates in more than
72 primary locations, with more then 163,000 alumni and an annual student population of more
then 72,000 students. Education Management’s post-secondary institutions offer regionally,
nationally and professionally accredited programs at the Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctorate
levels.

The Art Institutes is EDMC’s largest operating unit with more than 32 locations in North America.
The Art Institutes is the direct model and mentor for The Art Institute of Toronto. It is an important
source for design, media arts, fashion and culinary professionals.

The Art Institutes schools enrol students from all 50 of the United States, from all provinces of
Canada and from more than 114 other countries. http://www.aii.edu/programs. Schools within
the EDMC system include: Atlanta, Georgia; Boston, Massachusetts; Charlotte, North Carolina;
Chicago and Schaumburg, Illinois; Dallas and Houston, Texas; Denver, Colorado; Fort
Lauderdale, Miami, Sarasota and Tampa, Florida; Honolulu, Hawaii; Las Vegas, Nevada; Los
Angeles (Santa Monica and Orange County), San Diego and San Francisco, California,
Minneapolis, Minnesota; New York, New York; Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania;
Phoenix, Arizona; Portland, Oregon; Seattle, Washington; Washington, D.C.; Toronto, Ontario;
and Vancouver and Burnaby, British Columbia.


MISSION STATEMENT – ART INSTITUTE OF TORONTO


To be a leader in student centered employment-relevant postsecondary education that prepares
its students for careers in the applied arts, design and technology. Graduates are prepared for
entry-level positions and advancement in their chosen fields through a curriculum that
emphasizes applied career skills and competencies. Programs are delivered by qualified, caring
faculty in an environment that encourages expression, creativity, leadership and
individual responsibility.




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Part A – Organization Review

Academic Goals – (Bachelor)

The Art Institute of Toronto goals are an extension of the mission. The academic goals of The Art
Institute of Toronto are to educate applied arts, media and design professionals through quality
post-secondary educational programs designed to support the student’s development of skills
that are transferable to performance in the workplace. Program goals seek to prepare students
for entry-level employment and professional advancement within their chosen fields by providing
a balanced education with breadth and depth integrating curriculum that combines applied arts,
technology, related business practices and liberal arts.

Academic goals focus on learner-centered, applied career outcomes delivered in a supportive,
engaging environment. Students are provided with the education, methods, breath, depth and
motivation necessary to achieve success in their chosen fields. Qualified and experienced faculty
brings knowledge of subject fields from education and work experience to their instruction.

Students are expected to gain an understanding of a body of theoretical and practical knowledge
appropriate to their degree objectives. This understanding is demonstrated through measurable
student-learning outcomes specified in the outline of each course for each degree program. In
The Art Institute degree programs, students are expected to complete specific courses and
develop critical and analytical learning abilities, together with educational values, that contribute
to lifelong learning.


 Academic Goals The Art Institute of Toronto :

    1. Foster an educational setting that inspires creativity, critical thinking and innovation;

    2. Uphold a standard of institutional excellence through the recruitment of experienced and
       related professionals;

    3. Provide student-focused services that enhance student development;

    4. Ensure an environment of academic freedom and responsibility, collegiality and
       professionalism with policies driven by students, faculty and staff;

    5. Provide content and methodology required of traditional academic offerings in major
       areas of knowledge and skills that support lifelong learning and professional
       development;

    6. Deliver learner-centered outcomes driven by faculty who exhibit excellence in teaching
       and possess the appropriate academic credentials and industry experience;

    7. Provide safe, clean and accessible facilities appropriate for the delivery of applied post-
       secondary education programming, and maintain equipment and technologies to meet
       the needs of the program standards;

    8. Develop and revise curricula through regular reviews by a community of employers,
       advisor-subject experts, faculty, students and alumni;

    9. Benefit from system-wide program review processes, and track and report key
       performance indicators such as persistence and placement;

    10. Contribute to the dissemination of knowledge through teaching, learning and the creation
        of knowledge and service to community and related professions;



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Part A – Organization Review

    11. Provide varying lengths of academic and skills-based programming, leading to Diploma
        and Bachelor programs with an applied focus;

    12. Support continuous improvement, including faculty professional development, effective
        use of system-wide, internal and external quality assurance processes and resources,
        ongoing staff and faculty performance review and accountabilities; and

    13. Support curriculum that reflects sound practices in higher education for determining
        length, credit value, assessment, learning outcomes.

Values:

    •     Learner-centred educational programs, delivered in a supportive, interactive environment
          in which faculty and staff grow with students.

    •     Education, methods and motivation necessary to achieve success in their chosen fields.

    •     Continuous improvement and growth through a culture that values individual
          responsibility, teamwork and professional development.

Beliefs:

    •     Excellence in applied career-focused education that has its foundation in the expressed
          needs of the business, occupational and professional communities that our programs are
          designed to serve.

    •     Education that is learning-centred and measured by practical outcomes that enhance the
          lives of students, enabling them to contribute positively to the workplace.

    •     Value for the graduate’s investment.

    •     Respect for one another and encourage active participation by all employees.

    •     Fostering an environment where both students and faculty are expected to engage in an
          open dialogue.

    •     We have created a collaborative environment that fosters learning-centred education.

    •     We consistently operate our school in an ethical and prudent manner and with integrity.

    •     Employee development and ownership is essential to our productivity and our growth.

    •     A full and balanced treatment of the academic body of knowledge, theories and opinions
          with respect to the various individual subjects and general discipline.

        The worth and potential of each student and strive to provide quality programs and
         services which foster development of that potential.

Objectives

     Foster an educational setting that fosters creativity, critical thinking and
       innovation.

     Uphold a standard of institutional excellence through the recruitment of
       experienced and related professionals to join our faculty and staff.


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Part A – Organization Review



     Provide student focused services that enhance student development.

     Ensure an environment of academic freedom and responsibility, collegiality and
       professionalism with policies driven by students, faculty and staff.

     Provide content and methodology required of traditional academic offerings in
        major areas of knowledge and skills that support life long learning and
        professional development.

     Deliver learner-centered outcomes driven instruction by faculty who exhibit
        excellence in teaching and possess the appropriate academic credentials and
        industry related experience.

    Provide safe, clean and accessible facilities appropriate for the delivery of
       applied post secondary education programming; maintain equipment and
       technologies to meet the needs of the program standards.

     Develop and revise curricula through regular reviews by a community that
       employers, advisor-subject experts, faculty, students and alumni as well as
       benefiting from system-wide program review processes.

    Contribute to the dissemination of knowledge through teaching, learning, and the
       creation of knowledge and service to community and related professions.

    Deliver varying lengths of academic and skills based programming which leads to
        Diploma and Bachelor programs with an applied focus.

     Support continuous improvement including faculty professional development,
       effective use of system-wide quality assurance processes and resources,
       ongoing staff and faculty performance review and accountabilities.

     Support curriculum that reflects sound practices in higher education for
       determining length, credit value, assessment and learning outcomes.


5.2 Relationship of Programs to Mission
5.2.1 Current Degree Programs

The Art Institute of Toronto offers a number of advanced diploma programs in the
fields of Interior Design, Graphic Design, Media Arts, Animation and Game Art & Design, as
well as a host of professional development programming for business application. Our sister
Art Institutes and related EDMC institutions offer degree level programs, including in Media
Arts & Animation and Graphic Design.




                                                                                          23
The Art Institutes - Principal Academic Programs
 Media arts                           Design
   Digital Media Production             Graphic Design
   Game Art & Design                    Industrial Design
   Interactive Media Design             Interior Design
   Media Arts & Animation
                                      Fashion
   Photography
                                        Fashion Design
   Video Production
                                        Fashion Marketing
   Visual Effects & Motion Graphics
                                      Culinary
                                        Culinary Arts




                                                   Education Management Corporation   11
The Art Institutes - Enrollment by Area of Study
                       Media Arts
                         41%
                                       Fashion
                                         9%




                                         Culinary
                                           14%


                         Design
                          36%

* Based on Fall Term 2005 Enrollment

                                       Education Management Corporation   12
The Art Institutes - Enrollment by Academic Level
                                       Bachelor's
                                          60%




                                            Diploma/
            Associate's                     Certificate
               32%                              8%
* Based on Fall Term 2005 Enrollment
Part A – Organization Review

The Art Institutes is the largest operating unit with more than 32 locations in North America.
The Art Institutes schools enrol students from all 50 of the United States, from all provinces of
Canada and from more than 114 other countries. http://www.aii.edu/programs

Graphic Design, degree level programs are offered at Art Institutes ( approx. student program population 7500)
Media Arts & Animation degree level programs are offered at the Art Institutes: ( approx. student program population 5700 )




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Part A – Organization Review




5.2.2 Proposed Program Mission and Academic Goals Narrative

Graphic Design

The Graphic Design program reflects the mission and academic goals of The Art Institute of
Toronto. In particular, the program prepares students for career entry and professional
advancement within their chosen fields. The curriculum is up-to-date and balanced, combining
applied arts technology and techniques, related business practices and liberal arts education.
This is a degree program area in which the Art Institute system, as of the date of the production of
this document, more than 7500, students enrolled and a subject area with which the Art Institutes
have been providing programming for more than 20 years.

The program is designed to require a level of conceptual sophistication, specialized knowledge
and intellectual autonomy similar to that in an honours or specialist degree program, but with the
disciplinary content oriented to an occupational field of practice. The program offers education by
qualified professionals and prepares students for career entry and growth in their field.

Graphic Design curriculum takes a well-rounded approach that allows students to develop their
creativity and the needed knowledge and skills in technology, aesthetics and design, and
business. The curriculum is also designed to increase the students’ understanding of the
utilization of creative and applied professional skills of the Graphic Design sector.

The curriculum emphasizes applied job skills needed in the relevant field; this is at the core of
The Art Institute’s mission and academic goals. In addition to personal and intellectual growth, the
program is designed to prepare students for employment in the field of practice. Students achieve
proficiency in using technology related to the field and support the development of higher-level
intellectual skills that are needed to produce ideas, create art and design and manage and lead
creative teams. Students graduating from the Bachelor program can expect to find employment
in a wide variety of work environments, attain opportunities for career advancement and salaries
that are commensurate with a Bachelor degree. Consistent with the mission and goals of The Art
Institute of Toronto, the program reflects and recognizes higher education practices for
determining length, credit value, assessment, learning outcomes and the promotion of
educational and learning goals of post-secondary education.

Students learn by doing. Emphasis is placed on preparing students for entry into an occupational
field of practice. The programs incorporate a blend of theory and practice. The creation of a
senior portfolio, intended to develop and demonstrate the student’s readiness for employment, is
also a requirement of the program. The technical elements of the curriculum provide the practical
hands-on skills necessary for employment upon graduation. The student will build the requisite
skills and capabilities to meet the challenges and demands of the design industry. The faculty
facilitates the student’s learning through learner-centred instruction in a curriculum that reflects
industry-appropriate methodologies and practices for solving complex conceptual design
challenges.



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Increasingly entry into graphic design and professional growth in this sector requires post-
secondary education either at the advanced diploma or degree level. Entry-level graphic
designers are also often expected to have experience as graphic arts technicians, or in other
words, to have acquired a strong background in the technological specifics of the printing
process. Graphic designers are also expected to use a full suite of digital programs and tools,
including multimedia presentations, animated graphics and Web design.

Upon completion of the Graphic Design program, students will be able to: utilize conceptual and
visual skills in service of commerce to elicit a specific action; develop a message that is clear,
credible and focused; understand and produce work using the design process; accomplish
technical implementation of design for multiple media; develop an understanding of and be able
to apply the history of graphic design and professional knowledge; and process skills and
business and legal knowledge to solve working-world problems with reasonable expectations that
match clients’ needs. The program incorporates a blend of theory and practice, and includes a
terminal portfolio to demonstrating the student’s readiness for employment in the occupational
field of practice. The student develops lifelong learning and ongoing professional skills.

Graduates must also demonstrate developed skills in oral and written communication and must
successfully complete liberal arts and related studies in subjects outside the area of
concentration. The depth and breadth courses outside of the field are structured to provide
students with an introductory knowledge to the humanities, social and behavioural sciences and
mathematics and sciences. These courses provide the opportunity to acquire an understanding
of the assumptions and modes of analysis of another discipline and of the society and culture in
which they live and work.

Publishing, broadcasting and communications are the largest industries for graphic designers,
and many designers work in specialized design services, newspaper, book and directory
publishing, advertising and related services, printing and related support activity and architectural
and engineering services. Students are provided with educational experiences that develop
conceptual sophistication, specialized knowledge and intellectual autonomy. The program has
been benchmarked using a panel of employers and experts in the field. The program is applied,
relevant and informed by industry, faculty and research.

Employment opportunities are expected to continue to grow ahead of economic growth, but at the
same time, there is significant competition for employment as a graphic designer. A university
degree with a specialization in graphic design, commercial art, graphic communications or
cartooning is expected to be required increasingly. Although some employers will accept a
college diploma in graphic arts, the standard continues to migrate to towards the degree
standard.
The proposal appreciates the work of the Ontario Association of Registered Graphic Designers
and the increased focus of industry on appropriate credentials and accreditation standards.
There will be continued pressure and increasing demand for advanced training, education and
formal credentials in the graphic design sector.

The Art Institute of Toronto Graphic Design proposal is consistent with other applied bachelor
programs offered in Ontario, Canada and accredited programs in the United States.

This program proposal is demonstratively linked to the mission, purpose and goals of The Art
Institute of Toronto and the Art Institutes.




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Part A – Organization Review

Media Arts & Animation

Media Arts & Animation programs are robust and well established across the Art Institutes
system. Consistent with the mission and goals of The Art Institute of Toronto, this program
provides graduates with relevant career skills needed to obtain and develop careers in the
animation industry. The goal is accomplished through a focused curriculum based on industry
validated program exit competencies. This is a degree program area in which the Art Institute
system, as of the date of the production of this document, more than 5500 students enrolled and
a subject area with which the Art Institutes have been providing programming for more than 15
years.

The curriculum emphasizes applied job skills needed in the relevant field. This is at the core of
the Art Institutes mission and the academic goals of The Art Institute of Toronto. The program is
designed to require a level of conceptual sophistication, specialized knowledge and intellectual
autonomy similar to that in an honours or specialist degree program, but with the disciplinary
content oriented to an occupational field of practice. The program is balanced, providing students
with conceptual thinking skills and a liberal arts education, in addition to a foundation in art and
design. The curriculum allows students to develop their creativity and the needed knowledge and
skills in technology, aesthetics and design and business. Students are taught to understand the
utilization of creative and applied skills of the Media Arts & Animation and related sectors.

The Media Arts & Animation proposal is committed to providing relevant curriculum and
instruction. The Media Arts & Animation curriculum seeks to prepare its students for career entry
and professional advancement within the fields, by combining current applied arts technology and
techniques, related business practices and liberal arts education. The student develops lifelong
learning and ongoing professional development skills. Students achieve proficiency in using
technology related to the field and contribute to the development of higher-level intellectual skills
that are needed to produce ideas, create art and design and manage and lead creative teams.

The curriculum promotes sound practices in higher education for determining length, credit value,
assessment, learning outcomes and the promotion of educational and learning goals of post-
secondary education. Students learn by doing; emphasis is placed on preparing students for
entry into an occupational field of practice. The program blends theory and practice. The
creation of a senior portfolio project, intended to develop and demonstrate the student’s
readiness for employment, is also a requirement of the program.

The technical elements of the curriculum provide the practical hands-on skills necessary for
employment upon graduation. In addition to being in the same subject area as programs currently
taught at AiTO, the proposed programs are in areas of demonstrated strength and are directly
linked to the mission of both The Art Institute of Toronto and the Art Institutes.

Courses provide students the opportunity to apply knowledge under the direct supervision of
faculty. In addition, the program includes an internship as well as a capstone portfolio course,
designed to help students complete projects that integrate the knowledge gained through their
studies. The portfolio course also provides the student with example of his or her work that may
be shared with prospective employers.

The Media Arts & Animation Program requires that students build the requisite skills and
capabilities to meet the challenges and demands of the design industry. The faculty facilitates the
student’s learning through learner-centred instruction in a curriculum that reflects industry-
appropriate methodologies and practices for solving complex conceptual design challenges. The
program is benchmarked using research, employers-input and subject matter program experts.




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Part A – Organization Review

In addition to personal and intellectual growth, the program is designed to prepare students for
employment in the field of practice. The curriculum is also structured to provide insight into the
way in which the assumptions and methodologies have developed in the main fields within the
discipline. It also highlights Media Arts & Animation’s relationship and interaction with other
disciplines.

The depth and breadth courses outside of the field are structured to provide students with an
introductory knowledge to the humanities, social and behavioral sciences, mathematics and
sciences and more advanced knowledge. Students will have the opportunity to acquire an
understanding of the assumptions and modes of analysis of another discipline and of the society
and culture in which they live and work. Students will be required to take, in their first few quarters
of study, courses that develop a broad appreciation for the humanities, social and behavioral
sciences and mathematics and sciences.

The program design and outcomes are consistent with other similar bachelor degree level
programs offered in Ontario, Canada and the United States (accredited), and benchmarked
against employment outcomes by industry and the advice of subject matter and education
experts.




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5.4 Academic Policies

5.5 Policy Documents
Official school policy is set forth in the following documents:

1.       Art Institute of Toronto Catalogue
         academic policies and procedures and lists educational programs and descriptions.

2.       Faculty Handbook and Employee Handbook describe the duties,
         responsibilities and evaluation criteria of faculty in and out of the classroom.

3.       Student Handbook describes the general policies
         procedures and rules. It also contains certain other information students find useful.
         Academic grading policies and procedures are referenced.




Academic Policies and Processes Overview:

Admissions -

Admissions decisions are made by the Admissions Committee, which is comprised of members
of faculty and chaired by the Dean of Academic Affairs. The committee determines if the
applicant meets the entrance requirements and has a reasonable chance to be successful in the
program based upon his or her academic record, assessment tests, and essay and how well the
applicant’s education and career goals relate to the chosen program of study. The Admissions
Committee conducts a complete review of the student’s application and an assessment of
eligibility. The Committee may request additional information or require the applicant to meet with
a Program Director prior to making a final decision. The institute and program admissions
standards and criteria are strictly adhered to and the Admissions Committee must formally
approve every applicant. AiTO reserves the right to withdraw offers of admission made to
students who fail to meet the condition(s) outlined in their Offer of Admission, who fail to respond
within the specified response period, or who fail to make a deposit/fee payment as required.


Admission Requirements - Direct Entry -

The Art institute of Toronto’s admissions policies are designed to provide an opportunity for
students to pursue the bachelor degree in the art and design areas. More specifically, applicants
are required to possess a secondary school diploma with a grade point average of 65% or higher
and with the appropriate Ontario Secondary School Diploma (“OSSD”) or Ontario Academic
Courses (“OAC”).

Direct Entry Students and Mature Students who do not possess these qualifications may sit for a
validated assessment of their skills.

Each applicant, after completing the appropriate application materials, is evaluated by the
Admissions Committee. The Admissions Committee is comprised of faculty and staff who are
committed to student success, and who have been trained in evaluating writing samples and
transcripts. The Committee will review the following for each applicant:




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Part A – Organization Review

1.       The applicant’s high school transcript or GED scores and diploma;
2.       The applicant’s written essay of approximately 250 words; and
3.       In some cases, additional information such as college transcripts, letters of
         recommendation, portfolio work, etc.

The goals of the Committee are to: 1) determine that the applicant has a reasonable chance to be
successful based on past academic records; and, 2) determine that the program of study chosen
by the applicant is appropriate based on the applicant’s stated career goals. The Committee may
request additional information or require that the applicant meet with the Program Director in the
chosen program of study in order to make an accurate assessment of the applicant.

In addition to high school transcripts or GED scores and diploma, all applicants must submit
official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended prior to beginning classes. These
transcripts must be submitted whether or not the applicant will receive transfer credit for any
institutions attended.

                                             Program Admission Requirements
Academic                       AiTO requires that individuals applying for admission present the
                               OSSD with a minimum of 6 grade 12U/M courses or OACs or the
                               equivalent. An OSSD grade point average of 65% or better is
                               required.
Related work/volunteer         N/A
experience
Other (e.g., portfolio,        •      Interview with Admissions Committee, comprised of faculty
specialized testing,                and academic administration.
interview, G.R.E., etc.)       •     250-word essay.
                               •    Students with secondary school GPA below a 65% will be
                                     required to take a standardized admissions and placement
                                     test (Accuplacer) to assess their ability to be successful in the
                                     Art Institute programs. The test assesses skills in reading,
                                     writing and mathematics.


Admissions Policies for Mature Students -
                               Program Admission Requirements
Academic

Related work/volunteer         NA
experience
Other (e.g., portfolio,        •    Not less than 19 years of age as of December 31st of the year
specialized testing,                in which they will commence studies.
interview, G.R.E., etc.)       •    Have been away from a formal education for at least two
                                    years.
                               •    Interview with Admissions Committee comprised of faculty
                                    and academic administration.
                               •    250-word essay on why they want to pursue the course of
                                    study applied for and their expectations, including career
                                    expectations.
                               •    Attaining an appropriate score on the Accuplacer admissions
                                    and placement test.

The admissions process for both the Direct Entry Students and for the Mature Students utilizes
an externally developed and validated assessment. The Accuplacer test is designed, developed


                                                                                                   30
Part A – Organization Review

and graded by the College Board with the purpose of assessing an individual student’s basic
skills in reading, writing and mathematics. The test will be administered by The Art Institute of
Toronto. Accuplacer scores the individual student’s performance in those skills essential to
success. Students are required to achieve the following scores:

      Test               CPT Score                         Skill Description
                                        Students at this level are able to comprehend passages
   Reading              103 or higher
                                        that, although short, are somewhat complex in terms of
                                        the ideas conveyed, and that deal with academic subject
                                        matter, often in a theoretical framework. These students
                                        are able to:
                                                  • Extract points that are merely implied;
                                                  • Follow moderately complex arguments or
                                                     speculations;
                                                  • Recognize tone; and
                                                  • Analyze the logic employed by the author in
                                                     making an argument.

      Test               CPT Score                          Skill Description
                                        Students at this level have adequate arithmetic skills.
  arithmetic                   90
                                        These students can:
                                               • Estimate products and squares of decimals
                                                    and square roots of whole numbers and
                                                    decimals’
                                               • Solve simple percent problems of the form
                                                    p% of q = and ?% of q = r;
                                               • Divide whole numbers by decimals and
                                                    fractions; and
                                               • Solve simple word problems involving
                                                    fractions, ratio, percent increase and
                                                    decrease and area.


      Test               CPT Score                         Skill Description
                                        Students at this level can:
  Sentence                     86
                                               • Solve problems of faulty coordination and
                                                    subordination in a sentence with one or two
                                                    clauses;
                                               • Manipulate complex verb tenses;
                                               • Correct misplaced modifiers; and
                                               • Solve problems that combine grammar and
                                                    logic.



Advanced Standing -

Students who have attended another post-secondary institution may apply for transfer to The Art
Institute of Toronto. They must be in good standing with the sending institution, meet the
admission requirements, provide a secondary school transcript showing appropriate grades and
courses and participate in an interview. Students who have not successfully completed 30 credit



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Part A – Organization Review

hours of post-secondary study at another post secondary institution will be required to sit for the
admissions/placement test. Advanced standing can only be granted in cases where the course
(credits) from the sending institution are relevant and would meet or exceed the comparable
credit/courses and outcomes in the relevant AiTO program. The Dean of Academic Affairs has
final approval of all advanced standing application decisions and coordinates this assessment
with the Registrar and Director of the program for which the advanced standing is sought. Credit
awards and their transcript entries are monitored to avoid giving credit twice for the same
learning. All advanced standing decisions are regularly monitored, reviewed, documented and
evaluated to ensure their ongoing validity for the degree program(s).

    •    Students are required to meet with an assistant director of admissions. The purpose of
         the interview is to explore the student's background and interests as they relate to The
         Art Institute's programs, to assist the student in identifying the appropriate area of study
         consistent with his or her background and interests and to provide information concerning
         the curriculum and support services at The Art Institute.

    •    Complete application for admission, including essay.

    •    Submit secondary school transcript. Transcripts must show grades for all years of
         secondary school attended and date of graduation. The Admissions Committee gives
         preference to students with a 70% average or above. Transcripts must be mailed or
         faxed directly to AiTO.

    •    Submit official transcripts from each post-secondary institution attended, showing all
         courses attempted. Transcripts must be mailed or faxed directly from the post-secondary
         institution(s) attended to the Admissions Office at The Art Institute of Toronto.

    •    Students who have successfully completed less than 30 quarter credits at another
         institution of post-secondary education must achieve acceptable scores on the
         Accuplacer admissions/placement test.


Awarding of Transfer Credits -
Credit Transfer/Recognition and Procedures

Students who have attended another post secondary educational institution may apply for credit
and in all cases the awarding of Transfer Credits can only be approved by the Dean of Academic
Affairs and such cases the student will be required to demonstrate that:

    •    Degree the level standard and program learning outcomes are met.

    •    Credit will be awarded only for learning and not for experience.

    •    Credit will be awarded only for degree-level learning.

    •    Assessment of transfer credit will be conducted on a course-by-course basis and;

    •    Only credits from a recognized, approved, accredited post secondary institution will be
         considered for transfer credit.

    •    Only those credits with a 65% or higher grade will be considered for transfer of credit.

    •    Contact hours and course outcomes must be the equivalent to the Art Institute courses.


                                                                                                    32
Part A – Organization Review



    •    Request for transfer of credit must be made and awarded at the time of admission to the
         Art Institute.

    •    No more than 50% of credits required for the degree may be transferred from another
         institution.

    •    The final determination of credit transfer is made by the Dean of Academic Affairs in
         consultation with the relevant subject matter program director and subject to audit.



Final Determination of competence levels and credit awards will be made by academic
and appropriate subject matter experts and the final determination is made by the Dean of
Academic Affairs in consultation with the relevant Program Director and the Registrar.


Administrative Procedures for Assessing Advanced Standing -

The Registrar is responsible for transcript evaluation, including transfer credit evaluation, and is
trained by the Art Institutes, The Art Institute of Toronto and Assistant Vice President of Academic
Affairs. In addition to onsite training in these related matters, the Art Institute holds an annual
Registrar’s Academy aimed at continuing to upgrade their skills. Further, there are monthly
Registrar conference calls that provide the opportunity for questions and answers on issues that
arise. The final determination in assessing advanced standing is made by the Dean of Academic
Affairs, in consultation with the relevant program director and the Registrar.

Credit awards and their transcript entries will be monitored to avoid giving credit twice for the
same learning. The student information system will not permit the same course to be allocated to
two separate requirements. The Dean and the Corporate Vice Presidents for Registration and
Academic Affairs audit the credit allocation on an annual basis to assure that credits are being
awarded appropriately.


Promotion and Graduation Requirements -

Students are required to maintain a “C” average to graduate, must complete 66% of the courses
attempted and must complete their program of study within 150% of the program credit hour
length. In addition, students are required to maintain a “C” average throughout most of their
study at The Art Institute. Earlier in their studies they will be placed on probation should they not
maintain at least a D+ average and will be afforded two quarters to improve their GPA. Failing to
do so will result in suspension. By the end of the sixth academic term, students will be required
to maintain a “C” average. Students are required to complete 60% of the courses attempted
during the first four quarters and 66% thereafter.



    Program Requirement                                Level of Achievement
                                                Promotion                     Graduation
Courses in disciplines outside    Students not passing a course are      Students are required
the main field(s) of study        required to retake the course.         to pass all required
                                                                         courses.




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Part A – Organization Review


Courses in disciplines within   Students not achieving a “C” or better   Students are required
the main field(s) of study      are required to retake the course.       to pass courses in
                                                                         major field of study
                                                                         with a “C” grade or
                                                                         better.

Other, please specify (e.g.,    Same as above.                           Same as above.
work placement/internship)

Other, please specify (e.g.,    Not applicable                           Not applicable
research paper)

Other, please specify (e.g.,    Not applicable                           Not applicable
laboratories), etc.

Overall achievement             To continue enrolment in an academic     To qualify for
                                program students must:                   graduation and receive
                                                                         a degree all students
                                1. Achieve a minimum CGPA of 50%
                                                                         must:
                                at the end of the second academic
                                term;                                    1. Receive passing
                                2. Achieve a minimum CGPA of 54%         grades for all required
                                at the end of the fourth academic        course work;
                                term;                                    2. Accumulate the
                                3. Achieve a minimum CGPA of 57%         total credit
                                at the end of the sixth academic term    requirements for a
                                and every other term thereafter (8th,    program through
                                10th, 12th); and                         course work or transfer
                                4. Successfully complete all the         credit;
                                program requirements within the          3. Achieve a minimum
                                maximum allowable timeframe, which       CGPA of 60%; and
                                is 150% of the program length based
                                                                         4. Meet portfolio
                                in credits. The maximum allowable
                                                                         requirements as
                                timeframe is calculated as a period of
                                                                         appropriate.
                                time during which a student attempts
                                1.5 times the number of credit hours
                                required to complete the program.




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Part A – Organization Review


Grading System                               Academic Grading System
The grading system incorporates letter grades and codes that have the following numeric
equivalencies and definitions:
Letter                                            Grade Points
A+ Excellent                                      90-100%
A                                                 85-89%
A-                                                80-84%
B+                                                75-79%
B Good                                            70-74%
B-                                                66-69%
C+                                                63-65%
C Satisfactory                                    60-62%
C-                                                57-59%
D+                                                54-56%
D Marginal                                        50-53%
F Unsatisfactory                                  49% and below
OTHER ACADEMIC POLICIES:

Faculty and the Classroom -

Faculty members have the support of the Administration regarding classroom operations and
procedures. Problematic situations with students should be discussed with the Program Director.
In extreme situations, a student may be asked to leave class to consult with the Program Director
or the Dean of Academic Affairs. Faculty members have the full support of The Art Institute’s
administration in such cases. At all times faculty seeks to protect and enhance the safe, mature
and productive learning environment and the productive and professional learning relationship of
student and faculty.

Faculty Evaluation Policies and Procedures -

The Faculty Performance Evaluation provides objective input for identifying performance and
development needs in the overall educational process of The Art Institute. The procedure serves
as a positive communication vehicle among faculty, students, and administration. Five sources of
input are used in the evaluation of instructional performance: an annual performance review (the
Performance Planning and Appraisal Review, “PPAR”); a faculty developmental plan (included as
part of the PPAR); class visitation observations; student evaluations of course and instructor
(Institutional Development and Effectiveness Assessment, “IDEA”); and a teaching portfolio.
Documentation for these components of faculty evaluation is stored in the Faculty Development
Coordinator’s office.

    1. Student Evaluation of Course and Instructor

         Student evaluations provide student perspective on various factors within a course and
         class. Such evaluations reinforce communication of the educational process among
         faculty members, students and Program Directors. Each faculty member has a class
         evaluated each quarter, between the seventh and eleventh weeks. The Art Institute of
         Toronto uses the IDEA evaluation forms, which consist of both summative (short form)
         and formative (long form) assessments. The long form is distributed once per year in only
         one of the faculty member’s classes during that quarter, with no other classes receiving



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Part A – Organization Review

         IDEA surveys. During the other three quarters of the year, the IDEA short form is
         distributed to a class selected by the faculty member in consultation with the Program
         Director. The Faculty Development Coordinator distributes results of the IDEA surveys to
         Program Directors as well as faculty. Results of short form surveys are discussed
         between faculty members and their Program Directors on an as-needed basis. Results
         from long form surveys are discussed between the Faculty Development Coordinator and
         faculty members. The Faculty Development Coordinator initiates the scheduling of a
         meeting about long form survey results. New faculty members will be evaluated using
         the long form during their first quarter of teaching at The Art Institute.

    2. Evaluations

         Faculty members need to develop a grading system to determine the student’s academic
         progress throughout the quarter. The system can be based on a point system, using a
         numeric or letter code, or a contract with the student. The system of grading should be
         clear to the student in order to allow that student to track his or her progress. All faculties
         should discuss their method of grading with their Program Director in order to be
         consistent with their department practices. Note: Examples of different types of grading
         can be obtained from the Program Director. In the event faculty wishes to apply a
         modified grading standard or scale this change must be approved by the Program
         Director and the Dean of Academic Affairs.

         Evaluation of student’s academic progress can be based on tests, quizzes,
         presentations, participation, projects, inside and outside class assignments or homework.
         There should be enough grading to measure a student’s accomplishments for a mid-term
         grade and for a final evaluation of the student’s success in completing the course
         objectives. The academic progress policies and evaluation processes will be reflected in
         the program/course syllabus. Students have a right to know the grading standards, scale
         and academic progress policies. These polices must be expressed with clarity and
         provided to students the first day of classes. Faculty should review these policies in class
         with the students and direct students to the Student Handbook and Academic Catalogue.

Academic Integrity

Academic dishonesty is not tolerated at The Art Institute of Toronto. It is the responsibility of
every faculty member to include in his or her course syllabus for all courses the definition of
academic dishonesty, and to set aside time in the first week of each course to explain that
definition to their students.

Definition of Academic Dishonesty -

The Art Institute of Toronto defines an act of academic dishonesty as any attempt to take the
work of someone else and submit it, in part or in whole, as one’s own. Examples of academic
dishonesty may include, but are not limited to: copying another’s work on any type of student
evaluation; theft or distribution of evaluative materials (quizzes, tests, exams) prior to their
administration; plagiarism of any kind, etc.
Examples of cheating include:

    •    Obtaining a copy of an examination before it is officially available or learning an
         examination question before it is officially available;
    •    Copying another person’s answer to an examination question;
    •    Consulting an unauthorized source during an examination;
    •    Changing a score or a record of an examination result;



                                                                                                    36
Part A – Organization Review

    •    Submitting work prepared, in whole or in part, by another person and representing that
         work as one’s own;
    •    Offering for sale essays or other assignments, in whole or in part, with the expectation
         that these works will be submitted by a student for appraisal;
    •    Preparing work, in whole or in part, with the expectation that such work will be submitted
         by another student for appraisal;
    •    Submitting the work one has done for one class or project to a second class, or as a
         second project, without the prior informed consent of the relevant instructors; and
    •    Submitting work prepared in collaboration with another or other member(s) of a class,
         when collaborative work on a project has not been authorized by the instructor.

Plagiarism includes the unattributed use of material from any source – including books,
periodicals, CD-ROM and the World Wide Web. All quotations, paraphrases or other adaptations
of others’ work must be properly cited and documented. Any student who uses images, texts or
other media without proper attribution will be subject to the same penalties as students guilty of
other types of academic dishonesty.

Faculty members shall closely monitor academic evaluations to assure that the student submits
his or her own work. When faculty members suspect that a student has been academically
dishonest, they shall report it to their Program Director or the Dean of Academic Affairs as soon
as possible following the incident.

Mid-term Grades -

Mid-term grade sheets are provided to each instructor at the end of week four of each term. The
grade sheets are placed in each instructor's attendance file. Any mid-term evaluation must take
place by the end of week five so that a mid-term grade may be calculated, recorded on the grade
sheet and returned to the Registrar's office no later than Monday noon of week six.

Mid-term grades will not affect GPA calculations, nor will they appear on a final transcript. Mid-
term grades are not a part of the student's permanent record and are discarded at the end of
each quarter. Their main purpose is to inform the student of their academic progress and to allow
them to seek help if necessary. If students have a “D+” average or lower, it is recommended that
they make an appointment with the Program Director to discuss what steps are necessary to
improve their deficiencies.

Final Grades –

For all graduating students, the Final Grade form must be completed by Monday morning of the
11th week. All other final grades are due no later than the end of Week 11.

The recorded final grade of the student may not be changed without the approval of the Program
Director. The Grade Change Form is available in the Registrar’s Office and must be filled out
stating the grade change and reason. All grade changes must be submitted to the Registrar’s
Office no later than the end of the first week of the term immediately following the quarter in which
the initial grade was earned.

Student Privacy -

Canadian privacy legislation applies to The Art Institute of Toronto. In general, these obligations
prohibit the release of student records to any third party without written consent from the student.
It also allows the student to view his or her academic file, which is kept in the Registrar’s Office.
The privacy legislation’s major implication for faculty is the need for faculty to be cognizant of the



                                                                                                  37
Part A – Organization Review

student’s right to privacy. Students seeking additional information with respect to privacy should
consult the Director of Compliance.

It is, however, essential to be able to follow students’ academic history and for the Art Institute of
Toronto understand the factors affecting enrolment, student success and program delivery. The
increased emphasis on accountability for public and private investment means that it is important
to study program in-puts and “outcomes.” In order to carry out such studies, Statistics Canada,
accreditation, quality assurance, student assistance and Art Institute effectiveness analysis may
student information and related data. Institutions collect and provide to Statistics Canada student
identification, on occasion student contact information to allow for additional survey information to
be collected. Date relating to student demographic characteristics, enrolment information,
previous education and labour force activity may also be use for these limited purposes.

Student Classroom Behavior -

It is expected that students behave in a manner consistent with their status as members of a
special community of artists and scholars. Conduct that violates The Art Institute of Toronto’s
Student Conduct Policy is listed in the Student Handbook. Classroom violations should be
discussed with the Program Director and/or the Dean of Academic Affairs.

Departmental Policies -

In some cases, academic departments at The Art Institute of Toronto have a set of departmental
policies, about which all students within that department must be aware. It is the Program
Director’s responsibility to make sure all students within such departments are made aware of
these policies. Faculty within such departments, however, should also be familiar with the policies
in order to instruct students about them.

Academic Advising and Placement -

Before the first quarter of study, each student meets with an academic advisor. Every quarter
thereafter, each student meets with an advisor in the advising center or with his or her Program
Director. Advisors help with scheduling and provide guidance to foster progress and success.
Specific procedures for advisement are announced in advance of the registration period.

Course Changes -

Programs and courses are periodically updated to keep pace with changing industry needs,
standards, equipment, supplies and resource materials. The Art Institute of Toronto reserves the
right to change course titles, content or sequencing of courses any time it deems such action
necessary to enhance the educational program. In the event there is a material change in the
course or program content, the Quality Assurance Board will be consulted and appropriate
permissions obtained prior to implementation of any such change.

Grade Reporting -

Mid-term grades and final grades are made available to students by the Registrar’s Office and
electronically via the Online Services (OLS). Midterm evaluations assess classroom participation
and attitudes, cooperation with instructors in the completion of projects, the meeting of project
deadlines, and interaction with other students, attendance and skills development. Midterm
evaluations help students understand their strengths and weaknesses in each course.




                                                                                                  38
Part A – Organization Review

Continued Enrolment -

The Art Institute, The Academic Progress Policy ensures that all students enrolled in a degree
program make satisfactory progress towards a successful completion of the academic program.
The criteria and standards are set to recognize exemplary academic achievements or to detect
problems for which early intervention and/or remedial action can be taken. Poor academic
performance may lead to academic probation and/or termination. It is very important that
students attend all registered classes and complete them successfully. Should a compelling
reason arise to cease attendance, it is the student’s responsibility to immediately contact the
academic advisor or Program Director to discuss the best options.

Minimum Standards for Academic Progress -

To maintain academic progress, each student must meet the required minimum standards of the
following three criteria:

•        Maintain a minimum acceptable cumulative grade point average;
•        Achieve the minimum incremental completion rate; and
•        Complete the program within a maximum allowable time frame.

A student who withdraws in the first nine weeks of the quarter may return the next quarter in a
probationary status.

Denial of Graduation with a Degree -

Any student failing to achieve a C at the completion of required program credits will not be
allowed to graduate with a degree.

Procedure for Appealing Academic Termination -

Any student wishing to appeal an academic termination may do so in writing to the Dean of
Academic Affairs. The written appeal must state the mitigating circumstances that contributed to
the termination. The written appeal must be supported with appropriate documentation of the
mitigating circumstances and an explanation of how the circumstances have been remedied or
changed.

The Dean of Academic Affairs or a committee will review a student’s appeal and will determine
whether the student’s circumstance(s) and academic status warrant consideration for
reinstatement. The student may be asked to appear in person during the review process when
deemed necessary by the Dean or the Committee. The Dean may consult and involve Art Institute
system education specilaists where the Dean feels they are in a conflict of interest or where in the
view of the Dean the circumstances require or would benefit from additional and external review.

Examples of mitigating circumstances include: death in the immediate family; hospitalization of a
student; documented medical problems; and other special circumstances such as independently
documented work-related transfers, natural disasters, and family emergencies. Mitigating
circumstances are generally events that are outside the student’s control and are unavoidable.
A student who is granted an appeal may be reinstated and, if otherwise eligible, receive financial
aid; however, the student will be placed on probation for that quarter.

Procedure for Re-entry after Academic Termination -

A student terminated for failing to meet the academic progress requirements must appeal in
writing to the Dean of Academic Affairs for re-entry before the start of the quarter in which he/she
wishes to return. Also, any student who ceased attendance and whose grades in the last quarter


                                                                                                 39
Part A – Organization Review

of attendance did not to meet the minimum standards must go through the same appeal process
described in the preceding section.

If the appeal is granted, the re-entering student will be placed on probation during the quarter of
return. The student must meet the minimum standards of the academic progress policy to
continue in the program. The student must successfully retake courses previously failed so that
the recalculated GPA and successful completion percentage meets or exceeds the minimum
requirements. Some form of academic evaluation is conducted by the Dean or Review
Committee to determine whether the student has the desire and the academic ability to progress
satisfactorily in the program. A student is allowed one and only one re-entry appeal after being
academically terminated.

Student Re-entry Process -

Any student who has left The Art Institute for any time period must go through the formal re-entry
process. Each student’s academic status must be reviewed before they can be considered for re-
entry. For details, please refer to The Art Institute’s procedure for re-admission.

Make-Up Work Policy -

Students who fail to meet assigned deadlines or miss scheduled examinations due to
emergencies must document the situation and present documentation to their Academic
Department Director. The Academic Department Director will inform the student as to
departmental make-up procedures. When scheduling permits, all make-up classes should be
taken during the student’s subsequent quarter of study. Make-up classes must be completed
before the student enters his/her final quarter of study.

Academic Review Procedures -

Students are placed on academic probation or termination status by the Education Department.
The Registrar provides written notification to the student of probation status or termination.
Students who wish to appeal probation status or termination must comply with the “Appeal
Procedures.’’

Class Size -

Class sizes typically range from fewer than ten students for project or portfolio classes to a
maximum of 25 for lab-type classes and a maximum of 45-50 for lecture-type classes.


Attendance -

Developing and maintaining a good class and program attendance record is an important facet of
each student’s professional development. The attendance record is included in the school’s
database and is part of the student’s records.

Faculty members state on their course syllabi their policies for determining what will cause a
student to be marked absent or present. Students are required to abide by these policies. In the
event a student accumulates four absences in a given course, he or she will be suspended from
the course in question. For courses with a lab component, suspension will remove the student
from both the lab and the class.




                                                                                                 40
Part A – Organization Review

The AiTO Student Handbook provides students the general requirements for attendance:

  1.     Students are required to attend all class meetings, to arrive on time, and to stay for the
         duration of the class;
  2.     Faculty policies for marking absences related to tardiness to class, tardiness in returning
         from break, or leaving class early are stated in course syllabi. Students are required to
         abide by these policies;
  3.     Students who violate the attendance policy can be suspended from the course;
  4.     Appeal policies are available at the Registrar’s Office; and
  5.     Attendance and academic participation requirements must meet or exceed applicable
         student assistance active participation and attendance requirements.

A student is expected to attend all classes as scheduled, on time, and to remain in the classes for
the full duration. Outside employment is not to be scheduled during class hours. The Art Institute
reserves the right to schedule or reschedule students at any time necessary to accommodate
classroom and facility usage needs. There are no excused absences. It is recognized, however,
that a student may be absent from class due to serious illness or family emergency. Documented
absences of this nature will be considered prior to attendance suspension or termination.
Students on government sponsored student assistance have strict student participation and
attendance requirements.

The Art Institute’s programs are designed for continuous, year-round enrolment with full course
loads. Students who interrupt their studies may have to lengthen the time of their enrolment,
since some courses are not offered every quarter. The Art Institute expects students to attend all
scheduled meetings of each course. At the second absence, the student grade will be dropped
by one letter grade. Upon the third full absence, the student grade will be dropped another letter
grade. On the fourth full absence, the student will fail the class. Faculty members may use
discretion in cases with serious extenuating circumstances.

The general attendance recording, monitoring, and follow-up policies and procedures are as
follows:

Absence -

A full day of absence is defined as: being absent for the total number of hours classes are
scheduled each day for the program in which the student is enrolled. Absences are recorded from
the first day of the quarter regardless of the reason for absence.

Partial Absence -

A student who arrives late, or leaves class early, is charged in fifteen-minute increments of
absenteeism. This absence accumulates toward total absenteeism on a student’s quarterly
record.

Suspension for Consecutive Absences in All Classes -

Students absent from all classes for two weeks without notifying the Registrar’s Office will be
subject to suspension from The Art Institute for the remainder of the quarter. Students suspended
for this reason will:
•         receive an ‘S’ for all courses taken during the quarter of suspension with no tuition
          refund; and be required to repeat the courses at an additional tuition charge.




                                                                                                41
Part A – Organization Review



Students suspended for this reason may appeal their suspension.


Withdrawal Definitions -

For the purpose of determining a refund, a student is deemed to have withdrawn from a course of
instruction when any of the following occur:

1. The student notifies the school, in writing, of withdrawal or of the date of withdrawal,
   whichever is later;
2. The school terminates a student’s enrolment as provided in school policy;
3. The student fails to attend classes for a two-week period, in which instance the date of his or
   her withdrawal is deemed the last date of recorded attendance prior to the two-week
   absence; or
4. The student has violated Canadian Student Loans/Ontario Student Assistance
   participation/attendance policies.

Display and Use of Student Work -
Faculty members are encouraged to display student work. Recognizing achievement promotes a
culture of learning within The Institute. Display of student work also motivates students to strive
for excellence in their work and assists in portfolio development. When student work is displayed,
the objectives of the assignment, the title of the piece, the name of the student, and the media
used should be noted.
Because student work is used for many different purposes such as display, inclusion in catalogs,
etc., The Art Institutes reserve the right to copy and keep this work for the reasons specified.
Students sign an enrollment agreement, which gives the schools permission to publish their
photography, artwork, videotapes, and films. The statement reads, “I hereby give my consent to
The Art Institute of Toronto (and to those whom it may authorize) to photograph, film, and/or
videotape me and/or to use a photographic reproduction of me or my artwork or photography
(with or without my name), to identify me by name and/or with school and employment
information, and/or to quote or record statements made by me, for any editorial, promotional,
advertising, trade, or other purpose.”




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Part A – Organization Review


6.2 Governance Structures
6.2.1 Organization Chart


                                                                      Board of Directors
           Policy and Coordinating Board                              Board of Directors
       .   Policy and Coordinating Board
           Council of Presidents
       .   Specialist Presidents
           Council of Support
       .   Specialist Support
           Compliance/Legal
       .   Compliance
           System Program Review
       .   System Program Review



                                                                         President
                                                                         President
                                                                        Lisa Delorme
                                                                        Lisa Delorme



       Faculty Council & Curriculum
       Faculty Council & Curriculum
       Committees
       Committees
       . Program Advisory Committee                               Executive Committee
       . ProgramInput
         Student Advisory Committee                               Executive Committee
       . Student Input




                Dean of               Director of
           Academic of
                Dean Affairs         Director of
                                   Administrative &     Director of              Director of
                                                                                  Director of   Director Career
                                                                                                 Director Career
                                  Administrative &    Director of                 Human
           A                          Financial        Admissions                   Human       &Services/ Dean
                                                                                                 &e
                                     Financial        Admissions                 Resources
            Predrag Pesikan            Services        Lisa Delorme               Resources       of Students,
                                                                                                   of Students,
                                      Services
                                    Frank Pasceri                                Linda Hunter




                                                                                                                   44
Part A – Organization Review


6.2.2 Responsibilities and Authority

Regulatory Bodies

The Art Institute of Toronto is regulated provincially by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and
Universities as a registered private career college and is in good standing. The application to
offer degree level programs is made through and to the Ontario Postsecondary Quality Assessment
Board and the Post-Secondary Education Choice and Excellence Act,(2001) and subject
to Ministerial Consent and the requirements of the Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities,
Province of Ontario.

Overview

The philosophy underlying The Art Institute of Toronto governance model reflects a collegiate,
post-secondary education environment that values continuous improvement and performance
outcomes. The organization champions the value and importance of career education mission
and respects the critical role of faculty, staff and students. The approach to governance is
informed by 40 years of organizational development and experience in operating accredited
degree granting post secondary education intuitions in many environments.

AiTO is part of the Art Institutes family of post-secondary education institutions, which can be
compared to both public and private multi campus higher education systems. While benefiting
from central and system resources, AiTO is autonomous in its daily operations, implementation of
policies and in the delivery of its educational programs.

Governance AiTO framework is designed to realize the following principles:

•        Foster local autonomy and integrity while maximizing continuity, leveraging resources
         and capacities and exploiting the efficiency among the Art Institutes system-wide;
•        Enable The Art Institute of Toronto to have connections to national and international
         markets in addition to its own local market -- for students, education programs and job
         placement;
•        Achieve the benefits of specialization, economies of scale and group services that a
         system can provide;
•        Promote collaborative planning, development, performance, assessment, and quality
         management system-wide; and
•        Respect the distinct respective roles and responsibilities of governing boards,
         management, administration, faculty and decision-making.

The Board of Directors reflects the ownership of The Art Institute of Toronto and is a
legally constituted body with the legal responsibility of managing the assets of the organization.
The Board of Directors is ultimately responsible for maintaining the purpose, viability and integrity
of the institution, achieving institutional policies and goals, selecting administrative leadership and
providing the appropriate physical, fiscal and human resources. Board decisions are made in the
best interests of the institution not individual constituents. The Board of Directors the delegates
the management responsibility the Art Institute of Toronto Executive Committee.

A System System Coordinating Board provides oversight, guiding principles, policy direction,
best practices and minimum standard requiements. The Coordinating Board provides the
additional tier of accountability, quality assurance and policy governance framework that both
guides and supports the individual Art Institute.     A system coordinating board establishes
system-wide guidelines, policies, system rules or guiding principles, for planning,
coordination, quality assessment and operational standards. These system rules are incorporated


                                                                                                   45
Part A – Organization Review

into The AiTO Policy and Procedures. The system support includes areas of
marketing and admissions, academic affairs, finance, license and accreditation, graduate
employment assistance, human resources as well other areas that are all provided the additional
support system staff specialists. The Art Institute of Toronto President is also a member of the
Council of Presidents, which serves in an advisory capacity to the system coordinating board.

The Art Institute of Toronto Executive Committee

The Executive Committee is responsible for the day-to-day operation of The Art Institute of
Toronto. It has the authority to approve policy and business decisions and to set strategic
directions, consistent with the mission that governs the institution. The Executive Committee
consists of the President (who serves as the Chairperson), the Dean of Academic Affairs, the
Director of Administrative and Financial Services (Business Manager), the Director of
Admissions, the Human Resources Director, the Dean of Student Affairs and Director of Career
Services.

The Executive Committee is entrusted with the authority to manage the business and affairs of
The Art Institute of Toronto. In conjunction with the President, the Executive Committee sets a
budget consistent with AiTO goals and the strategic plan, and forecasts and manages resources
and cost to the best effect. The Executive Committee is supported by additional system experts
with expertise in particular subject areas, such as education, human resources, technology,
student services, compliance,student assistance, institutional effectiveness and quality assurance.

The President of The Art Institute of Toronto is the primary agent and is responsible for the
administration of the institution’s operations in accordance with policies.             Faculty and
administrative staff of The Art Institute of Toronto are involved in effective governance and this
administrative structure supports the fulfillment of the mission. Faculty and staff are also involved
in curriculum development and revision, provide support to students, and assess student learning
outcomes, strategic planning and committee participation.

The Dean of Academic Affairs is responsible for the overall supervision, coordination and
development of instructional policies, programs, personnel and facilities at AiTO. The Dean is the
chief education officer of the institution. This position is responsible for creating and sustaining
an environment of academic and professional excellence for students and educational team
members. The Dean hires faculty members in accordance with the institutional policies and
strictly adheres to qualifications guidelines. The Dean of Academic Affairs is also responsible for
the hiring of educational personnel, including faculty, library staff and the Registrar.

The Art Institutes shall maintain a core group of full-time faculty at to ensure consistency in
educational programs. Although some faculty will be hired on a part-time basis the administration
will observe the commitment and dedication each instructor exhibits to the school, its programs
and students. The administration may then offer part-time faculty an opportunity to become one of
the core full-time faculty members. All faculty teaching in the degree programs will meet or
exceed the qualifications standards of the Quality Assessment Board and the
system standards of the Art Institutes.

The Director of Administrative and Financial Services (Business Manager) plans for and carries
out sound business, administrative and educational practices in overseeing the financial function
of the campus and provides leadership, training, and supervision to the Accounting and Student
Financial Services Staff. In addition, the Director of Administrative and Financial Services
provides advice and counsel to the President and other members of the Executive Committee
regarding the financial impact of operating decisions. Position descriptions are attached for
members of the Executive Committee and management staff.




                                                                                                 46
Part A – Organization Review

AiTO provides a comprehensive Student Services Department that offers many valuable
resources to aid students in reaching their education and career goals. The services provided will
be similar services as those provided by other Art Institutes and include part-time job assistance,
career planning, personal counselling and housing assistance.

The EDMC Director of Compliance, Accreditation and Regulatory Affairs (Canada) is an external
member of both The Art Institute of Toronto and The Art Institute of Vancouver. This person has
the specific responsibility of supporting the Executive Committee decision-making process with
particular attention to business practices, consumer protection and compliance with regulatory,
accreditation, privacy, student assistance and Art Institute system processes and practices.

The Executive Committee is responsible for supporting the development, strategic direction and
mission of The Art Institute of Toronto in particular:

1. Adopts administrative and operational and business policies and procedures to achieve the
    purpose and mission of the School;
2. Approves the establishment and discontinuing educational programs;
3. Maintains long-term and annual comprehensive development plans which cover programs
    and services, instruction, human resources, facilities and fiscal resources;
4. Performs all necessary actions to promote the integrity and welfare of the School and
    protects it against improper or unlawful infringement;
5. Considers and acts on other appropriate recommendations of the President of the School;
    and
6. Operates The Art Institute of Toronto in a manner consistent with the Ai System guiding
    principles and guidelines.
7. Maintains a long-range and strategic plan;
8. Revises and maintains of its annual operating budget to determine operational priorities and
    decisions;
9. Ensures that financial management is maintained by quarterly monitoring of the annual
    operating budget in order for orderly and efficient operational actions to assure fiscal stability;
10. Ensures that an annual audit of the financial statements is performed by an independent
    public accounting firm. Any deficiencies noted by the independent accountants must be
    communicated directly to the Board of Directors and the Policy and Coordinating Board;
11. Establishes a capital and facilities improvement budget that will be maintained in the same
    manner as the annual operating budget;
12. Sets student tuition and other fees that will generate an amount sufficient to support the
    programs and services and guarantee a fiscal stability and perpetuity.

The Executive Committee has management and operational responsibility for Art Institute of
Toronto. However, the governing and operating structures reflect an important distinction
between business decision-making and academic decision-making. The Executive Committee
seeks the advice of qualified faculty on matters of education. The quality assurance and
validation purposes program proposals are also vetted and must have the approval of the system
Coordinating Board. The Executive Committee does not design or dictate the contents of
academic programs; this is the responsibility of qualified academic personnel. The Executive
Board’s decision making for the approval of a new program or material changes to programs
also involves consultation with the Art Institute System Coordinating Boards education specialists
and the Art Institute of Toronto’s Faculty Council and program curriculum review committee.The
Dean of Academic Affairs takes program proposals to the Executive Committee for approval.

The Executive Committee can make one of six decisions relating to academic progams:
(1) to create a recommended new program; (2) enhance a current program by implementing
recommended changes; (3) to leave a program unchanged; (4) to suspend enrolment into a
program; (5) terminate a program; or (6) refer the proposal or any program matter to the Curriculum
Committee or Faculty Council for study, recommendation or comment.

                                                                                                   47
Part A – Organization Review

Participation in Institutional Governance

As a post-secondary education institution, AiTO is committed to faculty participation in the
development and revision of academic programs, policies, and procedures. This participation
may be through informal communication with administration or in formal communication
processes, specifically, participation in departmental and general faculty meetings or through the
established committee processes.


Academic and Program Development:

Academic personnel lead in the development, delivery, evaluation, and revision of academic
programs. The faculty, under the leadership of the Program Directors and Dean of Academic
Affairs, delivers learning-centred, industry-relevant and competency-based instruction, imbued
with goals of higher learning. In addition to their regular classroom activities, faculty members
have responsibilities for curriculum development and assessment of student academic
achievement.

The review and revision of existing curricula is a responsibility shared among the faculty, Program
Directors, the Dean, the Curriculum Committees and the Program Advisory Committees (“PAC”)
for the program being reviewed.

Each program or related set of programs has a Curriculum Committee with faculty comprising a
significant part of its membership. Faculty members are responsible for the design and delivery
of effective classroom instruction that contributes to students’ learning. In fulfilling this
responsibility, faculty members contribute - individually and collectively - to an ongoing process of
curriculum development and revision.

Committee Structures

The committee structure is intended to promote effective interdepartmental communications, and
to provide opportunity for administration, faculty and staff to participate in various aspects of
institutional governance. Committees are developed in alignment with the mission and purposes
of the school. Committee objectives are established to support the institutional priorities, strategic
goals and degree quality assessment requirements.


Faculty Council

Faculty Council is the senior academic advisory body of The Art Institute of Toronto. The Council
is chaired by the Dean of Academic Affairs and includes the Registrar, Program Director, Director
of Student Services, one member of faculty from each program area and one student
representative from each degree program.

The Council is consulted for its advice on the mission and goals of the Institute,
and institutional and academic policies, including the establishment and termination of degree
programs and policies on the conduct of academic work.

The Faculty Council reviews and recommends and participates in the formulation of policy that
relates to a wide range of institutional priorities: policies regarding faculty and students, matters of
curriculum, academic prerequisites, requirements and standards for admission, retention and
granting of degrees, academic freedom and teaching. It carries out these responsibilities and
authorities in cooperation with the administration, staff and students. The Council is expected to
promote a consistent approach to faculty and staff development and academic policy.



                                                                                                    49
Part A – Organization Review

The Council is responsible for the approval of and recommendation to the Executive of all
academic policies and procedures. The Council is also responsible for the annual review of the
Faculty Handbook and Calendar and related academic policies. In addition, the Council provides
a structure for the discussion of possible policy-revision recommendations to be submitted to the
President or Dean of Academic Affairs.


AiTO Faculty Curriculum Committees

The Curriculum Committee reviews proposed course and program changes for AiTO curriculum,
and focuses on the appropriateness of the changes to the school's mission and educational
programs and for the requirements of accreditation. Approved courses or changes are
recommended through the President to the Executive. The Committee is responsible for
ensuring that established internal processes and procedures for curriculum review, revision,
design and development and implementation are properly followed and effectively communicated.
The Committee coordinates with system-wide program and curriculum specific teams across the
Ai system.


Admissions Committee

The purpose of this Committee is to review applicant files to ensure students have every
opportunity for success and to advice on the acceptance of new students. It is the decision-
making body with respect to the admission and acceptance of an applicant to The Art Institute of
Toronto. The Committee, chaired by the Dean of Academic Affairs, also is consulted on
admissions policies and procedures. It provides a formal structure for the recommendation of
changes in admissions policies to the Board, through the Dean of Academic Affairs and the
President.


Task Forces

The President of The Art Institute may occasionally find it necessary to assign a task force for a
specific task, project or research initiative. A task force is usually appointed for a specific period
and is disbanded when the project or research initiative is completed. This is particularly
important given the newness, growth and rapidity of change in the applied arts fields and AiTO’s
commitment to remain current and relevant in its programming.


Program Advisory Committees

Members of the local professional community assist and guide the development of each
academic program of The Art Institute. Program Advisory Committee (“PAC”) members serve for
a minimum of two years and meet with Program Directors at least twice per year to review
curricula as it relates to meeting the needs of the professional community. The review and
revision of existing curricula is a responsibility shared and led by faculty, Program Directors, the
Dean, the Curriculum Committees and the PAC for the relevant programs. The school has
established a PAC for each program or related set of programs. The PAC is a consultative group
of outside professionals practicing in the field of the department’s specialty. The PAC meets with
members of the faculty and the Program Director twice a year and conducts a formal review of
the program’s mission, exit competencies, course descriptions and course competencies. These
Committees also include current students and recent AiTo graduates.




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Student Advisory Committee

This committee is charged with the responsibility of looking at things from the view of a successful
student. Students assess what works well and what does not work and consider ways to solve
problems. Students work with their Program Director, the Assistant Dean for each respective
program area and the Dean of Academic Affairs to ensure the continual development of the
department. The Committee is used as a vehicle for advice, communications and feedback about
any element of the Institute’s operations. The Committee meets with the Executive Committee or
the President once a quarter, or as necessary. The Committee consists of not less than six and
not more than ten students. A copy of the Student Handbook is attached and provides national
information on the Student Advisory Committee.

Other Departments

 Registrar's Office

The Registrar and staff are responsible for maintenance of all student records including the
following:
        • Issuing grades;
        • Issuing transcripts;
        • Processing student status changes;
        • Record-keeping of students' attendance in class;
        • Foreign enrolment certification;
        • Refund verification enrolment certification and reports;
        • Supervision of quarterly student registration activities; and
        • Security of transcript records.

Admissions/Recruitment

         •    Meets quality goals for new students;
         •    Designs or assists in the design of quality promotional programs and materials; and
         •    Manages the high school recruiting and telemarketing programs.

Student Affairs

         •    Provides appropriate counselling services;
         •    Housing services;
         •    Gives advice and counsel to the President regarding overall student morale;
         •    Assists students identified as having special needs;
         •    Organizes student activities; and
         •    Assists international students.

Career Services

         •    Provides full- and part-time job assistance to students.

Student Financial Services

         •    Manages financial aid program(s).

Administrative Financial Services

         •    Manages student accounting services; and



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          •   Manages the financial and budgeting needs of The Art Institute.

Human Resources

          •   Manages personnel records;
          •   Manages recruiting;
          •   Manages job-related work issues; and
          •   Manages personnel issues.

Library

          •   Develops library and program resources;
          •   Manages DVDs, videos, slides and other AV materials;
          •   Provides research services; and
          •   Generally assists students.

Community & Professional Education

          •   Responsible for providing workshops to the community on a variety of offerings that
              vary from quarter to quarter.

Technology Services

          •   The technology services staff provide access to hardware and software and
              administers all technology resources through policy guidelines. Their goal is to
              provide fair and efficient service to all students and faculty.


System Policy & Coordinating Board

Guiding Principles: AiTO benefits from the counsel and guiding policies
established by a system policy coordinating board. The Coordinating Board provides
overarching policy governance oversight, quality assurance review and
adherence system standards of operation. The Board consists of senior
education, legal, accreditation, financial, compliance, quality assurance, student affairs and
organizational professionals from across the Ai System and from outside the system.

This Board is responsible for supporting system-wide planning, coordination, maintenance and
oversight of the individually governed Art Institutes. Its purpose is to establish guiding principles
and standards, achieve the highest possible quality, effectiveness and best practices in system
operations through policies and procedures directed toward system support, comparability,
resource and expertise.




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6.2.3 Reporting Structure Chart




                                  55
                                                      ART INSTITUTE OF TORONTO
                                                        ORGANIZATION CHART
                                                          ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
         Ai Coordinating Board - Ai System
         Academic and Operational Support
       Specialists, System Program Review and
        Guiding Principles –Quality Assurance                           Dean of
                                                                    Academic Affairs




                   Ai Toronto Faculty Council                                                               Program Advisory Committees




                                                                                                                  Library Director




                                                                                                                     Registrar




Continuing Education                Interior Design    Graphic Design                  Media Arts &
                                                                                        Animation     Liberal Arts Education          Game Art & Design
Part A – Organization Review




6.3 Administrative Staff
6.3.1 Administrative Positions

Title:                     AITO Campus President
Position Summary:          Responsible for: providing overall leadership for The Art Institute of
                           Toronto (AiTO); meeting objectives and standards of both the Private
                           Career Training Institutions Act (and the terms of AiTO’s accreditation)
                           and the Post-secondary Education Quality Assessment Board; student
                           recruitment and persistence, program development, and long-range plan
                           milestones, in concert with the school President, EDMC, and the school’s
                           Board. Consults closely with CS functional department heads.
Key Job Elements:          1. Upholds the EDMC/Ai/AITO philosophy: quality services to students;
                                development, growth, involvement, and recognition of employees;
                                sound economic principles; an environment that is conducive to
                                innovation, positive thinking and expansion that is also considered in
                                the formulation of policies; decision-making is communicated and
                                subscribed to by faculty and staff members in their work with
                                personnel and those outside the company.
                           2. Prepares annual and long-range business plans.
                           3. Meets key financial and operations targets.
                           4. Meets long-range plan milestones.
                           5. Ensures human resources are managed and developed.
                           6. Meets federal, provincial and accreditation standards.
                           7. Maintains internal and external relationships.
                           8. Develops and maintains political and community relationships.
                           9. Ensures the facilities are properly maintained and provided under
                                favourable long-term leases.
                           10. Hires, trains, manage and lead an effective management team.

Position                   1.   Demonstrated organizational leadership, including the capacity to
Requirements:                   lead and motivate multidisciplinary executive and staff teams in
                                complex environments.
                           2. Preferably a holds a degree in Education or Business administration
                                and/or not less than 10 years relevant experience.
                           3. Minimum of 10 years progressively responsible experience in career
                                education.
                           4. Some experience in business, preferably with prior P&L
                                responsibility.
                           5.   Ability to communicate effectively and build a team.
Environment:               This position operates under the general supervision of the School
                           President and has the operating responsibility of the campus. The
                           position has wide latitude in leading the activities of the campus. The
                           Campus President develops recommendations and creative solutions to
                           problems and participates in decision-making at the highest operating
                           level.
Organizational             Reports to:          Board of Directors and Coordinating Board; relational
Relationships                                   to Group VP at EDMC
                           Supervises:          Director of Administrative and Financial Services,
                                                Dean of Academic Affairs, Director of Admissions,
                                                Director of Career Services, Director of Human


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Title:                         Dean of Academic Affairs
Position Summary:              This position acts as the chief academic officer, operating with
                               shared supervision from the campus President, Executive
                               Committee, and members of the Central Staff. The chief academic
                               officer is responsible for the overall administration, coordination, and
                               development of instructional policies, programs, personnel and
                               facilities. This position is responsible for creating and sustaining an
                               environment of academic and professional excellence for students
                               and faculty and a collaborative working environment with educational
                               team members. The Dean of Academic Affairs is also responsible for
                               the financial performance of the Academic Affairs Department.
Key Job Elements:              1. Assures that the Art Institutes’ philosophy (quality services to
                                      clients; development, growth, involvement and recognition of
                                      employees; sound economic principles; and an environment
                                      which is conducive to innovation, positive thinking and
                                      expansion) is considered in carrying out the duties and
                                      responsibilities of this position.
                               2. Leadership and vision.
                               3. Fiscal health of the Academic Affairs Department and
                                      achievement of strategic objectives.
                               4. Faculty and staff development.
                               5. Curriculum implementation and development.
                               6. Student persistence and completion.
                               7. Compliance with system rules, provincial regulations, and
                                      accrediting criteria.
                               8. Community responsibilities.

Position Requirements:         1.   Minimum of Master’s degree in Education, preferably in a Major
                                    related to an Ai subject area. Doctoral degree strongly
                                    preferred.
                               2.   At least 10 years of increasingly responsible experience in
                                    education, with considerable academic management
                                    experience, preferably in a private or relevant public sector
                                    school setting.
                               3.   Excellent oral and written communication skills.
                               4.   Strong interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively
                                    as a member of a team.
                               5.   Ability to interact successfully with academic as well as business
                                    and regulatory personnel.

Strategic Objectives for       Leadership and Vision:
the Dean of Academic           • Develop and maintain a vision for educational growth of the
Affairs:                          school.
                               • Develop the Strategic Plan for the Academic Affairs Department.
                               • Participate as a member of the campus Executive Committee.
                               • Guide the Steering Committee on Institutional Effectiveness
                                  Planning.
                               • Build a strong, cohesive Academic Affairs management team.
                               • Serve on the Council of Deans in the Ai system.




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Title:                         Dean of Academic Affairs
                               Curriculum Development:
                               • Administer all academic programs to provide quality education
                                   with overall consistency to meet the needs of the marketplace.
                               • Oversee the campus’ representation on the school’s curriculum
                                   committee for the development/revision and/or implementation of
                                   all curricula.
                               • Collaborate with the Academic Affairs managers to organize
                                   regular evaluations of curricula in the various schools.

                               Student Persistence and Completion:
                               • Guide the Student Success Committee for overall improvement
                                   of persistence.
                               • Coordinate with the Director of Career Services and network with
                                   industry professionals to discuss new developments and trends
                                   and to obtain feedback on curriculum effects.

                               Compliance with System Rules, Provincial Regulations, and
                               Accrediting Criteria:
                               • In partnership with the campus President, coordinate general
                                  compliance of the School’s educational practices with national,
                                  provincial and regional regulations.
                               • Ensure the appropriate accrediting criteria and requirements are
                                  maintained.
                               • Comply with Ai System Rules and Policies as they apply to the
                                  Academic Affairs Department.
                               • Coordinate with the Director of Admissions and Admissions
                                  Review Committee to set and maintain Admission standards and
                                  the process.

                               Faculty and Staff Development:
                               • Supervise, develop, and evaluate all Academic Affairs managers,
                                  i.e., Academic Program Directors, Registrar, Librarian, and
                                  Administrative Assistants.
                               • Guide the Academic Affairs managers in hiring and developing
                                  faculty and staff members.
                               • Continually improve the faculty and educational staff orientation,
                                  training and development activities to promote a culture of
                                  learning.
                               • Oversee the evaluation of all faculty and staff in the Academic
                                  Affairs Department.
                               • Create and enforce the systems, policies, and procedures in
                                  order to ensure educational consistency.




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Title:                         Dean of Academic Affairs
Fiscal Responsibilities:       • Guide the Academic Affairs managers in the preparation and
                                  implementation of the budgeting process.
                               • Finalize annual budgeting for the Academic Affairs Department.
                               • Make necessary changes to ensure the fiscal health of the
                                  Academic Affairs Department and achievement of strategic
                                  objectives
                               • Meet the targets of all key drivers of the strategic plan.
                               • Manage the scheduling process for maximizing efficiencies while
                                  maintaining educational outcomes.

Title:                         Dean of Academic Affairs
Community                      • Develop educational articulation relationships with school districts
Responsibilities:                 and other institutions.
                               • Elevate the visibility and image of the school in the community.
                               • Enhance internship opportunities within the community by
                                  maintaining a quality educational presence.

Organizational                 Reports to:          The President
Relationships:                 Collaborates with:   Ai Executive Committee
                                                    CS Education
                                                    Ai system Functional area specialists
                                                    Program Advisory Boards
                                                    Coordinating Board
                                                    Ai Academic Deans Council
                                                    Ai Toronto Faculty Council
                               Supervises:          Educational managers to include:
                                                    School Deans
                                                    Academic Department Directors
                                                    Academic Program Director
                                                    Registrar
                                                    Supply Store Manager
                                                    Director of Technology
                                                    LRC personnel
                                                    Administrative Personnel
                                                    Faculty




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Title:                     Program Director
Position Summary:          A Program Director is the principal academic officer for a specific program
                           or programs. Responsibilities include: day-to-day operations, assisting
                           students toward successful program completion and staffing the
                           classroom with instructors who support the mission of the college. The
                           ADD is co-responsible with the Dean of Academic Affairs for the fiscal
                           well being of the department as it relates to education. The Director also
                           participates in activities that promote the stature of the department and
                           the college and abides by the mandates set by the Board of Coordinating
                           Board, the AiTO President, and the Executive Committee.
Key Job Elements:          1. Assure that the AiTO/Art Institutes philosophy: quality services to
                              clients; development, growth, involvement and recognition of
                              employees; sound economic principles; and an environment which is
                              conducive to innovation, positive thinking and expansion - is
                              considered in carrying out the duties and responsibilities of this
                              position.
                           2. Provide academic leadership.
                           3. Select, train, develop, manage, and lead faculty and staff team
                              members according to the guidelines provided by the Dean of
                              Academic Affairs.
                           4. Plan and implement a budget including personnel requirements,
                              program expenses, and capital needs.
                           5. Support AiTO programs designed to achieve student completion rates
                              as outlined in the five-year strategic plan.
                           6. Provide support to college and community relations activities.
                              Collaborate with other Academic Department Directors within own
                              school and across schools: scheduling, sharing faculty, and other.
                           7. Other responsibilities as determined by the Dean of Academic Affairs.
Organizational             Reports to: Dean of Academic Affairs
Relationships:             Supervises: Instructors and Student Help

Position                   1. Baccalaureate degree and relevant experience in the field. Appropriate
Requirements:                 industry credentials.
                           2. Held positions of increasingly responsible experience in the industry
                              and / or education.
                           3. Fiscal and personnel management experience.
                           4. Excellent oral and written communication skills.
                           5. Strong interpersonal skills with the ability to act effectively as a
                              member of a team.
                           6. Ability to interact successfully with academic as well as business and
                              regulatory personnel.
Accountability:            Direct: Academic department budget
                                     Academic integrity and quality of program
                                     Completion rates
                           Indirect: Program public relations effort
                                     Employment rates and salaries
Environment:               This position acts as the academic program’s chief officer making
                           decisions and operating in a coordinated effort with Dean, program-
                           specific advisory board, and all education department directors. The
                           Program Director provides support and guidance to students and faculty
                           and maintains a leadership role in all department functions. Inside contact
                           encompasses the entire range of personnel. Outside contacts may
                           include community and professional leaders as well as other educators.



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Title:                         Director of Admissions
Position Summary:              This position reports to the campus President and serves as the chief
                               sales and marketing executive for the School and as a member of the
                               campus Executive Committee. The Director of Admissions (“DoA”)
                               functions as the key person responsible for new student recruitment
                               and sales management for the admissions department. Manages the
                               Assistant Directors of Admissions and admissions support staff.
                               Responsible for attaining new student and start rate plans for the
                               campus. Oversees the conversion of inquiries to applicants, and
                               applicants to new students. Works closely with all campus Executive
                               Committee members to assure successful new student recruitment
                               support and admissions operation, as well as supporting the
                               Executive Committee members’ functions.

Key Job Elements:              1.   Establishes, forecasts and achieves new student and
                                    readmissions plans.
                               2.   Oversees hiring of all admissions staff, maintaining staffing
                                    plans, and oversees and assists in the training, development,
                                    motivation, and ongoing management of such staff including
                                    monthly, quarterly and annual reviews; new hire and veteran
                                    training; ongoing observations; turnover prevention via training
                                    and support provided.
                               3.   Responsible for conversions of inquiry to applicant; and applicant
                                    to new student.
                               4.   Responsible for school’s admissions budget and monitoring
                                    inquiry source results and cost effectiveness.
                               5.   Responsible for local inquiry generation and database marketing.
                               6.   Generates marketing plans to support inquiry conversion and
                                    applicant lock-in.
                               7.   Ensures compliance with all Ai standards, ethical standards, and
                                    compliance with all federal, provincial and accreditation
                                    requirements.
                               8.   Serves as a member of the campus’s Executive Committee.

Position                       1.   Minimum of Bachelor’s Degree in Business or equivalent
Requirements:                       experience.
                               2.   Minimum seven years of increasingly responsible experience
                                    managing a sales effort, particularly admissions recruitment or
                                    intangible products.
                               3.   Proven ability to inspire, motivate and lead a sales team.
                               4.   Ability to communicate, verbal and written.



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Title:                         Director of Admissions
                               5. Ability to serve effectively as a member of a team.
                               6. Computer literacy. Ability to learn and utilize the Ai inquiry and
                                   applicant system and report features.




Title:                         Assistant Director of Admissions
Position Summary:              Responsible for recruiting qualified applicants for admissions to The
                               Art Institute of Toronto. The Assistant Director of Admissions (“ADA”)
                               manages his/her time and inquiry resources to achieve monthly
                               application, and quarterly and annual enrolment plans. The ADA
                               must conduct a high quantity of prospective phone contacts to secure
                               weekly standard appointment interview activity, and to conduct follow-
                               up activity with unresolved interviewees and future class applicants.
                               The ADA is responsible for conducting all recruitment activities in
                               accordance with provincial and federal accreditation and school
                               policies and regulations, consistent with the highest ethical standards.

Key Job Elements:              1.  Manages inquiries to achieve prompt contact and performance
                                   activity weekly goals; utilizes Ai approved recruitment
                                   policies/formats; makes prompt and effective contact with
                                   applicants and redirects unqualified candidates based upon
                                   incompatible career goals.
                               2. Secures new inquiries (Personally Developed Referrals) by
                                   directly asking phone and in-person contacts about referrals of
                                   others to contact about the Institutes offerings.
                               3. Schedules and conducts interviews. Pursues qualified
                                   candidates for enrolment.
                               4. Determines appropriateness of candidates for admission based
                                   upon career goal compatibility.
                               5. Achieves enrolment and start rate goals.
                               6. Accurately and completely portrays Institute educational
                                   programs, expected outcomes, student services, and financial
                                   consideration to students, parents and educators.
                               7. Consistently conducts minimum monthly follow-up with all
                                   applicants to ensure successful matriculation. Assists other
                                   personnel and departments with data collection and problem
                                   solving.
                               8. Participates in appropriate recruitment and enrolment activities
                                   including: open houses, regional presentations, training
                                   sessions, orientation programs, career days, etc.
                               9. Accurately forecasts projected new students on a periodic basis
                                   for Director of Admissions.
                               10. Conducts all activities in accordance with the highest ethical
                                   standards. Adheres to all provincial and federal accreditation
                                   and Institute rules and regulations regarding student recruitment.
                               11. Strict adherence to Ethical Business Practices, policies and


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Title:                         Assistant Director of Admissions
                                   procedures.
Position                       1. Minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree.
Requirements:                  2. Minimum of 1-2 years non-durable goods sales and/or customer
                                   service experience preferred.
                               3. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills. Able to work
                                   with people from a variety of socio-economic and cultural
                                   backgrounds.
                               4. Ability to work independently and make decisions based on
                                   general guidelines.
                               5. Possesses a sincere interest in helping others to achieve life
                                   goals.
                               6. Is goal oriented and highly ethical.


Title:                          Director of Administrative and Financial Services
Position Summary:               This position acts as the chief financial and administrative officer for
                                The Art Institute of Toronto. Provides advice and counsel to the
                                campus President and campus Executive Committee members
                                regarding the financial impact of operating decisions. Provides
                                leadership to supervisory personnel of the AFS department.
                                Supports the decisions and utilizes the recommendations made by
                                the School President, Executive Committee

Key Job Elements:               1.  Assures that the Ai and EDMC philosophy (quality services to
                                    clients; development, growth, involvement and recognition of
                                    employees; sound economic principles; and an environment
                                    which is conducive to innovation, positive thinking and
                                    expansion) is considered in carrying out the duties and
                                    responsibilities of this position.
                                2. Establishes and implements policies that will withstand
                                    corporate and outside agency audits. Establishes and
                                    maintains operating procedures that guide the staff and lead
                                    supervisory personnel toward this end.
                                3. Establishes and manages the AFS organization, defines job
                                    parameters, hires and trains personnel, and leads all AFS
                                    supervisory personnel.
                                4. Monitors and controls the AiTO accounts receivable level to
                                    assure profitability maintained on all student accounts.
                                5. Coordinates and communicates AFS activities with other AiTO
                                    departments whenever appropriate.
                                6. Assures that AiTO is in compliance with all Federal, Provincial,
                                    and Local regulations and statutes.
                                7. Maintains a system of cash planning and management
                                    consistent with EDMC/AITO policy including the disbursement
                                    of financial aid funds.
                                8. Assures all requested financial and student reports are
                                    prepared in a timely manner.
                                9. Review AFS activities in search of opportunities to improve
                                    daily operations, raises the motivational level of staff, and
                                    increases cost-efficiency.
                                10. Develops short and long term planning objectives, prepares
                                    appropriate budgets to support the initiatives of the school.


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Title:                         Director of Administrative and Financial Services
                               11. Serves as a member of the Executive Committee. Keeps the
                                   campus President informed of all AFS activities.
Position Requirements:         1. Minimum of a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting or Business
                                   Administration or relevant professional credentials and
                                   experience.
                               2. At least seven years of increasingly responsible experience in
                                   financial management, preferably in a proprietary school.
                               3. Good general business knowledge.
                               4. Ability to communicate and work effectively as a member of a
                                   team.
                               5. Ability to interact with outside professionals such as lawyers,
                                   accountants, brokers, and bankers.
Accountability:                1. Evidence of compliance found in all audits has certified
                                   operation procedures and supervisory guides are successful.
                               2. Quality and accuracy of work indicate the organization,
                                   position responsibilities and procedures are delivering desired
                                   results.
                               3. Accounts receivable target is being maintained which verifies
                                   monitor and control procedures.
                               4. An attitude of quality service to students is fostered throughout
                                   the department.
                               5. Open communication exists between Campus President, AFS
                                   staff and management, and all AiToronto departments.
                               6. Annual audits verify the requisite federal, provincial, and local
                                   regulations and statutes are being complied with.
                               7. Business practices dictate adherence to Ai/AITO/EDMC
                                   policies.
                               8. Cash transactions are monitored as a function of financial
                                   control.
                               9. Verification of all financial and student reports prepared in a
                                   timely manner.
                               10. Periodic meetings with staff members occur to solicit creative
                                   input relative to AiTO growth .
                               11. Periodic review of short and long-range objectives assures
                                   success in completion of objectives.




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Title:                         Director of Financial Aid
Position Summary:              Develops, negotiates and finalizes student financial plans consistent
                               with financial planning policies and procedures and Federal/Provincial
                               regulations for awarding aid. Works closely with students and their
                               families to ensure the plan and re-plan continue to meet the families’
                               needs. Informs students on all acceptances and other matters related
                               directly to the student financial plan.
Key Job Elements:              1. Works cohesively with ADAs in order to facilitate outstanding
                                    service to prospective students and their parents.
                               2. Maintains Planning Load based on school need. Is available to
                                    assist with overflow appointments. Creates plans and explains the
                                    Plan and the new, continuing and re-entry student’s/parent’s rights
                                    and responsibilities for each aid source. Negotiates Payment
                                    Plans. Able to develop Student Financial Plans in concert with
                                    Institute procedures and knowledge of Federal regulations.
                               3. Processes Drops and Grads.
                               4. Assists new, continuing and re-entry students/parents with the
                                    completion of Student Assistance forms.
                               5. Assigns the appropriate budget to a student and package the
                                    student (award their aid).
                               6. Ensures that aid is paid to students’ accounts in a timely manner.
                                    Monitors EFT rosters.
                               7. Responsible for complete and accurate files and paperwork.
                               8. Completes Basic Verification/QA and C Code Requirements.
                               9. Certifies Loan Applications as required by Student Assistance
                                    directives.
                               10. Utilizes reports as appropriate to job duties.
                               11. Acts as a resource for training new Financial Aid Officers.
                               12. Is available for School Committee Work and to help other EDMC
                                    schools.
                               13. Assists with operations management of payment process.
                               14. Assists with quarterly Back to Basics Compliance Review on files
                                    of Financial Aid Officers.
                               15. Strong Customer Service Component as described in the Planner
                                    Productivity Report.
                               16. Demonstrates proficiency in timely collections: -90% aid paid
                                    consistently by end of 5th week of term and 98% by end of 8th
                                    week of term.
                               17. Maintains consistently clean files shown through Training
                                    Assessments for Compliance with Federal/provincial regulations
                                    and school policies and procedures. (Less than a 10% comment



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Title:                         Director of Financial Aid
                                   rate per term and less than a 5% potential liability rate for the
                                   year.)
                               18. Completes the appropriate training modules within 30 days of the
                                   new or revised module becoming available.
                               19. Performs special projects as assigned.
                               20. Ensures compliance with Student Assistance MOU.
Position                       1. Previous experience working with and technical knowledge of
Requirements:                      student financial aid programs.
                               2. High comfort level within a computerized environment.
                               3. Ability to make small group presentations as well as skill in
                                   interacting on a one on one basis. Strong verbal communication
                                   skills and attention to detail.




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Title:                         Director, Student Affairs
Position Summary:              Develops and implements programs and activities that support the
                               needs and foster personal growth of AiTO students. Specific
                               responsibilities include the delivery of effective and quality services to
                               students in the following areas: student housing; counselling; student
                               conduct; student activities and programs; and disability services. This
                               is done through creating policies, programs and services that support
                               the school’s mission, meet the needs of a diverse campus population,
                               foster student development and promote involvement in campus life.

Key Job Elements               1. Assures that the Ai/EDMC/AITO philosophy (quality services to
                                  clients; development, growth, involvement and recognition of
                                  employees; sound economic principles; and an environment
                                  which is conducive to innovation, positive thinking and expansion)
                                  is considered when carrying out the duties and responsibilities of
                                  this position.
                               2. Assists in the promotion of strategies and programs designed to
                                  positively impact student persistence and increase student
                                  satisfaction at the campus.
                               3. Assists in the development of short and long-range vision for
                                  student affairs.
                               4. Works collaboratively with the campus’s Executive Committee
                                  and all other departments on achieving campus objectives for
                                  enrolment and persistence.
                               5. Assures housing services are developed and maintained while
                                  promoting a residential life concept.
                               6. Assures student counselling services and proactive intervention
                                  programs are provided.
                               7. Supports and facilitates students career Planning and job search
                                  including tracking placement of students consistent with Quality
                                  Assurance, Ministerial and Student Assistance Requirements.
                               8. Develops and implements a judicial system, serves as Student
                                  Conduct Officer for the campus.
Position                       1. A Master’s degree in, Education, Counselling, Student Personnel
Requirements:                     Administration or other related field is required.
                               2. Three to five years of increasingly responsible experience in
                                  student services areas, preferably in a for-profit environment.
                               3. Excellent interpersonal skills on both an individual and group
                                  basis.
                               4. Effective problem resolution skills.
                               5. Ability to communicate and effectively act as a member of a team.
                               6. Good general business knowledge and ability to effectively
                                  supervise and lead a staff of professionals.
                               7. Knowledge of current practices and theories in student affairs in
                                  higher education.
                               8. Ability to communicate and act effectively as a member of a team.




                                                                                                       66
Part A – Organization Review


Title:                         Librarian
Position Summary:              Performs reference and bibliographic instruction utilizing traditional
                               print and online resources. Oversees the development and
                               maintenance of the collection of the Library. Processes Interlibrary
                               loan requests.
Performance                    1. Assists faculty, students, and staff in the development of
Responsibilities:                  research skills.
                               2. Provides reference services to all faculty, students and staff.
                               3. Promotes, develops and conducts Library bibliographic
                                   instruction including the use of online resources and the OPAC
                                   for faculty, students and staff.
                               4. Serves as the coordinator for collection development with
                                   faculty and students.
                               5. Assists in the preparation of the Library budget and in strategic
                                   planning for the Library.
                               6. Oversees student workers in the shelving and inventory of
                                   Library materials.
                               7. Oversees the repair and rebinding of Library materials.
                               8. Assists in coverage of circulation desk.
                               9. Maintains Library Web page, seeking out and adding
                                   appropriate links to remote resources and ensuring that all links
                                   are current and active in cooperation with the technical services
                                   librarian.
                               10. Other duties as assigned by the Dean of Academic Affairs.

Position Requirements:         1. Master's degree in Library Science from an ALA accredited
                                  institution.
                               2. Familiarity with collection management procedures, including
                                  collection development and the preservation and proper
                                  handling of Library materials.
                               3. Knowledge of and familiarity with OPAC's, OCLC, and the
                                  Internet.
                               4. Experience/knowledge in reference services and bibliographic
                                  instruction preferred.




                                                                                                  67
Part A – Organization Review


Title:                         Registrar
Position Summary:              This position is responsible for all student academic record keeping.
                               This includes compiling, maintaining and tracking student academic
                               information and records for internal and external analysis and/or use.
                               This position acts as the central records facilitator for permanent
                               academic information on current and prior students. The Registrar is a
                               prominent member of the academic affairs management team and
                               shares responsibility with the Dean of Academic Affairs for the
                               successful enrolment and persistence of students.

Performance                    1.  Assures that the Ai/EDMC/AITO philosophy (quality services to
Responsibilities:                  clients; development, growth, involvement and recognition of
                                   employees; sound economic principles; and an environment which
                                   is conducive to innovation, positive thinking and expansion) is
                                   considered in carrying out the duties and responsibilities of this
                                   position.
                               2. Assures the Office of the Registrar maintains records in
                                   accordance with regulatory requirements and in-house procedures.
                               3. Organizes and conducts quarterly registration process for in-school
                                   and incoming students.
                               4. Interacts with Program Directors and faculty to ensure students are
                                   properly enrolled.
                               5. Monitors attendance and persistence procedures.
                               6. Generates reports in requested formats for in-house, support staff
                                   and external agency use.
                               7. Processes student grades and enforces Satisfactory Academic
                                   Policy (SAP) and student assistance attendance requirements.
                               8. Serves as the Designated School Official for the Veterans
                                   Administration.
                               9. Reviews degree candidates and graduation ceremony.
                               10. Ensures AITO complies with and/or Degree Quality
                                   Assessment Board regulations and by-laws on attendance.
Position                       1. Bachelor’s degree in business related program and five years
Requirements:                      related experience.
                               2. Strong experience in supervisory management and records
                                   management.
                               3. Strong computer skills.
                               4. Excellent communication skills and ability to work effectively as
                                   part of a team.
                               5. Customer service, problem solving approach to work.




                                                                                                   68
Part A – Organization Review


Title:                         Faculty (Bachelor Programs)
Position Summary:              Instruct and facilitate meaningful learning in the course competencies in
                               the curriculum and proactively support all facets of the learning
                               environment. Provide career education through learner-centred
                               instruction that will enable graduates to fulfill the evolving needs of the
                               marketplace. Encourage a culture of learning that values responsibility,
                               life-long learning, diversity, ethics and professional development
                               and valuable accomplishments in specific area of faculty expertise.

Key Job Elements               1.     Provides competency-based education.
                               2.     Designs class instruction.
                               3.     Enables student exit competencies.
                               4.     Delivers learner-centred instruction.
                               5.     Encourages student success.
                               6.     Manages the classroom environment.
                               7.     Contributes to a culture of learning
                               8.     Relates industry experience to learning.
Position
                                       Key Job                                        Performance
Requirements:
                                       Element           Accountability               Expectation

                                    Provides            Graduate                 •   Provides instruction
                                    Competency          Outcomes,                    which creates the
                                    Based               Persistence Rate,            opportunity for the
                                    Education           Employment                   student to achieve
                                                        Rate,                        outcomes
                                                        Starting Salaries        •   Integrates career-
                                                                                     focused education
                                                                                     into course materials



                                    Designs class       Syllabus/Lesson          •   Develops
                                    instruction         Plans,                       instructional plans to
                                                        Classroom                    meet course
                                                        Assessment                   competencies
                                                                                 •   Develops activities
                                                                                     which support lesson
                                                                                     objectives

                                    Enables Exit        Student                  •   Provides instruction
                                    Competencies        Achievement,                 which fosters student
                                                        Evaluation of                achievement of
                                                        Learning                     identified exit
                                                                                     competencies
                                                                                 •   Establishes student
                                                                                     performance criteria
                                                                                     and evaluation
                                                                                     based on exit
                                                                                     competencies




                                                                                                          69
Part A – Organization Review


Title:                         Faculty

                                Delivers           Active Learning     •   Establishes a
                                Learner-                                   classroom
                                Centred                                    environment
                                Instruction                                conducive to
                                                                           collaborative
                                                                           learning and active
                                                                           student involvement

                                Encourages         Completion          •   Identifies resources
                                Student                                    to assist student
                                Success                                    learning
                                                                       •   Helps students solve
                                                                           problems that may
                                                                           impede successful
                                                                           program completion
                                                                           through advising,
                                                                           assisting, and/or
                                                                           referring students on
                                                                           academic or
                                                                           personal matters
                                                                       •   Participates in
                                                                           student persistence
                                                                           activities

                                Manages the        External/internal   •   Keeps accurate
                                Classroom          Audits                  records
                                Environment                            •   Submits grade and
                                                                           other reports on time
                                                                       •   Enforces school aca-
                                                                           demic and
                                                                           attendance policies

                                Contributes to a   Personal            •   Holds appropriate
                                Culture of         Development             level of academic
                                Learning           Service                 credentials
                                                                       •   Develops
                                                                           professional and
                                                                           technical skills
                                                                       •   Participates on
                                                                           curriculum task
                                                                           forces as needed
                                                                       •   Participates on
                                                                           system task forces
                                                                           as needed
                                                                       •   Participates in
                                                                           campus events as
                                                                           needed
                                                                       •   Serves as a member
                                                                           on school task forces




                                                                                                 70
Part A – Organization Review


Title:                         Faculty

                                                                            and committees as
                                                                            needed
                                                                        •   Contributes in institu-
                                                                            tional governance
                                                                        •   Participates in
                                                                            Faculty Development
                                                                            Process

                                Relates             Marketplace         •   Continues to develop
                                Industry            Knowledge               technical skills
                                Experience to                           •   Significant practical
                                Learning                                    experience in subject
                                                                        •   Introduces industry
                                                                            perspective into
                                                                            course materials
                                                                        •   Maintains active
                                                                            awareness of
                                                                            marketplace


Position
Requirements:
                               A master’s degree is the minimum academic credential required for
                               faculty teaching in a bachelor level programs.

                               Valuable accomplishments in area of expertiese and significant
                               practical experience in field they at teaching is required.




                                                                                                 71
Part A – Organization Review

Administrative Staff:

Title:                          Director of Human Resources
Position Summary:              Responsible for providing personnel services in the fields of
                               employment, training, compensation, employee relations, benefits
                               administration, safety, communications and legal compliance. Serves
                               as member of the Executive Committee and provides counsel
                               concerning the human resources impact of operating decisions.

Key Job Elements:              1.   Administers Human Resources policies and procedures as defined
                                    by the Corporation. Serves as a resource and main point of
                                    contact for human resources policy/procedure clarification in the
                                    school, and as an advisor for the School President and Executive
                                    Committee members.
                               2.   Cultivates and implements strategies to attract, retain and motivate
                                    talented employees. Designs programs to attract and retain an
                                    engaged and productive workforce. Oversees the hiring process
                                    within the school to ensure that jobs are filled quickly and with
                                    qualified candidates.
                               3.   Creates and supports a student and employee focused
                                    environment. Plans and designs employee communications
                                    programs and ensures their implementation. Promotes school-wide
                                    teambuilding efforts. Manages employee relations programs.
                                    Monitors and develops programs to improve employee attitudes.
                               4.   Oversees talent management. Works with School President and
                                    Executive Committee to manage succession planning. Assesses
                                    training and development needs; provides and coordinates training
                                    programs. Assists CS in coordinating relocation and transfers.
                               5.   Provides problem-solving services to the School’s Executive
                                    Committee and managers. Coaches and conducts conflict
                                    resolution and litigation avoidance. Minimizes risk to the
                                    organization in employee disputes. Acts as effective change agent.
                               6.   Manages employee benefits and compensation programs,
                                    including signature benefits, health and welfare, flexible spending
                                    and compensation plans, tuition assistance, tuition reimbursement,
                                    RRSP and stock purchase plans.
                               7.   Assures maintenance of personnel records and data within the
                                    school; assures compliance as required by Federal and State laws
                                    and accrediting bodies.

Position                       1.   Bachelor’s degree or higher in Business, or Behavioural Sciences
Specifications:                     or other related field; Graduate level Business degree desirable.
                                    Human Resources certification preferred.
                               2.   Five to seven years of increasingly responsible human resources
                                    management experience, within a proprietary educational
                                    environment or business setting.
                               3.   Knowledge of federal, provincial and local laws and regulations
                                    affecting human resources.
                               4.   Well-developed interpersonal communications and employee
                                    relations abilities. Capacity for problem solving, negotiation, and a
                                    tolerance for unstructured situations.




                                                                                                       72
Part A – Organization Review


Title                          Director of Human Resources

Organizational                 Reports to: School President
Relationships:                 Serves on: Executive Committee

Accountability:                Direct: Department Budget/ Achievement of the School’s annual
                               financial goals.
                               Indirect: Total Compensation and Benefit costs for the Institute.

Environment:                   This position operates with general supervision and with some freedom
                               to act. As the human resources officer for the institute, functional
                               decisions, recommendations and creative solutions to problems may
                               emanate at this level. There are established rules, policies or
                               procedures in many areas but the need for continual development of
                               practices is expected. Accuracy and consistency in administering
                               programs is essential. Contacts outside the school consist of suppliers,
                               industry organizations, governmental, regulatory and judicial personnel,
                               and prospective employees.




                                                                                                    73
Part A – Organization Review


Title:                         Director of Career Services
Position Summary:               Responsible for managing all aspects of the Office Career Services
                               (OCS), including the development of strong corporate relationships;
                               marketing the School’s graduates to national, regional and local firms;
                               meeting graduate outcome plans; and overseeing all OCS programs
                               and services offered to students, alumni and corporate contacts.
Key Job Elements:              1. Markets The Art Institute’s Career Services program and its
                                  students to corporations, both for existing relationships as well as
                                  for the development of new employer relationships. Responsible
                                  for making strategic decisions regarding the most desirable
                                  corporate relationships to cultivate for positive placement results.
                               2. Works with the School’s Executive Committee to develop and
                                  implement strategies for solidifying and leveraging corporate
                                  relationships across the entire school.
                               3. Co-manages (with the Dean of Academic Affairs) the preparation of
                                  students in their career search. The Director’s role is to develop an
                                  environment promoting the career counselling and placement
                                  efforts of students in each program.
                               4. Plans, oversees and assists in delivering career programs and
                                  workshops (self-assessment, resume writing, interviewing, portfolio
                                  development, negotiating, and job search strategies) designed to
                                  prepare students for the job market.
                               5. Trains, develops and manages a team of employment advisors
                                  (graduate and student), support staff, and student assistants.
                               6. Oversees the day-to-day operations of the office, all on-site
                                  recruiting activities, and the budget.
                               7. Provides individual career guidance to students seeking jobs in
                                  their program areas.

Organizational                 Reports to:          Art Institute President
Relationships:                 Supervises:          Career Services Advisors
                                                    Student Employment Advisors
                                                    Assistant Director of Career Services
Position                       1.    An undergraduate degree is required. A master’s degree in a
Requirements:                        related field would be helpful, but equivalent skill set is acceptable.
                               2.    Five or more years of strong management experience and/or career
                                     counselling experience in a corporate or academic setting.
                               3.    Knowledge of the career decision-making, job search and
                                     placement processes.
                               4.    Superior interpersonal communication skills.
                               5.    Ability to plan, direct, coordinate, monitor and motivate the activities
                                     of others.
                               6.    Clear and effective communication of information, summarization of
                                     facts, posing of questions, etc.
                               7.    Persuasive sales techniques both over the phone and in person.
                               8.    Ability to negotiate with others to arrive at a shared consensus or
                                     settlement.
                               9.    Ability to work effectively with others.
                               10.   Ability to listen to customers (e.g. students, corporate recruiters,
                                     etc.) and to understand and respond positively to their requests.
                               11.   Ability to work without close supervision and to set priorities and
                                     work schedule.




                                                                                                         74
Part A – Organization Review


Title:                         Director of Career Services
                               12. Ability to pay attention to details in designing, implementing, and
                                   maintaining systems, projects and programs.
                               13. Ability to create innovative or unique solutions to situations or
                                   problems.
                               14. Ability to work effectively under pressure, ambiguity and conflicting
                                   goals.
                               15. Ability to respond positively and to successfully manage change at
                                   work.
Environment:                   This position operates without close supervision and in a wide range of
                               areas. Provincial, federal accreditation and corporate requirements
                               impose some constraints on the freedom to act. The Director works
                               closely with all areas of the School, including the Executive Committee,
                               Admissions, Student Services, Education, Student Financial Services,
                               and Accounting and Financial Services to enhance external
                               relationships. The Director is an important part of a team, including the
                               Dean of Academic Affairs and Director of Admissions, which has an
                               integral role in the management and improvement of the Ai program.
                               Contacts inside the School may include all students and their parents,
                               employees and faculty.           Outside contacts are principally with
                               associations, employers, and support staff personnel.




                                                                                                    75
                                6.4 Academic Planning
                                                                  Projected
Start                                                            Completion                              Responsible
Date              Category          Specific Task                   Date           Benchmark               Position
                                                                                                       Dean Academic
                                                                            Membership to include      Department Directors
 Jan-06   Admissions         Form Admissions Committee               Jan-06 faculty and administration (ADDs)
                                                                            EDMC policy and
 Feb-06   Admissions         Train Admissions Committee              Feb-06 procedure                  Dean

                             Identify individual to administer              Familiarity with
 Mar-06   Admissions         admissions testing                      Mar-06 standardized testing      Dean
                             Train on administration of
 Mar-06   Admissions         admissions test.                         Apr-06                          Dean
                             Articulate process by which
                             admissions test and information                 Written description of
                             moves from admissions office                    policy reviewed by
                             to registrar, to admissions                     Academic Affairs
 Apr-06   Admissions         committee.                               Apr-06 Specialist               Dean

 Jan-06   Promotion          Identify Trining needs registrar        Jan-06                           Dean and President
                                                                            EDMC policy and
 Feb-06   Promotion          Train Registrar on SIS.                 Feb-06 procedure                 EDMC AVP

                             Train registrar on policy and                  EDMC policy and
 Feb-06   Promotion          procedures of registrar's office.       Mar-06 procedure for registrar   EDMC AVP
                             Train registrar on assessment
                             of prior learning for advanced                 EDMC policy and
 Feb-06   Promotion          standing                                Mar-06 procedures                EDMC AVP
                             Articulate process by which
                             prior learning assessment is                   Reviewed by academic
 Mar-06   Promotion          approved by dean                        Mar-06 affairs specialist        Dean
                                                                                    Published requirements
                                                                                    including academic
                                      Train registrar on graduation                 progress and process of
Oct-06    Graduation Standard         requirements                           Mar-06 applying for graduation     Dean AVP
                                      Develop schedule of offerings                 Reviewed by ADDs and
                                      for first quarter and for the                 Academic Affairs
Apr-07    Program Content Standard    following three quarters               Sep-06 Specialist                  Dean Registrar
                                      Conduct faculty orientation to                "Teaching at and Ai" and
Sep-06    Program Content Standard    programs                               Sep-05 orientation protocol        Dean, ADDs

          Program Content Standard    PAC meeting for each program                  System model                ADDs
                                      Identify lead person to build
                                      relationships with employer
                                      community with the goal of
                                      identifying potential internship              Knowledge of careers in
Nov-06    Program Content Standard    sites                                 Nov-06 design                       Dean
                                      Develop potential internship
Jan-07    Program Content Standard    sites                            Ongoing      Written plan with goals     ADDs
                                      Meet with potential internship
                                      site leaders and orient to                    Description of internship
Feb-07    Program Content Standard    requirements of internships.     Ongoing      experience                  ADDs
                                      Establish search committee for
                                      Directors of Liberal Studies,
                                      Graphic Design, Medial Arts
Apr-06    Program Delivery Standard   and Animation                          Apr-06                             Dean President

                                      Conduct national and regional
                                      recruiting effort to identify
                                      potential candidates for director                                         Dean President
May-06    Program Delivery Standard   positions and interview                Sep-06                             Human Resources

                                                                                     Terminal degree in liberal
                                                                                     studies field. Review by
Jun-06    Program Delivery Standard   Hire Director for Liberal Studies       Jul-06 academic affairs specialist Dean President

                                      Hire Director for Graphic Design
 Jul-06   Program Delivery Standard   and Media Arts and Animation           Aug-06 Appropriate degree in field Dean President
                                         Advertise and hire head
Jul-06   Capacity to Deliver: Library    librarian                               Aug-06 MLS                        Dean President
                                         Order online data bases and
Aug-06   Capacity to Deliver: Library    related resources                       Sep-06 See specs in Part B        Librarian

Sep-06   Capacity to Deliver: Library    Form Library Committee                  Sep-06 Department representation Librarian Dean
Aug-06   Capacity to Deliver: Library    Order library holding              Ongoing     AiPH library list         Librarian

                                                                                                                   EDMC technical
         Capacity to Deliver: Computer Order computers and install as                   System model for           support and AiTO
Jul-06   Access                        appropriate                               Sep-06 curriculum                 director of technology
                                                                                        Development of written
         Capacity to Deliver: Support    Develop advising program and                   description of model of
Sep-06   Services                        train ADDs, Registrar                   Nov-06 advising                   Dean ADDs
         Capacity to Deliver: Support    Develop career services and                                               Director of Career
Jan-07   Services                        placement                                Apr-07 EDMC system model         Services
         Capacity to Deliver: Support
Dec-06   Services                        Personal counseling                     Mar-07 Develop referral network   to be named
         Capacity to Deliver: Support
Oct-06   Services                        Develop tutoring program                 Jan-07 Plan for tutoring         Liberal Studies ADD

         Capacity to Deliver: Policies   Review policies, refine as                     system model as adopted Dean ADDs faculty
Jul-06   on Faculty                      appropriate to AiTO                     Feb-07 for campus considerations leadership
                                         Conduct search for faculty for
                                         first quarter of instruction and
Apr-05   Capacity to Deliver: Faculty    hire                                    Sep-05 Appropriate degree in field ADDs Dean
                                         Create faculty development
Feb-07   Capacity to Deliver: Faculty    plan for all faculty                     Mar-07 System model              ADDs
                                                                            Ongoing on a
                                                                            quarterly
Nov-06   Capacity to Deliver: Faculty    Conduct faculty observations       basis        System model              ADDs
                                                                            Anniversary
         Capacity to Deliver: Faculty    Review of faculty members          date         System model              ADDs Dean
                                           Conduct annual review of
                                           program including curriculum
                                           review, employer opinions,
            Capacity to Deliver: Quality   advisory committee input,
   Oct-06   Assurance                      student surveys.                Ongoing     System model               Dean
            Quarterly Week-By Week
            Schedule
                                           Focus on students in
                                           attendance, clearance of
                                           registered student, monitor
                                           confirmed students, SAP                     Data from following SIS
                                           appeals and probation students,             reports: Non-Registered,
            Capacity to Deliver:           clear out non-registered                    Pending, Registrar,
Week 1      Operations                     students.                       Ongoing     Confirmed                  Dean
            Capacity to Deliver:           Clear students, run S/I ratio,
Week 1      Operations                     Manage drop/add                 Ongoing                                Registrar

                                           Review with registrar flash
                                           report, send flash report, review
                                           previous quarter Student Drop
            Capacity to Deliver:           Report, compare to plan, look
week 2      Operations                     for patterns.                     Ongoing                              Dean and Registrar
                                                                                                                  Dean and Academic
            Capacity to Deliver:                                                                                  Department Directors
Week 3      Operations                     Begin classroom observation                                            (ADDs)
            Capacity to Deliver:           Examine persistence on weekly
Week 3      Operations                     basis                            On going                              Dean and Registrar
                                           Verify graduates names for the
            Capacity to Deliver:           quarter, provide to ADDs to
Week 3      Operations                     verify                                                                 Dean, Registrar, ADD
            Capacity to Deliver:           Finalize agenda for full faculty                                       Dean and faculty
Week 3      Operations                     meeting                                                                leadership
                                           Draft of schedule of course
            Capacity to Deliver:           offerings for following quarter
Week 4      Operations                     complete                                                               Dean and ADDs
            Capacity to Deliver:           Meet all students on academic
Week 4      Operations                     probation                                                              Dean
          Capacity to Deliver:   Draft of faculty development       Dean and faculty
Week 5    Operations             agenda for 12th week               leadership
          Capacity to Deliver:   Complete Schedule of offerings
Week 5    Operations             for following quarter              Dean and Registrar
                                 Finalize schedule for new
                                 faculty orientation and 12th
          Capacity to Deliver:   week faculty development           Dean and faculty
Week 5    Operations             activities                         leadership

                                 Finalize and distribute to ADDs
          Capacity to Deliver:   and faculty schedule of course
Week 6    Operations             offerings for following quarter    Dean and Registrar
          Capacity to Deliver:   Distribute pending graduate
Week 7    Operations             applications                       Registrar
          Capacity to Deliver:
Week 7    Operations             Registration                       Registrar
          Capacity to Deliver:
Week 8    Operations             Registration                       Registrar

                                 Prepare and distribute reminder
          Capacity to Deliver:   of holidays, in-service, 12th
Week 9    Operations             week dates for following quarter   Dean
          Capacity to Deliver:
Week 9    Operations             Registration                       Registrar
          Capacity to Deliver:   Administer student evaluation of
Week 9    Operations             course forms                       Dean

          Capacity to Deliver:   Finalize new student orientation
Week 10   Operations             plan for following quarter         Dean

          Capacity to Deliver:   Monitor registration in courses    Dean, ADDs,
Week 10   Operations             to assure appropriate offerings    Registrar
          Capacity to Deliver:   Conduct exit interview of
Week 10   Operations             graduating students                ADDs
          Capacity to Deliver:   Implement Graduation
Week 11   Operations             clearance process                  Registrar Dean
            Capacity to Deliver:         Confirm 12th week activities are
Week 11     Operations                   set                                                                        Dean ADDs
                                         Monitor full load equivalent,
            Capacity to Deliver:         registered credits and                                                     Dean, Registrar,
Week 11     Operations                   enrollment in classes                                                      ADDs

            Capacity to Deliver:         Run SAP analysis and notify                                                Registrar and Dean,
Week 12     Operations                   students, conduct SAP appeals                                              ADDs
                                         Academic Affairs strategic
            Capacity to Deliver:         Planning meeting for following
Week 12     Operations                   quarter                                                                    Dean
            Capacity to Deliver:
Week 12     Operations                   Conduct new faculty orientation                                            Dean ADDs
            Capacity to Deliver:         Conduct faculty development
Week 12     Operations                   activities                                                                 Dean ADDs
            Capacity to Deliver:
Week 12     Operations                   Finalize staffing                                                          Dean ADDs
            Capacity to Deliver:                                                                                    Dean of Students,
Week 12     Operations                   New Student Orientation                                                    Dean, ADDs

   Apr-06   Program Evaluation Standard Establish design of Evaluation      ongoing        Standards requirements   Dean

   Jun-06   Program Evaluation Standard Establish campus committees ongoing                Broad representation     President
                                        Gather data on an annual basis:
                                        including analysis of
                                        student/graduate views,
                                        analysis of graduate data,
                                        assessment of admissions
                                        standards, assessment of
                                        student progress standards,
                                        assessment of resource
            Program Evaluation Standard allocation.                     ongoing                                     Dean
                                        Using the data, conduct self
            Program Evaluation Standard study
                                                                                           3 members: employer, Ai,
                                        Appoint committee to review                        noncompeting design
    2010    Program Evaluation Standard self study                                    2010 school                   President
Part A – Organization Review


6.5 Participation in Standards and Policies
Curriculum Development
All programs are constantly assessment by program advisory committees and faculty and are
subject to an internal review every year. In addition such every program undergoes a review,
including external reviews and research, on a rolling schedule of not more than 5 years. This
review involves system-wide analyses, research and analyses, student success and key
performance indicators and advice from external consultants and industry advisory committees.

The faculty, under the leadership of the Program Directors and Dean of Academic Affairs, deliver
learning-centred, industry-relevant, and competency-based instruction, imbued with goals of
higher learning. In addition to their regular classroom activities, faculty members are responsible
for curriculum development and assessment of student academic achievement.

When new programs are proposed for possible development or a full program review is
undertaken, the full resources of the Ai system are called upon. The Ai system provides an
extensive array of services for the member schools. New programs are developed only after a
careful study of the need for the proposed program and an analysis of similar programs offered
by other institutions. Because of its resources, Ai can engage nationally recognized figures or
firms to conduct these studies. When such a study is complete and there is a demonstrated need
for the program, Central Staff (CS) at Ai develops a proposal for the program. This staff proposal
is a fully developed description of the proposed program, which usually includes the following:

•        Mission origination
•        Program description
•        Rationale
•        Needs analysis with supporting documentation such as student surveys, surveys of
         employers, broader analysis of needs in the field, government statistics, classified
         advertising, and/or on-line job notices.

Senior teams at CS review the proposal and information; and from these findings determine if the
proposed program is viable and consistent with the Ai mission. Once approved, the proposal is
then reviewed and contributed to by Ai central staff in the education group that, with the
assistance of the local school deans, build a DACUM panel of industry professionals from around
the country. These professionals are selected to represent a cross-section of the industry, both in
kind of business and size. The panel is facilitated by a nationally recognized curriculum specialist
who leads the group through a process of defining the competencies that are expected and
required at the entry level. The result of this group’s work is a list of hundreds of competencies
the entry-level professional should possess. Together these competencies and desired outcomes
are built into courses and ultimately into a curriculum with supporting documentation. The final
product includes:

•        Mission
•        Program Description
•        Rationale
•        Needs Analysis
•        Competencies – both broad categories and specific courses
•        Curriculum Structure
•        General Education Requirements
•        Course Titles, Descriptions and Objectives
•        Classroom Techniques
•        Hardware and Software requirements
•        Summary of Needed Technology Support



                                                                                                79
Part A – Organization Review


Faculty Qualifications, are a critical element of any program proposal. The
recommendation on faculty qualifications is developed with faculty, advice of
external experts and advisory committees. The qualification standards are reviewed by
central education staff and compliance counsel and validated against system, regional and
 local standards. In every case, the qualification standards must meet or exceed the local
accreditation or quality assessment standards but in the event local standards are deemed
to be below the system standards the qualification standards maybe increased into facilitate
system wide standards and transferability of credit and quality assurance standards.

When a model is accepted by the Coordinating Board, schools evaluate
the information received by the Dean and President during the earlier review to assess viability at
the individual school. The Executive Committee manages this process through a review of the
program, and discussion with Program Director(s) and Faculty from the appropriate areas.

Upon approval, the curriculum is submitted to the Program Director who again reviews the
recommended curriculum with departmental faculty and the Advisory Committee. At the
departmental level, faculty and Advisory Committee members discuss the relevance of the
program to the local market and the appropriateness of the curriculum, as written, to the local
marketplace needs. The educational structure and academic rigor is also evaluated. Often the
school recommends that things like the level courses or new courses be added or modified to
better address these needs as assessed by the school faculty and advisory committees.

Once the departmental review is complete the revised model is referred to the Curriculum Review
Committee and upon its recommendation, the Executive Board may choose to approve or not
approve the new proposal or may send it back to the Curriculum Committee for further
consideration.

Faculty participate in the development of academic programs, policies and procedures using a
variety of methods ranging from informal communications with the administration to formal
interaction in such venues as the All-Faculty Meeting and the Mid-Quarter and Week 12 program
or departmental meetings. Program Directors call the program meetings to discuss curriculum
planning, budget, capital, faculty and student survey results, and student success and faculty
development. Each Program Director routinely asks for and receives faculty feedback on
technology and other budget expenditures needed to ensure the quality of education. Curriculum
changes are discussed using Program Advisory Committee meeting feedback. Faculty routinely
make proposals and recommendations during these meetings. Depending on the topic, the
Program Director may act upon these proposals or send them further up to the Executive
Committee or President for further discussion.

The Art Institute of Toronto may advance programs that differ substantially ( from
the Ai system substantial defined as more than a 20% variance with system
models) based on AiTo's faculty, industry and advice. Programs maybe be approved where
the tests of academic rigor, school capacities, quality assurance standards, supported by
research supporting offering the program .

The review and revision of existing curricula is a responsibility shared among the faculty and also
includes Program Directors, the Dean of Academic Affairs, the Curriculum Committees and the
Program Advisory Committee (“PAC”) for the program being reviewed. AiTO has established a
PAC for each program or related set of programs. The PAC is a consultative group of outside
professionals practicing in the field of the department’s specialty. The PAC provides current
information to the faculty and Program Director, ensuring that they are aware of the demands and
standards of the industry. The PAC meets with members of the faculty and the Program Director
twice a year. A formal review of the program’s mission, exit competencies, course descriptions
and course competencies must be undertaken at one of these meetings.

The Committees also provides oversight to ensure all academic programs offered by the School
are consistent with its mission and purposes and satisfy Quality Assurance requirements. 80
Part A – Organization Review

meetings of all instructors are held at least once per quarter with the principal objective to discuss
issues related to the development and revision of curricula in all majors and general education, as
well as other elements of instructional design and delivery.

Through The Art Institutes, The Art Institute of Toronto has access to the additional resources
and expertise of the Ai system. In addition to the AiTO review and assessment of curriculum and
programs, system-wide task forces are convened when environmental scanning indicates the
potential need for major curricular revisions.

An Ai system task force typically consists of faculty, Program Directors, Deans, curriculum
specialists and Ai staff members. All Art Institutes International institutions offering the program
under review are asked to nominate faculty and administrators to serve on the task force. The
output of an Ai task force review is typically a model or prototype curriculum, which is forwarded
to all Art Institutes International schools offering that program for local review and modification. A
prototype curriculum developed by an Ai system task force serves as an initial input into the
curriculum development process. The faculty, Program Director, PAC and Curriculum Committee
has ultimate responsibility for the curricula.

The same task force approach is followed in developing the curriculum for a new academic
program. New program ideas may originate with faculty, administration, PAC members, or
industry professionals – indeed anywhere within The Art Institute of Toronto or The Art Institutes
system.

Whether the curriculum for a new program is developed locally or drawn from Ai system-wide, the
final decision to introduce a specific program of study is made by the Executive Board following a
recommendation from the faculty and Dean of Academic Affairs. Before a program is approved a
committee of the faculty and Program Directors is convened to review the prototype/model
including any relevant curriculum developed by the system task force and to further develop and
refine that curriculum for local implementation. Even where a curriculum may have initially been
developed or initiated from a prototype/model through an Ai system task force process; the entire
curriculum development process is completed locally. The implementation of a new program or
the significant revision of an existing program is subject to appropriate accrediting and agency
approvals.

The curriculum development process at both the Art Institute of Toronto and The Art Institutes
International is strong: it is a well-defined and developed process that includes faculty and allows
for local initiative, decision-making and control. At the same time, the resources and expertise of
the entire Art Institutes International system are available to The Art Institute of Toronto. This
curriculum development and decision-making process strongly supports The Art Institute of
Toronto in accomplishing its mission and purposes.

All Staff and Faculty Meetings

Between quarters a meeting is scheduled for all faculty and staff during the first week of each
break. The purpose of these meetings is to enhance communication between faculty and staff, to
understand each other’s objectives and jobs, to discuss issues relevant to the institute, to discuss
the vision, mission and the future of the institute and to identify long range plans to ensure the
success of students.

All Faculty Meetings

Between quarters an all-faculty meeting is scheduled, usually on the same day as the all-school
meeting, during the first week of each break. The major emphasis of these meetings is placed on
constructive discussion of policy, educational programs, relevant concerns affecting the institute



                                                                                                  81
Part A – Organization Review

and communications on individual departmental meetings. The President and Dean of Academic
Affairs not only address the faculty at formal meetings, but also encourage informal discussions
with faculty on a variety of topics. The President hosts faculty and staff at a luncheon every
quarter for an informal discussion on subjects concerning AiTO.

Department Specific Meetings

Each quarter Program Directors schedule meetings with faculty members who teach within their
program. Meetings are scheduled during the In-Service week, as well as during the quarter.
Curricular Evaluation, Revision, and Development

New Program Development

The Art Institute of Toronto participates with member schools of The Art Institutes in a curriculum
development process originally developed by The University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri. In
this DACUM process, members of the industry, which the program is to support, are invited to
describe and discuss the criteria they perceive for their field. These individual performance
objectives are then grouped into activity arrays.

Members of the faculty of the Art Institutes who have specific teaching expertise in the curriculum
area under development are invited to meet with the industry professionals in a face-to-face
discussion of the performance criteria. The faculty curriculum task force further discusses the
established criteria and digests them into a set of program outcomes and creates an initial set of
program and course descriptions incorporating the agreed-upon outcomes.

The program descriptions and course outcomes are shaped by curriculum specialists into a
model program of instruction. This model program is distributed to the schools where the faculty
who will teach in the program further refine the curriculum model to accommodate local industry
and job market realities as well to capture their individual and collective expertise.

The program that will teach the developed program then makes curriculum-writing assignments
based on the particular expertise of each faculty member.

The finalized curriculum is reviewed by The Art Institute of Toronto's Dean of Academic Affairs
and upon his/her recommendation presented to the Executive Committee and then to the
Coordinating Board for approval.

Revision of Existing Curriculum

In a process similar to the DACUM process employed for the development of new programs,
faculty members and Program Directors of individual academic departments of The Art Institute of
Toronto meet semi-annually with a locally constituted Program Advisory Committee. When
discussions indicate a need for a change in curriculum, those faculty members with teaching
experience in the courses under revision meet in ad-hoc committee to draft the curriculum
changes.

After review by the Program Director the committee results are distributed to the department
faculty at large for comment. The comments are reviewed by the curriculum committee and a final
draft of the curriculum is presented by the Program Director to the Dean of Academic Affairs.
Upon review and acceptance by the Dean of Academic Affairs, and at his/her recommendation,
the curriculum changes are presented to the Executive Committee and the Coordinating
Board/Council of Deans for final approval.




                                                                                               82
          Curriculum Development Process




                   Syllabi &
                   Topic
                   Outlines




    Organization
    of Program                     Portfolio
    Content                        Criteria




Program                                        Program
Mission &                  DACUM               Course
Description                                    Titles &
                                               Descriptions
Three phases of the DACUM process

Phase I
Experts from business, industry, and agencies serve as panel members to
brainstorm and discuss competencies for programs. The facilitator records the
experts’ description of duties, competencies, and tasks on a chart.

Phase II
Curriculum Task Force members discuss the phase I chart. The curriculum task
force members then
   • Develop scope and sequence chart for competencies
   • Group competencies into courses
   • Describe courses and define course competencies
   • Identify quarter sequences for the length of the program
   • Develop curriculum model for the program
   • Submit curriculum model for review and approval process
   • Develop syllabi and topic outline document for the program
   • Distribute to the schools for implementation

Phase III
Faculty, department chairpersons, dean, and president review the model and
supplemental program materials at the school level for the form of the program,
implementation, and approvals by accrediting agencies
Part A – Organization Review



Evaluation of Curriculum

Curricular evaluation occurs at several levels and through a variety of processes and instruments.

Measures include graduate outcomes, placement rates and starting salaries. Each quarter the
Director of Career Services reports these results to the faculty.

Another source of evaluation comes from the IDEA Survey of Student Reaction to Courses and
Instruction. Two particular items are pertinent: ratings of student sense of progress in their
chosen major, and student rating of the excellence of individual courses. The survey is
administered quarterly in at least one class taught by each faculty member. The results of
individual course surveys are shared directly with each faculty member as well as the Program
Director. School-wide results are reported to the Dean of Academic Affairs, and general
outcomes are shared with the Executive Committee of The Art Institute of Toronto.

Faculty members participate in quarterly group reviews of the work of students entering their final
quarter. Although the goal of these reviews is improvement of each student's terminal portfolio, a
secondary outcome is incidental evidence of possible curricular shortcomings.

Faculty members teaching in the same discipline area, e.g. layout and design convene quarterly
to discuss the outcomes in their related courses and consider revisions to curriculum to overcome
perceived shortcomings. Once a need for revision is discerned, the process for the revision of
existing curriculum outlined above is implemented at the direction of the Program Director.

Faculty Role in Curricular Evaluation, Revision, and Development:

The faculty of the Art Institute of Toronto takes an active part in course evaluation, initiation of
new courses, and revision of existing courses.

    Sources of Information:

    Placement rates and starting salaries. Each quarter the Director of Career Services reports
    these results to the faculty.

    The IDEA Survey of Student Reaction to Courses and Instruction. Two particular items are
    pertinent: ratings of student sense of progress in a chosen major, and student rating of the
    excellence of individual courses.

    Quarterly group reviews of the work of students entering their final quarter. Although the goal
    of these reviews is improvement of each student's terminal portfolio, a secondary outcome is
    incidental evidence of possible curricular shortcomings.

    Quarterly meetings of faculty members teaching in the same discipline area, e.g. layout and
    design. These discussions of the outcomes are an opportunity to determine shortcomings of
    course offerings and possible revisions to curriculum to overcome them.

    Professional practice of the faculty member. Experience of changes in the profession may
    indicate a need for course revision. Student Advisory Committee comment.

    Faculty Process for Initiating Course Revisions: Faculty identification of any need for
    curricular revisions brought to the attention the Program Director.




                                                                                                83
Part A – Organization Review

    Annual Performance Reviews. The performance review offers an opportunity for discussing
    faculty to discuss their n experience in class and expressing plans for the coming year.

    In-class observation and evaluation. The conversations that surround visits of the Program
    Director to class, particularly the co-operative evaluation of the class session, offer an
    opportunity for discussing changes to curriculum.

    Role in Class Revisions. Once a need for curricular revisions has been determined, the
    Program Director will make assignments for determining course outcomes, developing
    course objectives, and writing course descriptions. Such assignments will be based on the
    Program Director's knowledge class experience, professional practice, professional
    development activities, and expressed interest.

Curriculum Committee Procedure for Proposed Curriculum Changes.

Faculty must be involved in all phases of changes to the curriculum. Initially, proposed changes
are discussed with Program Director and departmental faculty, and presented to faculty on the
Curriculum Committee.

Next, the Program Director presenting the proposal reviews it with the Dean of Academic Affairs.
If appropriate, the Dean places the proposal on the agenda for the Program Director staff
meeting(s) allowing other departments to give input. If changes to the proposal occur as a result
of this meeting(s), the Program Director takes those changes back to the faculty. The cycle starts
anew until all parties agree to the change as proposed.

The Dean passes the proposal to the Curriculum Committee. The Dean may ask the committee
to review proposals before completion so that the committee can give input during the
development stages of curriculum writing. The committee must receive all developmental or final
proposals one week prior to meeting time.

Final proposals submitted in writing with the following documentation.
•       An explanation of the proposal in detail including a calendar for implementation
•       All dated faculty meeting notes relevant to the proposal
•       All dated Program Director staff minutes relevant to the proposal

After the Dean passes on the proposal to the Curriculum Committee, the Curriculum Committee
reviews the proposal at the next available scheduled meeting. In the case of more than one
request, the Dean and Curriculum Committee Chair will determine the order of the schedule. The
Program Director making the proposal will meet with the Curriculum Committee to present the
request.

All courses must have a final review from the Curriculum Committee before they are placed on
the quarter’s course schedule. This review includes courses developed as part of new programs.
Proposals that need further attention are passed back to the Dean of Academic Affairs to
determine whether to proceed anew.

The Dean of Academic Affairs is responsible for taking the recommendations forward to the
Executive Committee, after consulting with the Coordinating Board.(Changes that do not represent
a material content change, do not have a financial impact and do not represent a change of more than10%
of the program and have been approved by the Curriculum Committee and the Dean of Academic
Affairs need not be submitted to the Executive Committee for approval but shall be provided to
the Executive Committee for information purposes and the compliance officer is required to sign off.




                                                                                              84
Part A – Organization Review


7.2 Ethical Standards

Education Management and The Art Institute of Toronto operate in strict adherence to ethical
business practices reinforced by policy, procedures and a due diligence approach to compliance.
The Art Institute of Toronto adheres to the highest standards of ethical standards when
representing itself to its constituencies, the public and in its daily operations.

We value our staff, faculty, scholarship and community service and aspire to high standards in
working with our students, our faculty, our staff and external agencies to which we are directly or
indirectly responsible. (Please find also attached the “EDMC Code of Business Ethics”.)

Extensive internal auditing and compliance processes exist at every level of the organization
including having full-time Canadian compliance counsel with extensive experience in both the
public and private sectors and compliance management advising and reviewing operations,
practices and risk management issues at The Art Institute of Toronto. Published information is
undergoes a business practices and compliance review by both Canadian compliance counsel
and the central system business practices review before it is authorized for publication.

Important Contact Information and Resources:

EDMC Corporate Human Resources                    EDMC Corporate Compliance Hotline
Department
                                                  Phone: 1-866-439-6805
Ronald Ogrodnik                                   Email: edmc@openboard.info
Sr. VP, Human Resources                           Web: www.openboard.info/edmc
Education Management Corporation
210 Sixth Avenue, 33rd Floor
Pittsburgh, PA 15222-2603
Telephone: (412) 995-7645
Email: rogrodnik@edmc.edu
EDMC General Counsel                              EDMC Internal Audit
Frederick Steinberg                               Gary C. Grysiak
Sr. VP, General Counsel, Secretary                Vice President, Internal Audit
Education Management Corporation                  Telephone: (412) 380-1405
210 Sixth Avenue, 33rd Floor                      Fax: (412) 380-1405
Pittsburgh, PA 15222-2603                         Cell: (412) 916-3095
Telephone: (412) 995-7258                         Email: ggrysiak@edmc.edu
Confidential Fax: (412) 471-2954
Email: fsteinberg@edmc.edu

Royden Trainor
Director of Regulatory and Compliance Canada
655 Bay Street, Suite 200
Toronto, Ontario M5G 2K4
Telephone: (416) 351-7273
E-mail trainorr@aii.edu
EDMC Code of Business Ethics and Conduct Website
http://intranet.aii.edu/Css/Hr/Policies/COE




                                                                                               99
Part A – Organization Review




Code of Business Ethics and Conduct

The Art Institute of Toronto and Education Management Corporation are committed to being a
responsible member of the various communities in which it operates. EDMC strives to assure the
welfare of those dependent upon the continuation of its business success, namely,
employees, students and the employers of graduates. The Art Institute of Toronto is a microcosm
of culture and society. As such, the institution should be a bastion of ethical behaviour and can
serve as an example for students. An ethical school teaches students: ethical values and
concepts; critical thinking skills to help in decision-making; and a sense of responsibility for others
when making personal choices.

EDMC views the classroom as a laboratory for the process of decision-making and the
examination of personal, interpersonal and workplace choices. Instructors play an important role
in assisting students to view ethical choices as a vital part of their future lives, both as
professionals and in their daily living.

The Art Institute of Toronto makes every effort to maintain and demonstrate the highest ethical
standards in serving students, faculty, staff and the public. AiTO’s publications, such as the
annual catalogue, consistently and accurately reflect the Mission of the college. Student,
Employee, and Faculty Handbooks require that everyone demonstrate the highest standards of
professionalism. High ethical standards are supported through the employee and student codes
of conduct.

The Business Ethics Program was developed to guide EDMC’s business practices with regards
to compliance with law and maintenance of the highest moral, legal, ethical and financial
reporting standards. Our Code of Business Ethics and Conduct (the “Code”) applies equally to
EDMC directors as well as employees at all levels. All EDMC officers and managers are
responsible for communicating and implementing the policies contained in the Code within their
specific areas of supervisory responsibility.

No code of conduct can replace the thoughtful behaviour of an ethical director or employee, and
EDMC relies upon individuals to act with integrity, to use good judgment and to act appropriately
in any given situation. Nevertheless, EDMC believes that the Code helps to: focus best efforts
and best practice on areas of ethical risk; provide guidance to all personnel to help recognize and
deal with ethical issues; and foster a culture of honesty and accountability.

Statement of Business Conduct”            and    “Admissions     Ethics
Acknowledgement documents”.




                                                                                                  100
Part A – Organization Review


8.0 STUDENT PROTECTION
8.1 Student Recruitment Policies
Public reports, materials and advertising are produced in a full, accurate and truthful manner, and
recruitment policies follow fair business practices and are monitored and reviewed on an ongoing
basis on a system-wide and an individual basis. Recruitment materials are reviewed by the
Business Practices Committee. All recruitment staff is required to comply with ethical practices
and guidelines and are periodically audited for compliance with appropriate business practices.

Information about The Art Institute of Toronto policies and programs is published in its academic
year Catalogue and is readily available to students and the public and includes information about:
    • the organization’s mission and goals statement;
    • the history of the organization and its governance and academic structure;
    • each degree program (e.g., purpose, outcomes, length);
    • the academic credentials of faculty and senior administrators; and
    • Individual descriptions of all subjects in these programs and their credit value.

Prior to registration, students are provided with and confirm their awareness of policies and
procedures pertaining to:
    • credit transfer arrangements for incoming students, prior learning assessment, entrance
        examinations;
    • student support and services;
    • The financial methods the organization has selected to ensure the repayment of
        unearned (pre-paid) tuition and fees owing to students in the event of institutional failure
        or student withdrawal.
    • Copy of Student Handbook containing relevant policies on refunds, code of conduct,
        credit transfer policies.

Recruiting is distinguished from the admissions process. Admissions decisions are made by the
admissions committee and respect established admission criteria and the assessment of qualified
faculty. Recruitment relates to the generation of inquires, interest and encouragement of
applications from qualified students for consideration of admission to The Art Institute of Toronto.

Regional Admissions specialists are required to take a three-week training utilizing the “Gateway to
the Future” CD program with live role-plays and product knowledge training. Before working with
the public, the new admissions representative must pass the Intranet based “Mastery Test” and
“Compliance/FAQs” test. At approximately six weeks of hire, all new admissions representatives
are required to attend the company-conducted “New ADA Training Program” for further recruitment
training. Three months after conclusion of the program, the new admissions representative must
become ‘certified’ by a Training Specialist. Admissions representatives must re-certify on an annual
basis. Schools conduct follow-up training and observe new admissions representatives to review
skills such as: appointment setting; interview procedures; product knowledge; computer
methodology and skills; follow-up procedures; and admissions processes.

The Art Institutes International maintains a website (www.aii.edu) where students can see the
program offerings available at each campus. Additionally, the student can select a specific campus
and be redirected to that campus’ website with local contact information.

The formal admissions application requires the student to provide written confirmation the student is
aware of and has reviewed AiTO’s policies on Admission requirements, academic honesty,
intellectual property, credit transfer arrangements, withdrawals, dismissals and refunds and the
complaint process.



                                                                                                103
Code of Business Ethics and Conduct
Table of Contents

Overview of Business Ethics Program
        Important Contact Information and Resources                                                                                 04
        EDMC Values, Vision, and Mission                                                                                            05
        Code of Business Ethics and Conduct: Introduction                                                                           06
        Your Responsibilities                                                                                                       07
        Consequences of Non-Compliance                                                                                              08
        How to Report a Possible Violation                                                                                          09
        Our Commitment to You                                                                                                      10
Code of Business Ethics and Conduct
        Our Business                                                                                                               11
                Conflicts of Interest                                                                                               11
                Compliance with Laws and Regulations                                                                               12
                Illegal or Unethical Payments                                                                                      12
                Fair Dealing                                                                                                       13
                Political Activities                                                                                               13
        Our Company, Assets, and Future                                                                                            13
                Corporate Opportunities                                                                                            13
                Confidentiality / Insider Information                                                                               13
                Protection and Proper Use of Other Corporate Assets                                                                 14
                Accounting and Financial Reporting Standards                                                                       14
                SEC and Other Governmental Reports & Public Communications                                                         14
                Media Inquiries                                                                                                    15
        Our Environment                                                                                                            15
                No Harassment                                                                                                      15
                Equal Employment Opportunity and Discrimination                                                                    16
                Diversity                                                                                                          17
                Treatment of Students                                                                                              17
                Non-Fraternization and Consensual Relationships                                                                    17
                Illegal Drugs and Alcohol                                                                                          18
                Workplace Safety                                                                                                   18
        Code Acknowledgement                                                                                                       19

This Code is a general reference for EDMC directors and employees. It does not describe all applicable laws or all EDMC policies, nor does it
give full details of any individual law or policy. This document is not a contract for employment. All employment remains at will, meaning both
the employee and the Company may choose to terminate the employment relationship at any time.

The EDMC Board of Directors reserves the right to amend and revise this Code in its sole discretion. Employees will be notified of
any changes to the policies, procedures and obligations set forth herein. Any amendments or revisions to this Code will be promptly
disclosed as required by law or stock exchange regulation.

This Code is for the sole and exclusive benefit of EDMC and may not be used or relied upon by any other party.




                                                                  3 of 19
Code of Business Ethics and Conduct: Introduction

Education Management Corporation (together with its subsidiaries, “EDMC”) is committed to being a
responsible member of the various communities in which we do business. We strive to assure the welfare
of those dependent upon the continuation of our business success, namely our, employees,
students and the employers of our graduates.

The Business Ethics Program was developed to guide our business practices with regards to compliance
with law and maintenance of the highest moral, legal, ethical and financial reporting standards. Our Code
of Business Ethics and Conduct (the “Code”) applies equally to EDMC directors as well as employees at all
levels. All EDMC officers and managers are responsible for communicating and implementing the policies
contained in the Code within their specific areas of supervisory responsibility.

Of course, no code of conduct can replace the thoughtful behavior of an ethical director or employee, and
EDMC relies upon each of you to act with integrity, to use good judgment and to act appropriately in any
given situation. Nevertheless, we believe that this Code can help focus our Board of Directors (the “Board”)
and management on areas of ethical risk, provide guidance to our personnel to help you to recognize and
deal with ethical issues and help to foster a culture of honesty and accountability.

Upon your review of this Code, we encourage you to ask any questions regarding its policies and procedures
to ensure that you understand each of them as well as the overall intent of the Code. You are expected to
make every effort to remain in full compliance with both its letter and spirit. Please see the sections of the
Code entitled “Your Responsibilities” and “Consequences of Non-Compliance.”

EDMC welcomes and appreciates the efforts of individuals who report suspected violations of the Code.
Your reports will be handled confidentially. We will not tolerate any form of retaliation against anyone who
in good faith reports possible violations even if, upon investigation, suspicions prove to be unwarranted.
Please see the sections entitled “How to Report a Possible Violation” and “Our Commitment to You.”




                                                   6 of 19
BPC Guidelines   Guidelines have been created to ensure that all
                 advertising and marketing materials for EDMC-
                 owned operations conform to the various require-
                 ments within the field of education. These guidelines
                 are not a comprehensive list of all BPC regulations
                 and may not be considered a replacement for BPC
                 review. It is important to note that the BPC review
                 process is not a one-time-only process. Regulations
                 change over time and the continuing review process
                 ensures that advertising and marketing materials are
                 accurate within the current regulatory environment.

                 As the number of EDMC educational systems
                 grows, so does the amount of material that needs
                 to be reviewed. To expedite the review process
                 each school must designate a “Local Compliance
                 Coordinator” who will be responsible for checking
                 each submission for graphic standards compliance,
                 correct and up-to-date policy usage, and proofread-
                 ing. The BPC’s review process does not replace the
                 school’s responsibility for accuracy, nor will AMS or
                 BPC be responsible for proofreading.

                 Advertising & Marketing Services (AMS) will also
                 assist in the review by checking brand identity (i.e.,
                 use of proper logos), graphic standards, and content.
                 This will also give AMS staff members an opportunity
                 to view materials that EDMC schools are producing
                 so the department can better anticipate the kind of
                 collateral materials schools need.

                 Each school’s advertising and publications are
                 a reflection of the school itself and of EDMC
                 as a company. Adherence to these general
                 guidelines is a critical step in the process to
                 ensure our continued high quality.




                 3
Routing Procedure




                                             1
                                           School




                    5   BPC
                       Coord
                                                              2
                                                            AMS




                                 BPC                 BPC
                                Review              Coord


                           4                           3
Review Time




                    Publication                      Review Time

                    Direct Mail Letter                      1 week
                    TV/Radio Scripts                        1 week
                    Print Advertisements                    1 week
                    Brochures                               2 weeks
                    Catalogs/Handbooks                      3 weeks
                    Web Sites                               3 weeks
Graphic Standards   Advertising and marketing resources are available
                    on the EDMC Intranet site under the following links:

                    Graphic Standards for The Art Institutes:
                    www.intranet.aii.edu/Css/Advertising/
                    GraphicStandards/index.shtml

                    Graphic Standards for Argosy University:
                    www.intranet.aii.edu/Css/Advertising/
                    GraphicStandards/argosy/

                    Graphic Standards for South University:
                    www.intranet.aii.edu/Css/Advertising/
                    GraphicStandards/south

                    Graphic Standards for Brown Mackie College:
                    www.intranet.aii.edu/Css/Advertising/
                    GraphicStandards/bmc

                    Links to other marketing resources:
                    www.intranet.aii.edu/Css/Advertising/index.htm

                    BPC documents and policies are available on
                    the EDMC Intranet site under Business Practices
                    Committee: www.intranet.aii.edu/Css/
                    businesspractice/index.htm

Sending Materials   All documents must be submitted in hard copy via
For Review          fax or by mail. Submissions will not be accepted
                    electronically via email or Web links. That way, if
                    the item requires immediate attention and the BPC
                    Coordinator is out of the office, her assistant can for-
                    ward it to another team member to complete the
                    review. This will also ensure that we are reviewing
                    the entire document and any related links.

                    Fax number: 412.995.7248
                    Mailing address:
                    AMS Coordinator, Education Management
                    Corporation, 210 Sixth Avenue, 33rd Floor
                    Pittsburgh, PA 15222-2603

                    9
                              Business Practices Committee



Business Practices Committee (BPC) guidelines have been created to ensure that all EDMC
advertising and marketing materials conform to accreditation, licensing, legal, and US
Department of Education requirements within the field of education. These guidelines do not
comprise a comprehensive list of all BPC regulations and should not be considered as a
replacement for BPC review. All published materials are reviewed by PBC before they are
approved for release.

It is important to note that this review process is not a one-time-only process. Once approved,
not always approved. Regulations change and this continuing review process ensure that
materials are accurate within the current regulatory environment.

8.2 Policy Awareness
8.1.1 Art Institute of Toronto Academic Calendar

A copy of the proposed Academic Calendar for Degree bachelor programs is attached and among other
things contains the following information:




8.2.1 Academic Calendar

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Art Institute of Toronto Academic Calendar (Draft)

INTRODUCTION       4
MISSION STATEMENT 5
ACADEMIC GOALS     5
OBJECTIVES 5
VALUES       6
NOTICE CONCERNING TRANSFERABILITY OF CREDITS         8
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS DIRECT ENTRY – DEGREE    8
STUDENT EVALUATION OF COURSE AND FACULTY 8
POLICY GUIDELINES FOR SURVEYS OF STUDENT REACTION TO INSTRUCTION 9
SURVEY ADMINISTRATION 10
DISTRIBUTION OF RESULTS—SURVEY FOR SUMMATIVE & FORMATIVE EVALUATION 11
OUTLINE OF PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTERING IDEA SURVEYS 12
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY             13
ACADEMIC ASSESSMENT            14
MID-TERM GRADES 14
FINAL GRADES           14
ADVANCED STANDING              14
CREDIT TRANSFER/RECOGNITION AND PROCEDURES                   15
ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES FOR ASSESSING ADVANCED STANDING 15
PROMOTION AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 16
ACADEMIC ADVISING AND PLACEMENT              17
DEGREE PROGRAMS CONTINUED ENROLLMENT AND PROMOTION                       17
REVIEW PROCEDURES              17
REPORTING STRUCTURE            18
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES            19
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE            19
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT STRUCTURES               19
       Department of Graphic Design 19
       Department of Interior Design 19
       Department of Media Arts & Animation and Interactive Media Design 19
       Department of Game Art & Design       20
       Department of Liberal Arts    20
OTHER DEPARTMENTS              20
TECHNOLOGY SERVICES            21
QUALIFICATIONS OF THE FACULTY 21
COPYRIGHT ISSUES GOODS AND SERVICES POLICIES                 22
DEGREE PROGRAM/COURSE DESCRIPTIONS                    22
ACADEMIC COURSE SCHEDULE             31
CREDIT VALUE AND FACULTY QUALIFICATIONS               44
MODEL CLASS SYLLABUS           49
PERSONNEL POLICIES             52
TRANSFERABILITY OF CREDIT NOTICE             53




8.2.2 Policy Awareness (see additional comments @ Section 11.2)

Students enrolling at The Arts Institute of Toronto are required to sign an enrolment agreement.
Prior to registration, new students also receive a copy of the Calendar and student handbook.
The student is required to sign a form indicating they have received the handbook these
documents make students aware of The Arts Institute of Toronto policies including, but not limited
to, credit transfer arrangements, prior learning assessment, entrance examination requirements,
student support services, refund policies and dispute resolution. The enrolment agreement
requires the student to confirm they have reviewed AiTO policies and received and reviewed a
student handbook, which also contains the relevant policies. AiTO policies are generally
consistent with those of the Art Institutes and recognized practice at post secondary institutions.

All policies are contained on a student intranet site as well. Syllabi set out specific grade, and
program expectations as well as a statement on academic integrity.
Students -

Further, by signing the enrolment agreement, students confirm that they have read and
understand the regulations to the Post-Secondary Education Choice and Excellence Act as it
refers to Section 8 (REFUND POLICY) printed on the enrolment agreement.

Before starting their first quarter, all new students must attend and participate in orientation,
which includes: a presentation on The Art Institute; a presentation by the faculty about academic
life and success in school; a meeting with the Program Director in the student’s program of study;
pick-up of starting kits, supplies and ID cards; completion of registration, financial aid
arrangements, placement or exemption testing, as needed; and social events. An overview of the
student Handbook and The Art Institute of Toronto policies is included in this orientation. In
addition, course syllabi, which are provided to students during the first week of classes, outline
grading, copyright and academic honesty policies.

General policies for students, including grading, admissions, education policies and School safety
policies, are included in the Calendar. The conduct policies, disciplinary procedures, appeals
process, and campus security are in the student Handbook.

The School promotes student awareness of policies and procedures as outlined in the student
Handbook. New students are issued a Handbook at their orientation the week prior to classes or
on the first day of classes if they miss the orientation session. Additionally, the School draws
student attention to the Handbook during all orientation programs to reaffirm the importance of
documents outlining their rights and responsibilities.

Faculty and Staff -

All new full and part-time faculty members receive the faculty handbook at their orientation
meeting, which occurs prior to their first day of classes. New staff members are issued the
employee handbook at their orientation meeting on their first day of employment with the School.
All employees of The Art Institute of Toronto have access to the internal EDMC Intranet when on
campus.

All faculties receive a formal training and orientation in order to facilitate their initial days in the
classroom. Each new faculty member is assigned to a faculty mentor. The current faculty assists
the new faculty on situations as they arise. At The Art Institute of Toronto, new faculty receives a
formalized orientation that includes a tour of the facilities, an overview of classroom dynamics,
learning styles, student needs and classroom policies and procedures. Human Resources and
the Dean of Academic Affairs facilitate this initial orientation followed by a more specific program
and curriculum orientation by the Dean of Academic Affairs and Program Directors. Every new
instructor receives a Employee/Faculty Handbook, Faculty Training Manual, Student Handbook,
and Calendar at orientation. Under the direction of the Dean of Academic Affairs, a written record of
each faculty member's training is kept in the faculty member's personnel file.

All faculties are provided formal developmental courses that range from introductory instruction
for first time instructors to advanced pedagogical offerings in critical thinking, learning styles,
curriculum development, learning assessment, presentation styles and the domains of learning
(e.g. Bloom's Taxonomies). “EDMC University” and employee orientation includes significant
resource and policy materials to inform and support new faculty and employees. These training
courses are developed and administered. Revew of EDMC Business Practices and Ethics Policy is
required including a formal sing-off that this review has taken place and had been understood.
Part A – Organization Review


9.0 ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AND FREEDOM

9.1 Academic Freedom

9.1.1 Academic Freedom Policy

Academic Freedom goes to the heart of the nature and character of a degree granting institution.
The Art Institute of Toronto of AiTO respects the principles of academic freedom. The faculty is
afforded freedom in the classroom to express their professional points of view and conclusions
supported by relevant evidence and to communicate acquired knowledge and the results of
research freely. This includes the freedom of faculty to define and pursue their academic interests
and research with rigor and to disseminate knowledge according to their best judgment is valued.
Concurrently, faculties have a professional obligation to acquaint students with other pertinent
scholarly and professional views related to their subject areas. Academic freedom is a
fundamental characteristic of intuitions offering post secondary education at the bachelor’s level
and this is embraced by the Art Institute of Toronto. Academic freedom is a right of faculty and
AiTO expects its faculty members to exercise this freedom with integrity and with due regard for
the rights and freedoms of others.

The Art Institute of Toronto supports the right of its faculty and staff to engage in scholarly and
creative activities, to make public presentations and to present issues openly in the classroom.
AiTO recognizes that the intellectual and professional vitality of its academic community depends
on the ability of its members to exchange ideas freely and to explore the assumptions, beliefs,
methods and knowledge base of their disciplines.

The Art Institute of Toronto supports the right of its faculty and staff to engage in scholarly and
creative activities, to make public presentations and to present issues openly in the classroom.
AiTO recognizes that the intellectual and professional vitality of its academic community depends
on the ability of its members to exchange ideas freely and to explore the assumptions, beliefs,
methods and knowledge base of their disciplines.

In the classroom, the discussion of issues and the use of written or visual materials must be
conducted in an impartial spirit and must be accompanied by tolerance for differing views and by
discretion regarding the sensibilities of students and others. Academic freedom assures that
instructors are free to pursue the best means for realizing the goals and objectives set forth in the
institution's mission statement. This means that academic freedom exists to serve the best
interests of students.

It is the role of the faculty to bring to the teaching/learning environment their expertise and
enthusiasm and to convey the relevant information they possess to students. Faculty should also
endeavour to create an atmosphere in the classroom and/or laboratory that is conducive to the
attainment of the course objectives. The capacity of faculty to define and pursue their academic
interests and research with rigor and to disseminate knowledge according to their best judgment
is valued. In accordance with this, faculty exercises the freedom to be creative in these pursuits.

Faculty members are obliged to respect the program mission and objectives, outcomes and
educational goals of the curriculum. This requires faculty to address the course terminal
objectives and outcomes that define the scope and level of their courses. In that context, faculty
is encouraged to develop effective teaching strategies and methods for their classes, to seek
ways of enriching the educational experience of their students, and to participate collegially in the
continuing improvement of courses and programs.

The Art Institute of Toronto encourages its faculty and other employees to develop themselves
professionally through various means, which may include writing for publication, making


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presentations, designing inventions and technical improvements, and maintaining contact and
communication with educational and professional groups in their fields.

Academic freedom does not include the right to use one’s position to promote particular
ideologies or religious beliefs.


9.1.2 Academic Freedom Constraints

Students and staff are not to sign or adhere to a statement of faith and/or code of conduct that
would constitute a constraint upon academic freedom.


9.2 Intellectual Products
9.2.1 Intellectual Products Policy
The Art Institute of Toronto respects Canadian and International law and convention with respect
to the creation and ownership of intellectual property and copyright. For greater clarity, materials
prepared by faculty members for educational and student evaluation purposes relevant to the
performance of faculty duties at an Ai school are the property of AiTO. These materials include
but are not limited to: all student rosters; attendance forms; interim grade reports; assessments of
student work; curriculum documents; course descriptions; course objectives; weekly outlines;
syllabi, curricula, exams and lesson plans. It is recognized, however, that certain materials not
related to the performance of faculty duties or prexisting faculty developed materials that belong
to the faculty member or others that may be used by faculty. For example, AiTO would
not claim ownership interest in a faculty member’s intellectual property when the faculty member
uses a project from his/her previous employment as a classroom learning tool in order to carry
out his/her AiTO teaching responsibilities.

Exhibition of Student Work - Student artwork is important to The Art Institute. It is of great
benefit in teaching other students and in demonstrating the nature and value of the programs.
Admissions representatives use student artwork to show prospective students and counsellors
the achievements of Art Institute students. Student artwork is also a basic part of the calendar
and other publications and exhibitions illustrating the programs at The Art Institute. The Art
Institutes reserve the right to make use of the artwork of its students for such purposes. The Art
Institute also reserves the right to select artwork that is appropriate to a given circumstance and
may choose not to display work that might be viewed as objectionable by some audiences.

Delivery of Goods and Services Policy

For all programs, students are required to purchase standard texts or special lesson manuals and
lab supplies. Textbooks may be purchased from an outside bookstore, but must be those
identified as necessary by the faculty and required in the course or program.

Enrolment for a subsequent term may be denied to students who fail to fulfill their financial
obligations nor any transcript is released to a student with outstanding
financial obligations to the Art Institute of Toronto.




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9.3 Policy on Ethical Research Practices
Canada's granting councils—the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Natural Sciences
and Engineering Research Council, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council—
have adopted the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans
(TCPS). The Art Institute of Toronto’s proposed programs do not involve research that would fall
under the TCPS policy.

9.4. Academic Honesty
9.4.1 Academic Honesty Policy

Academic Dishonesty - Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated at The Art Institute of Toronto.
It is the responsibility of every faculty member to include in his or her course syllabus for all
courses taught the school’s definition of academic dishonesty, and to set aside time in the first
week of each course to explain that definition to students.

Definition of Academic Dishonesty - The Art Institute of Toronto defines an act of academic
dishonesty as: any attempt to take the work of someone else and submit it as one’s own.
Examples of academic dishonesty may include, but are not limited to: copying another’s work on
any type of student evaluation; theft or distribution of evaluative materials (quizzes, tests, exams)
prior to their administration; plagiarism of any kind, etc. Academic dishonesty is a deliberate
attempt to gain advantage by deceiving faculty or other professionals who are mentoring
students, other students or the administration.

Academic dishonesty includes but is not limited to:

Plagiarism is defined as claiming the words, ideas, artistry, drawings, images or data of another
person as if they were one’s own. This includes: copying another person’s work (including
information found on the Internet and unpublished materials) without appropriate referencing;
presenting someone else’s work, opinions or theories as if they are one’s own; working
collaboratively on an assignment, and then submitting it as if it was created solely by an individual
student; presenting another’s substantial or compositional changes to an assignment as one’s
own. Plagiarism also includes the un-attributed use of material from any source—including books,
periodicals, CD-ROM and the World Wide Web. All quotations, paraphrases, or other
adaptations of others’ work must be properly cited and documented. Any student who uses
images, texts, or other media without proper attribution will be subject to the same penalties as
students guilty of other types of academic dishonesty.

“Plagiarism” means the appropriation of another's work and the unacknowledged incorporation of
that work in one's written work for credit.




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“Collusion” means the unauthorized collaboration with another person in preparing written work
offered for credit.

The following statement is required on every syllabus:

    “Plagiarism, presenting the writings, images or paraphrased ideas of another as one’s own, is
    strictly prohibited at The Art Institute of Toronto. Properly documented excerpts from others’
    works, when they are limited to an appropriate amount of the total length of a student’s paper,
    are permissible when used to support a researched argument.”

Faculty are required to state clearly how acts of plagiarism will be treated when they
occur, and include this statement in the syllabus and review it with students for every course they teach.
The school plagiarism policy and the faculty member’s statement on penalties for policy violations
will both be items on the Syllabus Checklist document given to new and continuing faculty at the
start of every term.

In addition, this policy will be explained and discussed at faculty and staff meeting and will be
distributed in written form, and will constitute a part of new faculty orientation going forward


9.4.2 Academic Honesty Procedure

Academic evaluations - Faculty members shall closely monitor academic evaluations to ensure
that the student submits his or her own work. When faculty members suspect that a student has
been academically dishonest, they should speak with their Program Director or the Dean of
Academic Affairs as soon as possible following the incident.          Based on the possible
consequences of academic dishonesty as published in the Student Handbook, and in
consultation with the Department Director and Dean an appropriate response will be determined.

Examinations - Faculty members shall closely monitor examinations. If a student is detected
being dishonest during a test or quiz, the student should receive a failing grade for that particular
assignment and possibly for the course. The same rule applies for detected plagiarism in
academic and studio classes. If a student is in any way involved in securing, passing, or
receiving a test prior to the date of the examination, the student is subject to suspension or
expulsion, depending upon the recommendation of the Administration and faculty member. All
acts of dishonesty are to be brought to the attention of the Program Director and the Dean of
Academic Affairs.

Procedure - Decisions with respect to accusations of academic misconduct are made on the
basis of balance of probabilities. Where a faculty member has reason to believe an academic
offence has been committed he/she shall report it to the Dean of Academic Affairs. The Dean will
decide in a prompt fashion if the matter can be resolved in an informal fashion or if the formal
academic disciplinary process should be undertaken. The Dean must inform the student that an
allegation of academic misconduct has been made against the student and the student must
reply to the allegation within five days of being given notice. In the event the matter is resolved to
the mutual agreement of the Dean and the student, the matter is deemed closed and both parties
will sign letter to this effect.




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10.2 Financial Audit Policy

The Art Institute of Toronto participates in the Ernst & Young (an independent accounting firm)
annual financial audit of all EDMC operations. The audit is performed in accordance with
generally accepted auditing standards. Since the Institute is a wholly owned subsidiary of The Art
Institutes International, Inc., and Education Management, people who request financials are given
EDMC's consolidated audited financials, which is public information. The Art Institute of Toronto
will provide additional financial documents requested by quality assurance and governmental
agencies. The annual audited report of the EDMC annual report may be obtained by members of
the public from the corporate public relations office in Pittsburgh.

EDMC also has extensive systems of audit accountabilities, including a comprehensive
internal audit and the extensive rigorous compliance, audit and documentation requirements of
Sarbanes-Oxley. Audit policies are also setout in the Art Institute of Toronto’s procedures.

As part of The Art Institute of Toronto’s compliance with OSAP regulations, AiTO provides
additional documentation to the Ministry providing a reconciliation of Ai Toronto’s revenue setout
in the EDMC audited financial statements and prepared by a qualified accountant. Education
Management also conducts regular internal audits of all its operations and extensive procedural
and validation process with respect to its operations, including its financial operations.




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11.0 DISPUTE RESOLUTION

11.1 Dispute Resolution Policies & Complaint Procedures
Student Complaint Procedures: The Art Institute of Toronto provides students multiple options
for addressing concerns. Students seeking anonymous options can use a student comment form.
Students who choose to provide their names will be informed on the resolution of their concerns
directly. Students raising an issue regarding classroom instruction or activity should begin by
speaking with the instructor. If no satisfactory resolution is found the student is directed to speak
with the Program Director. If there is still no satisfactory resolution the student is directed to speak
with the Dean of Academic Affairs. Should the issue still not find adequate resolution the student
is directed to notify the President in writing and include all relevant information. The student can
mail the document or drop it off at the President’s office.

When students have a concern regarding non-instructional related issues, they are directed to
speak with any staff or faculty member including, but not limited to, their Instructor, Program
Director, Academic Advisor, Dean of Academic Affairs, Director of Student Affairs, or the
President. The College is committed to responding to student concerns within 48 to 72 hours
from the initial communication from the student.


Non-Academic Misconduct Overview: Where non-academic misconduct occurs, such as
vandalism, which may result in serious disciplinary sanctions such as suspension or expulsion,
the two basic requirements are notice and a hearing.

Notice involves informing the student of the conduct of which he or she is accused (the nature of
the charges), and the disciplinary rule violated. This notice must be timely, in the sense that the
student receives the information in time to enable the student to prepare and present a defence at
the hearing.

The requirement of a hearing represents an opportunity for the student to be heard and to speak
in his or her defence before an impartial decision-maker. The student must have the ability to
present evidence. The hearing should take place before serious disciplinary action such as
suspension or expulsion occurs.

Student Conduct Policies: Disciplinary codes basically deal with two types of misconduct,
academic deficiencies and non-academic or behavioral misconduct. Academic deficiencies occur
when a student fails to perform according to the academic standards set by the school. Both
public and private schools have broad discretion to set academic standards, and disciplinary
sanctions may be appropriate when a student's academic performance is inadequate. This
means that the student should be fully informed of both inadequate academic performance, and
the threat it poses to the student’s continued enrolment and graduation.

As members of The Art Institute, students have responsibilities and duties commensurate with
their rights and privileges. In this policy, The Art Institute provides guidance to students regarding
those standards of student conduct and behavior that it considers essential to its educational
mission.




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 11.1 Dispute Resolution & Complaint Policies

 Complaint Procedures
 If a student has a complaint or problem they are encouraged to follow the student complaint
 Procedure.

      a) The student should discuss complaints with the individual(s) within the appropriate
         department. Initial discussion should be with the person most knowledgeable of the
         issues involved or with immediate decision-making responsibility.
      b) If the student feels that the complaint has not been fully addressed, a written account
         should be submitted to the Dean of Student Affairs if related to non-academic issues or to
         the Dean of Education for academic issues. The written account should indicate the
         student name, phone number, and ID and discuss the steps the student has taken to
         remedy the situation.
      c) The appropriate Art Institute staff member or department will be notified of the complaint.
         A follow-up meeting with the student and the Dean of Student Affairs and/or the Dean of
         Education will be held within ten school days of the date of the written complaint in an
         effort to resolve the issue.
      d) If the student is not satisfied with the results of this meeting, the student may file a formal
         appeal with the President's Office. The appeal should be in writing and contain the
         student name and telephone number. The student should summarize the steps the
         student has taken to remedy the situation and indicate why the results are not
         satisfactory. The student will hear the results of the appeal within ten class days from the
         date the appeal is received.
      e) If the student remains dissatisfied and believes the Art Institute of Toronto is in breach of
         its enrolment agreement with the student and not in compliance with the Ontario Career
         Colleges Act, the student may file a formal complaint on the form provided for this
         purpose by the Private Career Colleges Branch of the Ministry of Training Colleges and
         Universities. The form can be obtained at the Art Institute of Toronto’s President’s office
         or off the Ministry website.
        •    An external binding third party arbitration dispute resolution process is also available.



Code of Conduct: Introduction:

As a student of The Art Institute of Toronto the student are a member of a special community of
artists and scholars and, as such, the student have the right to take full advantage of the
opportunities afforded the student for inquiry, artistic expression, and professional and personal
development. A community, however, must protect those rights for others and provide an orderly
environment for its academic mission. There are, therefore, responsibilities and expectations the
student has accepted by becoming a part of The Art Institute community. The Code of Conduct
and other college regulations form the nucleus of the expectations of an Art Institute student. Any
student who is found to have violated the student conduct policy is subject to disciplinary
sanctions up to and including suspension or permanent dismissal, as further described below.



115
Code of Conduct
Elements/Violations

The following is a list of behaviours that violate The Art Institute of Toronto Student Conduct
Policy; although not exhaustive, this list provides examples of unacceptable student behaviours.

1.    Persistent or gross acts of wilful disobedience or defiance toward college personnel.
2.    Assault, battery, or any other form of physical abuse of a student or college employee.
3.    Fighting.
4.    Verbal abuse of a student or college employee.
5.    Conveyance of threats by any means of communication including, but not limited to, threats
      of physical abuse and threats to damage or destroy college property or the property of other
      students or college employees.
6.    Any conduct that threatens the health or safety of another individual.
7.    Harassment by any means of any individual, including coercion, stalking, and personal
      abuse. Harassment includes but is not limited to, written or verbal acts or uses of technology,
      which have the effect of harassing or intimidating a person.
8.    Any form of unwanted sexual attention or unwanted sexual contact.
9.    Violations by guest of a student on college property. Students are responsible for the actions
      of their guests.
10.   Theft, attempted theft, vandalism / damage, unauthorized possession, or defacing of college
      property or the property of another student, faculty or staff member.
11.   Interference with the normal operations of the college (i.e., disruption of teaching and
      administrative functions, disciplinary procedures, pedestrian or vehicular traffic, or other
      college activities).
12.   Use of cell phones and pagers during scheduled classroom times.
13.   Unauthorized entry into, or use of, college facilities.
14.   Skateboarding in the campus facility.
15.   Forgery, falsification, alteration or misuse of college documents, records or identification.
16.   Dishonesty, including but not limited to cheating, plagiarism (submission of material that is
      wholly or substantially identical to that created or published by another person or persons,
      without adequate credit notations indicating authorship), or knowingly supplying false
      information or deceiving the college and/or its officials.
17.   Substitution for, or unauthorized collaboration with, a student in the commission of academic
      requirements;
18.   Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any Art Institute document relating to academic status;
19.   False claims of performance for work that has been submitted by the student.
20.   Disorderly, lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct. This would include but is not limited to any
      type of clothing or materials worn or brought onto the premises by any student or guest
      deemed to be lewd, indecent or obscene as determined by Art Institute officials.
21.   Extortion.
22.   Violation of Art Institute safety regulations, including but not limited to setting fires, tampering
      with fire safety and/or fire fighting equipment, failure to exit during fire drill, turning in false fire
      alarms and bomb threats
23.   Breach of peace on college property or at any college-sponsored or supervised program
24.   Use, sale, possession or distribution of illegal or controlled substances, drug or drug
      paraphernalia on college property or at any function sponsored or supervised by the Art
      Institute. Being under the influence of illegal or controlled substances on college property, or
      at any college function is also prohibited.
25.   Use, possession, sale, or serving of alcohol of any type in prohibited areas of the campus
      and college residences. Being under the influence of alcohol on Art Institute property or at
      any college function is also prohibited.
26.   Possession or use of firearms, explosives, dangerous chemicals, or other weapons on
      college property or at college sponsored functions

116
  27. Smoking in classrooms or other college buildings or areas unless designated as a smoking
      area.
  28. Failure to satisfy Art Institute financial obligations.
  29. Failure to comply with direction of college officials, faculty, staff or security officers who are
      acting in the performance of their duties.
  30. Failure to identify oneself when on college property or at a college-sponsored or supervised
      functions, upon request of a college official acting in the performance of his/her duties.
  31. Violation of federal, state or local laws and college rules and regulations on college property
      or at sanctioned or college sponsored functions.
  32. Any form of “hazing” and any act that endangers the safety of a student or that destroys or
      removes public or private property, for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with,
      or as a condition for continued membership in a group or organization. “Hazing” includes any
      method of initiation or pre-initiation into a student club or any pastime or amusement engaged
      in with respect to such a club that causes, or is likely to cause, bodily danger, physical harm,
      or personal degradation or disgrace resulting in physical or mental harm, to any student or
      other person attending the college
  33. Any in-school or off-campus act considered inappropriate or as an example of misconduct
      that adversely affects the interests of The Art Institute of Toronto and/or its reputation.
  34. Any violation of the student housing contract, rules and regulations and/or the college-
      sponsored housing student handbook.
  35. Any violation of the institution’s policies on the responsible use of technology including, but
      not limited to
           - The theft or abuse of computer, email, Internet or Intranet resources.
           - Unauthorized entry into a file, to use, read, or changes the contents of for any other
                purpose.
           - Unauthorized transfer of a file.
           - Unauthorized downloading of copyrighted materials in violation of law.
           - Unauthorized use of another individual’s identification and/or password.
           - Use of computing facilities to interfere with the work of another student, faculty
                member, or college official.
           - Use of computing facilities to send obscene or abusive messages.
           - Use of computing facilities to interfere with normal operation of the college’s computing
                system.
  36. Abuse of The Art Institute disciplinary system,
       including but not limited to:
           - Failure to obey the summons of a disciplinary body or college official.
           - Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information before a disciplinary body or
                college official.
           - Disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of a disciplinary proceeding.
           - Attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of a disciplinary body prior to
                and/or during the course of the disciplinary proceeding.
           - Verbal or physical harassment and/or intimidation of a member of a disciplinary body
                prior to, during, and/or after the disciplinary proceeding.
           - Failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under the student conduct policy.
           - Influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the
                disciplinary system.
  37. Harassment based on sex, race, colour, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, age,
      disability or any other criteria protected by state, federal or local law.

117
Disciplinary Procedures – Adjudication
The following procedures outline the process of adjudicating charges against students for having
violated one or more sections of the Conduct Code.

They are intended to provide for fairness and due process in an efficient and timely manner. It is
important, however, to remember that a college disciplinary hearing is not a court of law. The Art
Institute’s procedures are less formal and more appropriate to a collegiate community.

The term hearing officer shall be considered to refer to the Dean of Academic Affairs or her/his
designee in cases of alleged academic misconduct and/or to the Dean of Student Affairs or
her/his designee in cases of alleged non-academic misconduct.


Making Formal Complaints for Breach of Code of Conduct:
Any member of The Art Institute of Toronto community may file a complaint against any student
for misconduct or for otherwise being in violation of Art Institute policies. The complaint shall be
prepared in writing and directed to a Hearing Officer as defined above. Complaints should be
submitted as soon as possible after the alleged violation occurred.

The Hearing Officer shall review and investigate the complaint to determine if the allegations
have merit, to identify violations of the student conduct policy, and to impose sanctions for such
violations or, at his/her discretion, refer the matter to the Student Conduct Committee.

Unless otherwise provided by law, The Art Institute generally will not disclose the name of the
person making the complaint to the accused unless it determines in its sole discretion that the
circumstances warrant it.


Notification and Adjudication
 a) Within a reasonable period of time after the complaint is received, the Hearing Officer will
      notify the accused student of the complaint and the alleged violation of the student conduct
      policy. This notification may be in written form or through oral communication. If written, it
      will be addressed to the most recent address the student has recorded in the office of the
      registrar. The student will meet with the Hearing Officer to discuss the complaint and
      alleged violation. The Hearing Officer will render and communicate the decision to the
      student or, if the matter has been referred to the Student Conduct Committee, the Hearing
      Officer will provide information concerning the procedures to be employed and the
      student’s rights under those procedures.
 b) If a good faith effort has been made to contact the student to discuss the alleged violation
      and the student fails to appear for the meeting, the Hearing Officer may make a
      determination of violations of Art Institute policies on the basis of the information available,
      and impose sanctions for such violations. This decision shall be communicated to the
      student.
 c) The Hearing Officer or his/her delegate’s determination shall be made on the basis of
      whether it is more likely than not that the student violated a rule, regulation or policy of The
      Art Institute of Toronto.

  118
Procedures Regarding Student Dismissals

When the administration proposes to dismiss/expel a student from The Art Institute of Toronto,
the following procedures should apply unless the student elects to forego them.

The charges against the student shall be presented to the student in written form, including the
time, place and nature of the alleged offence(s). A time shall be set for a hearing not less than
two nor more than fifteen calendar days after the student has been notified of the charges and
his/her proposed dismissal from AiTo. Maximum time limits for scheduling of hearings may
be extended at the discretion of the Hearing Officer.


Guidelines when the case is referred to the Student Conduct Committee:

        • Hearings normally shall be conducted in private.
        • Admission of any person to the hearing shall be at the discretion of the Hearing Officer.
        • In hearings involving more than one accused student, the Hearing Officer, at his/her
            discretion, may permit the hearing concerning each student to be conducted
            separately.
        • The complaining party (which may be a member of the Administration) and the accused
            student may present witnesses at the hearing. Those witnesses may be questioned
            by the Hearing Officer. The number of witnesses permitted may be limited by the
            Hearing Officer.
        • Pertinent records, exhibits and written statements may be accepted as evidence for
            consideration by the Hearing Officer at his/her discretion.
        • All procedural questions are subject to the final decision of the Hearing Officer.
        • After the hearing, the Hearing Officer shall determine whether the student has violated
            the rules, regulations or policies that the student is charged with violating. The
            Hearing Officer will issue a written determination. If the Hearing Officer determines
            that a violation has occurred, the Hearing Officer’s determination will also address
            whether dismissal from The Art Institute is an appropriate sanction for the offence(s).
        • The Hearing Officer’s determination shall be made on the basis of whether it is more
            likely than not that the accused student violated a rule, regulation or policy of The Art
            Institute of Toronto (balance of probabilities )
        • The Hearing Officer shall provide the student with a copy of the determination,
            including information regarding the student’s right of appeal.

Interim Suspension
The Art Institute of Toronto may immediately remove or suspend a student from the Art Institute
of Toronto with out exhausting these procedures when, in the judgment of the Art Institute
President and/or Compliance counsel , the student poses a threat of harm to himself, to others
members The Art Institute community. This suspension can be appealed but the effect of the
suspension is immediate.




119
Student Conduct Committee

In certain cases and at the discretion of the Hearing Officer, the Hearing Officer may refer
consideration of charges against a student to the Student Conduct Committee for a hearing.

Preliminary Hearing
The charges against the student shall be presented to the accused student in written form,
including the time, place and nature of the alleged offence(s). A time shall be set for a hearing not
less than two nor more than fifteen calendar days after the student has been notified of the
charges. Maximum time limits for scheduling of hearings may be extended at the discretion of the
Hearing Officer. In most cases, the accused student will meet with the Hearing Officer to discuss
the procedures of a disciplinary hearing and clarify any questions the student may have.

Committee Composition
The Student Conduct Committee shall be composed of no fewer than three members of The Art
Institute of Toronto faculty or senior staff. The Committee shall be chaired by the Hearing Officer
who will not vote except in the case of a tie. The members of the Complaint Committee can not
be involved in the complaint.

Procedural Rights of the Student
Students accused of an act of misconduct and summoned to a hearing before the Student
Conduct Committee shall have the right to:

1. be accompanied by an advisor of his/her choice from among members of The Art Institute
   faculty, staff, or student body. The advisor may act as an advocate to assist the student but
   must act as or be professional legal counsel.
2. remain silent with no inference of guilt drawn there from;
3. present evidence in her/his own behalf;
4. call pertinent witnesses in his/her own behalf subject to the chair’s right to limit the number of
   witnesses;
5. receive a brief written summary of the committee’s report;
6. Appeal, procedures outlined in the Student Handbook.
7. Individuals involved in the final decision of appeals must be individuals who are not involved
   in the dispute or in a conflict of interest;
8. At the hearing officer (including student complaints committee process if applicable) and the
   appeal stage the student may have a “friend” or “advocate” appearing with them. This is not
   intended to be a professional legal representative but a fellow student, or a faculty member,
   or a staff member of the institution, who knows both the student and is familiar with the
   incident for which he or she is being accused of.




120
Committee Procedures

A hearing before the Student Conduct Committee is not a court trial and is not bound by the
procedures generally accepted in criminal or civil trials. While The Art Institute of Toronto
endeavours to provide students charged with an infraction a fair and impartial hearing, such a
hearing is not a civil or criminal trial and procedures may be quite different.

1. The chair of the Student Conduct Committee shall set the date, time, and place of the
   hearing, shall notify the members of the hearing committee, and shall summon all principals
   in the case.
2. All procedural questions are subject to the final decision of the Committee Chair who shall
   have the authority to use broad discretion in structuring the hearing and in determining the
   number of persons who testify.
3. Members of the hearing body are expected to disqualify themselves if their personal
   involvement in the case being heard is of such a nature as to prejudice their judgment.
4. Admission of any person to the hearing shall be at the discretion of the Chair.
5. Decisions of the hearing body shall be by majority vote with the Chair voting in the event of a
   tie.
6. The hearing body shall provide a brief written summary of each case with recommendations
   for appropriate disciplinary action to the Hearing Officer and to the student involved.
7. If accepted, the Hearing Officer will implement the committee’s recommendations.

Hearing Guidelines

Student Conduct Committee will follow the following guidelines:

1. The hearing will begin with the reading of charges against the accused.
2. Matters regarding procedure will be explained and clarified if necessary by the Chair.
3. Evidence supporting the charges will be provided to the Committee by the Hearing Officer. It
   will not be required that persons submitting evidence be present if they have provided
   statements to the Hearing Officer or have submitted written statements relevant to the
   charges.
4. Questions concerning the charges and supporting evidence may be entertained by the Chair.
5. The person charged will be given an opportunity to present a defence and to produce
   witnesses on her/his behalf.
6. Questions from members of the Committee concerning the charges and defence may be
   entertained by the Chair.
7. The person charged as well as those bringing the charges will be excused from the hearing
   room and the Committee will deliberate the charges and make a recommendation to the
   Hearing Officer.
8. The Committee’s determination shall be made on the basis of whether it is more likely than
   not that the accused student violated a rule, regulation or policy of The Art Institute of
   Toronto.
9. The Committee Chair shall provide the student with a copy of the determination, including
   information regarding the student’s right of appeal.

If a good faith effort has been made to contact the accused to discuss the alleged violation and
the student fails to appear for the hearing the Student Conduct Committee may consider the
charges in the absence of the student and render a decision.


121
    Appeal Procedures

        Students wishing to appeal a disciplinary decision may do so in the following manner:

    •     The student must initially obey the terms of the decision, i.e., a student who has been
          suspended from the college may not be on college property; a student dismissed from
          college-sponsored housing must leave according to the directions indicated by the decision.
    •     The student must write a letter of appeal, addressed to the President of The Art Institute of
          Toronto or her/his delegate. This letter will give the student the opportunity to indicate a
          position on the decision, and must be thorough and complete. It must be delivered to the
          President or his/her delegate within seven calendar days following receipt of the decision.
    •      The President or his/her designee may appoint an ad hoc review committee to review the
           appeal and make a recommendation regarding disposition of the appeal. This committee will
           be comprised of faculty or staff members not involved in making the initial decision nor
           involved in the complaint or dispute. The student making the appeal shall be provided an
           opportunity to address the committee in person. The student may be accompanied by one
           person (family member, friend, etc) or advocate but not a lawyer or to act in the capacity as a
           lawyer. The committee may prohibit from attending or remove any person who disrupts the
           proceedings of the committee.
•        The committee will report back to the President or her/his delegate with its recommendation
         following its review of the appeal. The President or his/her delegate will render a written
         decision on the appeal within thirty calendar days from receipt of the appeal. If the President
         is involved in the dispute or participated in the student complaint hearing on the same matter,
         the President will delegate the appeal committee report to a senior Art Institute of Toronto
         official or senior Art Institute official within the Art Institute family of schools for review and
         final decision.



11. 2 Awareness of Dispute Discipline Policy:


        The Art Institute of Toronto provides printed documents identifying policies, procedures, rights,
        and responsibilities to all internal constituents. These documents include the school policies,
        student handbook, faculty handbook, and employee handbook. In addition, all employees of The
        Art Institute of Toronto have access to the EDMC Intranet and The Art Institute of Toronto
        Internet, which provides access to supplemental information regarding policies and procedures.
         AiTo promotes student awareness of policies and procedures as outlined in the student
         Handbook. New students are issued a Handbook at their orientation the week prior to classes or
         on the first day of classes if they miss the orientation session. Additionally, AiTo draws student
         attention to the Handbook during all orientation programs to reaffirm the importance of documents
         outlining their rights and responsibilities. All students must attend and participate in orientation,
         which includes an overview of the student handbook and Art Institute of Toronto policies is
         included in this orientation. In addition, course syllabi, which are provided to students during the
         first week of classes, outline grading, copyright and academic honesty policies. Policies are also
         published on the publicly available Art Institute of Toronto WEB site

         Students enrolling at The Arts Institute of Toronto are required to sign an enrolment agreement.
         Prior to registration, new students also receive a copy of the student handbook. The AiTo student
         enrolment agreement contains a statement that students sign which certifying the students have
         read the relevant student policies. The current statement reads as follows:

        The STUDENT acknowledges having received and reviewed the program schedule and description
        outlining the program. The student acknowledges they have read, understood and agree to the terms set
        out in the Student Handbook, which contains The Art Institute policies including admissions, rules of
        conduct, withdrawal and termination, and dispute resolution, and together with this written agreement,
        constitutes the whole of the contract between the parties. __________ Student.



        122
Part of the enrolment process includes the requirement for students to sign a document
indicating they have received the handbook. The handbook provides students the Art Institute
of Toronto key policies including, but not limited to, credit transfer arrangements, prior
learning assessment, entrance examination requirements, student support services,
policies on student assesment, academic progress and, refund and dispute resolution policies.


“Student Handbook Acknowledgement

Dear Student,

Welcome to the Art Institute of Toronto

This handbook information, along with other materials the student may receive during your
introduction and orientation to The Art Institute of Toronto and covers many important topics. We
hope the student use these as a resource for you questions and as a guide to help the student
get acquainted with The Art Institute of Toronto.

Program and department information is also reviewed during your orientation and the student is
encouraged to contact the student academic director and/or the Student Affairs office if the
student has additional questions.

Please sign and date this acknowledgement. It will become part of your permanent student
record.

I have read, understood and agree to the policies set out in the Student Handbook and in
particular the Art Institute of Toronto policies regarding student conduct, withdrawal,
refunds, academic honesty, copyright, complaint and dispute resolution policies.
I have also reviewed the relevant program and academic progress information.

Student Name (Print) _______________________________________

Student (Signature) ________________________________________

Date_____________________________________________________ “


123
“NOTICE CONCERNING TRANSFERABILITY OF CREDITS

The Art Institute of Toronto

The mission of The Art Institute of Toronto is to help the student to prepare for entry-level
employment in your chosen field of study. The value of degree programs like those offered by
the Art Institute of Toronto is their deliberate focus on marketable skills. The credits earned are
not necessarily intended as a stepping-stone for transfer to another institution. For this reason,
there is no guarantee the academic credits the student earn at The Art Institute of Toronto will
transfer to another post secondary institution.

Programs offered by one school within The Art Institute’s system may be similar to but not
identical to programs offered at another school within the system. This is due to differences, in
educational practices, use of different instructional models, and local employer needs. Therefore,
if you decide to transfer to another school within The Art Institute’s system, not all of the credits
you earn at The Art Institute of Toronto may be transferable into another Art Institute program. If
you do wish to transfer credits from the Art Institute of Toronto to another Art Institute the student
should consult with the Dean of Education for specific information on how these policies would
impact the student in particular.

If you are considering transferring to either another Art Institute or an unaffiliated school, it is your
responsibility to determine whether that school will accept your Art Institute credits. We
encourage the student to make this determination as early as possible. The Art Institute of
Toronto does not imply, promise, or guarantee transferability of its credits to any other institution.

I have read, had an opportunity to ask questions about, and understand the above
limitations on transfer of my academic credits earned at The Art Institute of Toronto.


Student Name (please print)________________________________Date:

Student Signature: _______________________________________ Date:


Signature of parent or guardian if____________________________ Date:
Student is under 18

Representative of the Art Institute____________________________ Date:


Faculty and Staff Awareness of Policies and Procedures:

All new full and part-time faculty members receive the faculty handbook at their orientation
meeting, which occurs prior to their first day of classes. New staff members are issued the
employee handbook at their orientation meeting on their first day of employment with the School.
All employees of The Art Institute of Toronto have access to the internal EDMC Intranet when on
campus.



124
All faculty receive a formal training and orientation in order to facilitate their initial days in the
classroom. Each new faculty member is assigned to a faculty mentor. The current faculty assists
the new faculty on situations as they arise. At The Art Institute of Toronto, new faculty receives a
formalized orientation that includes a tour of the facilities, an overview of classroom dynamics,
learning styles, student needs and classroom policies and procedures. Human Resources and
the Dean of Academic Affairs facilitate this initial orientation followed by a more specific program
and curriculum orientation by the Dean of Academic Affairs and Academic Directors. Every new
instructor receives a Staff/Faculty Handbook, Faculty Training Manual, and Student Handbook at
orientation. Under the direction of the Dean of Academic Affairs, a written record of each faculty
member's training is kept in the faculty member's personnel file.

All faculty are provided formal developmental courses that range from introductory instruction for
first time instructors to advanced pedagogical offerings in critical thinking, learning styles,
curriculum development, learning assessment, presentation styles and the domains of learning
(e.g. Bloom's Taxonomies). “EDMC University” and employee orientation includes significant
resource and policy materials to inform and support new faculty and employees. These training
courses are developed and administered by the Director of Faculty Development or the Assistant
Academic Dean. Faculty are also provided a faculty handbook or academic manual containing
relevant academic and personnel information. The faculty acknowledgement reads as follows:


“FACULTY ACKNOWLEDGMENT

I hereby acknowledge receipt of the faculty Academic Manual dated___________.

I understand the Manual is for informational purposes only and communicates AiTo policies as of
the date of the Manual. I understand the AiTo’s policies may change from time to time, at the to
reflect the AiTo’s changing needs you will be provided of any such changes when they are
approved.

I understand the contents of this Manual (and any subsequent modifications to the policies
contained within the Manual) are CONFIDENTIAL AiTo information and remain AiTo property at
all times. I will not copy any portion of the Manual or share it with any person outside the AiTo
without the written permission of my supervisor.

I understand it is my obligation to read and comply with all policies and I should direct any
questions to the Dean of Academic Affairs.

Faculty Printed Name:


Position:


Faculty Signature:


Date:


The signed original copy of this acknowledgment should be given to the Dean of Academic Affairs
or Human Resources – it will be filed in your personnel file.


125
Part A – Organization Review

Sexual Harassment: Sexual harassment consists of unwelcome sexual advances, requests for
sexual favours, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature where:

a. Submission to such conduct is an explicit or implicit term or condition of a person’s status in a
course, program or activity or in admission, or in an academic decision;
b. Submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as a basis for an academic decision; or
c. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or
academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational
environment.

Examples of sexual harassment include, but are not limited to: unwanted sexual advances;
demands for sexual favours in exchange for favourable treatment; verbal abuse of a sexual
nature; graphic commentary about an individual’s body, sexual prowess, or sexual deficiencies;
leering; whistling; touching; pinching; assault; coerced sexual acts; suggestive, insulting or
obscene comments or gestures; stalking; and displaying sexually suggestible objects or pictures.
EDMC prohibits all conduct of this nature whether or not such conduct violates any applicable
laws.

Other Forms of Harassment: Verbal abuse, insulting comments and gestures, and other
harassing conduct are also forbidden under this policy when directed at an individual because of
his or her race, colour, sex, sexual orientation, familial status, age, religion, ethnic origin, or
disability. It is the responsibility of each employee and each student to conduct him or herself in a
professional manner at all times and to refrain from such harassment.

Complaint Procedure: Students who feel they have been harassed should follow the Student
Grievance Procedure for Internal Complaints of harassment or discrimination. Promptly after
learning of such alleged conduct, The Art Institute of Toronto will conduct an investigation for the
purpose of determining whether prohibited harassment has occurred. Efforts will be made to
ensure confidentiality to the extent consistent with the goal of conducting an appropriate
investigation. Students who initiate or participate in such investigations in good faith will be
protected against school-related retaliation. If an investigation confirms the allegations, The Art
Institute will take prompt corrective action, which may include discipline, up to and including
immediate dismissal.



126




                                                                                                118
Part A – Organization Review


12 .0 ORGANIZATION EVALUATION

12.1 Periodic Review Policy and Schedule
The Art Institutes and The Art Institute of Toronto have extensive and rigorous processes to
assess intuitional and program effectiveness including self-study process consequent with
regional and national accreditation processes and the Art Institutes own organizational and
review processes. For greater certainty, The Art Institute of Toronto formally accepts the
organizational review processes established by the Degree Quality Assessment Board. The Art
Institute of Toronto incorporated by reference the Ontario Quality Assessment Board’s
benchmarks and standards for “Periodic Review”.

Ai process for institutional review are extensive, documented, rigorous and regular review
processes and including self study and ongoing institutional effectiveness and planning. Strategic
planning and key performance indications are systematically utilized in a process that engages
every critical area of operation of the Art Institute and validated against clear performance matrix
and individual and system wide performance analysis, tracking and comparisons.

While the Art Institute is confident its extensive system and individual institute based review
processes meet or exceed the benchmarks set out in this section, for greater certainty the Art
Institute of Toronto formally adopts the Quality Assessment Boards review criteria, to wit:

a. organizational reviews at regular intervals, normally not exceeding five to seven years. The first
such evaluation should occur before a request for renewal of ministerial consent;

b. criteria for organizational review that include:

         i) assessment of the continuing adequacy of the organization’s mission statement and
         academic goals that accurately identify the academic character and aspirations of the
         organization;

         ii) assessment of the continuing adequacy of the organization’s governance structure
         and qualified administrative capacity necessary to organize and manage a competent
         institution of higher learning with appropriate participation by qualified academic staff and
         in consultation with students;

c. assessment of the organization’s ethical conduct and businesses practices in its dealings with
administrative, academic and support staff, students, regulators, suppliers, and the public in
general;

d. assessment of the continuing accuracy and completeness of the institution’s public reports,
materials and advertising and the key information about the organization and that it is readily
available to potential and current students;

e. assessment of the organization’s commitment to and the continuing appropriateness of its
academic freedom and integrity policies in that they (i) recognize and protect the rights of
individuals in their pursuit of knowledge; (ii) clearly define the ownership of the intellectual
products of employees and students; (iii) uphold formal ethical research standards; and (iv)
foster and enforce academic honesty;




                                                                                                 127
Part A – Organization Review

f. assessment of the continued financial stability of the organization and that it has the financial
resources to provide a stable learning environment and to ensure that students can complete the
program with the stated learning outcomes;

g. assessment of the continuing appropriateness of the organization’s dispute resolution policies
and practices.

The organization review procedure includes:

a. A Self-Study
A study undertaken by administrators, faculty members and staff of the organization based on
evidence relating to organizational performance against the criteria stated above, including
strengths and weaknesses, desired improvements, and future directions.

b. An Organization Evaluation Committee
A committee struck by the senior administration to evaluate the organization’s operational and
administrative activities, policies and procedures based on (a) the self-study and a site visit during
which members of the committee normally meet with administrators, faculty members, students,
graduates, and other relevant parties such as financial auditors, bankers, critical service providers
to gather information. A majority of the members must have relevant expertise in the degree-
granting environment, be from outside the institution, and be free of any conflict of interest.

c. The Report of the Committee
The Organization Evaluation Committee report assesses the appropriateness and quality of the
organization’s operation, policies and procedures, and recommends any changes needed to
strengthen that quality. The report must be addressed to the senior administration and be shared
with the academic council and governing Board, together with a plan of action responding to the
recommendations in the report.

The Art Institutes takes it dedication to constant evaluation, analysis, and improvement very
seriously. Every Art institute is engaged in ongoing strategic planning and performance
measurement process, which involves assessing institutional effectiveness at every level. This is
where the strength of being part of a larger system is even more evident. Institutions are
measured and assessed not only on an individual level, but also in relation to the entire system.
This provides many performance points of references and with the exploitation of sophisticated
systems allowing for tracking or key performance measures, the capacity for analysis and is
extensively utilized.

Ai Toronto Institutional Effectiveness and Performance Measurement Instruments:

As an outcomes-based institution, we use a variety of tools to develop and later evaluate the
teaching effectiveness of our faculty. As discussed earlier in this Standard, we hire instructors
who are professionals in their field with a minimum of two years of actual work experience. Once
employed with The Art Institute, we provide ongoing opportunities via the Faculty Development
Program for faculty to develop and refine their teaching skills. We also use a suite of surveys to
perform ongoing assessment.

Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory:

Noel Levitz is a nationally recognized organization that has created a questionnaire for four-year
colleges and universities. The 101 questions, in 11 sections, pertain to all aspects of college
activity. These are: Instruction Effectiveness, Academic Advising, Registration Effectiveness,
Recruitment and Financial Aid, Concern for the Individual, Campus Climate, Campus Support



                                                                                                 128
Part A – Organization Review

Services, Student Centeredness, Safety and Security, Service Excellence, and Campus Life.
There is also a section for the administering college to ask additional site-specific questions.

A system-wide process for administering the survey allows for the visionary process of a forward-
thinking initiative that elicits feedback and provides direction, combined with a quantifiable
foundation, a true starting point that creates a baseline for growth. Information gleaned from the
survey results should become part of each school’s institutional strategy, and be considered for
integration into the school’s institutional effectiveness plan.

The process of surveying our students to ascertain their levels of satisfaction results in active
engagement of our students as to their thoughts and perceptions. Further, the process promotes
the engagement of our staff and faculty when they are equipped with data that reveals
opportunities for improvement. Because leaders are charged with accountability, the survey
process provides an opportunity for school leaders to identify and respond to student issues and
perceptions in a timely, thoughtful way. The level to which we as administrators respond to the
issues raised from the surveys will be the distinguishing characteristic between management and
leadership.

The rationale supporting the administration of student success is manifold. First, the survey
provides the means to take a “temperature check” of the views and thoughts of our students,
which then becomes a “reality check” as we measure that against our perceptions of student
satisfaction. Additionally, having a uniform, systematic process for measuring and documenting
student satisfaction creates accountability among administrators to proactively manage and lead
initiatives to continually improve. The process itself provides for analysis as to how an individual
school is compared to its sister schools and to a national norm, and also allows for the
identification of best practices.

Implementation of the Noel Levitz Student Satisfaction survey initiative includes the following:

    •    Recommendations for administering the survey should be reviewed at the Student
         Success site: http://intranet.aii.edu/edmcu/LRC_StudentSuccess.asp.
    •    Administration of the survey should occur during the fall term, and be administered by
         Student Affairs personnel rather than faculty. Data from the surveys will be compiled at
         the system level and analyzed in order to provide constructive recommendations for
         initiatives targeting student satisfaction for the next budgeting cycle.

Survey of Graduates

Through our Career Services Department, we also survey our recent graduates. This quarterly
survey was developed by The Art Institute of Toronto and two research groups within EDMC, and
assesses graduates’ satisfaction generally with The Art Institute. It also asks specifically about
satisfaction with student services, such as academic advising, career services, admissions and
financial aid, with academic programs and faculty, and with facilities.

The academic programs and faculty section includes these statements:

•        My program dealt with practical experiences and applications for the workplace.
•        Program requirements were clear.
•        There was a good variety of classes in my program.
•        Overall, the quality of instruction was good.
•        Faculty members were knowledgeable in the field they taught.
•        Faculty members were accessible outside class.
•        Faculty members gave timely feedback to students on work in their courses.
•        I was given appropriate assistance with my résumé/portfolio and/or reel.
•        I could schedule the courses I needed with little difficulty.



                                                                                               129
Part A – Organization Review

From these surveys we have determined that Art Institute graduates feel that faculty are
knowledgeable in their field and give timely feedback. This corroborates the Noel Levitz Inventory
results. The mission of the college is to deliver education from professionals that have or are
directly working in their field of study and the students value our attention to this detail.

Survey of Graduates’ Employers

The Art Institute also conducts an annual Employer Survey. This survey allows us to gain insight
into how satisfied employers are with our graduates’ technical skills and their knowledge,
dependability, and professionalism.

The Employer Survey asks:
•     Do our graduates’ portfolios meet your hiring standards?
•     Do our graduates possess the creative skills your company requires?
•     Do our graduates have the technical training necessary for the job?
•     Are our graduates dependable?
•     Do our graduates have good communication skills?
•     Do our graduates' résumés provide their information on skills and knowledge?
•     Do our graduates present themselves in a professional manner in the interview?
•     Were our graduates well-prepared for the interview?
•     Do our graduates follow up appropriately after the interview?




                                                                                             130
Part A – Organization Review

Curriculum Review Process Including program review and reassessment of all Degree
level program includes:

Assessment:

•        Continuing consistency of the program with the AiTO’s mission, educational goals and
         long-range plans.
•        Learning outcomes: achievement of students/graduates compared to competencies and
         degree standards.
•        Assessment of program relevance.
•        Assessment of continuing appropriateness of method of delivery.
•        Assessment of appropriateness of structure of the program.
•        Review of student portfolio to establish the range of work students is producing the end of
         the program.
•        Analysis of employer opinions.
•        Analysis of student/graduate views.
•        Analysis of graduate data: employment rates, satisfaction level, default rate on Ontario
         Student Assistance Program or other student loan program
•        Assessment of admissions standards.
•        Assessment of student progress standards.
•        Assessment of resource allocation for the program: human, technical, and financial
         resources.

Curriculum Review:

The Art Institutes has articulated specific steps involved in developing and revising curriculum
models. The Curriculum Review Flowchart below outlines the activities that take place during the
review process. The Curriculum Development and Revision Process delineates the step-by-step
process used at the Curriculum Task Force meetings to develop program exit competencies,
course competencies, and to begin to create courses in an educational program.

                               CURRICULUM REVIEW FLOWCHART

                               Review Program Mission Statement




                               Review Program Exit Competencies




            Review Competency: Discipline within Field; Discipline Linked to field,
                               Discipline Outside Field.




                        Review Individual Courses & Course Competencies




                                   Review Portfolio Standards




                                                                                               131
Part A – Organization Review




                                     Review Course Descriptions




                               Review Course Outlines - Weekly By Topic




                                            Review Syllabi



CURRICULUM REVISION PROCESS


•   Review program mission statement.

•   Review program exit competencies by broad general
    categories.


            o    Based on information from experts; National Advisory Panel, Campus Advisory
                 Panel, and/or existing program exit competencies—depending upon the nature of
                 development/revision. Examples of categories include, but are not limited to:
                 Technical Skills, Design Skills, Art Foundations, Communication Skills, Professional
                 Development, Information Processing Skills, etc.



•   Comparison of newly generated program exit competencies with existing exit
    competencies.
                For revisions, develop finalized list of program competencies after comparison.



•   Label program exit competencies as either Discipline within field, Discipline Linked to
    Field, Discipline Outside Field.
            o    DL competencies are those competencies that are linked to the program and
                 programs like it and provide a foundation or basis of knowledge, attitudes, and skills
                 within a given program. They usually occur at the beginning of a program.
            o    DW exit competencies are those competencies that provide specialized knowledge,
                 attitudes, and skills within a given program. They usually occur later in the
                 curriculum and prepare the graduate to enter the job market. (In some cases, an
                 exit competency may be both foundation and work-ready.)
            o    DO competencies are designed to broaden the students’ understanding of society
                 and the world around them and to engender in them the ability to use the modes of
                 analysis of a field outside their major so that they may thoughtfully examine
                 phenomena from a perspective different from their major field of study. For example,
                 student may elect to develop a greater understanding of literary analysis or social
                 science analysis.


                                                                                                  132
Part A – Organization Review

•   Compare the list of course competencies with existing courses in the program
    curriculum (if appropriate) to determine matches.

            o   The course competencies must be the same or very similar for a match to exist. If
                there is a match, there may have an existing course. If there is some match, there
                will be need to revise the existing course. If there is no match, there will be need to
                develop a new course.

•   Review portfolio standards.


•   Review course descriptions.

•    The course description should be based on the course
     competencies.

•   Further delineate course competencies (for each course) to specific unit objectives
    and outline course topics by week in the quarter.

•   Review course syllabi for each course.




                                                                                                133
          Curriculum Review Process




                   Syllabi &
                   Topic
                   Outlines




    Organization
    of Program                     Portfolio
    Content                        Criteria




Program                                        Program
Mission &                  DACUM               Course
Description                                    Titles &
                                               Descriptions
Part A – Organization Review




Analysis of Employer Opinions

Employers’ views about the curriculum and the needs of the workforce are gathered on a regular
basis in two ways. First, the Professional Advisory Committee, which includes employers, meets
each quarter and in part their mission is to: “Help review the established curriculum of the
program and provide input on the appropriateness of the program’s objectives, content, and
length, and the adequacy of facilities and equipment.” The minutes of these meeting will be
available for review by the committee.

Second, each quarter the employers of students are surveyed to determine how well students are
actually doing on the job. This information will also be available to the committee. The survey
may be found at the end of this appendix.


Analysis of Student/Graduate Views

Views of students are gathered in two ways. First, the student evaluation of course includes a
series of questions designed to assess the students’ perception of the course and its relevance to
their chosen career. This data is collected over each quarter that the course is taught and is
available in a summary report related to the course. (Please see form at the end of this
appendix.)

Second, graduates are regularly surveyed for feedback on how well they are doing in their field of
study. The data from both of these sources will be made available to the committee for its review


Analysis of Graduate Data

Data on employment rates, satisfaction level, and default rate on Ontario Student Assistance
Program or other student loan program will be collected each quarter and will be made available
to the committee.


Assessment of Admissions Standards

There are two critical components to the admissions standards that potentially will yield
meaningful information related to making certain that admissions standards are appropriate: the
secondary school GPA and the Accuplacer test scores. A study correlating these two variables
with the overall cumulative GPA and the GPA in major field of study of the student will be
conducted. The results of this report will be made available to the committee. In addition, the
collective wisdom of the faculty will be sought in determining the admissions standards.




                                                                                             134
Part A – Organization Review




Assessment of Student Progress Standards

Student progress standards at an Art Institute tend to be relatively stabile, almost immutable, as
they have been developed over many years with a large number of students. Additionally, the
use of a common student information system with one database for all campuses makes it
exceedingly difficulty—if not impossible—to take a different approach at one campus.



Assessment of Resource Allocation for the Program

Human, technical, and financial resources: Resource allocation at an Art Institute is an ongoing
yearly process. Through the annual institutional effectiveness process the overall direction of the
institute is analyzed and addressed in the annual budgeting process. In addition, the technical
requirements of each programs are carefully examined each year and changes made in order for
the programs to remain current in terms of technological advances. While the Art Institutes do
not teach software per se, it is, obviously, extremely important that students are well versed in the
software that has wide application in their particular career field.


Program Review Procedure

The procedures for the review of the program will utilize a self-study methodology to be
undertaken by faculty and administrators of the program with the overall goal of identifying both
strength and weaknesses, and desired improvements. The self-study team will be comprised of
members of the faculty and appropriate administrators.
Once the self-study is completed, a Program Evaluation Committee will be empanelled to review
the self-study and to make recommendations. This committee will be comprised of three
members: One from the employer community who is conversant with the profession; one from a
regionally accredited Art Institute who is the director of the program; and one from a design
school that does not compete with The Art Institute of Toronto.

The Program Evaluation Committee will prepare a report assessing the program quality and
making recommendations to strengthen the quality of the program. The report will be addressed
to the President of The Art Institute of Toronto, shared with the academic leadership and
governing board. On the basis of the report and the self-study, a plan of action will be developed
to address the recommendations.




                                                                                                135
Part A – Organization Review


Forms used as part of Annual Institutional Effectiveness Assessment


EMPLOYER PROFILE
Company Name:
______________________________________________________________________
Respondent’s Name: ___________________________________________________
                               First                   Middle Initial         Last
Title:____________________________


Address: _____________________________________________________________________
Street                     City         State               Zip

______________________
Phone: ( ) ______-________ Fax: ( ) ______-________

E-mail:_______________________________________


I would prefer to fill out future surveys by:   Mail    E-mail
Website:_______________________________________
Number of employees:            1–10   11–25    26–50       51–100      101–250   251–500
                                Over 500



Hiring History of AITO Graduates

1. Has your company hired any AiToronto graduates in the last 18 months?
   YES NO

2. Was the graduate employed at your company prior to or while attending AiToronto?
   YES NO

If you answered YES to questions 1 or 2, please continue with the survey.
Thank you for your valuable feedback.

3. From which program(s) did you hire our graduates? (Please check all that apply.)

2.   Applied Information Technology
2.   Business Systems Analysis
2.   J2EE
2.   .Net
2.   Other _____________________________




                                                                                            136
Part A – Organization Review

4. Are you a recent graduate of the Art Institute who owns this company and/or is self- employed?
1.
     YES     NO


5. How many of our graduates did your company hire this past year?
1.
1.    0      1–2        3–4        5–6       7–10            More than 10


6. Approximately how many of our graduates has your company hired in the last 3 years?
1.
1.    0      1–2        3–4        5–6       7–10            More than 10


7. Is your company more likely to hire a graduate who has had an internship?
     YES     NO



Assessment of Skills of AiTO Graduates

Please mark the box that most accurately reflects your view of graduates your company has hired
from our school.

1. Graduates’ portfolios meet
1 . your company’s hiring standards.......                     ......   ......
2. Graduates possess the creative
1 . skills your company requires. ... ........                 ......   ......
3. Graduates have the technical
1 . training necessary for jobs in
1 . your company.. ......................... ........          ......   ......
4. Graduates are dependable....... ........                    ......   ......
5. Graduates have good
1 . communications skills............... ........              ......   ......
6. Graduates’ resumes provide the
1 . necessary information on their
1 . skills and knowledge................. ........             ......   ......
7. Graduates presented themselves
1 . in a professional manner for the
1 . interview.................................... ........     ......   ......
8. Graduates were well prepared for
1 . the interview.............................. ........       ......   ......
9. Graduates followed up appropriately
1 . after the interview. .................... ........         ......   ......
10. How do our graduates compare to
1 . graduates of comparable schools?
1 . LESS FAVORABLY
1 . SIMILARLY
1 . SOMEWHAT FAVORABLY
1 . VERY FAVORABLY




                                                                                            137
Part A – Organization Review

11. When hiring new grads, do you prefer candidates with:
1 . Bachelor’s degree ......... Certificate
1 . Associate’s degree......... Diploma

12. If there is one school that prepares their graduates very well, it is ______
1 . __________________________________________________________
1 . __________________________________________________________
1 . __________________________________________________________
13. If there is one area where your company would like to see our graduates’ skills strengthened,
it is ______________________________
1.
1 . __________________________________________________________
1 . __________________________________________________________
14. If there is one topic your company would like to see added to or changed in our curriculum, it
is_________________________________
1.
1 . __________________________________________________________
1 . __________________________________________________________
15. Which additional programs would you like to see offered?___________
1 . __________________________________________________________
1 . __________________________________________________________
1 . __________________________________________________________
16. Our graduates are very strong in the area of _______________________
1 . __________________________________________________________
1 . __________________________________________________________
17. If your company often chooses another candidate for a job rather than one of our graduates,
      what is the most common reason for that choice?
 1.
1 . __________________________________________________________
1 . __________________________________________________________
1 . _____________________________________________________




                                                                                              138
Part A – Organization Review


RECRUITMENT AND CAREER SERVICES

1. Where do you advertise for new employees? (Please check all that apply)
2
2.    Newspaper
2.    Trade Journals
2.    School career services office
2.    Website (please list sites)
________________________________________________
Other
______________________________________________________________
2. Would you be interested in posting your
2. advanced level job openings on our school’s
2. Alumni website? . .....................................YES NO

3. Would you be interested in
2. sending job openings to our
2. career services office? .............................YES           NO

4. Did you use our Career Services office?...YES NO
2. (If you answered YES, please continue with next question, if NO, please go on to next
section.)
2. a. Were you satisfied with the
2. a. service you received?...........................YES NO
2. b. Were you sent resumes/portfolios
2. a. that fit the qualifications of the job?. .....YES NO
2. c. Were you offered assistance in
2. a. coordinating interviews with
2. a. the graduate?. ......................................YES NO
2. d. Will you use our Career Services
2. a. office again to assist you in
2. a. your hiring needs?. ...............................YES NO
2. e. If any of the above Career Services
2. a. responses were NO, please explain ___________________________
2. ________________________________________________________
2.

ADDITIONAL INVOLVEMENT WITH SCHOOL
1. Have you ever attended a
1. Portfolio Review, Job Fair, or
1. other event at our school?. ........................YES            NO

2. If you answered YES to
2. question 1, did you find it
2. useful to your business?............................YES            NO

3. Does your company have
2. internship programs
2. available?...................................................YES   NO

2. If you answered YES to question 3,
2. whom should we contact?____________________________________
2. _________________________________________________________




                                                                                           139
Part A – Organization Review

4. If you answered NO to
2. question 3, would you be
2. interested in establishing one? ..................YES            NO

5. Would your company be
2. interested in sponsoring a
2. class project?.............................................YES   NO

2. If you answered YES to question 5,
2. whom should we contact?____________________________________
   _________________________________________________________

6. Would you be willing to
2. share your experience with
2. hiring one of our graduates
2. for possible inclusion in a
2. school publication or other
2. promotional material?. ...............................YES        NO

7. You may share my responses
2. with the school...........................................YES    NO


OTHER COMMENTS
_____________________________________________________________________________
___________________________ _____________ ________
_____________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________



                                                                          140
Part A – Organization Review




Student Success and Institutional Effectiveness Planning and Review


Student Success is inherent to EDMC’s vision of becoming the pre-eminent leader in higher
education. Integrated within this goal is a clear commitment to the social and intellectual growth of
students as the hallmark of effective student success efforts.

Student Success encompasses the total student experience from enrolment through graduate
employment whereby each student is individuated. Achieving student success is a multi-faceted
process requiring synergy, teamwork, collaboration, and mutual respect across functional areas
and across all school groups of EDMC.

Persistence is an Academic Affairs driven facet of Student Success that manifests as strategies
and initiatives designed to enable students to continue term-to-term resulting in completion.
Persistence begins at the point of admission and has as its objectives the enculturation of
students into academe in general and the college in particular; the remediation and/or
improvement of necessary academic, psychological, and social aptitudes and skills; and the
involvement of students as active participants in curricular, co-curricular, and student life
opportunities.

Student Satisfaction is a Student Affairs driven facet of Student Success and manifests as
strategies and initiatives designed to meet the student’s holistic, non-academic needs. Student
satisfaction is literally a measure quantified through the Noel Levitz surveys, but it is also an
intrinsic indicator that we are meeting students’ expectations. Initiatives promoting counselling
and wellness as well as leadership development support the personal as well as professional
growth of our students.

Career Achievement is a Career Services driven facet of Student Success and manifests as
strategies and initiatives designed to fulfill the career placement objectives and goals of our
students. If our vision at EDMC is to become the pre-eminent leader in career education, than the
logical outgrowth of that vision is a series of specific initiatives, policies and procedures that assist
our students in securing field-related placement.

Student success is achieved through recognizing and responding to the individual needs of
students, meeting expectations set in admissions, delivering a curriculum designed to include the
objectives and competencies set by employers which ultimately result in field-related employment
at competitive salaries.

EDMC has created the Student Success Leadership Plan as a comprehensive tool containing
strategies and interventions to assist schools in their efforts to promote student success and
achieve optimal program completion. Schools should use the system Student Success Plan as a
means to align their efforts with the corporate functional strategic plans, resulting in a holistic
approach to student success. By following these guiding principles for student success, each
school will be able to devise a student success leadership plan that is well-suited to its goals and
objectives.




141
Part A – Organization Review

Student Success Planning

We have undertaken a wide range of initiatives with the goal of improving academic
quality and persistence. Many programs recommended begin at the point of admission and have
as their objectives the enculturation of students into academe in general and in the college in
particular; the remediation and/or improvement of necessary academic, psychological, and social
aptitudes and skills; and the involvement of students as active participants in curricular, co-
curricular and student life opportunities as listed earlier in this paper.

The outcomes of these objectives can only be accomplished through an integrated system of
curricular, advising, and orientation activities involving faculty, academic affairs, student affairs,
and career services. However, nothing can be accomplished unless there is true belief in student
success through leadership by school Presidents and Executive Committees. It is time to get
back to basics, and have persistence as a major item in each and every school’s agenda.

At a minimum AiTo shall have:

▪   A functioning Student Success Committee supported by the President and Executive
    Committee with consistent and constructive communication between the two groups;

▪   An annual Student Success Leadership Plan that details the actions and initiatives to be
    taken in support of student success and persistence;

▪   A common first-term academic experience that includes an integrative studies course which
    prepares students for knowing, which assists students in the process of transition, and
    provides students with basic psychological, physical, and social skills;

▪   An advising system that features the pairing of faculty and staff mentors with students that
    begins shortly after admission, and is holistic and proactive in approach; an advising system
    that does not concentrate its entire efforts on registration activities;

▪   A system of support services involving pre- and post-enrolment assessment, the preparation
    of individual development plans for both academic and student life activities, individual and
    group tutoring, a tracking system, an early academic warning system, and proactive
    intervention; and,

▪   A multi-phased orientation program which prepares students for involvement in academic and
    student life focusing on bonding and academic preparedness.

We must always promote student success to our many constituencies as our dedication to
helping the student achieve their stated goals and objectives. We must also recognize that there
is a business impact to achieving or not achieving persistence plans. We must remember that a
school or campus must continually focus on its individual persistence plan while always
considering an overall focus on the system as a whole.




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