Docstoc

Oedipus Characters

Document Sample
Oedipus Characters Powered By Docstoc
					         Intoduction to Oedipus
         The Characters and how to 
         pronounce the names.




Title: Jan 8­2:08 PM (1 of 8)
      Oedipus (Eddy)                                                 http://m­w.com/dictionary/oedipus
        "swollen­foot," from oidan "to swell" + pous (gen. podos) 
        "foot." 

  •   Son of Jocasta (Iokasta) and Laius (Laios)
  •   Adopted son the the King and Queen of Corinth
  •   Slayer of Laius
  •   Defeater of the Sphinx
  •   King of Thebes
  •   Husband of Jocasta




Title: Jan 8­8:55 AM (2 of 8)
     Jocasta (Iokaste)
        http://m­w.com/dictionary/jocasta


      • Wife of Laius (Laios)
      • Mother and later wife of Oedipus
      • Queen of Thebes




Title: Jan 8­9:14 AM (3 of 8)
                                      Kreon (Creon)

                                • Brother of Jocasta
                                • Uncle/Brother­in­law of Oedipus
                                • Eventual king of Thebes




Title: Jan 8­9:14 AM (4 of 8)
       http://m­w.com/dictionary/Laius


                                           Laios
         • King of Thebes
         •  Husband of Jocasta (Iokasta)
         • Father of Oedipus




Title: Jan 8­9:14 AM (5 of 8)
              The Shepherd

           • Charged with killing Oedipus
           • Gives him to a Corinthian Shepherd
           • Witnesses the murder of Laios




Title: Jan 8­11:46 AM (6 of 8)
        Tiresias (Teiresias)

                                http://m­w.com/dictionary/tiresias
      • Blind seer




Title: Jan 8­9:14 AM (7 of 8)
   The Greek chorus (choros) is believed to have grown out of the Greek dithyrambs and tragikon drama in tragic plays of the ancient 
   Greek theatre. The chorus offers a variety of background and summary information to help the audience follow the performance, 
   commented on main themes, and showed how an ideal audience might react to the drama as it was presented. They also represent 
   the general populace of any particular story. In many ancient Greek plays, the chorus expressed to the audience what the main 
   characters could not say, such as their fears or secrets. The chorus usually communicated in song form, but sometimes spoke their 
   lines in unison.
   The chorus was an essential, primary component of early Greek theater during a time when tragedy and comedy were lyrical works. 
   Before the introduction of multiple, interacting actors by Aeschylus, the Greek chorus was the main performer in relation to a solitary 
               The importance of the chorus declined after the 5th century BC, when the chorus began to be separated from the 
   actor.[1][2]
   dramatic action. Later dramatists, such as Sophocles depended on the chorus less than their predecessors. In the Theban plays of 
   Sophocles, the chorus serves as a body of omniscient commentators that often reinforce the moral of the story. The chorus will 
   switch between the roles of "commentator" and "character". When the chorus is acting as a character, they often provide other 
   characters with the insight they need.
   The Greek chorus had to work in unison to help explain the play as there were only 1 ­ 3 actors on stage who were already playing 
   several parts each. As the Greek amphitheatres were so large, the chorus' actions had to be exaggerated and their voices clear so 
   that everyone could see and hear them. To do this they used techniques such as synchronization, echo, ripple, physical theatre and 
   the use of masks to aid them.




                                                                           http://m­w.com/dictionary/choragus



                                                                           Choragos


Title: Jan 8­9:14 AM (8 of 8)

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:150
posted:8/30/2009
language:English
pages:8