EXHIBITS

Document Sample
EXHIBITS Powered By Docstoc
					EXHIBITS
 EXHIBIT A

LOCATION MAP
     EXHIBIT B

 PROXIMITY TO OTHER
PUBLIC PROPERTY MAP
            Exhibit B




Exhibit B




               Exhibit B
      EXHIBIT C

MANAGEMENT PROSPECTUS
                                                                               Exhibit C



                      CONSERVATION AND RECREATION LANDS
                            MANAGEMENT PROSPECTUS
                            DIVISION OF FORESTRY
                DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE & CONSUMER SERVICES

Management Goals
      The Matanzas Marsh Tract which is part of the Northeast Blueways Project
for Florida Forever and St. Johns River Water Management District funds
encompasses approximately 8800 acres in St. Johns County, Florida, located
approximately ten miles south of St. Augustine. The Division of Forestry
proposes to manage portions of the project lying north of Pringle Grade Road
and East of Highway US 1 and South of CR 206 any other portions of the project
that are not selected for management by the Division of Recreation and Parks.
The Division of Forestry would manage these parcels in accordance with, and in
a manner designed to accomplish, the acquisition goals and objectives as
approved by the Land Acquisition Advisory Council. These goals and objectives
are hereby incorporated by reference.
      The primary land management goal for the Division of Forestry is to
restore, maintain and protect in perpetuity all native ecosystems; to
integrate compatible human use; and to insure long-term viability of
populations and species considered rare. This ecosystem approach will guide
the Division of Forestry's management activities on this project.

Qualifications for State Designation
      Major communities represented on this project include upland pine
forest/sandhill, upland mixed forest, dome swamp, mesic flatwoods and strands
of wetlands. The project's size and diversity makes it desirable for use and
management as a state forest. Management by the Division of Forestry as a
state forest is contingent upon the state obtaining legal public access to the
site and acquiring fee simple title to the core parcels.
Conditions Affecting Intensity of Management
      There are many areas of the project that will require considerable
restoration efforts. Until these restoration efforts are completed, the level
of management intensity and related management costs is expected to be
somewhat higher than what would be expected on a typical state forest.
Timetable for Implementing Management
      Once the core area is acquired and assigned to the Division of Forestry,
public access will be provided for non-facilities related, low intensity
outdoor recreation activities. Until specific positions are provided for the
project, public access will be coordinated through the Division of Forestry's
Bunnell District Headquarters and management activities will be conducted
utilizing district personnel. The Division of Forestry will cooperate with
and seek the assistance of other state agencies, local government entities and
interested parties as appropriate.
      Initial or intermediate management efforts will concentrate on site
security, public and fire management access, resource inventory, and removal
of existing trash. Steps will be taken to insure that the public is provided
appropriate access while simultaneously affording protection of sensitive
resources. Vehicular use by the public will be confined to designated roads
and unnecessary access points will be closed. An inventory of the site's
natural resources and threatened and endangered flora and fauna will be
conducted to provide the basis for formulation of a management plan.

      Prior to collection of necessary resource information, management
proposals for this project can only be conceptual in nature. Long-range plans
for this property will generally be directed toward the restoration of
disturbed areas and maintenance of natural communities. Management activities
will also stress enhancement of the abundance and spatial distribution of
threatened and endangered species.
                                                                                Exhibit C

      To the greatest extent practical, disturbed sites will be restored to
conditions that would be expected to occur in naturally functioning
ecosystems. Pine plantations will be thinned to achieve a more natural
appearance. Off-site species will eventually be replaced with species that
would be expected to occur naturally on the site.
      An all season burning program will be established utilizing practices
that incorporate recent research findings. Whenever possible, existing roads,
black lines, foam lines and natural breaks will be utilized to contain and
control prescribed and natural fires.
      Timber management activities will primarily consist of improvement
thinnings and regeneration harvests aimed at maintaining and perpetuating
forest ecosystems. Stands will not have a targeted rotation age but will be
managed to maintain a broad diversity of age classes ranging from young stands
to areas with old growth characteristics. This will provide habitat for the
full spectrum of species that would be found in the natural environment.
      The resource inventory will be used to identify sensitive areas that
need special attention, protection or management, and to locate areas that are
appropriate for any recreational or administrative facilities. Infrastructure
development will primarily be located in already disturbed areas and will be
the absolute minimum required to allow public access for the uses mentioned
above, to provide facilities to accommodate public use, and to administer and
manage the property.
      The Division will promote recreation and environmental education in the
natural environment. It is not anticipated that recreational facilities will
be developed. However, if it is determined that facilities are needed, the
use of low impact, rustic facilities will be stressed. High impact, organized
recreation areas will be discouraged because of possible adverse effects on
the natural environment. Unnecessary roads, firelines and hydrological
disturbances will be abandoned and/or restored to the greatest extent
practical.
Revenue Generating Potential
      As mentioned above, timber sales will be conducted as needed to improve
or maintain desirable ecosystem conditions. These sales will primarily take
place in upland pine stands and will provide a variable source of revenue
dependent upon a variety of factors. Revenue generating potential of this
project is expected to be moderate.
     EXHIBIT D

OPTIMAL MANAGEMENT
   BOUNDARY MAP
Exhibit D
       EXHIBIT E

MANAGEMENT PLAN ADVISORY
    GROUP SUMMARY
                                                                                                                        Exhibit E



                                                Matanzas State Forest (MaSF)
                                             10-Year Resource Management Plan

                                        Management Plan Advisory Group (MPAG)
                                          Public Meeting/Public Hearing Summary
                                             May 14, 2007 (6:30p.m./7:00 p.m.)
                                     @ St. Johns County Cooperative Extension Service,
                                    Wind Mitigation Bldg., 3111 Agricultural Center Drive
                                                St. Augustine, Florida 32092


MPAG Members Present:                                  Affiliation:
Scott Berish                                           Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
Kim Frawley                                            Recreation Interests
Mike Kuypers                                           DOF, Bunnell District Manager
Charlie Lopez                                          Hunting/ Environmental Education Interest
J.B. Miller                                            St. Johns River Water Management District
Cyndi Stevenson                                        St. John County Commission
Craig Hartwig for Pam Livingston-Way                   St. Johns Soil and Water Conservation Commission

Members Absent:
Patrick Hamilton                                       Local Landowner
Roger Van Gent                                         Audubon Society

Others Present:
Cathy Lowenstein                                       DOF, Forest Resource Administrator
Greg Ihle                                              DOF, Forester
Gary Carpenter                                         DOF, Forest Area Supervisor
Chris Kincaid                                          DOF, Recreation
Penny Isom                                             DOF, State Lands Planning Administrator
Katie Lewis                                            DOF, State Lands Planning Coordinator

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

6:40 p.m. Public Meeting:
Penny Isom started by thanking the MPAG members for attending and introduced Katie Lewis. Isom continued the
meeting by giving an overview of the approval process of a Ten-Year Resource Management Plan. Isom went on to
explain the purpose of the public hearing to the MPAG members and others that were present.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

7:10 p.m. Public Hearing:
No one from the public was in attendance. Penny Isom thanked the members for their participation in the THSF 10-
Year Resource Management Plan Advisory Group (MPAG). Isom explained the purpose of MPAG and the approval
process (through the Acquisition and Restoration Council). Mike Kuypers introduced the MaSF Staff and each
MPAG member introduced themselves to the group. Then, Greg Ihle presented a slideshow highlighting the
multiple-use management on MaSF. No one had formal comments related to the 10-Year plan, so the floor was open
up to questions. Below is a summary of questions.

A question was asked about the relocation of gopher tortoises from private lands to state-owned lands. Scott
Berish a representative from the FWC stated that there is not a program setup to relocate gopher tortoises from
private lands onto state-owned lands

A question was asked about the road use on MaSF. Greg Ihle stated that the roads on MaSF are multiple-use
(hiking, biking, etc.) useless they are designated as services roads. When roads are used for logging purposes, it is
the responsibility of the loggers to maintain the roads.
                                                                                                                        Exhibit E




A member asked if people will be allowed to recreate during hunting seasons. Greg Ihle responded that the
public and horseback riders are not excluded from the forest during hunting seasons. He went on to add that all areas
on MaSF, with the exception of the Gonzalez and Soddano Tracts, are open to hunting. Scott Berish of FWC
responded that they will work together will DOF to identify any areas where there maybe a major conflict between
user groups.

The public hearing adjourned at 8:10 p.m.
                                                                                                                              Exhibit E

                                                   Matanzas State Forest (MaSF)
                                                10-Year Resource Management Plan

                                           Management Plan Advisory Group (MPAG)
                                                    Public Meeting Summary
                                                    May 14, 2007 (8:00 p.m.)
                                        @ St. Johns County Cooperative Extension Service,
                                       Wind Mitigation Bldg., 3111 Agricultural Center Drive
                                                   St. Augustine, Florida 32092


MPAG Members Present:                                Affiliation:
Scott Berish                                         Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
Kim Frawley                                          Recreational Interests
Mike Kuypers                                         DOF, Bunnell District Manager
Charlie Lopez                                        Hunting/ Environmental Education Interest
J.B. Miller                                          St. Johns River Water Management District
Cyndi Stevenson                                      St. Johns County Commission
Craig Hartwig for Pam Livingston-Way                 St. Johns Soil and Water Conservation Commission

Members Absent:
Patrick Hamilton                                     Local Landowner
Roger Van Gent                                       Audubon Society

Others Present:
Cathy Lowenstein                                     DOF, Forest Resource Administrator
Greg Ihle                                            DOF, Forester
Gary Carpenter                                       DOF, Forest Area Supervisor
Chris Kincaid                                        DOF, Recreation Coordinator
Penny Isom                                           DOF, State Lands Planning Administrator
Katie Lewis                                          DOF, State Lands Planning Coordinator

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
8:30 Public Meeting:
The MaSF Management Plan Advisory Group (MPAG) public meeting started directly after the public hearing was
adjourned. Since all members were present earlier, thank-yous, introductions, and MaSF MPAG’s function were not
repeated. Below is a general summary of the meeting grouped by topic.

Land Management Plan Executive Summary
The Summary states that there are five known Archaeological/Historical sites found on MaSF, but Section III.B.2 of the plan
has six sites listed on the table.

Future Goals and Objectives (I.C.2)
Goal 1. Objective 2.
FWC’s representative commented that he would like to see ability for the use of dogs to hunt feral hogs on MaSF in order to
decrease their populations.
Goal 3. Objective 5.
Recommend changing “Develop hiking trail” to “Develop multiple-use trail.”

Degree of Title Held by Board (II.A.4)
The Trustees hold “joint fee” title to MaSF with the St. Johns River Water Management District.

Proximity to Other Public Resources (II.A.5)
The Guana State Park is now known as the Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve (GTMNERR).
The Wildlife Management Area is named Guana River Wildlife Management Area. Other nearby significant public lands
need to be added to list also.
                                                                                                                                 Exhibit E


Endangered and Threatened Species (III.B.5)
The gopher tortoise should be listed as threatened and the wood stork should be listed as endangered. The list of observed
species on MaSF in Exhibit I could be expanded upon. J.B. Miller will share his list of observed species on MaSF.

Swamps, Marshes, and Other Wetlands (III.B.7)
A member would prefer that the Intercoastal Waterway be referred to as the Matanzas River throughout the plan.

Unique Natural Features (III.B.9)
A member would like to see language added to this section that recognizes the undisturbed marsh lands on MaSF as
regionally significant.

Recreation Management (IV.A.4.h.)
A member recommended including Equestrian trails sub-section in the Recreational trails sub-section (IV.A.4.b).

Hunting (IV.A.9.c)
The FWC is not sure if the self-clearing check station will remain opened on MaSF. FWC thought it would be good to add a
statement letting readers know that MaSF was the location of the very first family hunt in the state of Florida.

Law Enforcement (IV.A.8)
Member questioned statement that “primary” law enforcement responsibilities will be handled by forestry staff….

Non-Native Invasive Species (IV.A 10)
A member would like to see language added to this section that the DOF may receive assistance in the treatment of exotics
from the SJRWMD through the Invasive Plant Management Program.

Scrubby Flatwoods (IV.B.3)
Member questioned 2 to 4 year fire return interval in the Prescription for Restoration section. Stated he thought it should be
5 to 8 year interval.

Maritime Hammock (IV.B.5)
Member asked if we would want to mention that cultural sites are located in Maritime Hammocks.

Depression Marsh (IV.B.8)
A member commented that loblolly bay (Gordonia lasianthus) should be included in the Existing conditions to occur in the
Depression Marsh.

Non-Native Invasive Plant Control (V.B.Priority 1. #2)
One member mentioned water management district’s invasive plant program and cooperation should be added to this item.

Forestry Tools/Heavy Equipment and Budget Items (V.B.Priority 1. #6)
Member questioned cost of 4x4 ATV ($9,600). State forest was going to check estimated cost with Gary Carpenter.

Proximity to Other Public Property (Exhibit B)
Map should be redone to reflect other public property such as Ft. Matanzas National Monument, GTMNERR, etc. J.B.
Miller will send shape files.


Wildlife Species Observed on Matanzas State Forest (Exhibit I)
J.B. Miller will provide his field notes of observed species on MaSF.


The public meeting adjourned at 9:30 p.m.
                                                                                                                                 Exhibit E

                                                    Matanzas State Forest (MaSF)
                                                 10-Year Resource Management Plan

                                                  Second Public Hearing Summary
                                                      June 7, 2007 (7:00 p.m.)
                                         @ St. Johns County Cooperative Extension Service,
                                        Wind Mitigation Bldg., 3111 Agricultural Center Drive
                                                    St. Augustine, Florida 32092




Attendees:
Bart Swab                                             Interested citizen, hunter
Mike Kuypers                                          DOF, Bunnell District Manager
Cathy Lowenstein                                      DOF, Forest Resource Administrator
Gary Carpenter                                        DOF, Forest Area Supervisor

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Public Hearing:
The public hearing began at 7:00 pm. One individual from the public was in attendance. After Mike Kuypers introduced the
purpose of the meeting, Cathy Lowenstein presented a short slide presentation as an overview of the State Forest and the
Division’s management goals and objectives.

A question/comment period was opened, with general discussion on plans for the Forest.

A comment was made about building permanent buildings or dwellings on MaSF. DOF responded that no building
structures are planned or anticipated, and the only facilities planned include parking areas, trailheads and primitive camping
areas.

The public hearing adjourned at 8:15 p.m.
       EXHIBIT F

LOCAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
   COMPLIANCE LETTER
Exhibit F
     EXHIBIT G

SOIL MAP/ SOIL LEGEND
    DESCRIPTIONS
Exhibit G
                                                                                               EXHIBIT G

SOIL TYPE DESCRIPTIONS

#2 Astatula fine sand, 0 to 8 percent slopes. This is nearly level to sloping soil, excessively drained
soil type that is found on knolls and narrow to broad ridges. The high water table is at a depth of more
than 72 inches. Permeability is very rapid. Organic matter content and natural fertility are low. The
natural vegetation includes mostly live oak (Quercus virginiana), bay (Magnolia virginiana), magnolia
(Magnolia grandiflora), cabbage palm (Sabal palmetto), hickory, and sand pine (Pinus clausa). The
understory includes paspalum (Paspalum notatum) and wiregrass (Aristida stricta).

#3 Myakka find sand. This is a nearly level, poorly drained, soil type that occurs in the flatwoods. The
high water table is at a depth of less than 10 inches for 1 to 4 months of the year. Permeability is rapid.
Organic matter content and natural fertility are low. The natural vegetation includes longleaf pine
(Pinus palustris), slash pine (Pinus elliottii), oak, and wax myrtle. The understory includes: bottlebrush
threeawn (Aristida spiciformis Ell.), wiregrass, chalky bluestem (Andropogon capillipes), and lopsided
indiangrass (Sorghastrum secundum Ell.)

#4 Myakka find sand, depressional. This is a nearly level, very poorly drained sandy soil type that is
found in shallow depressions within the flatwoods. The ground is covered with everywhere from 4
inches to 2 feet of standing water for 6 to 9 months during most years. Permeability is rapid. Natural
fertility organic matter content and are low. The natural vegetation includes mostly pond pine, tupelo
gum (Nyssa spp.), waxmyrtle (Myrica cerifera), and broomsedge bluestem (Andropogon virginicus).

#5 St. Johns fine sand, depressional. This is a nearly level very poorly drained soil type found in
depressions. The ground is covered with standing water for periods of 6 to 12 months a year.
Permeability is rapid in the surface layer. The organic matter content is moderate and natural fertility is
low. The natural vegetation includes mostly sweetgum, red maple, pond cypress (Taxodium ascendens),
hickory (Carya), and a few pond and longleaf pine. The understory includes brackenfern (Pteridium
aquilinum (L.), cinnamon fern (Osmunda cinnamomea), and St. John’s wort (Hypericum spp.).

#6 Tavares fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes. This is a nearly level to gently sloping, moderately well
drained soil type that is found on narrow to low ridges and knolls. Tavares soil high water table is
between 40 to 80 inches for 6 to 8 months of the year. Permeability is very rapid. Natural fertility is
low. The natural vegetation includes longleaf and slash pines, and mixed hardwoods-live oak, laurel oak
(Quercus laurifolia), and turkey oak (Quercus laevis). The understory includes native grasses wiregrass,
grassleaf goldenaster (Pityopsis oligantha), and low panicum (Panicum spp.)

#7 Immokalee fine sand. Nearly level, poorly drained soil is found on broad flats and knolls in the
flatwoods. Immokalee soil has a high water table of less than 10 inches for 2 months of the year.
Permeability of the surface layer is rapid. The natural fertility and organic matter content is low.
Natural vegetation in this soil type includes longleaf and slash pine, fetterbush (Lyonia lucida), inkberry
(Ilex glabra), and scrub oaks (Quercus geminata). The understory includes chalky bluestem, creeping
bluestem (Schizachyrium stoloniferum), and wiregrass.

#8 Zolfo fine sand. This nearly level somewhat poorly drained soil type is found on areas higher than
the adjacent flatwoods. Zolfo soil has a seasonal high water table at a depth of 24 to 40 inches for 2 to 9
months of the year. Permeability is rapid. Organic matter content and natural fertility are low. The
natural vegetation includes mostly slash pine, longleaf pine, and mixed hardwoods. The understory
includes greenbrier (Smilax L.) and dwarf huckleberry (Gaylussacia dumosa).
                                                                                                EXHIBIT G



#9 Pomona fine sand. This nearly level, poorly drained soil type is found in broad areas within the
flatwoods. The Pomona soil water table is within a depth of 10 inches for 1 to 3 months and is at a
depth of 10 to 40 inches for 6 months or more. Permeability is rapid. Organic matter content and
natural fertility are low. The natural vegetation includes mainly slash pine, longleaf pine, gallberry (Ilex
coriacea), and saw palmetto (Serenoa repens). The understory includes chalky bluestem, bushy
bluestem (Andropogon glomeratus), and creeping bluestem.

#11 Smyrna fine sand. This nearly level, poorly drained sandy soil is found in flatwoods. The Smyrna
soil water table is at a depth of less than 10 inches for 1 to 4 months and recedes to a depth of 10 to 40
inches for 6 months or more. Permeability is rapid. Organic matter content and natural fertility are low.
The natural vegetation includes mainly slash pine, longleaf pine, wax myrtle, and saw palmetto. The
understory includes wiregrass, dwarf huckleberry, and panicum.

# 12 Ona fine sand. This nearly level, poorly drained soil type is found in broad areas within the
flatwoods. The Ona soil water table is at a depth of less than 10 inches for 1 to 4 months and recedes to
a depth of 10 to 40 inches for 6 months or more. Permeability is rapid. Organic matter content and
natural fertility are moderate. The natural vegetation includes mainly slash pine, longleaf pine, wax
myrtle, and saw palmetto. The understory includes wiregrass, dwarf huckleberry, and panicum.

# 13 St. Johns fine sand. This nearly level, poorly drained soil type is found in broad flatwoods and
landscapes adjacent to drainageways. The St. Johns soil water table is at a depth of 0 to 15 inches for 2
to 6 months and at 15 to 30 inches during periods of low rainfall. Permeability is rapid. Organic matter
content is moderate and natural fertility is low. The natural vegetation includes mainly slash pine,
longleaf pine, waxmyrtle, and saw palmetto. The understory includes wiregrass, chalky bluestem, and
cinnamon fern.

# 14 Cassia fine sand. This nearly level, poorly drained soil type is found on low ridges that are
slightly higher than the adjacent flatwoods. The Cassia soil water table is at a depth of 15 to 40 inches
for about 6 months under natural conditions. Permeability is rapid. The natural vegetation includes
mainly slash pine, sand live oak, and sand pine (Pinus clausa). Cinnamon fern, low panicum, and
broomsedge bluestem are the native grasses.

# 15 Pomello fine sands, 0 to 5 percent slope. This nearly level to gently sloping, moderately well
drained soil type is found on long, broad to narrow, slightly higher ridges and knolls in the flatwoods.
The Pomello soil water table is at a depth of 24 to 40 inches for 1 to 4 months during the normal wet
season. The natural fertility and organic matter content are low. Permeability is rapid. The natural
vegetation includes mainly scrub and dwarf live oak (Quercus minima), slash pine, and sand pine.
Wiregrass is the native grass.

# 16 Orsino fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slope. This nearly level to gently sloping, moderately well
drained soil type is found on low ridges and knolls in the flatwoods. The Orsino soil water table is at a
depth of 40 to 60 inches for more than 6 months during most years. The natural fertility is low and
organic matter content is moderately low. Permeability is rapid. The natural vegetation includes mainly
southern magnolia, hickory, sand live oak, and sand pine. Wiregrass and panicum are the native grasses.

# 18 Floridana fine sand, frequently flooded. This nearly level, poorly drained soil type is found on
flood plains and in broad, shallow drainageways. Floridana soil is subject to flooding for 1 to 3 months
during the rainy season. The natural fertility is medium and organic matter content is low. Permeability
is rapid. The natural vegetation includes mainly water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica), red maple (Acer
rubrum), sweetgum, and cypress. Sawgrass and cinnamon fern are the native grasses.
                                                                                                EXHIBIT G



# 21 Wabasso fine sand. This nearly level, poorly drained soil type is found on broad landscapes in the
flatwoods. The Wabasso soil water table is at a depth of 10 to 40 inches for more than 6 months during
most years. The natural fertility and organic matter content are low. Permeability is rapid. The natural
vegetation includes mainly longleaf and slash pines, cabbage palms and live oaks. Wiregrass, wax
myrtle, and saw palmetto are the native grasses.

#22 Manatee fine sandy loam, frequently flooded. This nearly level, very poorly drained soil type is
found on flood plains and poorly defined drainageways. The Manatee soil water table is within 10
inches of the surface 2 to 4 months in most years. The natural fertility is high and organic matter
content is very high to moderate. Permeability is rapid. The natural vegetation includes mainly
sweetgum, cabbage palms, Blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica), and cypress. Cinnamon fern and wild grape
(Vitis rotundifolia) are the native grasses.

#23 Paola fine sand, 0 to 8 percent slope. This nearly level to sloping excessively drained soil type is
found on narrow to broad ridges and on hillsides of adjoining marshes and drainageways. The Paola soil
water table under normal conditions is at a depth of more than 72 inches. The natural fertility and
organic matter content are low. Permeability is rapid. The natural vegetation includes mainly live oak,
laurel oak, sand live oak, and sand pine. Panicum and scattered bluestem are the native grasses.

#24 Pellicer silty clay loam, frequently flooded. This nearly level, very poorly drained soil type is
found in low tidal marshes along stream estuaries. The Pellicer soil is flooded twice daily by normal
high tides. The natural fertility is limited by excess salt and organic matter content is very high.
Permeability is slow. The natural vegetation includes mainly seashore saltgrass (Distichlis spicata),
bushy sea-oxeye (Borrichia flutescens), glasswort (Salicornia virginica), and needlegrass rush (Juncus
roemerianus).

#25 Parkwood fine sandy loam, frequently flooded. A nearly level, poorly drained soil type found on
flood plains and in poorly defined drainageways. Parkwood soil is flooded 1 to 3 months during the
rainy season. The water table is within 10 inches of the surface 2 to 4 months during most years. The
natural fertility is high and the organic matter content is very high. Permeability is rapid. The natural
vegetation includes mainly sweetgum, blackgum, cabbage palm, and cypress. Cinnamon fern is the
native grass.

#26 Samsula muck. This poorly drained soil type is found in narrow to broad swamps and depressional
areas in the flatwoods. The Samsula muck soil water table is at or above the surface, except during
extended dry periods. The natural fertility and organic matter content are high. Permeability is rapid.
The natural vegetation includes mainly blackgum, cypress, loblolly bay (Gordonia lasianthus), wax
myrtle, greenbrier, and cinnamon fern.

# 29 Satellite fine sand. This nearly level, somewhat poorly drained soil type can be found on knolls
adjacent to drainageways and on slight ridges in the flatwoods. The Satellite soil water table is at a
depth of 10 to 40 inches for 2 to 6 months in most years. The natural fertility and organic matter content
are very low. Permeability is rapid. The natural vegetation includes mainly sand live oak, water oak
(Quercus nigra), and saw palmetto.

#30 Wesconnett fine sand, frequently flooded. This nearly level, very poorly drained soil found in
narrow to broad, weakly defined drainageways in the flatwoods. The Wesconnett soil water table is at a
depth less than 10 inches for 6 to 12 months during most years. The natural fertility is low and organic
matter content is moderate. Permeability is rapid.
                                                                                                EXHIBIT G


The natural vegetation includes mainly cypress, pond pine (Pinus serotina), loblolly bay, sweetgum and
red maple. Maidencane, cinnamon fern, and chalky bluestem are the native grasses.

#36 Riviera fine sand, frequently flooded. This nearly level, poorly drained soil is found in poorly
defined drainageways and on flood plains. This Riviera soil water table is within 10 inches of the
surface for 2 to 4 months in most years. The natural fertility and organic matter content are low.
Permeability is rapid. The natural vegetation includes a few slash pines, cabbage palms, sweetgum, and
water oaks. Wiregrass is the native grass.

#40 Pottsburg fine sand. This nearly level, poorly drained soil found in the flatwoods. The Pottsburg
soil water table is at a depth of less than 10 inches for 2 to 4 months during the normal wet season. The
natural fertility is medium and the organic matter content is very high. Permeability is rapid. The
natural vegetation includes mainly longleaf and slash pine, and saw palmetto. Wiregrass, creeping
bluestem, and chalky bluestem are the native grasses.

#41 Tomoka muck. This is a very poorly drained soil in weakly defined drainageways and
depressional areas. This Tomoka soil water table is at or above the surface, except during extended dry
periods. The natural fertility and organic matter content are low. Permeability is rapid. The natural
vegetation includes mainly scrub and dwarf live oak, slash pine and sand pine. Wiregrass is the native
grass.

#46 Holopaw fine sand. This nearly level, poorly drained soil found in low, broad areas in the
flatwoods. The Holopaw soil water table is at a depth of less than 10 inches for 1 to 3 months, but may
recede to a depth of 10 to 40 inches for 3 to 4 months in most years. The natural fertility and organic
matter content are low. Permeability is rapid. The natural vegetation includes mainly slash pines,
sweetgum, water oak, and wax myrtle. Cinnamon fern, lopsided indiangrass, and bluestem are the
native grasses.

#47 Holopaw fine sand, frequently flooded. This nearly level, very poorly drained sandy soil type that
is found in broad, shallow drainageways. The Holopaw soil water table is flooded for more than 1
month during most years. The natural fertility and organic matter content are low. Permeability is
rapid. The natural vegetation includes mainly slash and pond pines, cypress, loblolly bay, and
sweetgum. Cinnamon fern is the native grass.

#49 Moultrie fine sand, frequently flooded. This nearly level, very poorly drained soil type is found
in tidal marsh areas. The Moultrie soil water table is at a depth of less than 10 inches due to the tidal
fluctuation. The natural fertility and organic matter content are low. Permeability is rapid. The natural
vegetation includes mainly seashore saltgrass, bushy sea-oxeye, glasswort, and red maple.

#58 Eaugallie fine sand. This nearly level, poorly drained soil type is found on low knolls and ridges,
adjacent to depressions and drainageways in the flatwoods. The Eaugallie soil water table is within 10
inches of the surface for a period of 1 to 4 months and within 40 inches for more than 6 months. The
natural fertility and organic matter content are low. Permeability is rapid. The natural vegetation
includes mainly slash pine, cabbage palm, and southern bayberry (Morella caroliniensis). Wiregrass
and greenbrier are the native grasses.

#61 Riviera fine sand, depressional. This nearly level, very poorly drained soil type is found in
depressional areas and in the flatwoods. The Riviera soil water is subject to ponding for long periods of
time. The natural fertility and organic matter content are low. Permeability is rapid. The natural
vegetation includes mainly maidencane (Panicum hemitomon), cypress, and sawgrass.
                                                                                                Exhibit G



#63 Placid fine sand. This nearly level, very poorly drained soil type is found on broad, flat low lying
areas. The Placid soil water table is seasonally high within depth of 10 inches for more than 6 months in
most years. The natural fertility is low and organic matter content is moderate to high. Permeability is
rapid. The natural vegetation includes mainly slash and longleaf pines, cypress, and sweetgum.
Cinnamon fern, wiregrass are native grasses.

#64 Ellzey fine sand. This nearly level, poorly drained soil that formed in thick sandy sediments of
marine origin. The Ellzey soil water table is at a depth less than 10 inches for 2 to 4 months during most
years. The natural fertility and organic matter content are low. Permeability is rapid. The natural
vegetation includes mainly slash pines, saw palmetto, cypress, and sweetgum. Wiregrass and lopsided
indiangrass are some of the native grasses.
          EXHIBIT H

 MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES FOR
ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL
 SITES AND PROPERTIES ON STATE-
  OWNED OR CONTROLLED LANDS
                                                                                                           Exhibit H


   Management Procedures for Archaeological and Historical Sites and Properties on State-Owned or
                                      Controlled Properties
                                     (revised February 2007)

These procedures apply to state agencies, local governments, and non-profits that manage state-owned
properties.

A. General Discussion

Historic resources are both archaeological sites and historic structures. Per Chapter 267, Florida Statutes,
‘Historic property’ or ‘historic resource’ means any prehistoric district, site, building, object, or other real or
personal property of historical, architectural, or archaeological value, and folklife resources. These properties
or resources may include, but are not limited to, monuments, memorials, Indian habitations, ceremonial sites,
abandoned settlements, sunken or abandoned ships, engineering works, treasure trove, artifacts, or other
objects with intrinsic historical or archaeological value, or any part thereof, relating to the history,
government, and culture of the state.”

B. Agency Responsibilities

Per State Policy relative to historic properties, state agencies of the executive branch must allow the Division of
Historical Resources (Division) the opportunity to comment on any undertakings, whether these undertakings
directly involve the state agency, i.e., land management responsibilities, or the state agency has indirect
jurisdiction, i.e. permitting authority, grants, etc. No state funds should be expended on the undertaking until
the Division has the opportunity to review and comment on the project, permit, grant, etc.

State agencies shall preserve the historic resources which are owned or controlled by the agency.

Regarding proposed demolition or substantial alterations of historic properties, consultation with the Division
must occur, and alternatives to demolition must be considered.

State agencies must consult with Division to establish a program to location, inventory and evaluate all historic
properties under ownership or controlled by the agency.

C. Statutory Authority

Statutory Authority and more in depth information can be found in the following:

Chapter 253, F.S. – State Lands

Chapter 267, F.S. – Historical Resources

Chapter 872, F.S. – Offenses Concerning Dead Bodies and Graves

Other helpful citations and references:

Chapter 1A-32, F.A.C. – Archaeological Research

Chapter 1A-44, F.A.C. – Procedures for Reporting and Determining Jurisdiction Over Unmarked Human
Burials

Chapter 1A-46, F.A C. – Archaeological and Historical Report Standards and Guidelines
                                                                                                             Exhibit H


The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic
Buildings

D. Management Implementation

Even though the Division sits on the Acquisition and Restoration Council and approves land
management plans, these plans are conceptual. Specific information regarding individual projects must
be submitted to the Division for review and recommendations.

Managers of state lands must coordinate any land clearing or ground disturbing activities with the Division to
allow for review and comment on the proposed project. Recommendations may include, but are not limited to:
approval of the project as submitted, pre-testing of the project site by a certified archaeological monitor, cultural
resource assessment survey by a qualified professional archaeologist, modifications to the proposed project to
avoid or mitigate potential adverse effects.

Projects such as additions, exterior alteration, or related new construction regarding historic structures must also
be submitted to the Division of Historical Resources for review and comment by the Division’s architects.
Projects involving structures fifty years of age or older, must be submitted to this agency for a significance
determination. In rare cases, structures under fifty years of age may be deemed historically significant. These
must be evaluated on a case by case basis.

Adverse impacts to significant sites, either archaeological sites or historic buildings, must be avoided.
Furthermore, managers of state property should make preparations for locating and evaluating historic
resources, both archaeological sites and historic structures.

E. Minimum Review Documentation Requirements

In order to have a proposed project reviewed by the Division, the following information, at a minimum, must be
submitted for comments and recommendations.

Project Description – A detailed description of the proposed project including all related activities. For land
clearing or ground disturbing activities, the depth and extent of the disturbance, use of heavy equipment,
location of lay down yard, etc. For historic structures, specific details regarding rehabilitation, demolition, etc.

Project Location – The exact location of the project indicated on a USGS Quadrangle map, is preferable. A
management base map may be acceptable. Aerial photos indicating the exact project area as supplemental
information are helpful.

Photographs – Photographs of the project area are always useful. Photographs of structures are required.

Description of Project Area – Note the acreage of the project, describe the present condition of project area, and
any past land uses or disturbances.

Description of Structures – Describe the condition and setting of each building within project area if
approximately fifty years of age or older.

Recorded Archaeological Sites or Historic Structures – Provide Florida Master Site File numbers for all
recorded historic resources within or adjacent to the project area. This information should be in the current
management plan; however, it can be obtained by contacting the Florida Master Site File at (850) 245-6440 or
Suncom 205-6440.
                                                                                                           Exhibit H


                                                    *   *    *

Questions relating to the treatment of archaeological and historic resources on state lands should be directed to:

Susan M. Harp
Historic Preservation Planner
Division of Historical Resources
Bureau of Historic Preservation
Compliance and Review Section
R. A. Gray Building
500 South Bronough Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0250

Phone:         (850) 245-6333
Suncom:        205-6333
Fax:           (850) 245-6438
     EXHIBIT I

WILDLIFE SPECIES LIST
                                                                                      Exhibit I




            Wildlife Species Observed on Matanzas State Forest
                                    Compiled By: J.B. Miller


FISH
   Yellow bullhead                            Ameiurus natalis
   Spotted seatrout                           Cynoscion nebulosus
   Mosquito fish                              Gambusia holbrooki
   Bluegill                                   Lepomis macrochirus
   Striped mullet                             Mugil cephalus
   Southern flounder                          Paralichthys lethostigma
   Sailfin molly                              Poecilia latipinna
   Black drum                                 Pogonias cromis
   Red drum                                   Sciaenops ocellatus

AMPHIBIANS
  Southern cricket frog                       Acris gryllus gryllus
  Southern toad                               Bufo terrestris
  Green treefrog                              Hyla cinerea
  Pinewoods treefrog                          Hyla femoralis
  Squirrel treefrog                           Hyla squirella
  Little grass frog                           Pseudacris ocularis
  Pig frog                                    Rana grylio
  Southern leopard frog                       Rana utricularia

REPTILES
  Florida box turtle                          Terrapene carolina bauri
  Gopher tortoise                             Gopherus polyphemus
  American alligator                          Alligator mississippiensis
  Peninsula cooter                            Pseudemys floridana peninsularis
  Green anole                                 Anolis carolinensis
  Brown anole                                 Anolis sagrei
  Six-lined racerunner                        Cnemidophorus sexlineatus sexlineatus
  Five-lined skink                            Eumeces fasciatus
  Ground skink                                Scincella lateralis
  Cottonmouth                                 Agkistrodon piscivorus
  Black racer                                 Coluber constrictor
  Eastern diamondback rattlesnake             Crotalus adamanteus
  Corn snake                                  Elaphe guttata
  Yellow rat snake                            Elaphe obsoleta quadrivittata
  Florida banded water snake                  Nerodia fasciata
  Dusky pigmy rattlesnake                     Sistrurus miliarius barbouri
                                                          Exhibit I


BIRDS
   Anhinga                     Anhinga anhinga
   Great blue heron            Ardea herodias
   Great egret                 Ardea alba
   Snowy egret                 Egretta thula
   Little blue heron           Egretta caerulea
   Tri-colored heron           Egretta tricolor
   Green heron                 Butorides virescens
   Black-crowned night-heron   Nycticorax nycticorax
   White ibis                  Eudocimus albus
   Wood stork                  Mycteria americana
   Black vulture               Coragyps atratus
   Turkey vulture              Cathartes aura
   Wood duck                   Aix sponsa
   Osprey                      Pandion haliaetus
   Swallow-tailed kite         Elanoides forficatus
   Bald Eagle                  Haliaeetus leucocephalus
   Northern harrier            Circus cyaneus
   Sharp-shinned hawk          Accipiter striatus
   Red-shouldered hawk         Buteo lineatus
   Red-tailed hawk             Buteo jamaicensis
   American kestrel            Falco sparverius
   Merlin                      Falco columbarius
   Wild turkey                 Meleagris gallopavo
   Northern bobwhite           Colinus virginianus
   Clapper rail                Rallus longirostris
   Mourning dove               Zenaida macroura
   Common ground-dove          Columbina passerina
   Barred owl                  Strix varia
   Common nighthawk            Chordeiles minor
   Chimney swift               Chaetura pelagica
   Belted kingfisher           Ceryle alcyon
   Red-bellied woodpecker      Melanerpes carolinus
   Yellow-bellied sapsucker    Sphyrapicus varius
   Downy woodpecker            Picoides pubescens
   Northern flicker            Colaptes auratus
   Pileated woodpecker         Dryocopus pileatus
   Eastern phoebe              Sayornis phoebe
   Great crested flycatcher    Myiarchus crinitus
   Tree swallow                Tachycineta bicolor
   Barn swallow                Hirundo rustica
   Blue jay                    Cyanocitta cristata
   American crow               Corvus brachyrhynchos
   Fish crow                   Corvus ossifragus
   Carolina chickadee          Parus carolinensis
   Tufted titmouse             Parus bicolor
   Carolina wren               Thryothorus ludovicianus
                                                                 Exhibit I

BIRDS CON’T
   Ruby-crowned kinglet       Regulus calendula
   Blue-gray gnatcatcher      Polioptila caerulea
   American robin             Turdus migratorius
   Gray catbird               Dumetella carolinensis
   Northern mockingbird       Mimus polyglottos
   Brown thrasher             Toxostoma rufum
   Cedar waxwing              Bombycilla cedrorum
   White-eyed vireo           Vireo griseus
   Yellow-throated vireo      Vireo flavifrons
   Red-eyed vireo             Vireo olivaceus
   Northern parula            Parula americana
   Yellow-throated warbler    Dendroica dominica
   Pine warbler               Dendroica pinus
   Prairie warbler            Dendroica discolor
   Palm warbler               Dendroica palmarum
   American redstart          Setophaga ruticilla
   Ovenbird                   Seiurus aurocapillus
   Common yellow-throat       Geothlypis trichas
   Summer tanager             Piranga rubra
   Northern cardinal          Cardinalis cardinalis
   Indigo bunting             Passerina cyanea
   Painted bunting            Passerina ciris
   Eastern towhee             Pipilo erythrophthalmus
   Savannah sparrow           Passerculus sandwichensis
   Seaside sparrow            Ammodramus maritima
   Red-winged blackbird       Agelaius phoeniceus
   Common grackle             Quiscalus quiscula
   Brown-headed cowbird       Molothrus ater

MAMMALS
  Nine-banded armadillo       Dasypus novemcinctus
  Gray squirrel               Sciurus carolinensis
  Cotton mouse                Peromyscus gossypinus gossypinus
  Hispid cotton rat           Sigmodon hispidus
  Gray fox                    Urocyon cinereoargenteus
  Florida black bear          Ursus americanus floridanus
  Raccoon                     Procyon lotor
  River otter                 Lutra canadensis
  Opossum                     Didelphis marsupialis
  Eastern cottontail rabbit   Sylvilagus floridanus
  Fox squirrel                Sciurus niger
  Bobcat                      Felis rufus
  Wild pig                    Sus scrofa
  White-tailed deer           Odocoileus virginianus

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:11
posted:11/29/2011
language:English
pages:33