Terms: by D27ozeBC

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									Creating Windows 2000/XP Images That Will
  Install on Multiple Hardware Platforms
                                     Richard L. Benke
                                   Information Services
                       Virginia Information Technologies Agency at
                          Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center
                            Richard.Benke@wwrc.virginia.gov

Since posting information somewhere on an Internet forum (I don‟t even remember
where now) about how I create images, I‟ve received numerous inquiries from other
computer professionals who want advice on building a single image that will install on
multiple hardware platforms. Most of the questions people have asked, and most of the
issues they‟ve run into, are things that I ran into myself and had to work out. Because I
seemed to be offering the same information to multiple people, I decided to try to
document it. As you‟ll see, it‟s really not that difficult. But the few things that are
required are absolutely required.

I make no pretense of being the “Image Master” – I‟m sure other people have found
better ways to do some of these things than I have, and I hope they‟re willing to share
their knowledge just as I‟m willing to share mine. My e-mail address is provided above –
please feel free to contact me if you have something useful to offer.

My entire image creation process on the Master Computer is automated from beginning
to end, as is the image installation process on the Target Computers. Windows, all of the
apps, all of the updates, all of the user settings, all of the driver installations, are scripted
and require no human participation. If you‟re interested in scripting any step of image
creation or image installation and want to see my scripts, let me know (I wrote most of
them myself, but many of them came from other people or web sites – I‟ll credit them
where I can, but I‟ve long since lost track of where many of them came from).

Terms:

Master Computer – The computer you‟re using to create your image.
Target Computer – Any computer to which you‟re deploying your image.
Sysprep – Microsoft‟s System Preparation Tool. Sysprep is available free from
Microsoft‟s web site and is an essential tool for deploying images.
Mini-Setup – A Windows setup wizard initiated by Sysprep when an image is booted on
a target computer. Many of the setup options can be pre-specified in the Sysprep.inf file.
The Master Computer:
  1) Make sure ACPI is enabled in BIOS before you install Windows.

     I‟ve received dozens of requests for help with troubleshooting image creation and
     installation. Based on those requests, this is by far the most common mistake that
     people make.

     If you create an image on an ACPI-capable Master Computer that has ACPI
     turned off in BIOS and then deploy it to an ACPI-capable Target Computer that
     has ACPI turned on in BIOS (or the other way around), then the image won‟t boot
     on the target computer. What‟s more, changing the ACPI setting on the Target
     Computer, after an attempt to boot the image has been made, won‟t solve the
     problem because the image will have become corrupted – you‟ll have to enable
     ACPI and then re-image the Target Computer.

     Many or our Dell computers, particularly GX1‟s and GX110‟s, arrived “out of the
     box” with ACPI disabled. In fact, whether or not ACPI was enabled or disabled
     on any particular computer seemed to be fairly random. So it‟s worth the effort to
     check – don‟t assume.

  2) Before installing Windows on the Master Computer, remove any add-in sound
     cards, or disable the on-board sound card in BIOS.

     I‟ve found that having a sound card installed in an image can sometimes create
     problems. I frequently had problems with the Microsoft components (codecs and
     other various items) that get installed along with the sound card driver, even when
     the master computer was used as a target. The symptoms of this problem
     included System Tray lockups and extreme sluggishness of the OS.

  3) If you want your users to be able to successfully attach USB thumb drives or
     digital cameras without having administrative rights, plug these devices into the
     Master Computer during image creation.

     This way Windows will have already installed the proper drivers and users can
     attach these devices without the IT staff having to install the devices for them.
     The model of thumb drive or digital camera you use doesn‟t matter – what matters
     is that Windows will have installed the drivers to recognize external flash-type
     drives.

  4) Use Sysprep.

     Microsoft‟s Sysprep (System Preparation) tool is free and is meant for image
     creation. It‟s an essential tool. See other parts of this document for more
     information about how to use it (I don‟t provide full instructions – go to Microsoft
     for that; I simply point out some essentials that are difficult to glean from


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     Microsoft‟s documentation). Note that there are different versions of Sysprep for
     Windows 2000 and Windows XP.

  5) Before running Sysprep, change the Hard Drive Controller (HDC) to “Standard
     Dual Channel PCI IDE Controller”.

     This is perhaps the single most important step in creating an image that will cross
     hardware platforms.

     This step can be scripted using Microsoft‟s devcon.exe utility (included in the
     2000 and XP Resource Kits). However, devcon.exe wants to search mshdc.inf to
     find the most compatible HDC driver, and so will only change it to the generic
     driver if that‟s the only choice you give it. My solution requires a customized
     mshdc.inf file. If you‟d like to see my devcon.exe command line or have a copy
     of my mshdc.inf file, let me know (or if you know a better way to do this, please
     share).

  6) Run Sysprep with the following switches: -pnp -mini -reseal -quiet.

     Note that when you run Sysprep, you must do so as the absolute last step. The
     Master Computer will automatically shut down after Sysprep has run, and at that
     point you must save your image – the next time the image is booted, Sysprep will
     assume the image has been loaded on a Target Computer and will run mini-setup.

  7) For Windows 2000 images it‟s sometimes necessary to include extra information
     in the [MassStorageDrivers] section of Sysprep.inf. See my examples.


The Target Computer:
  1) As with the Master Computer, go into BIOS and make sure ACPI is enabled
     before you boot the image for the first time.

     If you make the mistake of booting the image with ACPI turned off, you‟ll have
     to turn ACPI on and re-image the Target Computer (simply enabling ACPI won‟t
     solve the problem because the image will have become corrupted – you‟ll have to
     re-image the Target Computer).

  2) If you‟re using Symantec GHOST, run GHOST with the –fni switch.

     This switch corrects issues with the way some Intel chipsets access the IDE
     controller prior to the OS loading, and is required on computers that have these
     chipsets (examples: Dell GX270; Gateway E4100). It won‟t hurt to use it on
     computers with other chipsets, so if you‟re scripting your GHOST installation, go
     ahead and include the -fni switch in your script. If you forget to use the –fni
     switch on a Target Computer that needs it, the image won‟t boot.


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   3) Update the Hard Drive Controller.

       Even though you told Sysprep to run a hardware detection when the image was
       installed on the Target Computer (using the –pnp switch), the hard drive
       controller will not be updated during hardware detection. Remember, on the
       Master Computer you changed the Hard Drive Controller to “Standard Dual
       Channel PCI IDE Controller” and it will stay that way until you change it.

       You can update the driver manually, or you can script it using Microsoft‟s
       devcon.exe utility. For some chipsets, such as those on the Dell GX260 or
       GX270, or the Gateway E4100, scripting the update poses additional challenges
       because you‟ll have to point devcon.exe to different .inf files, depending on the
       chipset *. See “Intel Chipset Drivers Part I” for my solution.

       * It‟s probably possible to merge these .inf files into mshdc.inf, but I‟ve never
       tried. If you know how to do it, please share.

Adding Drivers to Your Image
The OemPnPDriversPath statement in Sysprep

There‟s more than one method to add drivers to an image. After experimenting with
various strategies, the one I‟ve become most comfortable with is putting all the drivers I
need into a few folders, and instructing Sysprep to search those folders during mini-setup.
Part of the reason I like this method is that it‟s easy to add new drivers to an existing
image (in my case, using GHOST Explorer) without re-creating the image.

I have no documentation on my previous attempts at including drivers during an
unattended installation of Windows during image creation, so the method I‟ll discuss here
is the one I‟m most familiar with – using the OemPnPDriversPath statement in Sysprep.

The syntax of the OemPnPDriversPath statement in Sysprep

One of the biggest challenges I and many of the people who have contacted me about
image creation have faced is getting the syntax for OemPnPDriversPath correct. The
problem is that Microsoft‟s documentation on the syntax varies from one article to
another, and even when it‟s correct, it‟s not stated very clearly.

The correct syntax looks like this:

OemPnPDriversPath = “\Drivers\Folder1;\Drivers\Folder2;\Drivers\Folder3”

The folders, of course, can be named however you like. The quotes are required.
Different folders are separated by semicolons. And each folder is assumed to be relative
to %SystemDrive%. Thus, in the above example, this is what Sysprep “sees”:


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OemPnPDriversPath = “%SystemDrive%\Drivers\Folder1;
%SystemDrive%\Drivers\Folder2; %SystemDrive%\Drivers\Folder3”

Note that Sysprep uses “%SystemDrive%” as a string (it doesn‟t substitute a value for
%SystemDrive% - you‟ll see why in a minute). Don‟t include a drive letter or the string
“%SystemDrive%” in your statement – it‟s implied, and using either one will lead to
failure. But do include the “\” at the beginning of each path.

What the OemPnPDriversPath statement in Sysprep actually does

It‟s useful to know what OemPnPDriversPath actually does. When Sysprep is run on the
Master Computer, it adds the information from this statement to the registry like so:

Key: HKLM\Software\Microsoft\CurrentVersion
Value: DevicePath
Data:
%SystemRoot%\inf;%SystemDrive%\Drivers\Folder1;%SystemDrive%\Drivers\Folder2;
%SystemDrive%\Drivers\Folder3

Looking at the information above, now you see why Sysprep uses “%SystemDrive%” as
a string – it plugs the string “%SystemDrive%” into the registry, and the registry will
substitute the value of %SystemDrive%. Unfortunately, Microsoft never saw fit to
explain this fact in its own documentation, and it‟s caused confusion to a lot of people

Since this registry key is modified when Sysprep is run on the Master Computer, you
can‟t insert new folders into an existing image and expect it to work. You can add new
files, but not new folders, because Windows won‟t know to search the new folders. If
you want to add new folders, you‟ll have to re-create your image and run Sysprep again,
or else extract the system registry file from your image, add the new path to the registry
key above, and insert the modified registry file back into your image.

It‟s also important to note that Windows won’t search subdirectories – you have to
specify each directory that you want searched.

The placement of the Sysprep folder

Your Sysprep folder must reside on the root of %SystemDrive%, like so: C:\Sysprep.
After Sysprep has run, it will delete this folder. I‟m pointing this out because so many
people seem to miss this fact in Microsoft‟s documentation.

Using Sysprep to convert the drive to NTFS

There‟s a place in the Sysprep.inf file where you can tell Windows to convert the drive to
NTFS. It doesn‟t work, and Microsoft knows it doesn‟t work. So don‟t bother. You can,




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however, script the NTFS conversion after the image has been booted on the Target
Computer. I‟m pointing this out because several people have asked me about it.

If you want to know how to script the NTFS conversion, let me know. The methods are
slightly different between Windows 2000 and Windows XP.

Creating Your Driver Folders Part I

Most of the manufacturers are pretty good about giving their drivers unique names. My
images will install on over 20 different models of Dell, Gateway, and Compaq
computers, but I only have 4 folders where I store additional drivers, and that‟s mostly
for the sake of organization.

For the most part, where you do get duplicate driver file names, it‟s because you‟re
dealing with different versions of the same driver, where the newer driver will usually
work for older models of the device manufacturer‟s devices. For example, if your driver
folder already contains a driver information file named “IntelNIC.inf” for a device called
”Old Intel NIC”, and now you‟re adding a driver for “New Intel NIC” and find that the
new driver also has a file named “IntelNIC.inf”, the chances are good that the new file
will work with both NICs. You‟ll usually be OK if you make sure you always use the
newer version of any two files that have identical names.

As previously noted, Windows won‟t search subfolders for drivers. However it‟s
possible that some of your driver .inf‟s will have statements in them that point to
subfolders. For example, the .inf file for the display adapter on the Gateway 450Eb
laptop has a line in it that references “\Graphics”. It‟s therefore necessary to include the
“Graphics” sub-folder in the folder where you‟ve put the .inf file for this driver.

If you‟re not sure what to add, install the driver on a computer that has that device and
then look in Device Manager to see the list of driver files the device is using. The most
important file to include for troubleshooting purposes is the .inf file, since it tells
Windows what driver files to use for the device in question. If you‟ve got at least that
one file in your image, then during installation on the Target Computer, if you‟ve left
elements of a driver out, Windows will display a message that it can‟t find such-and-such
file, so you‟ll know what‟s missing.

Creating Your Driver Folders Part II

In helping people troubleshoot their own images, I‟ve noticed that many try to include all
of the drivers for every model of computer to which they‟re planning to deploy the
image. They‟re forgetting two things: (1) Windows may already have many of the
necessary drivers and (2) Many computers, even ones made by different manufacturers,
share many of the same devices and drivers. For example, a computer made by Dell and
another made by Gateway may have the same on-board NIC or audio or video controller.
The same could be true of multiple models made by the same manufacturer.




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My strategy is to create an image that has no extra drivers. I then install it (or create it)
on the oldest computer I‟ve got (say, a Dell GX1) and work my way up to the newest
model. In the case of the GX1 I would see that I don‟t need any extra drivers at all –
Windows XP already has them all. So then I install the image on the GX110. Again, no
extra drivers needed. Now the GX150 – ah, now maybe we need some drivers. Add
them to the image. Now install the new image on the GX200 – maybe another driver
needed. Add it to the image. Now install the new image on the GX260 – more drivers
needed, add them to the image. And so on.

Once you‟ve got an image that has all the drivers for all the computer models you‟re
currently working with, driver maintenance becomes routine. When your company gets a
new model of computer, install your current image on it, see what‟s missing, and add it.

Executable Driver Files

Windows won‟t process executable driver installation files during mini-setup. When you
download drivers from most manufacturers, you usually get an executable. For example,
downloading a driver from Dell for a video card may result in a file called ATDQWE.exe
or some such nonsense. You have to extract the actual drivers. In most cases, that‟s done
by running the executable from the command line with the “/a” switch.

When you extract the drivers, you‟ll often get files like “setup.exe” or “install.exe” – you
don‟t need them, as Windows won‟t run them during mini-setup. What you need are the
actual driver files – the .inf‟s, the .dll‟s, the .sys‟s and such (many of which may be
embedded in .cab files, so be mindful of the potential need to include .cab files).

Intel Chipset Drivers Part I

First, it‟s usually necessary to extract the drivers for Intel chipsets from the executable by
running it from the command line with the /a switch. But the location to which the
drivers are extracted is a little different, and you may not be notified of this fact during
extraction. The location is C:\Program Files\Intel.

Second, the drivers for the Hard Drive Controller (HDC) won‟t install without some help.
When mini-setup runs on the Target Computer, the HDC doesn‟t get updated (this was
noted in the section called “The Target Computer”). Instead, Windows continues to use
the generic driver you installed at the end of image creation prior to running Sysprep.

Of course, if you want to update the HDC driver manually, all you have to do is have it in
your image somewhere, or on a CD or other storage medium, and update the driver via
Device Manager.

But if you want to script the installation of the HDC, it can get complicated…

If the target computer has an HDC that Windows has a driver for, all you have to do is
run the devcon.exe utility and point it to mshdc.inf. This will work fine for most



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computers manufactured up to about 2003. But if the HDC driver is not included with
Windows and is instead included with the Intel Chipset Driver, you‟ll have to devise a
means of identifying the chipset and pointing devcon.exe to the correct .inf file.

My own solution is to use Intel‟s chipset ID utility, which is available from their web site.
I wrote a script that runs the utility and outputs the results to a text file. Then the script
searches the text file to find out what chipset it‟s dealing with, and builds the devcon.exe
command line accordingly.

Intel Chipset Drivers Part II: The “UMB Device” Problem

It‟s sometimes the case that after you install your image on a Target Computer, you see
something in Device Manager with an exclamation point next to it: a “UMB Device”.
You manually install driver after driver, trying to figure out how to get this device to not
show the exclamation point, but the exclamation point never goes away.

When you have this situation, you‟re missing a chipset driver, and manually installing the
chipset drivers after installing the image on the Target Computer won‟t fix the problem.
As many times as I‟ve worked on this particular problem, I‟ve found one thing to always
be true: either the driver will install during mini-setup, or it will never install at all. (I‟m
sure there must be a way to solve this problem after image installation, but I‟ve never
figured it out.) In any case, if you‟ve got this problem, it‟s an indication that you need to
add a chipset driver to your image. Once you get that driver into your image where
Sysprep will find it during mini-setup, the problem will go away.

The Multi-Processor/Hyper-Threading Problem

If you create an image on a single-processor master computer and install it on a multi-
processor target computer, the image may work, but the system will lack hyper-threading
capabilities and will identify itself as a single-processor computer. Conversely, if you
create an image on a multi-processor computer and install it on a single-processor
computer, the image may not boot at all. I am not speaking from experience on this
issue; I am simply repeating the observations of others.

The following solution is not mine. I‟ve not yet had an opportunity to work with creating
an image that will work properly on both a single-processor and a multi-processor
computer. Some time ago someone wrote me to ask if I knew how to get an image to
cross this barrier. I told him I didn‟t. But he seemed to be close to a solution, and I asked
him to share it if he worked it out. He was working with another person, and they each
sent me their statement of the solution. Here‟s what they sent me (I offer these verbatim
to prevent any mistranslation on my part):

Response #1:

I found that if the image is built 1st on a GX-270 and has the ACPI Multiprocessor PC
Hal then under device manager/computer change it to Standard PC it ask to reboot.



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When it comes back up 2 Standard PC are listed under computer. Sysprep the machine
and image it then image to a lower machine. After it comes up change the top Standard
PC to Advanced Configuration and Powers Interface (ACPI) PC reboot. After reboot go
in and delete the 2nd Standard PC. On the original GX-270 after it comes up you do the
same but change it back to ACPI Multiprocessor PC. With these changes it worked on a
GX 110/150/260/270/280.

Response #2:

You probably know how it is, we know that the average user wouldn't have a clue, nor
would they care if they had hyperthreading working or not. My geek squad and I do like
the challenge of making it work with all the bells and whistles. We do have developers
that would benefit from the few extra cycles that hyperthreading would bring, and we
were trying to avoid multiple images. Since I sent this to you yesterday, we have been
playing with the different HALS and did find a slightly inconvenient way to make the
single image work and still get the right HAL in place.

Essentially we made a dell 270 image and built it on the multiprocessor HAL. After it
was configured, we then changed the MP HAL to Standard, then we sysprepped and
imaged. The image will work on all of our systems, the slightly inconvenient part is that
the HAL has to be changed again back to ACPI on the singles, and MP on the
hyperthreads. It does give you ALL the HAL options when you go to change it. A little
rough but it seems to work. I have not seen this solution online, so you are the first to
know.

Another solution we are looking into deals with changes to the boot.ini and the copying
of the HAL and Kernel files to switch to the MP mode. The changes are such that we
probably could get a script to run it. If we get anywhere with it I will let you know.

I won‟t do these gentlemen the disservice of posting their contact information in this
document. However, if you‟d like to contact me privately, I can inquire as to whether
they‟d be amenable to having others ask them about their solution.

I never heard whether they got their solution of copying the HAL files to work, but
apparently someone else has found a way:

From: Porter, Reed
To: scripting@lists.listleague.com
Sent: Wednesday, January 12, 2005 9:31 PM
Subject: RE: [scripting] Type of Hall.dll

The one workstation I tested it on worked. It saw the processor, but I'm not sure it saw it as two,
and Ii don't have access to the unit any more. You should be able to run those commands after
imaging on a HT cpu with the MP hal, but I've never tried it.
Here is the article I used.
http://www.jnux.net/community/hal/




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BTW these commands assume the I386 directory from the CD was copied to the windows
directory. (blush)



From: scripting-admin@lists.listleague.com [mailto:scripting-admin@lists.listleague.com] On
Behalf Of François Racine
Sent: Wednesday, January 12, 2005 6:53 PM
To: scripting@lists.listleague.com
Subject: Re: [scripting] Type of Hall.dll

And about Hyperthreading computers? We have one HT machine. I tried my
uniprocessor image on that model and it is working but the OS is only seeing one
processor. Any idea how to manage it? We have 1 image for 12 models and I
would keep only one image.
_________________________________________
François Racine

Known problem with Sysprep

Sysprep incorrectly modifies a registry key that tells the computer how often to look for
changes in Group Policy. This error results in long log-on times. This may have been
corrected in SP2, but I don‟t know. For the solution, reference
http://www.jsiinc.com/SUBG/TIP3100/rh3129.htm.

Default User Profiles on Windows XP SP1 versus SP2
One of your goals in creating an image may be to create a default user profile – a
customized profile that will be applied to any user who logs on to the computer for the
first time. The way this is done changed as of Windows XP SP2.

Examples of things that might be included in a default user profile:

      Wallpaper
      Screen saver and screen saver settings (time-out, password protection, etc.).
      Desktop icons
      Start Menu items
      Disabling notification balloons like „Take the Windows Tour” that normally
       appear for all new users.
      Items on the Quick Launch Bar.
      Default settings for Office applications.
      Internet Explorer Favorites
      Explorer views, like whether to show “Details” versus “Thumbnails”; whether to
       show file extensions.
      Whether the Start Menu is Windows XP or Classic.
      Whether the “Theme” is Windows XP or Classic




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Creating a Default User Profile in Windows 2000, Windows XP and Windows XP
SP1

      Create the profile that you want all users to start out with.
      Copy the profile on top of the “Default User” profile in Documents and Settings.

Creating a Default User Profile in Windows XP SP2
    Create the profile that you want all users to start out with.
    Copy the profile on top of the Administrator profile (unless, of course the profile
       you‟re applying to all users is the Administrator profile).
    Sysprep will automatically copy the Administrator profile on top of the Default
       User profile. This is what Microsoft intended all along, but it didn‟t work until
       they fixed it in SP2. You can disable this if you want to. Reference
       http://support.microsoft.com/kb/q887816/ . (thanks to Les Landau at ListLeague)

How to manually copy one profile on top of another

      Make sure that “Show hidden files” is enabled. You won‟t be able to see the
       Default User profile with this setting disabled.
      Right-click on My ComputerProperties
      “Advanced” tab”User Profiles” section”Settings” button.
      Click the profile you want to copy from”Copy To”BrowseC:\Documents
       and SettingsLocate the folder that contains the profile you want to over-write.
       Follow prompts.

How to script copying one profile on top of another

This is the batch script I use (I have to thank someone from ListLeague for this, but I
don‟t remember who):

xcopy "%SystemDrive%\Documents and Settings\Testuser\*.*"
"%SystemDrive%\Documents and Settings\Administrator\" /s /h /r /y

erase "%SystemDrive%\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Local
Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Windows\*.*" /f /q

The second line (“erase”) is essential. It prevents users from being prompted to run mini-
setups on software that was installed using MSI‟s.

Important note about copying profiles

You can‟t copy TO or FROM a profile that is in use. You have to be logged as a
different user than either of the ones you‟re copying to or from.




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My Sysprep.inf for Windows 2000
;SetupMgrTag

[Sysprep]

; Refer to the SysprepMassStorage section for an explanation.
BuildMassStorageSection=yes

[Data]
  AutoPartition=0
  MsDosInitiated="0"
  UnattendedInstall="No"

[Unattended]
  UnattendMode=FullUnattended
  OemSkipEula=Yes
  OemPreinstall=Yes
  OemPnPDriversPath="\Drivers\1;\Drivers\2;\Drivers\3;\Drivers\4"
  TargetPath=\WINDOWS
  InstallFilesPath=C:\I386
  DriverSigningPolicy=Ignore
  ExtendOemPartition=1
  DisableDynamicUpdates=Yes
  FactoryMode=Yes
  UnattendSwitch=Yes

[GuiUnattended]
  ; The first 3 items in this list tell the computer to log on as Administrator
  ; after Mini-Setup has run.
  AdminPassword=<password removed from example>
  AutoLogon=Yes
  AutoLogonCount=1
  OEMSkipRegional=1
  TimeZone=35
  OemSkipWelcome=1

[UserData]
  ProductID=<Product key removed from example>
  FullName="Information Services"
  OrgName="Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center"

[Display]
  ; Some of the video drivers in your customized driver folders may include default
  ; resolution settings. If so, those settings will over-ride the settings you state here.
  ; In that case, you can use a freeware resolution changer to script the resolution after


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  ; Mini-Setup has run. I use 1365VidChng.exe. You can find it in a Google search.
  BitsPerPel=16
  Xresolution=800
  YResolution=600
  Vrefresh=85

[Identification]
  ; This account will be used to join the computer to the domain and so
  ; needs to be a domain account, not a local one.
   DomainAdmin=testacct
   DomainAdminPassword=<password removed from example>
   JoinDomain=<domain name removed from example>

[Networking]
  InstallDefaultComponents=Yes

[GuiRunOnce]
  ; This is where I tell Sysprep to launch my image installation script
  ; after Windows has loaded for the first time.
  "%SystemDrive%\WWRC\ImageInstaller\setup.bat"

[sysprepcleanup]

[SysprepMassStorage]

; I‟ve never needed this section for Windows XP, but it resolves certain
; problems for Windows 2000 and is recommended.
Primary_IDE_Channel = %windir%\inf\mshdc.inf
Secondary_IDE_Channel = %windir%\inf\mshdc.inf




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My Sysprep.inf for Windows XP SP1
;SetupMgrTag

[Data]
  AutoPartition=0
  MsDosInitiated="0"
  UnattendedInstall="No"

[Unattended]
  UnattendMode=FullUnattended
  OemSkipEula=Yes
  OemPreinstall=Yes
  OemPnPDriversPath=\Drivers\1;\Drivers\2;\Drivers\3"
  TargetPath=\WINDOWS
  InstallFilesPath=%SystemDrive%
  DriverSigningPolicy=Ignore
  ExtendOemPartition=1
  DisableDynamicUpdates=Yes
  FactoryMode=Yes
  UnattendSwitch=Yes

[GuiUnattended]
  ; The first 3 items in this list tell the computer to log on as Administrator
  ; after Mini-Setup has run.
  AdminPassword=<password removed from example>
  ;EncryptedAdminPassword=Yes
  AutoLogon=Yes
  AutoLogonCount=1
  OEMSkipRegional=1
  TimeZone=35
  OemSkipWelcome=1

[UserData]
  ProductID=<product key removed from example>
  FullName="Information Services"
  OrgName="Woodrow Wilson Rehab Center"

[Display]
  ; Some of the video drivers in your customized driver folders may include default
  ; resolution settings. If so, those settings will over-ride the settings you state here.
  ; In that case, you can use a freeware resolution changer to script the resolution after
  ; Mini-Setup has run. I use 1365VidChng.exe. You can find it in a Google search.
  BitsPerPel=16
  Xresolution=800
  YResolution=600


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  Vrefresh=85

[Identification]
  ; This account will be used to join the computer to the domain and so
  ; needs to be a domain account, not a local one.
   DomainAdmin=testacct
   DomainAdminPassword=<password removed from example>
   JoinDomain=<domain name removed from example>

[Networking]
  InstallDefaultComponents=Yes

[GuiRunOnce]
  ; This is where I tell Sysprep to launch my image installation script
  ; after Windows has loaded for the first time.
  "%SystemDrive%\WWRC\ImageInstaller\Setup.bat"

[sysprepcleanup]

My Sysprep.inf for Windows XP SP2
Sorry, I‟m still working on this one. You‟re on your own. If you find any good tips or
tricks, please share.




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