EE105 Microelectronic Devices and Circuits by Tcnxcjv3

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 20

									              EE105
Microelectronic Devices and Circuits
  http://www-inst.eecs.berkeley.edu/~ee105

           Prof. Sayeef Salahuddin
         sayeef@eecs.berkeley.edu
            515 Sutardja Dai Hall
                       Teaching Staff
                        Sayeef Salahuddin

              •Professor@ Berkeley since Fall 2008
              •Courses: EE 230, EE105
              •Office Hours: 1-2P, Tuesday and
                     Wednesday @ 515 Sutardja Dai Hall
                     Other times through appointment



Research: quantum
transport in nano scale
devices


EE105 Fall 2011            Course Overview, Slide 2   Instructor: Salahuddin
                  Teaching Assistants
                                   Amit lakahni




DISCUSSION TA:



                  Will Biederman


                                                       Wilson Ko
LAB TAs:


EE105 Fall 2011             Course Overview, Slide 3               Instructor: Salahuddin
                               Schedule
                    Mon             Tues              Wed          Thurs              Fri

       9.00       Discussion        Lab               Lab
                      6              6                 8


      10.00



      11.00



      12.00          Lab
                     23


       1.00                    SS Office Hours   SS Office Hours



       2.00                                        Discussion
                                                       22


       3.00

                                  Lecture                          Lecture

       4.00                                        Discussion
                                                       9


       5.00




EE105 Fall 2011                  Course Overview, Slide 4                    Instructor: Salahuddin
           What is this class all about?
Semiconductor devices & basic integrated circuits
• What will you learn?
    – How semiconductor devices work
    – Voltage amplifier circuits
          • analysis and design
          • applications
    – Digital CMOS circuit fundamentals


(Refer to course syllabus for detailed list of topics)
EE105 Fall 2011             Course Overview, Slide 5   Instructor: Salahuddin
              Relation to Other Courses
• Prerequisite:
      – EE40: KVL and KCL, Thevenin and Norton equivalent
        circuits, impedance, frequency response (Bode plots),
        semiconductor basics, simple pn-junction diode and
        MOSFET theory and circuit applications, large-signal vs.
        small-signal response, analog vs. digital signals.


• Relation to other courses:
      – EE105 is a prerequisite for EE113 (Power Electronics) and
        EE140 (Linear Integrated Circuits).
      – EE105 is also helpful (but not required) for EE141
        (Introduction to Digital Integrated Circuits).
EE105 Fall 2011            Course Overview, Slide 6     Instructor: Salahuddin
                  Class Materials
   • Textbook:
      Fundamentals of Microelectronics (1st Edition)
      by Behzad Razavi, Wiley Press, January 2008
   • Lecture notes will be posted on the bspace
   • Lab assignments (and tutorials) will be posted
     online at the bspace
   • Use bspace for all information: inst website may
     not be updated
   • This class is available through podcast
EE105 Fall 2011       Course Overview, Slide 7   Instructor: Salahuddin
                  Discussion Sections
• Students are encouraged to regularly attend a
  discussion section.
• The TAs will review key concepts covered in the
  lectures, and work through sample problems.




EE105 Fall 2011        Course Overview, Slide 8   Instructor: Salahuddin
                  Laboratory Sections
• Lab sections will begin Wednesday 9/6.
   – 353 Cory (no food or drinks!)
• Students must regularly attend a lab section.
• Lab experiments will be done in pairs. Each person
  should turn in his/her individual assignments.
• Each pre-lab assignment is due at the beginning of
  the corresponding lab session. Post-lab assignments
  are due at the beginning of the following lab session.
        Pick up a computer account form today.
  (You will need to use it for the Prelab 1 assignment!)
EE105 Fall 2011        Course Overview, Slide 9   Instructor: Salahuddin
                                  Grading
 – Homework                                                   Letter grades will be
     • due Tuesdays (beginning of class)              15%     assigned based
     • late homeworks not accepted                            approximately on the
                                                              following scale:
 – Laboratory assignments
     • due at beginning of lab session                15%             A+: 98-100
                                                                      A: 88-98
                                                                      A-: 86-88
 – 2 midterm exams (in class)                                         B+: 84-86
     • closed book                                                    B: 74-84
                                                      30%             B-: 72-74
                                                                      C+: 70-72
 – Final exam*
                                                                      C: 60-70
     • Fri 12/16/2010 from 7-10pm                                     C-: 58-60
     • closed book                                                    D: 50-60
     bring calculator                                 40%             F:   <50


EE105 Fall 2011                   Course Overview, Slide 10            Instructor: Salahuddin
  Top 5 Ways to Avoid an “A” Grade
1. Skip live lectures
2. Don’t put adequate effort into HW assignments
     –      Do it at the last minute
     –      Rely too much on collaboration

3. Don’t attend discussion sections
4. Don’t turn in the Lab reports
5. Don’t review HW solutions, old/sample exams and
   solutions


EE105 Fall 2011             Course Overview, Slide 11   Instructor: Salahuddin
                     Miscellaneous
• Special accommodations:
      – Students may request accommodation of religious creed,
        disabilities, and other special circumstances. Please make an
        appointment to discuss your request, in advance.
• Academic (dis)honesty
      – Departmental policy will be strictly followed
         • Cheating on an exam will result in an “F” course grade.
      – Collaboration (not cheating!) is encouraged
         • Homework should be done individually.
• Classroom etiquette:
      – Arrive in class on time!
      – Bring your own copy of the lecture notes.
EE105 Fall 2011            Course Overview, Slide 12    Instructor: Salahuddin
                                  Schedule
                    Mon             Tues               Wed          Thurs            Fri

     9.00         Discussion        Lab                Lab
                      6              6                  8


    10.00



    11.00



    12.00            Lab
                     23


     1.00                      SS Office Hours    SS Office Hours



     2.00                                           Discussion
                                                        22


     3.00

                                  Lecture                           Lecture

     4.00                                           Discussion
                                                        9


     5.00




EE105 Fall 2011                     Course Overview, Slide 13                 Instructor: Salahuddin
Introduction
              Early History of IC Devices
                                                                  ENIAC-The first
                                                             Lee De Forest, 1906 digital computer


 1940’s: Vacuum-tube era
       –   Vacuum tubes were used for radios,
          television, telephone equipment,
          and computers
       … but they were expensive, bulky,
         fragile, and energy-hungry
 Invention of the point-contact transistor
           ▪ Walter Brattain, John Bardeen,
             and William Shockley, Bell Labs, 1947
            Nobel Prize in Physics 1956
     – reproducibility was an issue, however
 Invention of the bipolar junction transistor (BJT)
           ▪ William Shockley, Bell Labs, 1950
     – more stable and reliable; easier and cheaper to make
 EE105 Fall 2011                 Course Overview, Slide 15                     Instructor: Salahuddin
             Discrete Electronic Circuits
• In 1954, Texas Instruments produced the first commercial
  silicon transistor.

                                                    ~$2.50 each

• Before the invention of the integrated circuit, electronic
  equipment was composed of discrete components such as
  transistors, resistors, and capacitors. These components,
  often simply called “discretes”, were manufactured separately
  and were wired or soldered together onto circuit boards.
  Discretes took up a lot of room and were expensive and
  cumbersome to assemble, so engineers began, in the mid-
  1950s, to search for a simpler approach…
EE105 Fall 2011         Course Overview, Slide 16             Instructor: Salahuddin
              The Integrated Circuit (IC)
 • An IC consists of interconnected electronic components in a
   single piece (“chip”) of semiconductor material.
     – In 1958, Jack S. Kilby (Texas          – In 1959, Robert Noyce
       Instruments) showed that it              (Fairchild Semiconductor)
       was possible to fabricate a              demonstrated an IC made in
       simple IC in germanium.                  silicon using SiO2 as the
                                                insulator and Al for the
                                                metallic interconnects.




                                                 The first planar IC
                                                 (actual size: ~1.5mm diameter)

EE105 Fall 2011              Course Overview, Slide 17             Instructor: Salahuddin
From a Few, to Billions of Components
 • By connecting a large number of components, each performing
   simple operations, an IC that performs complex tasks can be built.
 • The degree of integration has increased at an exponential pace
   over the past ~40 years.
     – The number of devices on a chip doubles
       every ~2 years, for the same price.                           Intel Penryn® Processor

                    “Moore’s Law” still holds today.




                                                                         300mm Si wafer




  EE105 Fall 2011                        Course Overview, Slide 18    Instructor: Salahuddin
                  The Silicon Revolution
• Steady progress in integrated-circuit technology over 40+ years
  has had dramatic impact on the way people live, work, and play.
• The semiconductor industry is approaching $300B/yr in sales:



          Military
            2%                                            Communications
                       Computers
                                                              24%
                         42%




          Industrial       Transportation              Consumer Electronics
             8%                 8%                           16%
EE105 Fall 2011            Course Overview, Slide 19             Instructor: Salahuddin
       EECS 105 in the Grand Scheme
• Example electronic system: cell phone




EE105 Fall 2011     Course Overview, Slide 20   Instructor: Salahuddin

								
To top