2011-2012 GMS Guide

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					2011-2012 GMS Guide
  Criteria Breakdown

  School Coordinator Logistics




              1
Criteria Breakdown
 Criteria List

 Bronze Criteria

 Silver Criteria

 Gold Criteria

 Platinum Criteria

 Platinum Focus Criteria

 Criteria Menu




                 2         Return to Main Menu
                   Gold Medal SchoolsTM Criteria
                                    éA policy must be written for these criteria

                                          Bronze Criteria

    To become a Bronze School, you must complete all six Bronze Criteria.
    Upon completion your school will receive $200.
é
    1. Write a policy that requires grades K-2 to receive 45-75 minutes and grades 3-6 to
       receive 90-150 minutes of structured physical activity each week using the Utah State
       Office of Education’s Physical Education Core Curriculum

    2. Teach Health Education Core Curriculum provided by Utah State Office of Education

    3. Establish a Gold Medal MileTM walking program and a goal for student participation

    4. Promote Safe Routes to School by requiring the development and distribution of a
       written Student Neighborhood Access Program (SNAP) plan, SNAP map, and safe drop-
       off/pick-up map

é 5. Write a policy mandating a tobacco-free school
    6. Complete and submit Heart Health Surveys



                                           Silver Criteria
    To become a Silver School, you must continue implementing the Bronze Criteria and
    complete all four Silver Criteria. Upon completion your school will receive $300.

    1. Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization must coordinate at least one
       health-related event per year that involves students, teachers, faculty, staff, and parents

é 2. Write a policy that requires a yearly teacher, faculty, and staff wellness program
    3. Offer a variety of competitive and non-competitive physical activity programs to students

    4. Choose and complete three criteria from the Criteria Menu




                                                    3                 Return to Criteria Breakdown
                                         Gold Criteria
   To become a Gold School, you must continue implementing the Bronze and Silver
   Criteria and complete all four Gold Criteria. Upon completion your school will
   receive $500.

é1. overseen by PEthat requires K-6 Physical Education (PE) and physical activity courses to be
    Write a policy
                   teacher(s) or specialist(s)

é2. a punishment for teachers, faculty, and staff that food is not to be used as a reward or as
    Write a policy


   3. Complete four of the following from Changing the Scene - Improving the School
      Nutrition Environment (Gold #3A-#3I)

   é a. whenever foodthatavailable outside of school meal services to be available
        Write a policy
                       is
                          requires healthy food and beverage choices


       b. Enroll school as a Team Nutrition School and conduct nutrition education activities
          and promotions that involve students, teachers, faculty, staff, parents, and the
          community

       c. Offer nutrition education in the school dining room and classroom, with coordination
          between school food service personnel and teachers, faculty, and staff

   é d.   Write a policy that requires lunch to be at least twenty minutes long from the time
          students are seated and held between 11:00 am and 1:00 pm

   é e.   Write a policy that bans advertising of less nutritious food choices and promotes
          healthy food choices

   é f.   Write a policy that requires food service personnel to have appropriate pre-service
          training and regular participation in professional development

       g. Require all organizations to raise funds by selling only non-food items

       h. Consider student needs in planning for a healthy school nutrition environment by
          asking students for input and incorporating their feedback into policy making

   é i.   Write a policy that requires recess to be scheduled immediately before lunch for most
          or all grades

   4. Choose and complete two criteria, in addition to the three options chosen for the Silver
      level, from the Criteria Menu


                                                 4                 Return to Criteria Breakdown
                                        Platinum Criteria
    To become a Platinum School, you must continue implementing the Bronze, Silver,
    and Gold Criteria and complete all five Platinum Criteria. Upon completion your
    school will receive $300.

    1. Strengthen your School Community Council by holding regular meetings and including
       health on the agenda at each meeting

é 2.   Write a policy that requires healthy food and beverage choices to be available whenever
       food is available outside of school meal services

    3. Plan and carry out a year long teacher, faculty, and staff wellness program

    4. Involve families and the community in completing the Gold Medal SchoolsTM criteria

é 5.   a. Write a policy that requires recess to be scheduled immediately before lunch for most
          or all grades
                                                   -or-

é      b. Write a policy that requires lunch to be at least twenty minutes long from the time
          students are seated and held between 11:00 am and 1:00 pm


                                         Platinum Focus
    After completing the Platinum Criteria choose one focus area, listed below, each
    year until you have completed all of them.

       •	   Asthma
       •	   Diabetes Control
       •	   Environmental Quality
       •	   Fruits and Vegetables Galore
       •	   Immunizations
       •	   Mental Health and Wellness
       •	   Oral Health
       •	   Sun Safety
       •	   Violence and Injury Prevention




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                                       Criteria Menu

   1. Participate in Walk to School Day

   2. Participate in the American Heart Association’s physical activity and community service
      programs, Jump Rope for Heart or Hoops for Heart

   3. Participate in a Grocery Store Tour or Albertsons Healthy Eaters™ Field Trip

   4. Participate in a health related walk

   5. Participate in Truth From Youth advertising contest

   6. Teach a proven effective tobacco prevention program and/or curriculum in the classroom

   7. Utilize the National Dairy Councils Classroom - Cafeteria Connections program to
      market and promote the link between the cafeteria and the classroom

   8. Participate in United States Dempartment of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service
      program, HealthierUS Challenge

   9. Participate in one health campaign

   10. Hold a Field Day

   11. Allow the community to use the school’s facilities for physical activity outside school
       hours

   12. Establish a School Health Council that discusses ways to meet Gold Medal Schools
       criteria

é13. Write a policy thatrecess as ateachers, faculty, and staff to not withhold Physical
     Education (PE) or
                          requires
                                    punishment

é14. Write a policy that provides continuing education and training in the areas of physical
     education, tobacco prevention, and nutrition
é15.Write a policy that requires both lunch and breakfast programs
   16. Participate the President’s Challenge

   17. Participate in the Governor’s Golden Sneaker Award Program


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            Bronze
Bronze Criteria

Bronze #1: Structured Physical Activity

Bronze #2: Health Ed Core

Bronze #3: Gold Medal Mile

Bronze #4: Safe Routes to School

Bronze #5: Tobacco Policy

Bronze #6: Heart Health Surveys

Bronze Resources


                   7            Return to Criteria Breakdown
                                       Bronze Criteria

 To become a Bronze School, you must complete all six Bronze Criteria. Upon
 completion your school will receive $200.

é 1.   Write a policy that requires grades K-2 to receive 45-75 minutes and grades 3-6 to receive
       90-150 minutes of structured physical activity each week using the Utah State Office of
       Education’s Physical Education Core Curriculum

   2. Teach Health Education Core Curriculum provided by Utah State Office of Education

   3. Establish a Gold Medal MileTM walking program and a goal for student participation

   4. Promote Safe Routes to School by requiring the development and distribution of a written
      Student Neighborhood Access Program (SNAP) plan, SNAP map, and safe drop-off/pick-up
      map

é 5.   Write a policy mandating a tobacco-free school

   6. Complete and submit Heart Health Surveys




                     é    A policy must be written for these criteria




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                                                Bronze #1
   Write a policy that requires grades K-2 to receive 45-75 minutes and grades
   3-6 to receive 90-150 minutes of structured physical activity each week using
   the Utah State Office of Education’s Physical Education Core Curriculum


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that requires the Utah State Office of Education’s (USOE) Physical Education (PE) Core
       Curriculum to be taught in grades K-6
           ◦ Principal Signature
    •	 Require grades K-2 receive 45-75 minutes of structured physical activity each week
    •	 Require grades 3-6 receive 90-150 minutes of structured physical activity each week

Structured physical activity is defined as a planned, supervised activity where students participate in organized
physical activities taught and/or supervised by teachers or other school/district personnel.

Some recesses should be left unstructured to give students an opportunity to choose their own form of play.

Rationale
According to the U.S. Surgeon General, regular physical activity is one of the most important things people can do
to maintain and improve their physical health, mental health, and overall well-being.1 The National Association for
Sport and Physical Education and the Utah State Office of Education recommend that students receive 150 minutes
of structured physical activity each week.2

Schools have a responsibility to help students and staff members establish and maintain lifelong habits of physical
activity. Physical activity in schools contributes to the total growth and development of all children. Physical activity
provides opportunities for students to gain knowledge, skills, and attitudes which promote physical activity as part
of their everyday lives. People of all ages can improve their health through physical activity. Physical activity can help
to control weight, control high blood pressure, reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart attack, and colon cancer, and
reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety.3

     1.   U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent and Decrease Overweight
          and Obesity, January 2001

     2.   National Association for Sport and Physical Education, Moving into the Future: National Standards for Physical Education, 2nd
          Edition, 2004. www.aahperd.org/naspe/template.cfm?template=publications-nationalstandards_3.html.

     3.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Promoting Physical Activity,
          www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/pdf/Trails_Increasing_Opportunities.pdf



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                                           Bronze #1
Resources
Utah State Office of Education (USOE)             Frank Wojtech
                                                  801-538-7732
                                                  frank.wojtech@schools.utah.gov

USOE Core Curriculum                              www.schools.utah.gov/curr/core/corepdf/RHL3-6.pdf

Utah Department of Health                         Brett McIff
Physical, Nutrition, and Obesity Program          801-538-9362
                                                  bmciff@utah.gov

Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn                  Tab D: Physical Activity

PE Lesson Ideas                                   www.pecentral.org

2010 Shape of the Nation Report                   www.aahperd.org/naspe/publications/

5-Minute Energizers                               http://209.200.69.140/downloads/EnergizersK-2.pdf

Brain Breaks                                      www.emc.cmich.edu/brainbreaks




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                                                                                           Bronze #1


                                                  Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Review policy during a meeting
  •	 Place copy of policy in teacher, faculty, staff room
  •	 Communicate policy
          ◦ Newsletters
          ◦ Back to school night
          ◦ Parent Teacher conferences
          ◦ Report Cards
          ◦ Student Handbook
          ◦ School Directory
          ◦ Brochure
  •	 Provide copies of Utah State Office of Education’s (USOE) Core Curriculum
  •	 Use 5 Minute Energizer books, online
  •	 Provide physical activity Web sites
  •	 Designate time for classrooms to walk Gold Medal Mile TM (GMM)
  •	 Designate one recess for students to walk GMM
  •	 Attend Gold Medal SchoolsTM, USOE, or school district PE training/webinar




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                                                                                               Bronze #1


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how K-2 students are receiving 45-75 minutes of structured Physical Activity
   •	 Describe how 3-6 students are receiving 90-150 minutes of structured Physical Activity

Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Structured Physical Activity Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Structured Physical Activity Policy
   •	 Describe how K-2 students are receiving 45-75 minutes of structured Physical Activity
   •	 Describe how 3-6 students are receiving 90-150 minutes of structured Physical Activity




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                     Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools TM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “K-2 grade students will receive 45-75 minutes of structured physical activity each week.”
         •	 “3-6 grade students will receive 90-150 minutes of structured physical activity each week.”
         •	 “Utah State Office of Education Physical Education (USOE) Core Curriculum will be taught in all
             grades.”
         •	 “Structured physical activity is defined as a planned, supervised activity where students participate
             in organized physical activities taught and/or supervised by teachers, faculty, staff, or other school/
             district personnel.”

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 Consequences to violating this policy should be listed here
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




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                                         Policy Sample

Intent
Effective August 15, 2011 K-2 grade students will receive 45-75 minutes of structured physical activity per week.
3-6 grade students will receive 90-150 minutes of structured physical activity per week.

In addition, Utah State Office of Education (USOE) Physical Education (PE) core curriculum will be taught in all
grades.

Structured physical activity is defined as planned, supervised activity where students participate in organized physical
activities taught and/or supervised by teachers, faculty, staff, and district personnel. The content of structured
physical activities include: fitness, motor skill development, social/emotional development, and knowledge of
physical fitness.

PE program will enable students to:
    •	 Achieve and maintain health-enhancing levels of physical fitness
    •	 Apply movement concepts and principles to enhance motor skill development
    •	 Demonstrate competency in a variety of movement forms
    •	 Demonstrate respect for self and others through responsible personal and social behavior
    •	 Understand physical activity provides opportunities for enjoyment, challenges, and self-expression
    •	 Apply knowledge using a variety of thinking skills

Recess cannot be counted unless students participate in structured physical activity such as the Gold Medal MileTM.
(GMM). Other free time does not fulfill this requirement. Activities such as USOE Core Curriculum, GMM, and
5-minute energizers will fulfill this criterion.

Rationale
According to the U.S. Surgeon General, regular physical activity is one of the most important things people can do
to maintain and improve their physical health, mental health, and overall well-being.1 The National Association for
Sport and Physical Education and the Utah State Office of Education recommend that students receive 150 minutes
of structured physical activity each week.2

Schools have a responsibility to help students and staff members establish and maintain lifelong habits of physical
activity. Physical activity in schools contributes to the total growth and development of all children. Physical activity
provides opportunities for students to gain knowledge, skills, and attitudes, which promote physical activity as part
of their everyday lives. People of all ages can improve their health through physical activity. Physical activity can help
to control weight, control high blood pressure, reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart attack, and colon cancer, and
reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety.3

Reinforcement
The Principal and PE specialist will review policy at the beginning of each year.

Teacher, faculty, and staff participation is vital to the success of this policy. This policy will be discussed during the


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                                                                                                                        Bronze #1


                                            Policy Sample
first meeting of the year. Any classes found not routinely participating in the required amount of structured physical
activity each week will receive a warning from the principal. In addition teachers, faculty, or staff will meet with PE
specialist to design a more effective plan for reaching required amount of PE.

Endorsement


________________________________________
Principal Name

________________________________________                                _______________
Principal Signature                                                           Date


     1.   U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent and Decrease Overweight
          and Obesity, January 2001

     2.   National Association for Sport and Physical Education, Moving into the Future: National Standards for Physical Education,
          2nd Edition, 2004. Available at www.aahperd.org/naspe/template.cfm?template=publications-nationalstandards_3.html

     3.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Promoting Physical Activity,
          www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/pdf/Trails_Increasing_Opportunities.pdf




                          Policy Guidelines
                                  e


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                                              Bronze #2

   Teach Health Education Core Curriculum provided by Utah State Office of
   Education


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Teach the Health Education Core Curriculum provided by Utah State Office of Education (USOE) in all
       grades.

Curriculum for Kindergarten, first and second grades can be found in K-2 Integrated under Fine Arts, Health,
Physical Education, Science, and Social Studies. Curriculum for third through sixth grade can be found in
Responsible Healthy Lifestyles 3-6 under Health Education.

Rationale
The health of students is strongly linked to their academic success, and their academic success is strongly linked to
their health.1 The purpose of the Health Education Core Curriculum is to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes
necessary for practicing lifelong health enhancing behaviors.2

     1.   Center for Disease Control, Coordinated School Health Program, December 2010, www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/CSHP

     2.   Utah State Office of Education, Core Curriculum, 2008, www.schools.utah.gov/curr/healthpe/



Resources
Utah State Office of Education (USOE)                                Frank Wojtech
                                                                     801-538-7732
                                                                     frank.wojtech@schools.utah.gov

USOE Core Curriculum                                                 www.schools.utah.gov/curr/core/corepdf/RHL3-6.pdf

National Health Education Standards                                  iweb.aahperd.org/iweb/Purchase/ProductDetail.aspx




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                                                                                                   Bronze #2


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Provide copies of Utah State Office of Education (USOE) Health Education Core Curriculum
  •	    Have athletes- or other local role models talk about importance of health
  •	    Provide lesson plans for teachers, faculty, and staff
  •	    Integrate the USOE Health Education Core Curriculum with other subjects




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                                                                                                  Bronze #2


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 How do your teachers, faculty, and staff teach the Utah State Office of Education Health
   •	 List grades that are taught the Health Education Core Curriculum

End-Year (April)
   •	 How do your teachers, faculty, and staff teach the Utah State Office of Education Health Education Core
      Curriculum?
   •	 List grades that are taught the Health Education Core Curriculum




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                                                Bronze #3
   Establish a Gold Medal MileTM walking program and a goal for student
   participation


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Establish a Gold Medal Mile TM (GMM) walking program
    •	 Set a goal for student participation
    •	 Track miles walked

Each student must walk an average of one mile each week. The mile can be an actual mile or a segment of a mile
that can easily be repeated.

Rationale
It is recommended that children and adolescents get at least one hour of physical activity each day.1 There are many
benefits of physical activity, including walking, for children. Benefits include building and maintaining healthy
bones, muscles, and joints, helping control weight, improving self image, and fostering healthy social and emotional
development.2

     1.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, 2008 Physical Activity
          Guidelines, www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/pdf/PA_Fact_Sheet_Children.pdf

     2.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Kids-Walk-to-School,
          www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/kidswalk/health_benefits.htm



Resources
Local Health Departments                                                Page 433

Gold Medal Schools Web site                                             health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/schoolcoordinators/




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                                                                                              Bronze #3


                                                   Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Goals
          ◦ Set a goal to walk to a destination
          ◦ Plan a walking event
          ◦ More goal ideas can be found on page 45
  •	 Tracking
          ◦ Gold Medal MileTM Log
          ◦ Excel tracking system
          ◦ More tracking ideas and forms can be found on pages 45-49
          ◦ Enter miles walked by logging in to the Gold Medal SchoolsTM Web site
          ◦ Borrow a mile measurement wheel from the Local Health Department
  •	 Promotion
          ◦ Post a map and show progress towards a destination
          ◦ Create a walking group
          ◦ More promotion ideas can be found on page 49
  •	 Faculty Motivation
          ◦ Have a competition between students, teachers, faculty, and staff
          ◦ Provide a prize to teacher who reports miles most frequently
          ◦ More faculty motivation ideas can be found on page 50
  •	 Student Motivation
          ◦ Gold Medal Mile certificate
          ◦ Provide prizes to top walkers
          ◦ More student motivation ideas can be found on page 51
  •	 Bulletin Boards
          ◦ Bulletin board ideas




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                                                                          Bronze #3


                                  On-line Report
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 What is your school’s Gold Medal MileTM goal?
   •	 How many total miles have been walked this school year?
   •	 Describe how miles are being collected

End-Year (April)
   •	 What is your school’s Gold Medal MileTM goal?
   •	 How many total miles have been walked this school year?
   •	 Describe how miles are being collected




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                                                Bronze #4
   Promote Safe Routes to School by requiring the development and distribution
   of a written Student Neighborhood Access Program (SNAPTM) plan, SNAPTM
   map, and safe drop-off/pick-up map

Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a Student Neighborhood Access Program(SNAPTM) plan,
    •	 Create a SNAPTM map
    •	 Create a safe drop-off/pick-up map

The School Community Council should lead this project. If none of the students at your school walk or bike to
school you will only need to turn in a safe drop-off/pick-up map.

Rationale
Children and adolescents who walk or ride their bikes to school regularly tend to be more active than those who are
driven to school.1 According to the Surgeon General’s report, Physical Activity and Health, 1996, states that higher
levels of regular physical activity is associated with lower mortality rates.2

Adolescents start developing and establishing patterns of health related behaviors in their youth. Walking to school
is one way to help students establish healthy health patterns as well as decrease their chances of atherosclerosis,
hardening of the arteries, and coronary heart disease.3

     1.   American Journal of Health Promotion, Associations Among Individual, Social, and Environmental barriers and Children’s
          Walking or Cycling to School, November 2007, Vol. 22 No. 2

     2.   U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, The Surgeon General’s report, Physical Activity and Health, April 1996

     3.   National Associate of State boards of Education, Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn, March 2000

Resources
Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT)                               Cherissa Wood
Safe Routes to School Coordinator                                      801-965-4486
                                                                       cwood@utah.gov


UDOT SNAP Planning Guide                                               www.SNAPforschools.com
                                                                       Download a copy

UDOT Safe Routes Web site                                              www.udot.utah.gov/snap
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                                           Bronze #4
Safe Routes to School                                   www.saferoutestoschools.org
                                                        www.saferoutesinfo.org

Safe Routes to School Code and Constitution
    •	 Go to www.le.state.ut.us
    •	 Click on Utah Code and Constitution - Keyword Search
    •	 Search the Utah Code for “routing plan”
    •	 Click Search
    •	 In the Search Results look for Section 53A-1a-108




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                                                  Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Post oversized maps
  •	 Include law enforcement, traffic officials, parents, and students in development of SNAP plan or maps
  •	 Introduce Safe Routes to School in connection with Walk to School Day (October) or Green Ribbon Month
     (September)
  •	 Teach pedestrian and biker safety
  •	 Put map in student directory or handbook
  •	 Distribute plan and maps
          ◦ Back to school night
          ◦ Report cards’
          ◦ Flyer




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                                                              Bronze #4


                                On-line Reports
Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach written SNAP Plan draft
   •	 Provide link for SNAP map draft
   •	 Attach Safe Drop-off/Pick-up map draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach written SNAP plan
   •	 Provide link for SNAP map
   •	 Attach Safe Drop-off/pick-up map




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                       SNAP Plan Guidelines
Template
SNAP plan must include:

    □ Location and/or description of
         •	 School name
         •	 School address
         •	 Existing traffic controls (i.e. stop signs, yield signs, traffic lights, marked crosswalks, etc.)
         •	 Established reduced speed school zones and signs in front of the school and surrounding areas
         •	 Hazards (i.e. missing or broken sidewalks, high speed roads, etc.)
         •	 School bus loading/unloading zone
         •	 Other vehicle loading/unloading zones

    □ Distribution of plan and information
         •	 Who will receive a copy of the SNAPTM plan and when
         •	 Communication procedures for the SNAPTM plan for students, teachers, faculty, staff, parents, and
             surrounding community, faculty, parents, and surrounding community

(Optional)
   □ Location and/or description of
           •	 “This plan will be reviewed each year.”
           •	 Describe how this policy will be communicated to appropriate people
           •	 Towns that feed into school
           •	 Sidewalks along the student walking/biking access routes
           •	 Bus stops for students
           •	 “Stranger Danger” communication issues (i.e. walking school bus)

    □ Distribution of plan and information
         •	 Training of crossing guards and drivers of a walking school bus

    □ Concerns
        •	 Issue: describe and discuss safety issues around school’s preferred walking and biking routes
        •	 Solution: Describe what the school would like to do to solve the problem

Maps
Map 1 Student Neighborhood Access Program (SNAPTM) map must include:
   □ Indication of
         •	 Preferred access route for students
         •	 Crosswalk zones
         •	 Stop signs
         •	 Stop lights
         •	 Yield signs
         •	 Crossing guard(s)
         •	 Marked pedestrian crosswalks

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                                  Plan Guidelines
          •	   Reduced speed school zones and signs
          •	   Railroad crossing
          •	   School bus loading/unloading zone
          •	   Bridge or tunnels

Map 2 Safe drop-off/pick-up map must include:
   □ Indication of
          •	 Entrances/exits
          •	 School bus loading /unloading zone
          •	 Other vehicle loading/unloading zones
          •	 Parking/no parking
          •	 Arrows showing flow of traffic


Open a sample plan in Word




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                                                                                                 Bronze #4


                          SNAPTM Plan Sample
Boulton Elementary School SNAP Plan

School Traffic Safety Committee Members
Darrel Chamberlain, SNAP Committee Chair/Safe Schools Coordinator
Dodi Sorensen, SNAP Committee Member/PTA representative
Jone Sun, Vice Principal

School Plan
Boulton Elementary School is located at 2611 South Orchard Drive in Bountiful, Utah.

Existing Traffic Control Locations
       Stop Lights
       On Orchard Drive there are three lights:
                200 West (Right in front of the school)
                2200 South (At Dick’s Market)
                3100 South (Val Verda Arch)
       Along 2600 South there are two lights:
                500 West (At the LDS stake center)
                Main Street (This light is probably not used by students)

       Stop Signs on Main Access Roads
       On Davis Blvd:
              3300 South
              3100 South
              2750 South
       On 80 West:
              No stop signs
       On 200 West:
              No stop signs
       On Orchard Drive
              No stop signs
       On 200 West:
              At Orchard Drive

Established Cross Walks
        Bountiful Blvd:
               400 East
        Davis Blvd:
               3100 South
               50 West
               North Canyon Road
        2600 South:
               In front of South Davis Jr. High
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                          SNAPTM Plan Sample
       Orchard Drive:
             3100 South

Other Established Cross Walks:
       200 West 2350 South
       100 West Orchard Drive
       150 West Orchard Drive
       North Canyon Road and Orchard Drive
       2550 South Orchard Drive
       400 East Indian Springs Road
       200 West Orchard Drive

Established Crossing Guards
        One crossing guard controls the crossings at Orchard Drive crossing 200 west and 200 west crossing
        Orchard Drive. She does not cross the kids on the north side of the intersection (Orchard Drive crossing 200
        West).

Establish Narrow School Routes
        No Sidewalks:
               Vista Circle Drive
               3100 South on the north side
               Davis Blvd from 3100 south to North Canyon Road
               200 West 3100 South
               3300 South
               50 West
               100 West
               3000 South
               300 West
               2700 South
               2800 South
               2900 South
               3000 South
               400 West
               3400 South
               50 East 3400 South
               100 East 3400 South
               3700 South
               150 East (Oak Ridge Circle)
               Glade Hollow (Sidewalks just on North side)
               200 East 3000 South
               175 East 3000 South
               150 East 3000 South
               2750 South (Sidewalks just on North side)

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                                                                                                       Bronze #4


                           SNAPTM Plan Sample
                Holbrook Drive
                Indian Springs (Sidewalks half way up on one side)

Traffic Volume
        Traffic volume is high along Orchard Drive, 2600 South, Davis Blvd, Bountiful Blvd, 500 West, 3100
        South, and North Canyon Rd.

Other Hazards (i.e. Steep hills, canals, narrow shoulders, water, etc.)
      Chelsea Dr and Indian Springs Rd are both steep
      Narrow shoulders along Orchard Dr. and 2600 South

Yield Signs
        975 East and Chelsea Drive
        950 East at Chelsea Drive
        50 West 3300 South
        Holbrook Rd at 50 West
        2900 South at 50 West
        2900 South at Vista Circle

Reduced Speed School Zones
      3100 South at Davis Blvd

School Bus Loading Zones
       West of the school

Loading/Unloading Areas for Students Who Arrive by Car
      Southwest of the school and East of the school

Dissemination of Plan and Training
Upon approval of the plan, a hard copy will be available in the office to view or by accessing the Boulton Elementary
Web site.

PTA and the school will advertise the SNAP plan once it is complete on the Web site and in the monthly newsletter.
Boulton Staff and PTA will implement the “Five E’s” of Safe Routes to School:
   •	 Evaluation – Monitoring and documenting outcomes and trends through the collection before and after the
       SR2S projects.
   •	 Engineering-Creating operational and physical improvements to the infrastructure surrounding school that
       reduce speeds and potential conflicts with motor vehicle traffic, and establishing safer and fully accessible
       crossings, walkways, trails, and bikeways.
   •	 Education-Teaching children about the broad range of transportation choices, instructing them in important
       lifelong bicycling and walking safety skills, and launching driver safety campaigns in the vicinity of schools.
   •	 Encouragement-Using event and activities to promote walking and bicycling.
   •	 Enforcement-Partnering with local law enforcement to ensure traffic laws are obeyed in the vicinity of school

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                                                                                                         Bronze #4


                           SNAPTM Plan Sample
         (this include enforcement of speed, restriction, yielding to pedestrians in crossings, and proper walking and
         bicycling behaviors), and coordinating community enforcement such as crossing guard projects.
Maps
Map 1 – Student Neighborhood Access Map
Map 2 – School Location Boundary map
Map 3 – School Location Site Map
Map 4 – Loading/Unloading Area Map

Recommendations
    1. Issue: The speed at the intersection of 200 West and Orchard Drive is unsafe.
       Discussion: The speed along Orchard Drive (which becomes 2600 South) is 35 mph with many cars
       going through the intersection even faster. There is not a Slow School Zone through that area.
       Solution: Have Bountiful City put a Slow School Zone at the intersection as soon as House Bill 103
       passes and is signed by the governor

    2.     Issue: There is a curve in Orchard Drive heading West as it approaches the intersection of 200 West 2600
           South reducing visibility of the students crossing and the crossing guard.
           Discussion: The current crossing guard only comes out into the first land of the five lane intersection, so
           the cars heading West on Orchard cannot always see her. She does this so cars turning right on Orchard
           Drive (heading East) will stop.
           Solution: Have a second crossing guard that will stand in the West bound lanes so traffic will stop.

    3.     Issue: There is no crossing guard for the students crossing 200 West on the North side of 2600 South.
           Discussion: The students that live West of 200 West and North of 2600 South have to first cross 2600
           South and then cross 200 West. Many of the accidents involving cars hitting children have been at this
           crossing or along 200 West as the kids have been afraid to cross at the intersection
           Solution: Have a second crossing guard that will cross students along 200 West. This will be the same
           crossing guard as in issue #2.

    4.     Issue: There are no shoulders on Orchard Drive (2600 South), so student walk next to traffic flowing at
           35-40 mph. Last year several students were putting their hands out to see if they could touch cars as they
           passed.
           Solution: Training in the school about proper behavior on the sidewalk. Add a Slow School Zone (same as
           issue #1).

    5.     Issue: South side of 200 West 2600 South needs crossing ladder marks. They have faded.
           Solution: Bountiful City will repaint the ladders.

    6.     Issue: Student running done the hill in front of the school next to Orchard Drive.
           Discussion: After student cross the parking long in front of the school some of them run down the hill
           instead of following the sidewalk around.
           Solution: Have the district cut a path down the middle of the hill and put a sidewalk with a handrail to
           keep students off the hill.


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                                                                                                Bronze #4


                    SNAPTM Plan Sample
7.   Issue: There are few sidewalks to the East and South of the school
     Discussion: In the subdivision direction South and Southeast of the school most of the roads do not have
     sidewalks. When the roads are snows this forces students to walk in the path of traffic.

8.   Issue: 400 West/Vista Circle Dr and 2900 South needs crosswalks.
     Discussion: The intersection where 400 West, Vista Circle and 2900 South intersect need crosswalks on
     all four sides.

9.   Issue: Canyon Estate Dr. (450 East) at 3400 South needs a crosswalk.




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                                                                                 Bronze #4


                       SNAPTM Map Sample
Link to Map is: http://snapforschools.com/Map_view.aspx?EntityID=516




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                       Bronze #4

Drop-off/Pick-up
  Map Sample




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                                              Bronze #5

  Write a policy mandating a tobacco-free school



Criteria Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy mandating a tobacco-free school
           ◦ Principal Signature
    •	 Order tobacco-free signs

Tobacco-free decals and metal signs are available to all schools with a passing tobacco-free policy. Learn how to order
free decals and signs.

Rationale
Despite major national movements to undermine tobacco companies and tobacco marketing, tobacco is still the
leading cause of preventable death in the United States.1 Tobacco use is addictive. Illnesses caused by tobacco use
increase demands on the U.S. healthcare system. Statistics show that about 1,000 people younger than 18 begin
smoking on a daily basis.2 Many children and adolescents do not understand health consequences of tobacco use.
Evidence shows that school health programs can be an effective means of preventing tobacco use among youth.3

     1.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office on Smoking and Health, September 2010,
          www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/fast_facts/index.htm

     2.   US Department of Health and Human Services, National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National findings, 2008,
          http://oas.samhsa.gov/nsduh/2k8nsduh/2k8Results.cfm

     3.   CDC, MMWR, Guidelines for school health programs to prevent tobacco use and addiction, February 1994



Resources
Utah Department of Health                                           Karlee Adams
Tobacco Prevention and Control Program                              801-538-6992
                                                                    karleeadams@utah.gov
                                                                    www.tobaccofreeutah.org

Utah Indoor Clean Air Act Statute                                   www.tobaccofreeutah.org/uicaa-statute.html

Utah Indoor Clean Air Act Rule                                      www.tobaccofreeutah.org/r392-510.htm


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                                   Bronze #5
Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn          Tab F: Tobacco Use




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                                                                                       Bronze #5


                                                   Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Review policy during meeting
  •	 Place copy of policy in teacher, faculty, staff room
  •	 Communicate policy
          ◦ Newsletters
          ◦ Back to school night
          ◦ Parent Teacher conferences
          ◦ Report Cards
          ◦ Student Handbook
          ◦ School Directory
          ◦ Brochure
  •	 Display “no TOBACCO use on school property” signs
  •	 Have students make “No Tobacco” or place existing signs around school
  •	 Introduce policy in conjunction with Red Ribbon Week (October)




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                                                               Bronze #5


                       On-line Reports
Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Tobacco-Free School Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Tobacco-Free School Policy




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                                                                                                          Bronze #5


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal SchoolsTM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “In accordance with the Utah Indoor Clean Air Act tobacco use by students, teachers, faculty, staff,
             district employees, parents, and visitors on school or district property, in school-owned vehicles,
             and at school-sponsored functions away from school property is prohibited. Tobacco-use on school
             district property is prohibited during school and non-school hours.”
         •	 Require that all students receive instruction on how to avoid tobacco use
         •	 Prohibit tobacco advertising in school buildings, at school functions, and in school publications (i.e.
             on signs, T-shirts, caps, or through school sponsorship of school events)
         •	 Identify access and referral to cessation programs for students, teachers, faculty, staff, parents, and
             visitors

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be enforced, who will be involved in enforcement, and elaborate on enforcement
            strategies
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




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                                                                                                             Bronze #5


                                         Policy Sample
Intent
In accordance with the Utah Indoor Clean Air Act tobacco use by students, teachers, faculty, staff, district
employees, parents, and visitors on school or district property, in school-owned vehicles, and at school-sponsored
functions away from school property is prohibited. Tobacco-use on school district property is prohibited during
school and non-school hours.

Possession, sale, delivery, transfer, or distribution of tobacco products or tobacco paraphernalia by students, district
employees, parents, and visitors is prohibited within 1000 feet of school property or within 1000 feet of any
school-sponsored activity. No tobacco advertising will be permitted in any form in the school buildings, at school
functions, or in school publications. Endorsement of or sponsorship in any form of school-related events by tobacco
companies is prohibited.

Green Meadow Elementary School teachers shall incorporate tobacco-prevention into their health unit curriculum.
Teachers in grades K-6 are encouraged to use research-based best practice curriculum. All teachers are encouraged to
draw on the resource of the Local Health Department (LHD) for prevention to assist in teaching these materials.

Blue Hills School District will facilitate students and district staff in accessing statewide tobacco cessation classes to
help them quit.

Tobacco cessation classes are also offered through the LHD and Blue Hills School District. Any student or employee
who is interested in quitting tobacco use may enroll in these classes on a voluntary basis. Students will not be
penalized in any way for requesting to take the cessation classes on a voluntary basis. The school will make every
effort to assist students or employees in accessing these programs.

Rationale
Despite major national movements to undermine tobacco companies and tobacco marketing, tobacco is still the
leading cause of preventable death in the United States.1 Tobacco use is addictive. Illness caused by tobacco use
increase demands on the U.S. healthcare system. Statistics show that about 1,000 people younger than 18 begin
smoking on a daily basis.2 Many children and adolescents do not understand health consequences of tobacco use.
Evidence shows that school health programs can be an effective means of preventing tobacco use among youth.3

Reinforcement
In the event that any student, teacher, faculty, or staff is found using, selling, in possession of, or distributing
tobacco, the school administrator will offer the option of completing a cessation class. If they choose not to
participate in a cessation class, students will be suspended for the day, referred to local law enforcement, and
processed through the court system according to Utah laws. Teachers, faculty, staff, parents and visitors will be
referred to local law enforcement.

If any student, teacher, faculty, staff, district employee, parent, or visitor is found advertising tobacco they will be
notified of the policy and asked to discontinue. If they continue, students will be suspended for the day, teachers,
faculty, and staff will receive a written warning, and parents and visitors will be asked to leave premises.

This policy will be reviewed at a faculty meeting within the first month of each school year.

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                                                                                                                 Bronze #5


                                          Policy Sample
Teachers, faculty, and staff will educate students, families, and visitors of the tobacco-free policy in handbooks
and newsletters, on posted notices or signs at every school entrance and other appropriate locations, and by other
efficient means. To the extent possible, schools and districts will make use of local media to publicize the policies and
help influence community norms about tobacco use.

Endorsement


________________________________________
Principal Name


________________________________________                             _______________
Principal Signature                                                  Date


     1.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office on Smoking and Health, September 2010,
          www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/fast_facts/index.htm

     2.   US Department of Health and Human Services, National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National findings, 2008,
          http://oas.samhsa.gov/nsduh/2k8nsduh/2k8Results.cfm

     3.   CDC, MMWR, Guidelines for school health programs to prevent tobacco use and addiction, February 1994




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                                          Bronze #6

   Complete and submit Heart Health Surveys



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Have one administrator and 80% of classroom teachers complete the online Heart Health Surveys (HHS) by
       November 19, 2011

Rationale
Completion of HHS will help collect baseline data to keep Gold Medal SchoolsTM (GMS) current on the issues
facing schools in Utah. The survey will help direct GMS to determine the best way to reach students in helping
them make good choices about their health.



Resources
LHD                                                          Page 433

Heart Health Survey                                          health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/surveys/gms.html




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                                                                                                         Bronze #6


                                                        Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Distribute Heart Health Survey (HHS) link to teachers and administrator during a meeting
  •	    Set a date for teachers and administrator to complete HHS
  •	    Print 5 Minute Energizer books and give to teachers, faculty, and staff after HHS are complete
  •	    Stress that school will not receive their award money if HHS are not complete




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Bronze Resources
  Gold Medal Mile Ideas




            44            Return to Bronze Menu
                                Gold Medal MileTM
                                      Ideas
Goals
Tracking
Promotion
Faculty Motivation
Student Motivation

Goals
  •	    Set goal to walk somewhere
  •	    Make bulletin board to track miles
  •	    Plan walking event
  •	    Have a competition between students, teachers, faculty, and staff


Tracking                                                                               Gold Medal Mile Log
  •	 Gold Medal MileTM Log                                                                    For
         ◦ Students fill in a circle on the Gold Medal Mile (GMM)                      _________________
           log every time they walk a lap. When the page is full the
                                                                                Fill in a circle for each lap you walk.
           students turn them into their teacher. At the end of the
           month teachers put their classes’ charts in the School
                                                                                     mmmmmmmmm
           Coordinator’s box. The mentor picks them up on the last
                                                                                     mmmmmmmmm
           day of each month and totals the number of miles.
                                                                                     mmmmmmmmm
                                                                                     mmmmmmmmm
                                                                                     mmmmmmmmm

                                                                                 This page is equal to fifteen miles.



  •	 Excel Tracking System
         ◦ Give tracking form to teachers, faculty, and staff. Have teachers, faculty, and staff complete form
            and put it in the Gold Medal SchoolsTM inbox. The Mentor or School Coordinator can pick up
            completed forms and total miles.
         ◦ Use excel spreadsheet to total miles. List teachers, faculty, and staff on the excel spreadsheet with
            two places a month to enter miles walked per class. When entering miles walked per class the excel
            spreadsheet will calculate schools total miles walked.



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                                                                                        Bronze Resources


             Gold Medal Mile Ideas
Tracking Form for Excel Tracking System

               Gold Medal Schools Miles Walked
                     Date
                     Teacher Name
                     Grade
                     *Miles Walked
                    *Miles class walked=(number of students walking) X (miles walked)

 Comments:


 Thank you for walking!


Spreadsheet for Excel Tracking System




                                                 46                  Return to Bronze Resources Menu
                                                                                       Bronze Resources


                 Gold Medal Mile Ideas
•	 Mileage Marker
       ◦ Each footprint on the Mileage Marker card is punched
          with a heart shape punch each time students walk a lap.
          Have an assigned person or the student council outside
          punching the cards during lunch or recess.




•	 Mile Tracker
       ◦ Students fill a space on the Mile Tracker for each time they walk around the marked playground. The
          full card is worth ten miles. The younger students’ teachers initial the cards before turning them in
          Students turn the cards into the office.

   Tracker 1                                                     Tracker 2
    Name: _____________________ Mile Tracker
                 1         2          3          4                  Gold Medal Mile
      1
      2                                                             Name___________________Grade_____
      3
      4
      5
      6
      7
      8
      9
      10




                                                     47               Return to Bronze Resources Menu
                                                                                         Bronze Resources


                 Gold Medal Mile Ideas
•	 Classroom Tracker
        ◦ The classroom tracker can help Mentors keep track of miles walked at multiple schools without
          getting them mixed up. The classroom tracker also allows teachers to express any comments or
          concerns they have.



                                         GMS Miles Walked

      Teacher Name: _________________________________________


       Date          School                    Total Miles Walked           Comments/Concerns
                                               per Class




      Total Students in Classroom:_________

                              *Return to GMS Mailbox Thursday Mornings


•	 Gold Medal Mile Counters
       ◦ Gold Medal Mile (GMM) Counters are taken around to teachers each month. Each GMM Counter
         has the class roster on it. Some classes choose to have the students keep track of their own miles and
         others choose to have the teachers track for the whole class.

                            Gold Medal Mile Counter
    Teacher:                                         Month
    Grade:

                           Mon    Tues   Wed   Thurs Fri     Mon   Tues    Wed   Thurs Fri   Mon   Tues   Wed
    Student's Name
    Student's Name
    Student's Name
    Student's Name
    Student's Name
    Student's Name
    Student's Name
    Student's Name
    Student's Name
    Student's Name                                  48                    Return to Bronze Resources Menu
    Student's Name
                                                                                           Bronze Resources


                   Gold Medal Mile Ideas
  •	  Health and Fitness Committee
         ◦ The Health and Fitness committee is a group of seven energetic 6th graders. Each committee
             member mentors a different grade level and one mentors the teachers, faculty, and staff. Their job
             is to motivate, encourage and track miles for the grade level they are responsible for. They go into
             each classroom weekly and collect miles logged in journals. Miles are then brought to the School
             Coordinator or Mentor who puts them into a master log.
  •	 Popsicle Sticks
         ◦ Make a cup our bucket for each grade or class, depending on how you will be tracking the mile.
             Place the cups or buckets at the end of your walking track. As students go out to walk give them
             popsicle sticks. As students complete a lap have them put one popsicle stick in the cup or bucket
             designated for their grade or class. Count the popsicle sticks at the end of the walk. You can put
             colors on the cups/buckets and popsicle sticks to make it easier to determine where the sticks should
             go. Assign a student to oversee the cups or buckets, rotate that student each day or week.
  •	 Beans/Tickets
         ◦ Teachers use beans to count their miles. They put a bean in a container for every mile walked. The
             beans are counted by classroom students and then turned into the school coordinator.


Promotion
  •	 Post a map and show the schools’ progress towards their destination
  •	 Stop Cities
          ◦ If you have set a destination goal for your school make it fun and education by including stop cities
             along the way. Mark stop cities with stars on a large map. Each time they reach a stop city hang up
             a fact sheet about that city next to the map, along with a note indicating the next stop city and how
             many miles away it is.
          ◦ See a list of stop cities (including facts for each city)
             McMillan Elementary used on their way to Beijing
  •	 Walk the GMM in the Kick-off assembly
  •	 Be creative in marking the course (painted footsteps, balloons,
     signs, etc.)
  •	 Create a walking group for faculty and staff
  •	 Make a GMS flag and let students carry it as they walk the
     GMM




                                                       49                 Return to Bronze Resources Menu
                                                                                            Bronze Resources


                      Gold Medal Mile Ideas
Faculty Motivation
  •	    Have a competition between students and teachers, faculty, and staff
  •	    Give top walking faculty an hour away from the classroom covered by the principal
  •	    Provide a prize for the teacher who reports their miles most frequently
  •	    Prep time coupon



                              Fifteen minues of prep time
                              while your class walks the
                              Gold Medal MileTM. Contact
                              office to redeem coupon.



  •	    Have grades take turns walking the GMM
  •	    Use GMM as part of teacher, faculty, and staff wellness program
  •	    Have a competition between faculty members
  •	    Incorporate the GMM into other subject lessons
  •	    Walk the GMM after a teacher, faculty, and staff meeting
  •	    Sign-Up Sheet

                      Sign up to have your class walk with the “Queen of the Mile”

 Date -             1:50 p.m.                                     2:10 p.m.
 Thursdays          Please put your grade and room number by your Please put your grade and room number by your
                    name                                          name
    Sept. 29
       Oct. 13
       Oct. 27
       Nov. 3
       Nov. 10
       Our school’s mentor for Gold Medal schools will come and pick your class up to walk the
                               track just before their assigned recess,.




                                                        50                Return to Bronze Resources Menu
                                                                                            Bronze Resources


                   Gold Medal Mile Ideas
Student Motivation
  •	 Gold Medal Mile Certificate
         ◦ The GMM certificate allows the school coordinator or mentor to track student progress throughout
           the year by circling the miles the student earns. Present certificates for top walkers at the awards
           assembly.

                                Gold Medal MileTM Award



                              2011                                              2012




             Miles Walked 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 87 80 85 90 95
     100 105 110 115 120 125 130 135 140 145 150 155 160 165 170 175 180 185 190 195
    200 205 210 215 220 225 230 235 240 245 250 255 60 265 270 275 280 285 290 295 300


 Principal                                               School Coordinator

  •	 Give students a foot charm or medallion (both can be found at www.fitnessfinders.net when they reach a
     walking goal
           ◦ Have a different colored medallion for each month. Make a goal for each month, when students
              reach that goal they get that month’s colored medallion.
  •	 Ask local businesses to donate prizes for top walkers
  •	 Have a competition between grades or students and faculty
  •	 Have a competition with a neighboring GMS
           ◦ Pick a week such as Unplug ‘n Play week and see which school can walk the most miles per student.
              Invite special guests to come and walk with students such as families, local police officers and
              teachers. A reward is not necessary, bragging right should be enough.
  •	 Hire a D.J. once a year to liven things up during the walk
  •	 Have a trophy that is awarded to the class or student with the most miles walked for the month; Let that
     class keep the trophy in their room until another class beats them
           ◦ Other awards could include a yellow jersey or golden shoe
  •	 If the school reaches their walking goal have the principal kiss a pig, shave their head or give the students a
     break with an afternoon of fun games or an assembly
  •	 Have a special focus one week out of each month
                                                        51                 Return to Bronze Resources Menu
                                                                                      Bronze Resources


                 Gold Medal Mile Ideas
•	 Give anyone walking the GMM that pushes them selves or encourages another student to push him or
   herself a “Got Caught Walking” ticket. Put the tickets in a container with the “GCW” logo on it. At the end
   of each draw out 5 tickets and announce the winner over the intercom.

   Got Caught Walking

   Got Caught Walking - Ticket

             Got Caught Walking


        Name                            Date


   Got Caught Walking - Logo




                                                   52                 Return to Bronze Resources Menu
                     Silver
Silver Criteria

Silver #1: PTA/PTO Health Event

Silver #2: Teacher, Faculty, and Staff Wellness Program

Silver #3: Competitive and Non-Competitive Activities

Silver #4: Criteria Menu

Silver Resources




                           53          Return to Criteria Breakdown
                                           Silver Criteria
    To become a Silver School, you must continue implementing the Bronze Criteria and
    complete all four Silver Criteria. Upon completion your school will receive $300.

    1. Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization must coordinate at least one
       health-related event per year that involves students, teachers, faculty, staff, and parents

é 2. Write a policy that requires a yearly teacher, faculty, and staff wellness program
    3. Offer a variety of competitive and non-competitive physical activity programs to students

    4. Choose and complete three criteria from Criteria Menu




                                                   54                           Return to Silver Menu
                                                    Silver #1
   Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization must coordinate
   at least one health-related event per year that involves students, teachers,
   faculty, staff, and parents

Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 The Parent Teacher Association (PTA)/Parent Teacher Organization (PTO) of your school must coordinate a
       health-related event that involves students, teachers, faculty, staff, and parents and is advertised as a tobacco-
       free event.

Holding a health fair will not meet this criterion. A health fair is any event where nothing other than brochures,
flyers, etc. are distributed.

This criterion may count towards any Criteria Menu options that your PTA/PTO coordinates.

Rationale
Role modeling is one of the most powerful influences on behavior.1 Evaluation has found that community
participation in school health promotion programs can increase morale, participation in vigorous activity, and
improve physical fitness.

Students who have quality time with their parents they are more likely to be accepted by their peers and have a
positive attitude towards authority. Students who spend time with parents are also less likely to be involved in
violent behavior at school.2

     1.   Health Is Academic, School-site health promotion for staff, January1998

     2.   Adolescence Journal, Adjustment problems in the family and school context, attitude towards authority, and violent behavior at
          school in adolescence, November 2007

Resources
Schools PTA Health Commissioner or other PTA member

National PTA                                                           www.pta.org

Utah PTA Health Page                                                   www.utahpta.org/comm/health/

Phoenix Alliance                                                       www.utahphoenixalliance.org

Center for Disease Control                                             www.cdc.gov/tobacco
                                                                55                                      Return to Silver Menu
                                 Silver #1

Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids         www.kickbuttsday.org

Great American Smokeout                www.cancer.org/Healthy/StayAwayfromTobacco/

Red Ribbon Week                        www.nfp.org




School Coordinator Assignments
                                  56                           Return to Silver Menu
                                                                                                        Silver #1


                                                      Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Give memo to the PTA/PTO
  •	 See Criteria Menu #9 Resources section for a list of National campaigns
  •	 Walk to School Day
          ◦ Assist with and participate in Walk to School Day. Encourage information of walking school buses.
             (See Criteria Menu #1)
  •	 Family Fitness Night
          ◦ Sponsor a Family Fitness Night one night a month. Provide games and activities for students and
             their families.
  •	 After-School Physical Activity/Fitness Program
          ◦ Provide structured activities that promote life long physical activity such as walking, biking,
             swimming, roller blading, hiking, etc.
  •	 Non-food Fundraising
          ◦ Support and promote a policy that encourages organizations to raise funds by selling non-food items
             (See Gold #3G)
  •	 Cookbook Sale
          ◦ Have students collect healthy recipes and physical activity tips to publish in a school cookbook and
             sell to the community. Use the money to purchase exercise equipment.
  •	 Physical Activity School Carnival
          ◦ Contact organizations in your community to donate and contribute to the carnival. Most outdoor
             games should involve physical activity such as basketball shoot out, baseball toss, ring toss, and mini
             golf.
  •	 Truth from Youth Anti-Tobacco Advertising Contest
          ◦ Assist school in implementing the Truth from Youth Advertising Contest, an anti-tobacco advertising
             contest for 4th and 5th grades (See Criteria Menu #5)
  •	 School Walk Event
          ◦ Assist school in holding a school walk event. (See Criteria Menu #4)
  •	 Provide tobacco prevention techniques and cessation support to parents and families




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                                                                 Silver #1


                               On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe the Health-Related Event
   •	 How was the event promoted tobacco-free?

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe the Health-Related Event
   •	 How was the event promoted tobacco-free?




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                                                    Silver #2
   Write a policy that requires a yearly teachers, faculty, and staff wellness
   program


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy requiring a yearly teachers, faculty, and staff wellness program
           ◦ Principal Signature
    •	 Organize and implement a teachers, faculty, and staff wellness program(s) that lasts throughout the year
           ◦ If you choose walking the Gold Medal Mile™ as your teachers, faculty, and staff wellness program,
              methods for tracking the miles walked must be created

Rationale
School-site health promotion activities for staff are designed to promote physical, emotional, and mental health
of school employees as well as prevent disease and disability. These programs have proven to save health care costs,
improve daily attendance, and promote employees’ general health and well being1. Faculty and staff who participate
in health promotion programs serve as a good role model for the students. The Wellness Councils of America and
Canada have found that employees that participate in a wellness program have significantly lower cholesterol levels,
blood pressure, and weight.2

     1.   Utah Department of Health, Building a Healthy Worksite toolkit, http://health.utah.gov/worksitewellness/pdfs/Worksite_toolkit.
          pdf

     2.   Wellness Councils of America and Canada, Why Wellness Works, April 2008, http://www.welcoa.org/

Resources
American Cancer Society                                                 www.cancer.org

American Diabetes Association                                           www.diabetes.org

American Heart Association                                              www.americanheart.org

Centers for Disease Control’s:                                          www.hearthighway.org/pdfs/sixstepguide.pdf
6 Step Guide for a Heart Healthy Worksite

Check Your Health                                                       www.checkyourhealth.org

Choose My Plate                                                         www.choosemyplate.gov/

Health and Work Benefits of a Worksite Health Program                   www.sitemaker.umich.edu/worksitepa/home
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                                                 Silver #2
Healthfinder                                                  www.healthfinder.gov

Healthy Worksite Award                                        www.health.utah.gov/ahy/Worksite/Worksite_home.htm

The President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports        www.fitness.gov

Tompkins County Worksite Wellness Guide                       www.tompkins-co.org/wellness/worksite/workwell/

Wellness Councils of America: Well Workplace Workbook         www.welcoa.org/wellworkplace/index.php?catefory=7

Worksite Wellness Facts                                       www.preventdisease.com/worksite_wellness/

School Employee Wellness                                      www.schoolempwell.org

Utah Department of Health Employer Resource Guide             http://health.utah.gov/worksitewellness/

Utah Council for Worksite Health Promotion                    www.health.utah.gov/worksitewellness/resourcewellness.html
Resource Directory

School Employee Wellness                                      health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/guide/EmpWellness.pdf
Fact Sheet

Fit, Healthy and Ready to Learn                               Tab C: General Policies Pg C-18

Local Health Departments                                      page 433




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                                                                                                       Silver #2


                                                      Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Go to the Teachers, Faculty, and Staff Wellness Resources section for detailed information, including
     handouts and tracking forms, on teacher, faculty, and staff wellness programs
          ◦ 12 Healthy Holiday Habits
          ◦ Gold Medal Games
          ◦ Holiday Weigh In
          ◦ Savor the Spectrum
          ◦ Try - A - Trail
          ◦ Wellness 300
          ◦ Wellness Calendar
          ◦ Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart
          ◦ Your Wellness Program
  •	 Go to Wellness Ideas in the Teachers, Faculty, and Staff Wellness Resources section for detailed information
     for these programs
          ◦ Pedometer Craze
          ◦ Gold Medal Mile
          ◦ Stroke Awareness
          ◦ Health Promotion
          ◦ Physical Activity
          ◦ Lose a Staff Member
          ◦ Stress Management
          ◦ AHA, Start!
          ◦ Nutrition for You
          ◦ Days of the Week
          ◦ Pull the Plug
          ◦ Special Interest Clubs
          ◦ Wee Five
          ◦ Tobacco Cessation
          ◦ Active for Life Challenge
          ◦ Optimum Health Services
          ◦ Weight Watchers
          ◦ Insurance Based Programs
          ◦ Other Resources




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                                                                                      Silver #2


                                     On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe activities teachers, faculty, and staff participated in
   •	 How were activities promoted?
   •	 If applicable describe how faculty participation was tracked


Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Teachers, Faculty, and Staff Wellness Policy draft


End-Year (April)
   •	   Attach Teachers, Faculty, and Staff Wellness Policy
   •	   Describe activities teachers, faculty, and staff participated in
   •	   How were activities promoted?
   •	   If applicable describe how faculty participation was tracked




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                                                                                                            Silver #2


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools™ policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “Wellness activities will be made available to all teachers, faculty, and staff each year.”
         •	 Description of tobacco cessation program
         •	 Do not include detailed information about this year’s wellness program. This information will be
            included in the description.

    □ Rationale
        •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
        •	 How policy will be communicated
        •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”
        •	 Consequences to violating this policy should be listed here

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




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                                                                                                                          Silver #2


                                   Policy Guidelines
Intent
Green Meadow Elementary will sponsor a teacher, faculty, and staff wellness program each year.

In addition tobacco cessation will be encouraged to all teachers, faculty, and staff. Green Meadow Elementary will
advertise the Utah Tobacco Quit Line and Quitnet by placing cards and posters in the faculty room. The cessation
directory will also be displayed in the faculty room.

Rationale
Teachers, faculty, and staff who participate in health promotion programs serve as a good role model for the
students. School-site health promotion activities for staff are designed to promote physical, emotional, and mental
health of school employees as well as prevent disease and disability. These programs have proven to save health care
costs, improve daily attendance, and promote employees’ general health and well being1. The Wellness Councils
of America and Canada have found that employees that participate in a wellness program have significantly lower
cholesterol levels, blood pressure, and weight.2

Reinforcement
This policy will be reviewed at the beginning of each school year and a wellness activity will be decided on. The year’s
wellness activities will be announced at the first faculty meeting of the school year. Upon hire new employees will be
informed of the policy and encouraged to participate.

Endorsement


________________________________________
Principal Name


________________________________________                                _______________
Principal Signature                                                     Date

     1.   Utah Department of Health, Building a Healthy Worksite toolkit, http://health.utah.gov/worksitewellness/pdfs/Worksite_Toolkit.
          pdf

     2.   Wellness Councils of America and Canada, Why Wellness Works, April 2008, http://www.welcoa.org




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                                                    Silver #3
   Offer a variety of competitive and non-competitive physical activity programs
   to students


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Provide multiple opportunities for students to practice physical activity through participation in physical
       education, intramural programs, sports, and recreation clubs
    •	 Both competitive and non-competivite physical activities must be provided programs to all students

Competitive activity is defined as an exclusive activity in which elimination and the creation of a winner is at the
forefront. Non-competitive activity is defined as cooperative activities or activities that require participation from all
persons at all times.

Rationale
The National Association for Sport and Physical Education understands that physical activity provides opportunities
for enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social interaction.1 Activities that involve team competition make
students feel like an important part of their class. When teams are formed in ways that preserve the dignity and self
respect of every child the activity is enjoyed more.2 It is also important for students to participate in non-competitive
activities. It has been found that students who participate in non-competitive activities often have higher self-
confidence, more self-management skills, and enjoy physical activity.3

     1.   National Association for Sport and Physical Education, National Standards for Physical Education: a guide to Contest and
          Assessment, April 2004

     2.   University of Wisconsin, Competitive and Non-Competitive physical Activity, April 2011, www.ediphy.wisc.edu/db/files/
          appropriate%20practices002.doc

     3.   California Department of Education, Physical Education Framework for California Public Schools: Kindergarten Through Grade
          Twelve. 2009, http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/cr/cf/documents/2009peframework.pdf

Resources
PE Central                                                              www.pecentral.org

Human Kinetics                                                          www.humankinetics.com

Peaceful Playground                                                     www.peacefulplaygrounds.com



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                                                Silver #3
5 Minute Energizers                                   www.eatsmartmovemoreenc.com/Energizers/Texts/k-
                                                      5-Energizers.pdf

                                                      www.curriki.org/xwiki/bin/view/Coll_IsaacNewton/

Ideas for Non-competitive games                       www.funattic.com

Guidelines for After-School Physical Activity         www.ncpublicschools.org/docs/curriculum/
and Intramural Sport Programs




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                                                                                                          Silver #3


                                                        Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Provide activities in physical education classes, recess, intramural programs, sports, and recreation clubs
  •	 Competitive Activities
         ◦ Flag tag, basketball, flag football, baseball, kickball, soccer, tug-of-war, croquet, relay games, four
            square, badmitten, wall ball, tether ball, whiffle golf, etc.
  •	 Non-Competitive Activities
         ◦ Jump rope, hopscotch, walking the Gold Medal Mile™, stacking cups, dance, yoga, 5-minute
            energizers, skill training, etc.




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                                                           Silver #3


                                   On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List of competitive activities
   •	 List of non-competitive activities

End-Year (April)
   •	 List of competitive activities
   •	 List of non-competitive activities




                                           68   Return to Silver Menu
                                           Silver #4

  Choose and complete three criteria from Criteria Menu



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Choose and complete three criteria from the Criteria Menu.




                                                      69            Return to Silver Menu
      Silver Resources
Teacher, Faculty, and Staff Wellness Resources




                       70                   Return to Silver Menu
                             Wellness Resources
12 Healthy Holiday Habits
Gold Medal Games
Holiday Weigh In
Savor the Spectrum
Try-A-Trail
Wellness 300
Wellness Calendar
Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart
Your Wellness Program
Wellness Ideas

Gold Medal Games
Welcome to the 2009-2010 Gold Medal Games. As a participant, we invite you and your team to join in a fun
competition based on how much you exercise, eat your fruits and veggies and engage in healthy activities. This is
a program for all exercise levels – whether you are a beginner or advanced, the program is geared to help you get
moving. You will be competing for the Gold, Silver and Bronze Medal prizes. Prizes will be given out throughout the
competition and at the end of the school year.

How to Get Started
  1. Teachers, faculty, and staff will be placed into teams of three
  2. Choose a team captain to collect weekly points and distribute information to members
  3. Follow the program by accumulating as many points as you can. You will be responsible to track your own
      points and report then to your team captain weekly You will get points for:
          a. Number of minutes of exercise
          b. Eat fruits and vegetables
          c. Drink water
          d. Attend wellness workshops
  4. Teams will be awarded Gold, Silver and Bronze prizes at the end of the year

How to Earn Points
  1. Exercise: Earn one point for every minute do aerobic exercise or strength training activities
  2. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption: Earn one point for every serving of fruits and vegetable
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                             Wellness Resources
    3. Water Intake: Earn one point for every eight ounce cup of water
    4. Bonus Activities
          a. Earn 30 points for every wellness workshop or health activity attended. Workshops or activities will
              be offered once a month.
          b. Earn 20 points for every new exercise or sport that you normally would not do
          c. Earn 30 points for every team exercise, activity, or sports done together

Gold Medal Games Points Tracker


                                    Gold Medal Games
                                                   Points Tracker

Name__________________________                  Team___________________________


 Week of:       Exercise             Fruits & Veggies     Water                Bonus (explanation of      Total
                                                                               activity)
 Sunday
 Monday
 Tuesday
 Wednesday
 Thursday
 Friday
 Saturday



Savor the Spectrum
How it Works
Savor the Spectrum refers to enjoying the different colors of fruits and vegetables and the benefits they provide. The
Savor the Spectrum contest encourages participants to eat at least 100 servings of fruits and vegetables over a 20 day
period, focusing on getting a variety of colors of fruits and vegetables.

Participants keep track of their own fruit and vegetable intake using the tracking chart and turn in their totals at the
end of the twenty days. Recipes with fruit or vegetable ingredients are sent out via e-mail each weekday. Prizes may
be awarded to participants with the most servings.

For information about serving sizes and to determine recommended intakes for individuals visit www.
choosemyplate.gov.


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                            Wellness Resources
Coordinator Instructions
   1. Pick a start and finish date
   2. Send an e-mail to all teachers, faculty, and staff two to three weeks before you plan to start. Explain the
      contest and ask those who would like to participate to e-mail you by your deadline (about two days before
      the start date)
   3. Compile a list of all participants’ e-mail addresses
   4. The day after your deadline e-mail all participants a tracking sheet
   5. Send an e-mail to all participants each day (or weekday) of the contest with a recipe attached. Include words
      of encouragement or facts about fruits and vegetables
   6. On the last day ask participants to send you their total number of servings for the twenty day period
   7. Send a thank you e-mail to all participants, recognize top winners. If you are doing prizes arrange a time to
      award prizes and recognize winners

A Twist
Rather than working individually ask participants to form groups of 4 to 6. This will challenge many to eat more
servings for the sake of the group.

Savor the Spectrum Recipes

Apple Crisp                                               Oatmeal Blueberry Muffins
Asian Chicken Noodles                                     Potato Soup
Avocado Mandarin Salad                                    Roasted Garlic Cauliflower
Beef Stroganoff                                           Split Pea Soup
Chicken Salad Sandwich                                    Strawberry Smoothie
Chicken Tetrazzini                                        Stuffed Bell Peppers
Corn and Black Bean Salsa                                 Sweet Potatoes
Cranberry Pear Chicken                                    Taco Soup
Eggplant Tomato Sandwich                                  Vegetable Pasta with Fresh Tomatoes
Fruit Pizza

Additional Savor the Spectrum Resources

Fruit & Veggie Fast Facts
Savor the Spectrum Tracking Sheet




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                             Wellness Resources
Try – A - Trail
How It Works
Each time a participant tries a new trail or walking route they fill out a Try -A- Trail form and put it in the Try
-A- Trail box. To reward participants, regularly draw names out of the box and award winners with prizes. After
the drawings, post all entries on a bulletin board so everyone can learn about the new trail. Each trail can only be
entered once per teacher, faculty, and staff member but they can enter as many different trails as they would like.

Try - A - Trail Form


                                             Try - A - Trail
   Instructions:
   Select a trail. You can locate some on www.utahwalks.org. Walk or hike one mile or more between September
   and November.

   When you Try - A - Trail complete this form below and put it in the “Try - A - Trail” box located in the
   teacher, faculty, and staff lounge. All forms will be entered into a drawing in November.

   Complete the following information:
   Name _______________________________________________
   Trail Name or route walked___________________________________
   Distance traveled ____________________
   Describe something you enjoyed about this trail
   ____________________________________________________________________________________
   ____________________________________________________________________________________
   ____________________________________________________________________________________
   ____________________________________________________________________________________



Wellness 300
Welcome to the Wellness 300. We appreciate you joining the race to improve your health and are ready to give you
some tips on how to do so.

The Challenge
In a 10 week period eat at least 300 servings of fruits or vegetables and exercise at least 30 times.

How it works
Before the challenge you will receive three “track”ing cards to measure your progress. Each card contains 100 fruit
and vegetables dots and ten exercise dots. For every serving of a fruit or vegetable that you ate color in a yellow dot.
For every session of 30 minute aerobic activity color in a blue dot.



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                                                                                                        Silver Resources


                            Wellness Resources
This is a race against yourself, so go at your own pace. Be sure to finish all three cards in ten weeks. Once your card
is complete return it to the front office to receive a small prize.

What counts as a serving
For most fruits and vegetables, a serving is ½ cup. A serving of dried fruit is ¼ cup and a serving of lettuce is one
cup. To find more information about serving sizes visit the Fruits & Veggies—More Matters ® Web site www.
fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/?p=1366.

Exercise Requirements
In order for your exercise to count for the challenge, it must be an aerobic activity that gets your heart pumping. It
needs to be for at least 30 consecutive minutes and you should be able to feel your pulse increase.

Courtesy of BYUWellness

Wellness 300 Tracking Form




                                    LAP 1                                                                                                 LAP

                                      Exercise Lap
                                                                                                                                           E
                                      Fruit and Vegetable Lap
                                                                                                                                           F
                 W E LL N E S S                                                                                   W E LL N E S S

                 300                                                                                              300
                                      Mark a yellow dot for each
                                                                                                                                           M
                                      serving of fruit or vegetables
                                                                                                                                           s
                                      and a blue dot for each 30
                                                                                                                                           a
                                      minutes of exercise
                                                                                                                                           m
                                       Start




                                                                       BYUWellness




                                                                                                                              WELLNE


                                                                                               Fruits and Vegetables
                                    LAP 3                                                      Eating at least five servings of fruit or
                                                                                               vegetables is easy when you consider
                                                              75                     Return    how small Resources is. Mark
                                                                                              to Silver one serving sizeMenu a
                                       Exercise Lap                                            fruit and vegetable dot each time you
                                                                                                   Silver Resources


                            Wellness Resources
Your Wellness Program
Ideas
When your mind and body are run down they don’t function at their best. That means your concentration and
memory are decreased. Even your immunity is at risk when your body is run down. Choose ways to relieve effects
of stress and be healthier when stress arrives. Check out some of the following ideas and see which would be easiest
to fit into your schedule.

Take 10 minutes each day doing one of the following suggestions or one of a similar nature of your choice. Do
this beginning ____________ until _____________. Record your participation on the card provided and submit
completed cards to _______________ on __________________.

     1.   Exercise breaks - 5 minute energizers, sprint to the mailbox, go up and down stairs, run the Gold Medal
          Mile™, one day park farther away and take the stairs instead of the elevator, or walk or ride your bike to
          the store

     2.   Release tension - punch a pillow, muscle relaxation starting with your toes up to your scalp tense then
          release your muscles, or write a letter expressing yourself. Let out pent up energy while getting into your
          menial tasks (i.e. while cleaning scrub a little harder and vent your frustration you’ll feel better after and
          you’ll have a cleaner house).

     3.   Mental Vacations - your hobbies, do a crossword puzzle, try a new recipe, do research on your summer
          vacation, build something, knit, or read a book or article just for fun NOTE: While taking a mental
          vacation let your mind wander. This excludes stressing about what you are not doing.

     4.   Rest and Relaxation - take a cat nap, soak in the tub even if it is just a foot bath, watch the sunrise and
          the sunset, find your favorite constellation of the season, bird-watch, take a nature walk, actually smell
          flowers, try some aroma therapy, yoga, pilates or tai chi

     5.   Be happy - laugh out loud, rent a comedy, read the comics, smile, or even do something nice for someone
          else

By Kristine Jeppesen, Gold Medal SchoolsTM Mentor




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                                                                      Silver Resources


                            Wellness Resources
Your Wellness Program Log


                      Wellness Program
    Monday         Tuesday   Wednesday   Thursday   Friday      Saturday      Sunday




    Monday         Tuesday   Wednesday   Thursday   Friday      Saturday      Sunday




    Monday         Tuesday   Wednesday   Thursday   Friday      Saturday      Sunday




    Monday         Tuesday   Wednesday   Thursday   Friday      Saturday      Sunday




Signature




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                                                                                                Silver Resources


                            Wellness Resources
Wellness Ideas
Pedometer Craze
   •	 Teachers, faculty, and staff receives a pedometer to wear in order to track the number of steps walked in a
      day
          ◦ Give awards each time milestones are met such as 100 miles walked

Gold Medal Mile
   •	 Walk the Gold Medal MileTM with students
          ◦ Develop a way to track their progress
          ◦ Provide incentives

Stroke Awareness
    •	 Coordinate stroke education awareness campaign www.hearthighway.org/pdfs/strokecampaign.pdf. Contact
       the Utah Department of Health, Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program, Sarah Davis, Secondary
       Prevention Specialist, 801-538-9209, scdavis@utah.gov.
    •	 Encourage teachers, faculty, and staff to keep blood pressures within normal ranges
            ◦ Provide blood pressure checks during recess and lunch
            ◦ Offer a pre and post test at start and end of year or term
    •	 Encourage teachers, faculty, and staff to keep cholesterol level within normal ranges
            ◦ Offer cholesterol screening during recess and lunch
            ◦ Offer a pre and post test at start and end of the year or term

Health Promotion
   •	 Provide health tips through emails, weekly announcements, posting in the teacher, faculty, and staff room
            ◦ Ask questions about the tips and enter teachers, faculty, and staff in a drawing for providing answers
   •	 Work with a neighboring high school to provide free after-school access to fitness facilities/equipment for all
       teachers, faculty, and staff
   •	 Hold Lunch & Learns
            ◦ Topics could include diabetes, blood pressure, cholesterol, breast cancer, nutrition, physical activity,
               bicycling, yoga, safety, etc.

Physical Activity
   •	 Provide aerobics, yoga, strength training, walking club, exercise videos, etc.
   •	 Encourage teachers, faculty, and staff to participate in 30 minutes of any type of physical activity five days
       per week
            ◦ Develop a way to track progress
            ◦ Give rewards for teachers, faculty, and staff who meet certain landmarks such as five days of physical
               activity per week for four consistent weeks
   •	 Make a bulletin board showing teachers, faculty, and staff being physically active
            ◦ Ask teachers, faculty, and staff to bring a picture of them running, biking, mountain climbing,
               skiing, etc.
   •	 Use on-line programs such as www.myephit.com to create customized fitness plans, get nutrition
       information, submit questions to a coach, etc.
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                            Wellness Resources
    •	 Encourage teachers, faculty, and staff members to bike to and from work. Provide incentives to those who
       participate.
    •	 Highlight and practice the 5 Minute Energizers at faculty meeting

Lose a Teacher, Faculty, or Staff Member
   •	 Hold a teacher, faculty, and staff weigh-in at the beginning of year and then again at end of year to see if the
       group has collectively lost weight
           ◦ Provide weight loss/management tips throughout the year to keep teachers, faculty, and staff
              motivated
           ◦ Arrange for teachers, faculty, and staff to weigh in as a group on a large scale (i.e. at a truck stop) so
              individual weight does not have to be recorded
           ◦ Call it “Lose a Teacher, Faculty, or Staff Member” and set a goal to lose the weight of one teacher,
              faculty, or staff member by the end of the year

Stress Management
    •	 Invite a massage therapist or therapist student to provide free 15 minute massages to teachers, faculty, and
        staff
    •	 Provide comic relief at a teacher, faculty, and staff meeting
    •	 Practice time management
    •	 Start a gratitude journal. Have each teacher, faculty, and staff member write an entry.

American Heart Association, Start!
   •	 Participate in the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Program, Start!
           ◦ This program will help teachers, faculty, and staff get fit and heart healthy all year round. Go to
              http://startwalkingnow.org/ for more information.

Nutrition for You
   •	 Eat more fruits and vegetables all year round. Try to get 5-9 a day.
            ◦ Include fruit and vegetable recipes in teacher, faculty, and staff newsletters
            ◦ Create a card to track progress
            ◦ March Madness: March is nutrition month. Enjoy healthy snacks while watching a little basketball.
            ◦ Encourage teachers, faculty, and staff to bring healthy, low-fat foods to meetings with healthy recipes
            ◦ Make fruit and healthy snacks available to teachers, faculty, and staff for 25 cents per snack
            ◦ Hold a tasters table of healthy fruit/vegetable recipes

Days of the Week
   •	 Promote special days such as
            ◦ “Move it Monday” where teachers, faculty, and staff are encouraged bike to school
            ◦ “Taste it Tuesday” where teachers, faculty, and staff try a new fruit
            ◦ “Walk it Wednesdays” where teachers, faculty, and staff are encouraged to walk 10 minutes at lunch
            ◦ “Thirsty Thursday” where teachers, faculty, and staff focus on water intake
            ◦ “Fresh Friday” where teachers, faculty, and staff add more vegetables to their diet


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                                                                                               Silver Resources


                            Wellness Resources
Pull the Plug
    •	 Hold “Pull the Plug” week
            ◦ Encourage teachers, faculty, and staff to spend less time in front of the TV, cell phone, computer, or
              video game and more time being active

Special Interest Clubs
    •	 Organize special interest clubs such as walking, cycling, healthy cooking, recipe swap, yoga, gardening, and
        stress management

Wee Five
   •	 Promote “WEE Five or More a Day”
          ◦ W- drink five or more glasses of water
          ◦ E- eat five or more fruits and vegetables
          ◦ E- exercise five or more minutes at recess

Tobacco Cessation
   •	 Encourage teachers, faculty, and staff to use quit smoking programs
          ◦ Utah Department of Health, 1-877-220-3466

Structured Programs
    •	 Active For Life Challenge
           ◦ This 10-week program encourages teachers, faculty, and staff to be more active on a regular basis
              by setting individual goals and forming teams for motivation and support. Participants earn points
              by doing physical activity and eating healthy food choices. This program is sponsored through
              the American Cancer Society. For more information, visit www.cancer.org/docroot/PED/content/
              PED_1_5X_Active_For_Life.asp.

    •	 Optimum Health Services (Davis, Salt Lake Valley, and Weber-Morgan Health Departments only)
           ◦ Services include weight loss classes, personal training, running coaching, community classes, wellness
             programs, and body assessments. Contact Lora Erickson at 801-299-1601, blonderunner@netzero.
             net.

    •	 Weight Watchers
           ◦ Provides group sessions and discounts. Visit www.weightwatchers.com or call Kimberly Evans at
             801-486-0125 ext. 113

    •	 Health Insurance Based Programs
           ◦ Altius Health Plans will provide educational programs at your place of work on topics such as cancer,
             preventative health, fitness, weight management, etc. Call the Quality Improvement Department at
             801.933.3660.
           ◦ Educators Mutual holds a Walk the Walk wellness program each Spring. Visit www.educatorsmutual.
             com for more information.
           ◦ If your schools uses PEHP insurance Healthy Utah can help you with wellness programs, hold blood

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                                                                                  Silver Resources


               Wellness Resources
  pressure checks at the school for teachers, faculty, and staff, follow-up as needed by a school nurse,
  and provide a teacher, faculty, and staff wellness newsletter monthly. Visit www.healthyutah.org for
  more information. Many health clubs and/or fitness centers offer discounts to Intermountain Health
  Plan members. To see which centers participate in your area visit www.selecthealth.org.
◦ Health screenings such as blood pressure and cholesterol are available. Contact local insurance
  representatives.




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                            Gold
Gold Criteria                    Gold #3E: Bans Advertising

Gold #1: PE Teacher/Specialist   Gold #3F: Food Service Training

Gold #2: Non-Food Rewards        Gold #3G: Non-Food Fundraisers

Gold #3: Changing the Scene      Gold #3H: Student Input

Gold #3A: Healthy Options        Gold #3I: Recess Before Lunch

Gold #3B: Team Nutrition         Gold #4: Criteria Menu

Gold #3C: Nutrition Education Gold Resources

Gold #3D: Adequate Eating


                                 82       Return to Criteria Breakdown
                                          Gold Criteria

    To become a Gold School, you must continue implementing the Bronze and Silver
    Criteria and complete all four Gold Criteria. Upon completion your school will receive
    $500.

é 1. Write a policy that requires K-6 Physical Education (PE) and physical activity courses to be
     overseen by PE teacher(s) or specialist(s)

é 2. withheldpolicy punishment faculty, and staff that food is not to be used as a reward or
     Write a
              as a
                    for teachers,


    3. Complete four of the following from the Changing the Scene Program-Improving the School
       Nutrition Environment (Gold #3A-#3I)

   é a. whenever foodthatavailable outside of school meal services to be available
        Write a policy
                       is
                          requires healthy food and beverage choices


        b. Enroll school as a Team Nutrition School and conduct nutrition education activities and
           promotions that involve students, teachers, faculty, staff, parents, and the community

        c. Offer nutrition education in the school dining room and classroom, with coordination
           between school food service personnel and teachers, faculty, and staff

   é d. studentspolicy that requires lunch to be11:00 am and 1:00 pm long from the time
        Write a
                 are seated and held between
                                                 at least twenty minutes


   é e. healthy food choices advertising of less nutritious food choices and promotes
        Write a policy that bans


   é f.    Write a policy that requires food service personnel to have appropriate pre-service
           training and regular participation in professional development

        g. Require all organizations to raise funds by selling only non-food items

        h. Consider student needs in planning for a healthy school nutrition environment by
           asking students for input and incorporating their feedback into policy making

   é i.   Write a policy that requires recess to be scheduled immediately before lunch for most
          or all grades

    4. Choose and complete two criteria, in addition to the three options chosen
       for the Silver level, from the Criteria Menu


                  éA policy must be written for these criteria
                                                 83                       Return to Gold Menu
                                                      Gold #1
   Write a policy that requires K-6 Physical Education (PE) and physical activity
   courses to be overseen by PE teacher(s) or specialist(s)


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that requires K-6 Physical Education (PE) and physical activity courses to be overseen by PE
       teacher(s) or specialist(s)
            ◦ Principal signature
    •	 A representative from your school must attend a PE training and share information received with teachers,
       faculty, and staff

Gold Medal Schools’TM (GMS) definition of certified PE teacher(s) or specialist(s) is a person who attends a GMS,
Utah State Office of Education (USOE), or school district approved training each year.

Rationale
Studies have found that well-prepared physical education specialists teach higher quality lessons. Effective teaching
of physical education requires a body of knowledge and instructional skills different from the skills necessary to teach
other subjects.1

Professional development activities will provide basic knowledge of the physical development of children. This
knowledge combined with skill practice and other appropriate instructional techniques are designed to promote
lifelong habits of physical activity. It is essential for all teachers assigned to teach physical education to be ready and
able to apply this body of knowledge to successfully emphasize lifelong physical activity.

     1.    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Guidelines for School and Community Programs to Promote Lifelong Physical
           Activity Among Young People, August 2006, www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr4606.pdf

Resources
GMS PE Webinar

Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn                                     Tab C: General Policies Pg 41
                                                                     Tab D: Physical Activity Pg 20

American Alliance Health, Physical Education,                        www.aahperd.org/publications
Recreation, and Dance Online Store

National Association for Sports and Physical Education               www.aahperd.org/naspe

                                                               84                                Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                       Gold #1


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Demonstrate and share information and activities learned from PE training with teachers, faculty, and staff
     in a meeting or through handouts
  •	 Use your Gold Medal Schools™ award money to purchase PE equipment
  •	 Look in Physical Activity Resources in the GMS Guide Additional Resources




                                                      85                            Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                   Gold #1


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year Progress (November)
   •	 List the PE training your PE teacher(s) or specialist attended
           ◦ Submit agenda

Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach PE Teacher(s) or Specialist Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach PE Teacher(s) or Specialist Policy
   •	 List the PE training your PE Teacher(s) or specialist attended
           ◦ Submit an agenda




                                                        86             Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                             Gold #1


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal SchoolsTM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “Physical education (PE) classes will be taught by certified PE teacher(s) or PE specialist(s)”
         •	 “A certified PE teacher or PE specialist is defined as a person who attends one Gold Medal Schools
            (GMS)/Utah State Office of Education (USOE)/District approved training each year.”
         •	 One school representative must attend a GMS/USOE/District approved PE training and share the
            information with all classroom teachers

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




                                                          87                             Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                                      Gold #1


                                           Policy Sample
Intent
Physical Education (PE) classes will be taught by certified PE teacher(s) or PE specialists. A certified PE teacher or
PE specialist is defined as a person who attends one Gold Medal Schools™ (GMS), Utah State Office of Education
(USOE), or school district approved training each year.

One school representative must attend a GMS, USOE, or school district approved PE training and share
information with classroom teachers.

Rationale
Studies have found that well-prepared PE specialists teach higher quality lessons. Effective teaching of PE requires a
body of knowledge and instructional skills different from the skills necessary to teach other subjects.1

Professional development activities will provide basic knowledge of the physical development of children. This
knowledge combined with skill practice and other appropriate instructional techniques are designed to promote
lifelong habits of physical activity. It is essential for all teachers assigned to teach PE to be ready and able to apply
this body of knowledge to successfully emphasize lifelong physical activity.

Reinforcement
This policy will be discussed with all individuals teaching PE, and will be reviewed each year by the Principal, and
PE specialist. The School Coordinator will ensure that someone from the school will attend a PE training each year.

Endorsement

_____________________________________________
Principal Name

_____________________________________________                                _______________
Principal Signature                                                           Date

     1.    Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guidelines for School and Community Programs to Promote Lifelong Physical
           Activity Among Young People, August 2006




                                                               88                                Return to Gold Menu
                                                      Gold #2
   Write a policy for teachers, faculty, and staff that food is not to be used as a
   reward or withheld as a punishment


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that requires teachers, faculty, and staff do not give food as a reward or withhold it as a
       punishment
           ◦ Principal signature

Parties, activities, or events with food are acceptable, but healthy food options should be available.

Rationale
Establishing healthy student attitudes towards eating require that teachers, faculty, and staff do not use food as an
incentive. Research indicates that a child’s food preference patterns are largely influenced by repeated exposure to food
and the social context in which food is offered.1 Positive or negative emotions associated with the setting and type of
food offered or restricted may have long-lasting effects on student’s food preferences.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that “schools should discourage teachers from using
food for disciplining or rewarding students. Some teachers give students low-nutritive foods, such as candy, as a
reward for good behavior, and punish misbehaving students by denying a low-nutritive treat. These practices reinforce
students’ preferences for low-nutritive foods and contradict what is taught during nutrition education.2”

A survey in 2002 asked Utah kids what they really want for classroom rewards. Only 7% of them said they would like
a candy bar or other food item.3

     1.   Journal of School Health, Are Elementary Schools Teaching Children to Prefer Candy But Not Vegetables?, March 1998

     2.   CDC, Healthy Youth!, December 2008 www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/nutrition/Making-It-Happen/pdf/approach6.pdf

     3.   Gold Medal SchoolsTM, Rewards Kids Will Crave: Non-Food Alternatives. Pgs 7, 50

Resources
Fit, Healthy and Ready to Learn                                       Tab E: Healthy Eating Pgs12, 15

Rewards Kids Will Crave                                               health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/guide/RewardsKids.pdf
                                                                      Contact your Local Health Department for hard copies



                                                               89                               Return to Gold Menu
                                              Gold #2
You Did It! How to Reward and Motivate Kids         http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/pdfs/You_Did_It!.pdf
without Using Food

Non-Food Incentive Ideas                            www.orientaltrading.com
                                                    1-800-875-8480




                                               90                          Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                        Gold #2


                                                      Ideas
Ideas
  •	 During a meeting:
         ◦ Distribute Rewards Kids Will Crave books, contact Local Health Department (LHD) for books
         ◦ Give each teacher, faculty, and staff an introductory gift bag of non-food items to be used as rewards
           for their students
  •	 Non-food reward alternatives:
         ◦ Colored pencils, crayons, pens, pencils, highlighters, colored chalk, markers, rulers, small reading
           books, bookmarks, stickers, key chains, bouncy balls, silly putty, yo-yo, posters, friendship bracelets,
           extra computer time, extra recess time, extra reading time, no homework assignment, teacher’s helper,
           etc.




                                                      91                            Return to Gold Menu
                                                                             Gold #2


                                  On-line Report
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 What types of non-food choices did the teachers provide?

Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Non-Food Reward Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Non-Food Reward Policy




                                                     92          Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                             Gold #2


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools TM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “Food will not be given as a reward, or withheld from students as a punishment.”

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 Consequences to violating this policy should be listed here
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




                                                          93                             Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                                      Gold #2


                                           Policy Sample
Intent
In an attempt to improve the health of students at Green Meadow, school personnel will use rewards, and incentives
that do not undermine the health of students and/or reinforce unhealthful eating habits. Food will not be given as a
reward, or withheld as a punishment.

Possible reward alternatives to food include stickers, pencils, tokens that can be redeemed for prizes, etc. For a
complete list of non-food incentives please refer to the Rewards Kids Will Crave books.

Celebrations including food are not restricted; however, healthy food choices should be served as well.

Rationale
Establishing healthy student attitudes towards eating require that teachers, faculty, and staff does not use food as an
incentive. Research indicates that a child’s food preference patterns are largely influenced by repeated exposure to
food, and the social context in which food is offered.1 Positive or negative emotions associated with the setting and
type of food offered or restricted may have long-lasting effects on student’s food preferences.

A survey in 2002 asked Utah kids what they really want for classroom rewards. Only 7% of them said they would
like a candy bar or other food item.2

Reinforcement
This policy will be reviewed by the Principal each year. All teachers, faculty, and staff will be made aware of this
policy in the first faculty meeting of the year, and at the faculty meeting following Winter Break. At these meetings
ideas for non-food incentives will be discussed.

Any teachers, faculty, and staff found distributing food incentives will be asked to stop by the principal.

Endorsement

_____________________________________________
Principal Name

_____________________________________________                                 _______________
Principal Signature                                                            Date

     1.   Journal of School Health, Are Elementary schools teaching to prefer candy but not vegetables?, March 1998

     2.   Gold Medal Schools, Rewards Kids Will Crave Pgs 7, 50




                                                                94                                 Return to Gold Menu
                                             Gold #3
   Complete four criteria from Changing the Scene – Improving the School
   Nutrition Environment (Gold #3A-#3I)


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Complete four criteria from the Changing the Scene program
    •	 Download a free copy of the Changing the Scene kit

Resources
Changing the Scene kit                                    www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/changing.html

Team Nutrition                                            www.fns.usda.gov/tn
                                                          703-305-1624




                                                    95                          Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                      Gold #3


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Introduce kit during teacher, faculty, and staff meeting
  •	 Hold a meeting with all the food service personnel to gain insight about what changes they would like to be
     made through Gold Medal Schools™ and Changing the Scene - Improving the School Nutrition Environment




                                                      96                           Return to Gold Menu
                                                  Gold #3A
   Write a policy that requires healthy food and beverage choices to be available
   whenever food is available outside of school meal services


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that requires healthy food and beverage choices to be available whenever food is provided
       outside of school meal services
            ◦ Principal signature

This includes school celebrations, events, class parties, assemblies, fundraisers, concession stands, vending machines,
and school stores.

Rationale
A schools nutrition environment is influenced by all food available at the school. Foods with little nutritional value
compete with healthy school meals. Mixed signals are sent to students when health and nutrition are taught in the
classroom but are not upheld in the lunch area. By providing healthy choices to students their eating habits and
education achievements will improve.1, 2

     1.   American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Brief fasting, stress, and cognition in Children, August 1981

     2.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, School Food Environments and Practices Affect Dietary Behaviors of US Public
          School Children, February 2009

Resources
Changing the Scene- Improving the School Nutrition Environment                   “The Facts: Competitive Foods”
       Support Materials, A Guide to Local Action                                Pages 18-20

Utah State Office of Education: Child Nutrition                                  Kimberly Loveland
                                                                                 801-538-7562
                                                                                 kimberly.loveland@schools.utah.gov

Schools Foods Tool Kit                                                           www.cspinet.org/schoolfoodkit

Nutritional Integrity                                                            www.cspinet.org/nutritionpolicy/

Foods Sold in Competition with USDA School Meals Programs                        www.cspinet.org/nutritionpolicy/



                                                                 97                                  Return to Gold Menu
                                              Gold #3A
Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools:                          www.iom.edu/CMS/3788/30181/42502.aspx
Leading the Way Toward Healthier Youth

Model School Wellness Policies                                     www.schoolwellnesspolicies.org/resources/

The Learning Connection:                                           www.actionforhealthykids.org/resources/files/
The Value of Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity in Our Schools




                                                      98                           Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                    Gold #3A


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Remind parents to bring healthy options in newsletters
  •	 Inform students, teachers, faculty, staff, parents, Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization,
     etc. of policy for consistent nutrition standards
  •	 Turn vending machines off during school hours
  •	 Use non-food fundraisers or sell healthy food at fundraisers
          ◦ If you choose to have food fundraisers do not allow unhealthy fundraising and bake sale items to be
              sold during lunch hours
  •	 Change drinks offered in vending machines to 100% fruit juices, Gatorade, and water
  •	 Ensure nutritious food options are provided in cafeteria
  •	 Provide attractive fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat or non-fat dairy options at meal times
  •	 Decrease unhealthy food choices during lunch and in vending machines




                                                      99                           Return to Gold Menu
                                                                Gold #3A


                                  On-line Report
Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Health Food Choices Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Healthy Food Choices Policy




                                                100   Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                           Gold #3A


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools TM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “Healthy food and beverage choices are available whenever food is provided outside of school meal
             services This includes school celebrations and events, a la carte, class parties, assemblies, fundraisers,
             concession stands, vending machines, school stores, etc.”
         •	 “Health choices must meet the following guidelines.
                  Nutrition Guidelines for Food
                  Snack items should not exceed:
                       ◦ 200 calories
                       ◦ 35% calories from fat (not to exceed 35 calories from fat per 100 kcal)
                       ◦ 10% calories from saturated and trans fat (not to exceed 1 g saturated and trans fat per
                          100 kcal)
                       ◦ 35% calories from total sugar by weight
                  A la carte items should not exceed:
                       ◦ 400 calories
                       ◦ 35% calories from fat (not to exceed 35 calories from fat per 100 kcal)
                       ◦ 10% calories from saturated and trans fat (not to exceed 1 gm saturated and trans fat per
                          100 kcal)
                       ◦ 35% calories from total sugar by weight
                  In addition, it is recommended that the snacks and a la carte food items contain one of the
                        following:
                       ◦ 5gm protein per serving
                       ◦ 2gm fiber per serving
                       ◦ 10% of the DV for any of the following – calcium, iron, vitamin A or vitamin C
                  NOTE: Nutrition guidelines for food does not include legumes, nuts, nut butters, seeds, egg,
                        cheese, vegetables (not fried), and fruits.
                  Nutrition Guidelines for Beverages
                  Beverages should be limited to:
                       ◦ Water that is non-flavored, non-sweetened, non-carbonated
                       ◦ 100% fruit and/or vegetable juice with no added sweeteners
                       ◦ Unflavored/flavored low fat (1%) and fat free milk and milk alternatives (soy and rice)
                          with no more than 30g carbohydrate per 8oz


                                                         101                             Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                   Gold #3A


                               Policy Guidelines
                Calculations:
                To calculate calories from total fat use this equation:
                    calories from fat ÷ total calories x 100
                To calculate calories from saturated fat use these equations:
                    grams of saturated fat x 9 = calories from saturated fat
                    calories from saturated fat ÷ total calories x 100
                To calculate total sugar by weight use this equation:
                    Grams of sugar ÷ gram weight of product x 100”

        •	 “Examples of Healthy Food and Beverage Choices:
               Fresh fruit                                Nuts and seeds
               Canned fruit in water or fruit juice       Fruit Rockets (applesauce w/ different flavorings)
               Fresh Vegetables with low-fat dip          Fruit leather
               Hummus with whole grain crackers or chips Baked chips
               Water-packed Sunkist tuna with crackers    Pudding –low fat
               Snyder’s pretzels                          100% fruit and/or vegetable juices
               Beef jerky –97% fat free                   Cereal bowls
               Yogurt and/or gogurt                       Nature Valley granola bars
               String cheese                              Quaker fruit and oatmeal bars
               Breakfast cereal bars                      Soymilk
               Trail mix                                  Low fat or fat free milk”
  □ Rationale
       •	 Support for policy

  □ Reinforcement
       •	 How this policy will be communicated to teachers, faculty, staff, parents, fundraising groups, Parent
          Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization, and any other groups or people bringing food into
          the school outside of school meals.
       •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”
       •	 Consequences to violating this policy should be listed here

  □ Endorsement
      •	 Principal Signature
      •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




                                                      102                          Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                            Gold #3A


                                        Policy Sample
Intent
Healthy food and beverage choices are available whenever food is provided outside of school meal services. This
includes school celebrations and events, a la carte, class parties, assemblies, fundraisers, concession stands, vending
machines, school stores, etc.

Healthy choices must meet the following guidelines:

Nutrition Guidelines for Food
Snack items should not exceed:
   •	 200 calories
   •	 35% calories from fat (not to exceed 35 calories from fat per 100 kcal)
   •	 10% calories from saturated and trans fat (not to exceed 1 g saturated and trans fat per 100 kcal)
   •	 35% calories from total sugar by weight

A la carte items should not exceed:
    •	 400 calories
    •	 35% calories from fat (not to exceed 35 calories from fat per 100 kcal)
    •	 10% calories from saturated and trans fat (not to exceed 1 gm saturated and trans fat per 100 kcal)
    •	 35% calories from total sugar by weight

In addition, it is recommended that the snacks and a la carte food items contain one of the following:
    •	 5gm protein per serving
    •	 2gm fiber per serving
    •	 10% of the DV for any of the following – calcium, iron, vitamin A or vitamin C

NOTE: Nutrition guidelines for food does not include legumes, nuts, nut butters, seeds, egg, cheese, vegetables (not
fried), and fruits.

Nutrition Guidelines for Beverages
Beverages should be limited to:
   •	 Water that is non-flavored, non-sweetened, non-carbonated
   •	 100% fruit and/or vegetable juice with no added sweeteners
   •	 Unflavored/flavored low fat (1%) and fat free milk and milk alternatives (soy and rice) with no more than
       30g carbohydrate per 8oz

Calculations
To calculate calories from total fat use this equation:
        calories from fat ÷ total calories x 100
To calculate calories from saturated fat use these equations:
        grams of saturated fat x 9 = calories from saturated fat
        calories from saturated fat ÷ total calories x 100
To calculate total sugar by weight use this equation:
        Grams of sugar ÷ gram weight of product x 100
                                                          103                             Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                                      Gold #3A


                                             Policy Sample
Examples of Healthy Food and Beverage Choices
      Fresh fruit                                                             Nuts and seeds
      Canned fruit in water or fruit juice                                    Fruit Rockets (applesauce w/ different flavorings)
      Fresh Vegetables with low-fat dip                                       Fruit leather
      Hummus with whole grain crackers                                        Baked chips
      Water-packed Sunkist tuna with crackers                                 Pudding –low fat
      Snyder’s pretzels                                                       100% fruit and/or vegetable juices
      Beef jerky –97% fat free                                                Cereal bowls
      Yogurt and/or Gogurt                                                    Nature Valley granola bars
      String cheese                                                           Quaker fruit and oatmeal bars
      Breakfast cereal bars                                                   Soymilk
      Trail mix                                                               Low fat or fat free milk”

Rationale
A school’s nutrition environment is influenced by all food available at the school. Foods with little nutritional value
compete with healthy school meals. Mixed signals are sent to students when health and nutrition are taught in the
classroom but are not upheld in the lunch area. By providing healthy choices to students their eating habits and
education achievements will improve.1, 2

Reinforcement
This policy will be reviewed each year. Teachers, faculty, staff, parents, Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher
Organization, fund-raising groups and all other groups or people bringing food into the school will be given a copy
of this policy each year.

All groups in violation of this policy will:
    •	 On first violation receive a warning
    •	 On second violation be asked to remove food that day
    •	 On third violation no longer have the privilege to bring food on school property or at school-sponsored
        functions.

Endorsement

________________________________________
Principal Name

________________________________________                                   _______________
Principal Signature                                                        Date

     1.   American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Brief fasting, stress, and cognition in Children, 1981, Vol 34

     2.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, School Food Environments and Practices Affect Dietary Behaviors of US Public
          School Children, February 2009



                                                                  104                                   Return to Gold Menu
                                                   Gold #3B
   Enroll school as a Team Nutrition School and conduct nutrition education
   activities and promotions that involve students, teachers, faculty, staff,
   parents, and the community

Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Sign up to be a Team Nutrition school
    •	 Hold one nutrition education activity which involves students, teachers, faculty, staff, parents, and the
       community

Rationale
Studies have shown that nutrition education programs that focus on influencing students’ actual eating behaviors are
much more likely to help students adopt health eating habits than the traditional, fact based approach.1 Teachers,
faculty, and staff serve as a role model to the children in their classroom. When teachers, faculty, and staff are
teaching and living healthy lifestyles the children are more likely to follow in that example.

In the last twenty years, the percentage of young children who are obese has more than doubled. Child obesity is
being recognized as a national epidemic causing the onset of and increased prevalence of disease.2 Team Nutrition is
working to help schools increase physical activity, and nutrition education in schools.

     1.   Journal of Nutrition Education, The effectiveness of nutrition education and implications for nutrition education policy,
          programs, and research, January 1995

     2.   Team Nutrition, Healthy Schools, http://teamnutrition.usda.gov/healthierUS/index.html

Resources
Team Nutrition                                                                   www.fns.usda.gov/tn

Utah State Office of Education: Child Nutrition                                  Kimberly Loveland
                                                                                 801-538-7562
                                                                                 kimberly.loveland@school.utah.gov

Changing the Scene- Improving the School Nutrition Environment                   Pages 24-26, 38
       A Guide to Local Action

Center for Food and Justice, Farm to School                                      www.farmtoschool.org

One Tray, One Nation                                                             www.onetray.org


                                                                105                                  Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                          Gold #3B


                                                         Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Invite a Guest Chef
  •	    Replace Junk Food with healthy foods
  •	    Invite parents, grandparents, or community to eat school lunch with students
  •	    Plan an activity that will promote nutrition to students, teachers, faculty, staff, parents, and community




                                                         106                            Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                Gold #3B


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Date of sign-up for a Team Nutrition School
   •	 Describe nutrition education activities offered
   •	 How were students, teachers, faculty, staff, parents, and community involved?

End-Year (April)
   •	 Date of sign-up for a Team Nutrition School
   •	 Describe nutrition education activities offered
   •	 How were students, teachers, faculty, staff, parents, and community involved?




                                                      107                             Return to Gold Menu
                                                  Gold #3C
   Offer nutrition education in the school dining room and classroom, with
   coordination between school food service personnel and teachers, faculty,
   and staff

Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Provide nutrition education in the classroom
    •	 Provide nutrition education in the dinning room

Rationale
Teaching nutrition education in both places helps ensure that healthy practices are being taught as well as practiced.
The Surgeon General’s call to Action to Prevent and Decrease Overweight and obesity encourages school personnel to
collaborate together. The report encourages health education to help students develop the knowledge, attitudes, skills,
and behaviors to adopt and maintain healthy eating habits. 1

     1.   United States Department of Health and Human Services, The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent and Decrease Overweight
          and Obesity, 2001

Resources
Changing the Scene- Improving the School Nutrition Environment                 Pages 24-25
       A Guide to Local Action

Utah State Office of Education: Child Nutrition                                Kimberly Loveland
                                                                               801-538-7562
                                                                               kimberly.loveland@schools.utah.gov

Health Ed Core Curriculum                                                      www.schools.utah.gov/curr/core/page2.htm

Classroom Resources                                                            www.dolesuperkids.com




                                                               108                                 Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                 Gold #3C


                                                   Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Incorporate healthy fruit and veggie books into classroom lessons
         ◦ Math - Expose kids to fractions and measurement through a delicious vegetable garden, in the book,
            “Inchworm and a Half ” by Elinor J. Pinczes
         ◦ Language Arts - Find rich vocabulary in the book, “Still Life Stew” by Helena Clare Pittman
         ◦ Social Studies - Share an American biography of John Chapman, “The Story of Johnny Appleseed”
  •	 Hang Fruits & Veggies – More Matters® posters in the dinning room and around the school, www.
     pbhcatalog.com
  •	 Hold a trivia contest
  •	 Conduct taste tests
  •	 Decorate the cafeteria
  •	 Hold a bulletin board or poster contest




                                                   109                           Return to Gold Menu
                                                                          Gold #3C


                                On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe methods used to teach nutrition in classroom
   •	 Describe methods used to teach nutrition in dining room


End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe methods used to teach nutrition in classroom
   •	 Describe methods used to teach nutrition in dining room




                                                    110         Return to Gold Menu
                                                  Gold #3D
   Write a policy that requires lunch to be at least twenty minutes from the time
   students are seated and held between 11:00 am and 1:00 pm


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that requires lunch to be at least twenty minutes from the time students are seated
           ◦ Principal signature
    •	 Lunch must be scheduled between 11:00 am and 1:00 pm for all students
    •	 Breakfast, if available, is to be at least ten minutes from the time students are seated.

Rationale
The time students eat and the amount of time they are given to eat is important in forming good eating habits. If
students eat at irregular times they are more likely to form unhealthy eating habits such as snacking on unhealthy
food in between meals. If students are not allowed enough time to eat they are less likely to enjoy their food and try
healthier options.1

Students who have healthy eating habits do better in the classroom. Those students who are undernourished
continually earn lower test scores and are distracted in the classroom, preventing them from performing at their
highest level.2

     1.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Position of the American Dietetic Association: Local Support for Nutrition
          Integrity in Schools, January 2006

     2.   American Journal of Public Health, Physical Education and Academic Achievement in Elementary School: Data From the
          Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, April 2008

Resources
Changing the Scene- Improving the School Nutrition Environment                  Pages 21-22
       A Guide to Local Action

Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn                                                Tab E: Healthy Eating Pgs 1 & 17

Utah State Office of Education: Child Nutrition                                 Kimberly Loveland
                                                                                801-538-7562
                                                                                kimberly.loveland@schools.utah.gov




                                                                111                                 Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                      Gold #3D


                                                      Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Place a timer on each table. Set timer for 10 minutes for breakfast and 20 minutes for lunch. Students are
     not allowed to leave the table until the timer has gone off.
  •	 Increase the lunch period in small increments until you reach 20 minutes by the end of the school year. This
     will allow students to slowly adjust to the change.
  •	 Require students to be excused by lunch personnel or parent volunteer before they can leave the cafeteria
  •	 Schedule recess before lunch to ensure that students don’t rush out to recess without eating their lunch first
  •	 Handout memo explaining the importance of adequate eating time




                                                      112                            Return to Gold Menu
                                                                 Gold #3D


                                On-line Reports
Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Adequate Eating Time Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Adequate Eating Time Policy




                                                 113   Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                           Gold #3D


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools TM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.
Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “Lunch will be served between 11:00 AM and 1:00 PM.”
         •	 “Students will have at least twenty minutes to eat their lunch from the time students are seated.”
         •	 “Students will have at least ten minutes to eat their breakfast from the time students are seated.” (This
            statement may be omitted if school does not serve breakfast.)

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year and when schedule changes are being made.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




                                                         114                             Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                                        Gold #3D


                                           Policy Sample
Intent
Green Meadow Elementary will regulate the time that meals are served and the length of time that students have to
eat their meals.

Breakfast will be served from 7:30 am to 8:00 am. Students will be allowed at least ten minutes to eat their breakfast
from the time they are seated.
Lunch will be served from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm. Students will be allowed at least twenty minutes to eat their lunch
from the time they are seated.

Rationale
The time students eat and the amount of time they are given to eat is important in forming good eating habits. If
students eat at irregular times they are more likely to form unhealthy eating habits such as snacking on unhealthy
food in between meals. If students are not allowed enough time to eat they are less likely to enjoy their food and try
healthier options.1

Students who have healthy eating habits do better in the classroom. Those students who are undernourished
continually earn lower test scores and are distracted in the classroom, preventing them from performing at their
highest level.2

Reinforcement
Principal will make schedule changes to ensure that meals are served at the proper time and that students have
enough time to eat. This policy will be discussed in faculty meeting. The principal will send a letter to parents
informing them that the amount of time students have to eat has been increased. This policy will be reviewed each
year and when making scheduling changes to ensure proper timing of meals.

Endorsement

_____________________________________________
Principal Name

________________________________________                                _______________
Principal Signature                                                     Date

     1.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Position of the American Dietetic Association: Local Support for Nutrition
          Integrity in Schools, January 2006

     2.   American Journal of Public Health, Physical Education and Academic Achievement in Elementary School: Data From the
          Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, April 2008




                                                                115                                 Return to Gold Menu
                                                    Gold #3E
   Write a policy that bans advertising of less nutritious food choices and
   promotes healthy food choices


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that bans the promotion of less nutritious food choices and promote healthy food choices
           ◦ Principal signature

Rationale
The advertisement and sale of less nutritious food counteracts the nutrition education students are receiving in
the classroom. The promotion of less nutritious choices will cause students to form unhealthy eating habits.1, 2 By
providing nutrition education, and promoting, and selling nutritious at your school you will be helping students
make healthy food choices and lead healthier, more active lives3.

     1.   American Journal of Public Health, A pricing strategy to promote low-fat snack choices through vending machines, May 1997

     2.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Pricing strategy to promote fruit and vegetable purchase in high school cafeterias,
          September 1997

     3.   National Policy & Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obesity (NPLAN), Restricting Food and Beverage
          Advertising in Schools, February 2009, www.nplanonline.org/sites/phlpnet.org/files/nplan/RestrtngAds_FactSheet_web_
          FINAL_090219.pdf

Resources
Changing the Scene - Improving the School Nutrition Environment                   Page 27
       A Guide to Local Action

Utah State Office of Education: Child Nutrition                                   Kimberly Loveland
                                                                                  801-538-7562
                                                                                  kimberly.loveland@schools.utah.gov

Guidelines for Responsible Food Marketing to Children                             www.cspinet.org/marketingguidelines.pdf

How Food Companies Market Obesity to Children                                     www.cspinet.org/new/200311101.html

More Matters Plan Book                                                            www.pbhcatalog.com



                                                                 116                                  Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                      Gold #3E


                                             Gold #3E
NPLAN Restricting Food and Beverage Advertising in Schools   www.nplanonline.org
Fact Sheet

NPLAN Restricting the Advertising of Food and Beverages      www.nplanonline.org
Sold on School Grounds




                                                    117                    Return to Gold Menu
                                                                   Gold #3E


                                                Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Hold trivia contest
  •	    Conduct taste test
  •	    Decorate cafeteria
  •	    Hold Bulletin Board or Poster contest
  •	    Have “Lucky Sticker Day”




                                                118     Return to Gold Menu
                                                                         Gold #3E


                                 On-line Reports
Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Ban of Less Nutritious Food Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Ban of Less Nutritious Food Policy




                                                        119   Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                           Gold #3E


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal SchoolsTM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “Advertising of less nutritious food is banned”
         •	 Describe how healthy choices will be promoted

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 Consequences to violating this policy should be listed here
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




                                                         120                             Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                                           Gold #3E


                                            Policy Sample
Intent
Advertising of less nutritious foods on Green Meadow school grounds is prohibited. Advertising or endorsements
for companies who make less nutritious food products is also prohibited and shall not appear: 1) in any part of the
school building 2) on any of the property surrounding the building (i.e. portables, playgrounds, parking lot etc.)
3) on school materials given to children at school (pencils, book covers, toys, bookmarks, etc). In addition, healthy
foods will be promoted in the cafeteria and classrooms with nutrition posters.

Rationale
Advertisement and sale of less nutritious food counteracts the nutrition education students are receiving in the
classroom. Promotion of less nutritious choices will cause students to form unhealthy eating habits.1, 2 By providing
nutrition education, and promoting, and selling nutritious foods at your school you will be helping students make
healthy choices and lead healthier, more active lives.

Reinforcement
This policy will be discussed in teacher, faculty, and staff meeting and will be reviewed each year. All advertisements
and endorsements of less nutritious foods will be removed from the building. They may be removed by any student,
teacher, faculty, staff or other employee at Vineyard. If teachers, faculty, and staff are found distributing anything
that advertises these types of foods, that person will be asked to collect all the items and take them home. Students
will not be punished for wearing clothing with endorsements of less nutritious food items; however teachers, faculty,
and staff should try to teach the importance of healthy food choices.

Endorsement

_____________________________________________
Principal Name

_____________________________________________                                   _______________
Principal Signature                                                             Date

     1.   American Journal of Public Health, A pricing strategy to promote low-fat snack choices through vending machines, May 1997

     2.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Pricing strategy to promote fruit and vegetable purchase in high school cafeterias,
          September1997




                                                                 121                                  Return to Gold Menu
                                                  Gold #3F
   Write a policy that requires food service personnel to have appropriate pre-
   service training and regular participation in professional development


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that requires food service personnel to have appropriate pre-service training
           ◦ Principal signature

Rationale
A well-trained and well-educated food service personnel will prepare more nutritious food that appeals to students,
offer a greater variety of nutritious food, and prepare food safely to reduce the incidence of illness. Healthy school
meals provide the energy and nutrients that students need to perform well in school. By providing a variety of healthy
foods for school meals the food service staff can help students learn to enjoy many different foods and develop healthy
eating habits.1,2

     1.   Journal of the American Medical Association, School-based nutrition programs and services, October 1993

     2.   School Nutrition Association, Careers and Education, April 2011, www.schoolnutrition.org/CareerEducation.aspx

Resources
Changing the Scene- Improving the School Nutrition Environment                Pages 15, 17, & 25
       A Guide to Local Action

Utah State Office of Education: Child Nutrition                               Kimberly Loveland
                                                                              801-538-7562
                                                                              kimberly.loveland@schools.utah.gov

School Nutrition Association                                                  http://teamnutrition.usda.gov

Team Nutrition                                                                www.fns.usda.gov/tn

Fruits and Vegetables Galore                                                  www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/fv_galore.html

More Matters Plan Book                                                        www.pbhcatalog.com




                                                              122                                 Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                Gold #3F


                                                    Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Provide reimbursement for trainings
  •	 Encourage food service personnel to attend trainings together
  •	 Use Fruits and Vegetables Galore as a training tool




                                                    123              Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                   Gold #3F


                                 On-line Reports
Policy Drafts
   •	 Attach Food Service Personnel Pre-Service Training Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Food Service Personnel Pre-Service Training Policy




                                                      124               Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                            Gold #3F


                                  Policy Guidelines

Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools TM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    Intent
             •	 “Food service personnel must receive adequate training or certification before hire or within six
                months of hire.”
             •	 List the training(s) your school will require
             •	 “Food service personnel must attend continuing education every 1-3 years.”

    Rationale
          •	 Support for policy

    Reinforcement
          •	 How policy will be communicated
          •	 Consequences to violating this policy should be listed here
          •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    Endorsement
          •	 Principal Signature
          •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




                                                          125                             Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                                     Gold #3F


                                           Policy Sample
Intent
In an effort to ensure the health, and safety of our students, teacher, faculty, and staff, Green Meadow Elementary
will require food service personnel to:
     •	 Be certified by the School Nutrition Association before hire, or within six months of hire date
              ◦ Any food service staff currently working at the school who has not received the School Nutrition
                 Association certification must become certified within six months of this policy being hired
     •	 Participate in professional development activities every one to three years. These activities include but are not
        limited to
              ◦ Attending a Serve Safe class
              ◦ 45 hours of continuing education in the following areas:
                     ▪ Operations
                     ▪ Nutrition
                     ▪ Administration
                     ▪ Marketing

Rationale
A well-trained and well-educated food service personnel will prepare more nutritious food that appeals to students,
offer a greater variety of nutritious food, and prepare food safely to reduce the incidence of illness. Healthy school
meals provide the energy and nutrients that students need to perform well in school. By providing a variety of
healthy foods for school meals, food service personnel can help students learn to enjoy many different foods and
develop healthy eating habits.1, 2

Reinforcement
Food service personnel will be informed of this policy and will receive the training, and certification that is necessary
to comply with this policy. When hiring new food service personnel they will be required to either be certified by the
School Nutrition Association or receive the certification in six months. This policy will be reviewed each year.


Endorsement

_____________________________________________
Principal Name

_____________________________________________                                   _______________
Principal Signature                                                              Date

     1.   Journal of the American Medical Association, School-based nutrition programs and services, October 1993

     2.   School Nutrition Association, Careers and Education, April 2011, www.schoolnutrition.org/CareerEducation.aspx




                                                                126                                 Return to Gold Menu
                                                  Gold #3G

   Require all organizations to raise funds by selling only non-food items



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Participate in non-food fundraisers

Rationale
By using only non-food fundraisers schools will promote a healthy lifestyle while still raising funds. Studies have
shown that school revenues remain steady or increase when schools sell healthy or non-food items as a fundraiser.1

     1.   Healthy Lifestyles, National Conference of State Legislatures, June 2007

Resources
Changing the Scene- Improving the School Nutrition Environment                   Pages 18 & 20
       A Guide to Local Action

Utah State Office of Education: Child Nutrition                                  Kimberly Loveland
                                                                                 801-538-7562
                                                                                 kimberly.loveland@schools.utah.gov

Non-food fundraiser ideas                                                        www.nojunkfood.org/fundraising/tosell.html

Healthy Fundraising USA (only non-food items)                                    www.healthyfundraisingusa.com

School Fundraisers (choose only non-food items)                                  www.school-fundraisers.com




                                                                127                              Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                    Gold #3G


                                                         Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Sell wrapping paper, candles, magazines, greeting cards, flowers, or wristbands
  •	    Sell shirts, bags, mugs, pencils, etc. with the school logo
  •	    Survey parents to find out what they are most likely to buy from fundraisers
  •	    Hold a carnival or fair
  •	    Encourage local businesses to donate items
  •	    Have a Gold Medal Mile™ fundraiser
  •	    Ask parents for donations rather than asking them to purchase items




                                                        128                               Return to Gold Menu
                                                                      Gold #3G


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List the non-food fundraisers the school has held

End-Year (April)
   •	 List the non-food fundraisers the school has held




                                                      129   Return to Gold Menu
                                               Gold #3H
   Consider student needs in planning for a healthy school nutrition
   environment by asking students for input and incorporating their feedback
   into policy making


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Collect input from the students when making changes to the school nutrition environment

Rationale
Finding out what children like is one of the best ways to influence them to do something. No education policy is
likely to be effective if it is not accepted by those it will affect. Students need to be actively involved in development,
revision, and review of policies.1

     1.   NSABE Boardsmanship Review, Characteristics of Good Policy Research, January 1998.

Resources
Changing the Scene - Improving the School Nutrition Environment             Pages 22 & 28
       A Guide to Local Action

Utah State Office of Education: Child Nutrition                             Kimberly Loveland
                                                                            801-538-7562
                                                                            kimberly.loveland@schools.utah.gov




                                                            130                                Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                   Gold #3H


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Include students on a council that makes decisions at your school
  •	 Create a student Gold Medal Schools™ Council
  •	 Have a suggestion box




                                                     131                 Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                 Gold #3H


                                On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how student input was received when making changes to the school’s nutrition environment
   •	 Describe changes made from student input

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe how student input was received when making changes to the school’s nutrition environment
   •	 Describe changes made from student input




                                                    132                          Return to Gold Menu
                                                     Gold #3I
   Write a policy that requires recess to be scheduled immediately before lunch
   for most or all grades


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that requires recess to be scheduled immediately before lunch
           ◦ Principal signature

Rationale
Having recess immediately before lunch will help improve student behavior on the playground, in the cafeteria, and
classroom. Students will waste less food and drink more milk. Studies show that students will be more settled and
ready to learn upon returning to the classroom.
Recess before lunch ensures that children will come to lunch less distracted and ready to eat. It will also increase the
likelihood that students will take time to eat, try healthier food, and enjoy their lunchtime more. In a recent study
when recess was scheduled before lunch, school children consumed more calories and total nutrients. This helps
children stay more alert and focused throughout the rest of the day.1

     1.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Position of the American Dietetic Association: Local Support for Nutrition
          Integrity in Schools, January 2006

Resources
Changing the Scene- Improving the School Nutrition Environment                  Pages 21-22
A Guide to Local Action

Utah State Office of Education: Child Nutrition                                 Kimberly Loveland
                                                                                801-538-7562
                                                                                kimberly.loveland@schools.utah.gov

Western Dairy Council Article                                                   www.nutritionexplorations.org/pdf/sfs/recess.pdf

Recess Before Lunch Guidebook                                                   http://opi.mt.gov/pdf/schoolfood/RBL/




                                                                133                                 Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                         Gold #3I


                                                        Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Discuss with another school how they successfully implemented recess before lunch
  •	    Provide research benefits of recess before lunch
  •	    Present this idea to teachers, faculty, staff, and parents
  •	    Try it first with upper grades
  •	    Use different colored flags to let students know when it is time for them to come in for lunch




                                                        134                            Return to Gold Menu
                                                                 Gold #3I


                                 On-line Reports
Policy Drafts
   •	 Attach Recess Before Lunch Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Recess Before Lunch Policy




                                                135   Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                            Gold #3I


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal SchoolsTM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “Recess will be scheduled immediately before lunch”
         •	 Include recess and lunch bell schedule

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




                                                         136                             Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                            Gold #3I


                                        Policy Sample
Intent
Green Meadow Elementary will schedule recess immediately before lunch.
Each class will be assigned a letter. This will help students know when to come in for lunch. Students will be
dismissed for recess at the appropriate time. After a fifteen minute recess the playground duty will blow a whistle
and show the letter to indicate which classes will then go in for lunch. Students will line up and go into the school to
wash their hands. They will then line up for lunch. When the twenty-minute lunch is over, their teacher, faculty, or
staff will come to pick them up for class.

The lunch schedule for all grades is as follows:

                                                   Recess Pick Up,
                          Dismiss to                                        Teacher Pick-Up for
 Grade             Letter                          Wash, Line Up for
                          Recess                                            Class
                                                   Lunch
 First             A          11:30                11:45                    12:10
 First             A          11:30                11:45                    12:10
 First/Second      A          11:30                11:45                    12:10
 Second            B          11:40                11:55                    12:20
 Second            B          11:40                11:55                    12:20
 Third             C          11:50                12:05                    12:30
 Third             C          11:50                12:05                    12:30
 Third/Fourth      C          11:50                12:05                    12:30
 Fourth            D          12:00                12:15                    12:40
 Fourth            D          12:00                12:15                    12:40
 Fifth             E          12:10                12:25                    12:50
 Fifth             E          12:10                12:25                    12:50
 Fifth/Sixth       E          12:10                12:25                    12:50
 Sixth             F          12:20                12:35                    1:00
 Sixth             F          12:20                12:35                    1:00

Rationale
Having recess immediately before lunch will help improve student behavior on the playground, in the cafeteria, and
classroom. Students will waste less food and drink more milk. Studies show that students will be more settled and
ready to learn upon returning to the classroom.
Recess before lunch ensures that children will come to lunch less distracted and ready to eat. It will also increase the
likelihood that students will take time to eat, try healthier food, and enjoy their lunchtime more. In a recent study
when recess was scheduled before lunch, school children consumed more calories and total nutrients. This helps
children stay more alert and focused throughout the rest of the day.1
                                                           137                           Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                                          Gold #3I


                                           Policy Sample
Reinforcement
This policy will be reviewed each year. Teachers, faculty, and staff will be made aware of this policy at teacher, faculty,
and staff meeting. Parents will receive a letter informing them of this policy in their back to school packet.

Endorsement


________________________________________
Principal Name


________________________________________                                _______________
Principal Signature                                                           Date

     1.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Position of the American Dietetic Association: Local Support for Nutrition
          Integrity in Schools, January 2006




                                                                138                                 Return to Gold Menu
                                                Gold #4
   Choose and complete two criteria, in addition to the three options chosen for
   the Silver level, from the Criteria Menu


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Choose and complete two criteria, in addition to the three options chosen for the Silver level, from the
       Criteria Menu.




                                                        139                            Return to Gold Menu
             Gold Resources
Healthy Food Choices Policy for Change Recommendations

Healthy Food Guidelines

Additional References for Gold #3A: Healthy Options

Resources for Gold #3C: Nutrition Education

Additional References for Gold #3D: Adequate Eating




                           140                Return to Gold Menu
                                                                                                  Gold Resources

                                 Summary of
                              Recommendations
Healthy Food Choices Policy Recommendations for Change

The recommendations for change will take the current Healthy Food Choices Policy and further specify which
competitive foods the guideline encompasses, make recommendations similar to those around the country, separate
recommendations for snack items and a la carte as well as food and beverages, and present recommendations in a
label friendly manner.

                          Summary of National Organizations and State Recommendations

While there is some variation among states and recommendations, in general the trend seems to claim these as
healthy food guidelines for foods sold as competitive food items.

Food:
   •	   Maximum 200 calories for a snack, 400 calories for a la carte
   •	   35% or less calories from fat
   •	   10% or less from saturated and trans fat
   •	   Maximum 35% calories from total sugar by weight
   •	   300mg or less per serving of sodium for snack items
   •	   450mg or less per serving of sodium for pastas, meats and soups
   •	   600mg or less per serving of sodium for entrees

    NOTE: Does not include legumes, nuts, nut butters, seeds, egg, cheese, vegetables (not fried), and fruits

Beverages:
    •	 Water is non-flavored, non-sweetened, non-carbonated
    •	 100% fruit and/or vegetable juice with no added sweeteners
    •	 Unflavored/flavored low fat and fat free milk and milk alternatives (soy and rice) with no more than 30gm
       carbohydrate per 8oz


In addition, there are specific recommendations on when these types of foods should be sold. There is variation from
not during school hours to 30 minutes before and after lunch.


                                      Recommended Updates to Current Policy

The following are recommended changes to the current policy. Changes are based on the confusion of what foods
nutrition guidelines pertained to, inconsistent recommendations for fat and sugar with the rest of the country, lack
of separation between food and beverages, additional nutrient requirements specific to Utah, healthy foods that
recommendations do not apply and gram versus percent representation.

Intent: To increase the nutritional value of foods available to students throughout the day and limit the availability
of foods that compete with healthy lunches from school or home.
                                                         141              Return to Gold Resources Menu
                                                                                                 Gold Resources

                                 Summary of
                              Recommendations
Availability: Competitive food is defined as any food or beverage available for sale or any food offered to the student
throughout the day that is not included in the National School Lunch Program. These foods and beverages include
but are not limited to vending machines, school stores, a la carte, fundraisers, and school events during the normal
school day. Competitive foods should be limited in availability including not being available 30 minutes prior and
after the completion of the lunch period with the exception of a la carte items. All competitive foods should meet
the nutrition guidelines below. Healthy food and beverage choices including but not limited to fruits, vegetables,
low-fat dairy products, and whole grain products, shall be available wherever food and beverages are available at
school.

Nutrition Guidelines:
Snack items should not exceed:
    •	 200 calories
    •	 35% calories from fat (70 calories or less)
    •	 10% calories from saturated and trans fat (2gm or less)
    •	 35% calories from total sugar by weight

A la carte items should not exceed:
     •	 400 calories
     •	 35% calories from fat (140 calories or less)
     •	 10% calories from saturated and trans fat (4.5gm or less)
     •	 35% calories from total sugar by weight

    NOTE: Nutrition guidelines for food does not include legumes, nuts, nut butters, seeds, egg, cheese, vegetables
    (not fried), and fruits

In addition, it is recommended that snacks and a la carte food items contain one of the following:
    •	 5gm protein per serving
    •	 2gm fiber per serving
    •	 10% of the DV for any of the following – calcium, iron, vitamin A or vitamin C

Beverages should be limited to:
    •	 Water that is non-flavored, non-sweetened, non-carbonated
    •	 100% fruit and/or vegetable juice with no added sweeteners
    •	 Unflavored/flavored low fat (1%) and fat free milk and milk alternatives (soy and rice) with no more than
       30gm carbohydrate per 8oz

Calculations:
Calories from total fat
        calories from fat ÷ total calories x 100

Calories from saturated fat
        grams of saturated fat x 9 = calories from saturated fat
        calories from saturated fat ÷ total calories x 100

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                                                                             Gold Resources

                               Summary of
                            Recommendations
Total sugar by weight
        Grams of sugar ÷ gram weight of product x 100

Examples of Healthy Food and Beverage Choices:
      Sunkist tuna with crackers
      Snyder’s pretzels
      Beef jerky –97% fat free
      Yogurt and/or gogurt
      String cheese
      Breakfast cereal bars
      Trail mix
      Nuts and seeds
      Fruit Rockets (applesauce w/ different flavorings)
      Fruit leather
      Baked chips
      Pudding –low fat
      100% fruit and/or vegetable juices
      Cereal bowls
      Nature Valley granola bars
      Quaker fruit and oatmeal bars
      Soymilk
      Low fat or fat free milk




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                                                                                               Gold Resources


                    Refrences for Gold #3A
For more information on why healthy choices should be available whenever food is served outside of school meal
service visit these Web sites:

Center for Science in the Public Interest, State School Foods Report Card 2007, www.cspinet.
org/2007schoolreport.pdf Accessed on March 3, 2008.

Eat Smart: North Carolina’s Recommended Standards for all Foods Available in the School, 2004, www.
eatsmartmovemorenc.com/EatSmartSchoolStds/EatSmartSchoolStds.html

HealthierUS School Challenge, Criteria & Instructions for Elementary Schools, Updated October 2007, www.
teamnutrition.usda.gov/healthierUS/index.html

National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity, Model Local School Wellness Policies on Physical Activity and
Nutrition, March 2005, www.schoolwellnesspolicies.org/resources/NANAWellnessPolicies.pdf

California Center for Public Health Advocacy, SB 965: Healthy Beverage Bill, www.publichealthadvocacy.org/
legsuccess.html. Accessed on March 3, 2008.

California Center for Public Health Advocacy, SB 12: School Nutrition Standards-Summary, Available at www.
publichealthadvocacy.org/legsuccess.html

Trust for America’s Health. Supplement to F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies Are Failing in America, 2008, August
2008, www.rwjf.org/pr/product.jsp?id=33711

Utah Education and Administration Code R277, www.rules.utah.gov/publicat/code/r277/r277.htm




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                             Gold #3C Resources
Trivia Questions
Taste Testing Survey
Fruit and Veggie Prep Ideas

Trivia Questions

Healthy Eating Trivia

Q: Which contains less fat, skim milk or whole milk?
A: Skim milk

Q: Which food groups provide lots of fiber?
A: The grain group (bread, cereal, rice, and pasta), fruit group, and vegetable group

Q: One piece of bread is how many servings in the grain group?
A: One

Q: Which important vitamins and minerals do you get from the dairy group?
A: Calcium and Vitamin D

Q: What important nutrient do you get from the meat group?
A: Protein


Supermarket Trivia

Q: When you dry a grape what do you get?
A: A raisin

Q: Name one dried fruit that you can buy at the supermarket?
A: Dried apricots, dried apples, raisins, dried cranberries, dried cherries, etc.

Q: What is the only vegetable that is only sold fresh? It is never canned, dried, or frozen?
A: Lettuce

Q: True or False: The average supermarket carries well over 200 fruits and vegetables in its fresh produce department.
A: True



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                             Gold #3C Resources
Q: When was the first supermarket opened?
A: 1930 in New York City (closest guess wins)

Q: Name a fruit or vegetable you can buy in a can.
A: Peaches, corn, green beans, peas, etc.


Fruit Trivia

Q: True or False: There are more than 10 different types of apples.
A: True

Q: True or False: Bananas are grown in the U.S.
A: False bananas only grow in tropical climates close to the equator.

Q: Which fruit was given its name because it looked like a pinecone?
A: Pineapple

Q: What fruit is used to make wine, juice, and raisins?
A: Grapes

Q: What state makes the most grapes in the U.S. –California, New Mexico, or Arizona?
A: California

Q: This fruit is a great source of potassium, which helps your muscles work.
A: A Banana

Q: Which is the sweetest citrus fruit: grapefruit or orange?
A: Orange

Q: Do oranges grow on trees or on vines?
A: Trees

Q: Which state produces more oranges each year – Florida or California?
A: Florida


Vegetable Trivia
Q: Name a vegetable juice.
A: Tomato, carrot, etc.

Q: True or False: A potato is a vegetable.
A: True

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                                                                                              Gold Resources


                             Gold #3C Resources
Q: Name a red vegetable.
A: Beets, red bell peppers, radishes, red onions, red leaf lettuce, etc.

Q: How many kernels does the average ear of corn have?
A: 800 kernels - arranged in 16 rows (closest wins)

Q: What vegetable has the highest water content?
A: Lettuce, it’s about 94% water

Q: True or False: Yams and sweet potatoes are the same thing.
A: False, even though they look similar and are used in the same way.


Vitamin and Mineral Trivia
Q: True or False: Vitamin C helps keep your body from getting sick.
A: True

Q: What is a good source of Vitamin C?
A: Oranges, almost any citrus fruit

Q: True or False: Milk is a good source of Calcium.
A: True

Q: Name a food with a lot of vitamin A.
A: Carrots, pumpkins, sweet potato, spinach, liver

Q: Why does our body need Vitamin A?
A: For vision and healthy skin


What Am I? Trivia

Q: I’m an orange vegetable that is good for your eyesight. What am I?
A: A carrot

Q: I’m round and white and I’m great in tacos, on hamburgers, or in pasta sauce, but sometimes I can make you cry.
What am I?
A: An onion

Q: I’m green on the outside, red or pink on the inside, and sometime have lots of black seeds. What am I?
A: A watermelon



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                                                                                               Gold Resources


                             Gold #3C Resources
Q: I’m an orange potato that grows in the south. I’m an excellent source of Vitamin A. What am I?
A: A sweet potato

Q: I’m a fruit that is brown on the outside and green on the inside. I’m named after a bird native to New Zealand. I
contain very small black seeds. What am I?
A: A kiwifruit

Q: I’m red with a single large seed in the middle. I grow on trees. What am I?
A: A cherry

Q: I’m the world’s most popular fruit. You can’t eat my skin or my seed. I’m very sweet. What am I?
A: A mango

Q: I am a yellow citrus fruit that is very sour! What am I?
A: A lemon


Taste Testing Survey
Grade____              Food Item_______________


Have you eaten this food before?
       Yes             No      If yes, how often? _______________


Did you like this food?
       Yes              No      If no, why not? __________________


Would you eat this food if it were prepared another way?
      Yes             No


Would you like this food to be served as a part of school lunch?
      Yes              No       If yes, how often?_______________




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                             Gold #3C Resources
Fruit and Veggie Preparation Ideas
Artichoke
Wash under running water; pull off first row of petals. Cut stem to 1 inch or less. Snip off tips of petals. Cook by
boiling steaming, microwaving, or sautéing.

Asparagus
Steam lightly

Blood Orange
Cut into slices and serve

Cactus Pear
Cut into slices and serve

Couscous
Instant couscous is prepared by adding boiling water while stirring quickly and letting stand 4-5 minutes, fluff and
serve like rice.

Eggplant
Slice and place on skewers, then grill

Fresh Pineapple
Slice and serve

Guava
Skin and seeds are edible. Try cooked or raw.

Humus
Serve with slices of pita bread

Kiwifruit
Slice and serve

Kumquat
Although somewhat tart, kumquats are completely edible. Peeling is not necessary.

Mango
Mangos must be peeled. Section and serve

Nectarine
Slice and serve


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                            Gold #3C Resources
Parsnip
Parsnips are generally cooked and may be served as a side dish. Try lightly seasoning and baking until soft.

Plantain Banana
When greenish-yellow and still firm, the plantain may be cooked like a potato and served as a side dish.

Polenta
Bring 3 cups of water to a boil. Combine polenta with 1-cup cold water and 1-teaspoon salt. Stir into boiling water
and cook, stirring frequently, for about 10 minutes. Pour into a sheet pan and refrigerate until firm, slice and serve.

Quinoa
Rinse thoroughly, use 2 parts liquid 1 part quinoa. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook 15 minutes,
until clear.

Spaghetti Squash
Slice in half and place in dish with 1 inch of water. Cover and cook for 20 minutes, until soft. Slice and serve.

Star Fruit
Slice clockwise into stars and serve.




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                                                                                                 Gold Resources


                  References for Gold #3D
The Surgeon General’s Call To Action To Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity, 2001 p 20
       Actions for schools “Provide an adequate amount of time for students to eat school meals, and schedule
       lunch periods at reasonable hours around midday.”

Changing the Scene: Improving the School Nutrition Environment (TEAM Nutrition, USDA, 2000)
      p. 21
      Children will enjoy their food more and may try more healthy options if they can relax, eat and socialize
      without feeling rushed. Studies show that environment has a powerful influence on behavior.
      p.22
       further defined as: “students have enough time to eat and socialize –at least 10 minutes after receiving
      breakfast and 20 minutes after receiving lunch.”
      Students in elementary grades are easily distracted from eating their meal – they want to hurry and finish
      eating to join friends on the playground.

Fit, Healthy and Ready to Learn: A School Health Policy Guide, published by the National Association of State
Boards of Education. Also states at least 20 minutes after receiving lunch (page E-18)
        “Students and staff shall have adequate time to eat meals in pleasant surroundings and shall have adequate
        time to eat, relax, and socialize; at least 10 minutes after sitting down for breakfast and 20 minutes after
        sitting down for lunch.”
        www.nasbe.org/healthy_schools/publications/FHRTL_Healthy_Eating.pdf

Action for Healthy Kids. Recommendations for Nutrition Policies in Utah Schools, May 2005.
Elementary and Secondary Schools
        Allow at least 10 minutes for breakfast and 20 minutes for lunch (once seated).

The Learning Connection: The Value of Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity in Our Schools, clearly
documents the importance of adequate nutrition for academic achievement.

Center of Disease Control School Health Index, Module 4, N.9
       Defines adequate time to eat school meals as at least 20 minutes for lunch, once they are seated.
       www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/SHI/pdf/Elementary.pdf

National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity. Model Local School Wellness Policies, March 2005.
       www.schoolwellnesspolicies.org/WellnessPolicies.html
       Meal Times and scheduling. Schools: will provide students with at least 10 minutes to eat after sitting down
       for breakfast and 20 minutes after sitting down for lunch. (p 10)




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                Platinum
Platinum Criteria

Platinum #1: School Community Council

Platinum #2: Healthy Options

Platinum #3: Yearlong Wellness Program

Platinum #4: Family and Community Involvement

Platinum #5A: Recess Before Lunch

Platinum #5B: Adequate Eating Time




                      152       Return to Criteria Breakdown
                                        Platinum Criteria
    To become a Platinum School, you must continue implementing the Bronze, Silver,
    and Gold Criteria and complete all five Platinum Criteria. Upon completion your
    school will receive $300.

    1. Strengthen your School Community Council by holding regular meetings and including
       health on the agenda at each meeting

é 2.   Write a policy that requires healthy food and beverage choices to be available whenever
       food is available outside of school meal services

    3. Plan and carry out a year long teacher, faculty, and staff wellness program

    4. Involve families and the community in completing the Gold Medal SchoolsTM criteria

é 5.   a. Write a policy that requires recess to be scheduled immediately before lunch for most
          or all grades
                                                   -or-

é      b. Write a policy that requires lunch to be at least twenty minutes long from the time
          students are seated and held between 11:00 am and 1:00 pm




                                                 153                  Return to Platinum Menu
                                        Platinum #1
   Strengthen your School Community Council by holding regular meetings and
   including health on the agenda at each meeting


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Strengthen your School Community Council (SCC) by holding regular meetings and including health on
       the agenda

All schools are already required to have a SCC as explained in Utah Code 53A. The Utah Code states that the
council must include parents or guardians, school employees, and the Principal. We ask that you also include a
Parent Teacher Association (PTA)\Parent Teacher Organization (PTO) representative, food service personnel, GMS
School Coordinator, a student, and a health expert such as a physical education specialist at the portion of the
meeting where health is discussed.

Rationale
School Community Council’s play an important role in the development of health in the school and community.
Including health on the agenda at School Community Council agenda’s allows widespread collaboration in planning
health policy and allows it to be adapted to local circumstances. Such collaboration also helps build widespread
awareness and support for the school.1

     1.   Journal of School Health, School health education, October 2005

Resources
Utah Code Section 53A - Chapter 1a – 108
   •	 Go to www.le.state.ut.us
   •	 Click on Utah Code/Constitution on left hand side
           ◦ Click on Keyword Search
   •	 Select Search Form
           ◦ Advanced Search
   •	 On first line type in: school community councils
   •	 Click on Match #1 – 53A-a-108




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                                                                                          Platinum #1


                                                  Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Assign each member of the School Community Council (SCC) a month that they are in charge of adding a
     health item
  •	 Excuse Gold Medal SchoolsTM (GMS) members after health topic has been discussed
  •	 Discuss ways to meet and maintain GMS criteria
  •	 Send memo to the SCC
  •	 Create an action plan to help you continue to implement Bronze, Silver, and Gold criteria, and meet
     Platinum criteria at first SCC meeting of the year
          ◦ Update and discuss action plan at each meeting




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                                                                       Platinum #1


                                On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	   List members of the School Community Council
   •	   List health topics included on agenda
   •	   How often did the School Community Council meet?
   •	   Attach School Community Council meeting minutes

End-Year (April)
   •	   List members of the School Community Council
   •	   List health topics included on agenda
   •	   How often did the School Community Council meet?
   •	   Attach School Community Council meeting minutes




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                                         Platinum #2
   Write a policy that requires healthy food and beverage choices to be available
   whenever food is available outside of school meal services


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that requires healthy food and beverage choices to be available whenever food is provided
       outside of school meal services
            ◦ Principal signature

This includes school celebrations , events, class parties, assemblies, fundraisers, concession stands, vending machines,
and school stores.

Rationale
A schools nutrition environment is influenced by all food available at the school. Foods with little nutritional value
compete with healthy school meals. Mixed signals are sent to students when health and nutrition are taught in the
classroom but are not upheld in the lunch area. By providing healthy choices to students their eating habits and
education achievements will improve.1, 2

     1.   American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Brief fasting, stress, and cognition in Children, August 1981

     2.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, School Food Environments and Practices Affect Dietary Behaviors of US Public
          School Children, February 2009

Resources
Changing the Scene- Improving the School Nutrition Environment                   “The Facts: Competitive Foods”
       Support Materials. A Guide to Local Action                                Pages 18-20

Utah State Office of Education: Child Nutrition                                  Kimberly Loveland
                                                                                 801-538-7562
                                                                                 kimberly.loveland@schools.utah.gov

Schools Foods Tool Kit                                                           www.cspinet.org/schoolfoodkit

Nutritional Integrity                                                            www.cspinet.org/nutritionpolicy/

Foods Sold in Competition with USDA School Meals Programs                        www.cspinet.org/nutritionpolicy/


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                                            Platinum #2
Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools:                          www.iom.edu/CMS/3788/30181/42502.aspx
Leading the Way Toward Healthier Youth

Model School Wellness Policies                                     www.schoolwellnesspolicies.org/resources/

The Learning Connection:                                            http://www.actionforhealthykids.org/
The value of Improving nutrition and Physical Activity in Our Schools




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                                                                                                 Platinum #2


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Remind parents to bring healthy options in newsletters
  •	 Inform students, teachers, faculty, staff, parents, Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization,
     etc. of policy for consistent nutrition standards
  •	 Turn vending machines off during school hours
  •	 Use non-food fundraisers or sell healthy food at fundraisers
          ◦ If you choose to have food fundraisers do not allow unhealthy fundraising and bake sale items to be
              sold during lunch hours
  •	 Change drinks offered in vending machines to 100% fruit juices, Gatorade, and water
  •	 Ensure nutritious food options are provided in cafeteria
  •	 Provide attractive fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat or non-fat dairy options at meal times
  •	 Decrease unhealthy food choices during lunch and in vending machines




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                                                                  Platinum #2


                                On-line Reports
Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Health Food Choices Policy draft


End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Healthy Food Options policy




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                                                                                                       Platinum #2


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools TM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “Healthy food and beverage choices are available whenever food is provided outside of school meal
            services This includes school celebrations and events, a la carte, class parties, assemblies, fundraisers,
            concession stands, vending machines, school stores, etc.”
         •	 “Health choices must meet the following guidelines.
                 Nutrition Guidelines for Food
                 Snack items should not exceed:
                      ◦ 200 calories
                      ◦ 35% calories from fat (not to exceed 35 calories from fat per 100 kcal)
                      ◦ 10% calories from saturated and trans fat (not to exceed 1 g saturated and trans fat per
                         100 kcal)
                      ◦ 35% calories from total sugar by weight
                 A la carte items should not exceed:
                      ◦ 400 calories
                      ◦ 35% calories from fat (not to exceed 35 calories from fat per 100 kcal)
                      ◦ 10% calories from saturated and trans fat (not to exceed 1 gm saturated and trans fat per
                         100 kcal)
                      ◦ 35% calories from total sugar by weight
                 In addition, it is recommended that the snacks and a la carte food items contain one of the
                       following:
                      ◦ 5gm protein per serving
                      ◦ 2gm fiber per serving
                      ◦ 10% of the DV for any of the following – calcium, iron, vitamin A or vitamin C
                 NOTE: Nutrition guidelines for food does not include legumes, nuts, nut butters, seeds, egg,
                       cheese, vegetables (not fried), and fruits.
                 Nutrition Guidelines for Beverages
                 Beverages should be limited to:
                      ◦ Water that is non-flavored, non-sweetened, non-carbonated
                      ◦ 100% fruit and/or vegetable juice with no added sweeteners
                      ◦ Unflavored/flavored low fat (1%) and fat free milk and milk alternatives (soy and rice)
                         with no more than 30g carbohydrate per 8oz


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                                                                                                Platinum #2


                             Policy Guidelines
                Calculations:
                To calculate calories from total fat use this equation:
                    calories from fat ÷ total calories x 100

                To calculate calories from saturated fat use these equations:
                    grams of saturated fat x 9 = calories from saturated fat
                    calories from saturated fat ÷ total calories x 100

                To calculate total sugar by weight use this equation:
                    Grams of sugar ÷ gram weight of product x 100”

        •	 “Examples of Healthy Food and Beverage Choices:
               Fresh fruit                                 Nuts and seeds
               Canned fruit in water or fruit juice        Fruit Rockets (applesauce w/ different flavorings)
               Fresh Vegetables with low-fat dip           Fruit leather
               Hummus with whole grain crackers or chips Baked chips
               Water-packed Sunkist tuna with crackers     Pudding –low fat
               Snyder’s pretzels                           100% fruit and/or vegetable juices
               Beef jerky –97% fat free                    Cereal bowls
               Yogurt and/or gogurt                        Nature Valley granola bars
               String cheese                               Quaker fruit and oatmeal bars
               Breakfast cereal bars                       Soymilk
               Trail mix                                   Low fat or fat free milk”

  □ Rationale
       •	 Support for policy

  □ Reinforcement
       •	 How this policy will be communicated to teachers, faculty, staff, parents, fundraising groups, Parent
          Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization, and any other groups or people bringing food into
          the school outside of school meals.
       •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”
       •	 Consequences to violating this policy should be listed here

  □   Endorsement
       •	 Principal Signature
       •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word



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                                                                                                        Platinum #2


                                         Policy Sample
Intent
Healthy food and beverage choices are available whenever food is provided outside of school meal services. This
includes school celebrations and events, a la carte, class parties, assemblies, fundraisers, concession stands, vending
machines, school stores, etc.

Healthy choices must meet the following guidelines:

Nutrition Guidelines for Food
Snack items should not exceed:
    •	 200 calories
    •	 35% calories from fat (not to exceed 35 calories from fat per 100 kcal)
    •	 10% calories from saturated and trans fat (not to exceed 1 g saturated and trans fat per 100 kcal)
    •	 35% calories from total sugar by weight

A la carte items should not exceed:
     •	 400 calories
     •	 35% calories from fat (not to exceed 35 calories from fat per 100 kcal)
     •	 10% calories from saturated and trans fat (not to exceed 1 gm saturated and trans fat per 100 kcal)
     •	 35% calories from total sugar by weight

In addition, it is recommended that the snacks and a la carte food items contain one of the following:
    •	 5gm protein per serving
    •	 2gm fiber per serving
    •	 10% of the DV for any of the following – calcium, iron, vitamin A or vitamin C

NOTE: Nutrition guidelines for food does not include legumes, nuts, nut butters, seeds, egg, cheese, vegetables (not
fried), and fruits.

Nutrition Guidelines for Beverages
Beverages should be limited to:
    •	 Water that is non-flavored, non-sweetened, non-carbonated
    •	 100% fruit and/or vegetable juice with no added sweeteners
    •	 Unflavored/flavored low fat (1%) and fat free milk and milk alternatives (soy and rice) with no more than
       30g carbohydrate per 8oz

Calculations
To calculate calories from total fat use this equation:
        calories from fat ÷ total calories x 100

To calculate calories from saturated fat use these equations:
        grams of saturated fat x 9 = calories from saturated fat
        calories from saturated fat ÷ total calories x 100


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                                                                                                       Platinum #2


                                       Policy Sample
To calculate total sugar by weight use this equation:
        Grams of sugar ÷ gram weight of product x 100

Examples of Healthy Food and Beverage Choices
      Fresh fruit                             Nuts and seeds
      Canned fruit in water or fruit juice    Fruit Rockets (applesauce w/ different flavorings)
      Fresh Vegetables with low-fat dip       Fruit leather
      Hummus with whole grain crackers        Baked chips
      Water-packed Sunkist tuna with crackers Pudding –low fat
      Snyder’s pretzels                       100% fruit and/or vegetable juices
      Beef jerky –97% fat free                Cereal bowls
      Yogurt and/or Gogurt                    Nature Valley granola bars
      String cheese                           Quaker fruit and oatmeal bars
      Breakfast cereal bars                   Soymilk
      Trail mix                               Low fat or fat free milk

Rationale
A school’s nutrition environment is influenced by all food available at the school. Foods with little nutritional value
compete with healthy school meals. Mixed signals are sent to students when health and nutrition are taught in the
classroom but are not upheld in the lunch area. By providing healthy choices to students their eating habits and
education achievements will improve.1, 2

Reinforcement
This policy will be reviewed each year. Teachers, faculty, staff, parents, Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher
Organization, fund-raising groups and all other groups or people bringing food into the school will be given a copy
of this policy each year.

All groups in violation of this policy will:
     •	 On first violation receive a warning
     •	 On second violation be asked to remove food that day
     •	 On third violation no longer have the privilege to bring food on school property or at school-sponsored
        functions.

Endorsement

________________________________________
Principal Name

________________________________________                         _______________
Principal Signature                                              Date




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                                                                                                              Platinum #2


                                        Policy Sample
1.   American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Brief fasting, stress, and cognition in Children, 1981, Vol 34

2.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, School Food Environments and Practices Affect Dietary Behaviors of US Public
     School Children, February 2009




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                                         Platinum #3

   Plan and carry out a year long teachers, faculty, and staff wellness program


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Plan and carry out a year long teachers, faculty, and staff wellness program

You can do one wellness activity all year long or many different wellness activities throughout the year.

If you choose walking the Gold Medal Mile™ as your teachers, faculty, and staff wellness program, methods for
tracking the miles walked must be created.

Rationale
School-site health promotion activities for staff are designed to promote physical, emotional, and mental health
of school employees as well as prevent disease and disability. These programs have proven to save health care costs,
improve daily attendance, and promote employees’ general health and well being1. Faculty and staff who participate
in health promotion programs serve as a good role model for the students. The Wellness Councils of America and
Canada have found that employees that participate in a wellness program have significantly lower cholesterol levels,
blood pressure, and weight.2

     1.   Utah Department of Health, Building a Healthy Worksite toolkit, http://health.utah.gov/worksitewellness/pdfs/Worksite_Toolkit.
          pdf

     2.   Wellness Councils of America and Canada, Why Wellness Works, April 2008, http://www.welcoa.org/

Resources
American Cancer Society                                               www.cancer.org

American Diabetes Association                                         www.diabetes.org

American Heart Association                                            www.americanheart.org

Centers for Disease Control’s: 6 Step Guide for a Heart               www.hearthighway.org/pdfs/sixstepguide.pdf
Healthy Worksite

Check Your Health                                                     www.checkyourhealth.org

Choose My Plate                                                       www.choosemyplate.gov
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                                          Platinum #3
Health and Work Benefits of a Worksite Health Program          www.sitemaker.umich.edu/worksitepa/home

Healthfinder                                                   www.healthfinder.gov

Healthy Worksite Award                                         www.health.utah.gov/ahy/Worksite/Worksite_home.htm

The President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports         www.fitness.gov

Tompkins County Worksite Wellness Guide                        www.tompkins-co.org/wellness/worksite/workwell/

Wellness Councils of America: Well Workplace Workbook          www.welcoa.org/wellworkplace/index.php?category=7

Worksite Wellness Facts                                        www.preventdisease.com/worksite_wellness/

School Employee Wellness                                       www.schoolempwell.org

Utah Department of Health Employer Resource Guide              www.health.utah.gov/bhp/pdf/Worksite_Toolkit.pdf

Utah Council for Worksite Health Promotion Directory           www.health.utah.gov/worksitewellness/

School Employee Wellness Fact Sheet                            www.hearthighway.org/pdfs/SchoolEmpWellness.pdf




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                                                                                                 Platinum #3


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Go to the Teacher, Faculty, and Staff Wellness Resources section for detailed information, including
     handouts and tracking forms, on teacher, faculty, and staff wellness programs
          ◦ 12 Healthy Holiday Habits
          ◦ Gold Medal Games
          ◦ Holiday Weigh In
          ◦ Savor the Spectrum
          ◦ Try - A - Trail
          ◦ Wellness 300
          ◦ Wellness Calendar
          ◦ Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart
          ◦ Your Wellness Program
  •	 Go to Wellness Ideas in the Teachers, Faculty, and Staff Wellness Resources section for detailed information
     for these programs
          ◦ Pedometer Craze
          ◦ Gold Medal Mile
          ◦ Stroke Awareness
          ◦ Health Promotion
          ◦ Physical Activity
          ◦ Lose a Staff Member
          ◦ Stress Management
          ◦ AHA, Start!
          ◦ Nutrition for You
          ◦ Days of the Week
          ◦ Pull the Plug
          ◦ Special Interest Clubs
          ◦ Wee Five
          ◦ Tobacco Cessation
          ◦ Active for Life Challenge
          ◦ Optimum Health Services
          ◦ Weight watchers
          ◦ Insurance Based Programs
          ◦ Other Resources




                                                     168                      Return to Platinum Menu
                                                                                         Platinum #3


                                   On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe activities the teachers, faculty, and staff participated in
   •	 How were activities promoted?
   •	 How was the teachers, faculty, and staff participation tracked?

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe activities the teachers, faculty, and staff participated in
   •	 How were activities promoted?
   •	 How was the teachers, faculty, and staff participation tracked?




                                                         169                 Return to Platinum Menu
                                          Platinum #4

   Involve families and the community in completing Gold Medal Schools™
   criteria


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Involve families and the community in completing the Gold Medal Schools (GMS) criteria

A majority of the parents must be involved and invited to participate.

Rationale
Involving family in school activities is important. The research is undisputable. The more a parent is involved in
their children’s education the more successful the child will be.1 Involving families and the community in Gold
Medal Schools is a great way for your school to reach out to students and parents to build a bond between school
and home.

     1.   Quick and Easy Ways to Connect with students and their parents, grades K-8: improving student achievement through parent
          involvement, Page 135

Resources
GMS Criteria

Local Health Department                                                 Page 433




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                                                                                                    Platinum #4


                                                       Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Have parents track Gold Medal Miles™ walked outside of school hours
  •	 Allow students to earn points or recognition for involving their family in 30 minutes of physical activity (i.e.
     walking together as a family, ski trip, family hike, etc.)
  •	 Provide a monthly/quarterly health newsletter to parents (i.e. Gold Medal Schools™ (GMS) events, health
     facts, ways parents can improve their children’s health at home)
  •	 Walk the Gold Medal MileTM as a community
  •	 Invite community to use school gym facilities before or after regular school hours. Post a calendar of “open
     gym” times on front door or let local newspaper know.
  •	 Submit an article about GMS to local newspaper




                                                       171                      Return to Platinum Menu
                                                                                     Platinum #4


                               On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how families and community were involved with Gold Medal SchoolsTM

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe how families and community were involved with Gold Medal SchoolsTM




                                                  172                    Return to Platinum Menu
                                    Platinum #5A

   Write a policy that requires recess to be scheduled immediately before lunch
   for most or all grades


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that requires recess be scheduled immediately before lunch
           ◦ Principal signature

Rationale
Having recess immediately before lunch will help improve student behavior on the playground, in the cafeteria, and
classroom. Students will waste less food and drink more milk. Studies show that students will be more settled and
ready to learn upon returning to the classroom.
Recess before lunch ensures that children will come to lunch less distracted and ready to eat. It will also increase the
likelihood that students will take time to eat, try healthier food, and enjoy their lunchtime more. In a recent study
when recess was scheduled before lunch, school children consumed more calories and total nutrients. This helps
children stay more alert and focused throughout the rest of the day.1

     1.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Position of the American Dietetic Association: Local Support for Nutrition Integrity
          in Schools, January 2006

Resources
Changing the Scene- Improving the School Nutrition Environment                   Pages 21-22
       A Guide to Local Action

Western Dairy Council Article                                                    www.nutritionexplorations.org/pdf/sfs/recess.pdf

Recess Before Lunch Guidebook                                                    opi.mt.gov/Programs/SchoolPrograms/




                                                                173                           Return to Platinum Menu
                                                                                                  Platinum #5A


                                                         Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Discuss with another school how they successfully implemented recess before lunch
  •	    Provide research benefits of recess before lunch
  •	    Present this idea to teachers, faculty, staff, and parents
  •	    Try it first with upper grades
  •	    Use different colored flags to let students know when it is time for them to come in for lunch




                                                        174                      Return to Platinum Menu
                                                                Platinum #5A


                                On-line Reports
Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Recess Before Lunch Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Recess Before Lunch Policy




                                                175   Return to Platinum Menu
                                                                                                     Platinum #5A


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal SchoolsTM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “Recess will be scheduled immediately before lunch.”
         •	 Include recess and lunch bell schedule

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




                                                         176                       Return to Platinum Menu
                                                                                                     Platinum #5A


                                        Policy Sample
Intent
Green Meadow Elementary will schedule recess immediately before lunch.
Each class will be assigned a letter. This will help students know when to come in for lunch. Students will be
dismissed for recess at the appropriate time. After a fifteen minute recess the playground duty will blow a whistle
and show the letter to indicate which classes will then go in for lunch. Students will line up and go into the school to
wash their hands. They will then line up for lunch. When the twenty-minute lunch is over, their teacher, faculty, or
staff will come to pick them up for class.

The lunch schedule for all grades is as follows:

                                                   Recess Pick Up,
                          Dismiss to                                        Teacher Pick-Up for
 Grade             Letter                          Wash, Line Up for
                          Recess                                            Class
                                                   Lunch
 First             A          11:30                11:45                    12:10
 First             A          11:30                11:45                    12:10
 First/Second      A          11:30                11:45                    12:10
 Second            B          11:40                11:55                    12:20
 Second            B          11:40                11:55                    12:20
 Third             C          11:50                12:05                    12:30
 Third             C          11:50                12:05                    12:30
 Third/Fourth      C          11:50                12:05                    12:30
 Fourth            D          12:00                12:15                    12:40
 Fourth            D          12:00                12:15                    12:40
 Fifth             E          12:10                12:25                    12:50
 Fifth             E          12:10                12:25                    12:50
 Fifth/Sixth       E          12:10                12:25                    12:50
 Sixth             F          12:20                12:35                    1:00
 Sixth             F          12:20                12:35                    1:00

Rationale
Having recess immediately before lunch will help improve student behavior on the playground, in the cafeteria, and
classroom. Students will waste less food and drink more milk. Studies show that students will be more settled and
ready to learn upon returning to the classroom.
Recess before lunch ensures that children will come to lunch less distracted and ready to eat. It will also increase the
likelihood that students will take time to eat, try healthier food, and enjoy their lunchtime more. In a recent study
when recess was scheduled before lunch, school children consumed more calories and total nutrients. This helps
children stay more alert and focused throughout the rest of the day.1
                                                           177                      Return to Platinum Menu
                                                                                                                 Platinum #5A


                                           Policy Sample
Reinforcement
This policy will be reviewed each year. Teachers, faculty, and staff will be made aware of this policy at teacher, faculty,
and staff meeting. Parents will receive a letter informing them of this policy in their back to school packet.

Endorsement


________________________________________
Principal Name


________________________________________                                _______________
Principal Signature                                                     Date

     1.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Position of the American Dietetic Association: Local Support for Nutrition
          Integrity in Schools, January 2006




                                                                178                          Return to Platinum Menu
                                     Platinum #5B
   Write a policy that requires lunch to be at least twenty minutes from the time
   students are seated and held between 11:00 am and 1:00 pm


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that requires lunch to be at least twenty minutes from the time students are seated
           ◦ Principal signature
    •	 Lunch must be scheduled between 11:00am and 1:00pm for all students
    •	 Breakfast, if available, is to be at least ten minutes from time students are seated

Rationale
The time students eat and the amount of time they are given to eat is important in forming good eating habits. If
students eat at irregular times they are more likely to form unhealthy eating habits such as snacking on unhealthy
food in between meals. If students are not allowed enough time to eat they are less likely to enjoy their food and try
healthier options.1

Students who have healthy eating habits do better in the classroom. Those students who are undernourished
continually earn lower test scores and are distracted in the classroom, preventing them from performing at their
highest level.2

     1.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Position of the American Dietetic Association: Local Support for Nutrition
          Integrity in Schools, January 2006

     2.   American Journal of Public Health, Physical Education and Academic Achievement in Elementary School: Data From the
          Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, April 2008

Resources
Changing the Scene- Improving the School Nutrition Environment                  Pages 21-22
       A Guide to Local Action

Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn                                                Tab E: Healthy Eating Pgs 1 & 17

Utah State Office of Education: Child Nutrition                                 Kimberly Loveland
                                                                                801-538-7562
                                                                                kimberly.loveland@schools.utah.gov




                                                                179                          Return to Platinum Menu
                                                                                                  Platinum #5B


                                                       Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Place a timer on each table. Set timer for 10 minutes for breakfast and 20 minutes for lunch. Students are
     not allowed to leave table until timer has gone off
  •	 Increase lunch period in small increments until you reach 20 minutes by end of school year. This will allow
     students to slowly adjust to the change
  •	 Require students to be excused by lunch personnel or parent volunteer before they can leave cafeteria
  •	 Schedule recess before lunch to ensure that students don’t rush out to recess without eating their lunch first
  •	 Handout memo explaining the importance of adequate eating time




                                                      180                       Return to Platinum Menu
                                                                  Platinum #5B


                                On-line Reports
Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Adequate Eating Time Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Adequate Eating Time Policy




                                                 181   Return to Platinum Menu
                                                                                                     Platinum #5B


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools TM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “Lunch will be served between 11:00 AM and 1:00 PM.”
         •	 “Students will have at least twenty minutes to eat their lunch from the time students are seated.”
         •	 “Students will have at least ten minutes to eat their breakfast from the time students are seated.” (This
            statement may be omitted if school does not serve breakfast.)

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year and when schedule changes are being made.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




                                                         182                       Return to Platinum Menu
                                                                                                                       Platinum #5B


                                             Policy Sample
Intent
Green Meadow Elementary will regulate time that meals are served and length of time that students have to eat
their meals.

Breakfast will be served from 7:30am to 8:00am. Students will be allowed at least ten minutes to eat their breakfast
from time they are seated.
Lunch will be served from 11:00am to 1:00pm. Students will be allowed at least twenty minutes to eat their lunch
from time they are seated.

Rationale
The time students eat and the amount of time they are given to eat is important in forming good eating habits. If
students eat at irregular times they are more likely to form unhealthy eating habits such as snacking on unhealthy
food in between meals. If students are not allowed enough time to eat they are less likely to enjoy their food and try
healthier options.1

Students who have healthy eating habits do better in the classroom. Those students who are undernourished
continually earn lower test scores and are distracted in the classroom, preventing them from performing at their
highest level.2

Reinforcement
Principal will make schedule changes to ensure that meals are served at the proper time and that students have
enough time to eat. This policy will be discussed in faculty meeting. The principal will send a letter to parents
informing them that the amount of time students have to eat has been increased. This policy will be reviewed each
year and when making scheduling changes to ensure proper timing of meals.

Endorsement

_____________________________________________
Principal Name

________________________________________                                   _______________
Principal Signature                                                        Date

     1.   Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Position of the American Dietetic Association: Local Support for Nutrition Integrity
          in Schools, 106(1), January 2006

     2.   American Journal of Public Health, Physical Education and Academic Achievement in Elementary School: Data From the Early
          Childhood Longitudinal Study, 98(4), April 2008




                                                                  183                            Return to Platinum Menu
               Platinum Focus
Platinum Focus Criteria List         Immunization

Asthma                               Mental Health & Wellness

Diabetes                             Oral Health

Environmental Quality                Sun Safety

Fruits & Vegetables                  Violence and Injury
                                     Prevention




                               184          Return to Criteria Breakdown
                                         Focus Criteria
                                  é A policy must be written for these criteria

                                      Asthma Criteria

    To complete the Asthma Criteria your school must continue implementing the
    Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete four of the following
    criteria. Criteria 1 and 4 are required.

    1. Develop a system to track students with asthma (required)

    2. Teachers, faculty, and staff attend an asthma basics training

    3. Promote Utah’s Asthma Inhaler Law and use of the mandatory Self-Administration Form

é 4. teachers, faculty, and staff to complete the on-line extracurricular Asthma
     Write a policy requiring all Physical Education and
                                                          Winning with
                                                                          athletic

       program (required)

    5. Develop a system to track asthma action plans for students with asthma

    6. Complete another project, with the Utah Department of Health Asthma Program has
       approved

                              Diabetes Control Criteria
    To complete the Diabetes Criteria your school must continue implementing the
    Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete four of the following
    criteria. Criterion #1 is required.

é 1. management at school (required)
     Write a policy that allows for individualized accommodation for diabetes


    2. Provide easy access to healthy food choices and information

    3. Increase awareness of diabetes risk factors, the relationship between obesity, and
       development of type 2 diabetes, prevention of diabetes, and its complications

    4. Arrange for a health care professional to train school personnel on diabetes

    5. Complete another project, with the Utah Department of Health Diabetes Control
       Program has approved
                                               185            Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                       Environmental Quality Criteria
  To complete the Environmental Quality Criteria your school must continue
  implementing the Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete two of
  the following criteria.
  1. Apply online to Adopt-a-Waterbody for your school to clean up

  2. Learn how to conserve water at home and school

  3. Have a school wide recycling program

  4. Help improve air quality by taking the ten-week “I Choose Clean Air” pledge

  5. Participate in the National Energy Foundation’s Energy Action program

  6. Use the Project Learning Tree: Environmental Education Activity Guide

  7. Complete another project, with the Utah Department of Environmental Quality has
     approved


                  Fruits and Vegetables Galore Criteria
  To complete the Fruits & Vegetables Galore Criteria your school must continue
  implementing the Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete two of
  the following criteria. The first criterion is required.

é 1.   Write a policy focusing on presentation of fruits and vegetables in the cafeteria
       (required)

  2. Write a policy incorporating fruit and vegetable standards from the HealthierUS School
     Challenge into the school lunch

  3. Participate in a garden-based learning activity

  4. Complete another project, which the Utah Department of Health Physical Activity,
     Nutrition, and Obesity Program has approved




                                                186           Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                               Immunization Criteria
  To complete the Immunization Criteria your school must continue implementing
  the Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete two of the following
  criteria. Criterion #1 is required.

  1. Have school staff responsible for completing annual immunization state reports
     (example school secretary, school administrator, school nurse) document online
     training for monitoring compliance with immunization requirements reporting
     (required)

  2. Sign your school up to use the Utah Statewide Immunization Information System to track
     immunization compliance

  3. Distribute information about the Vaccines for Children program

  4. Complete another project, which the Utah Immunization Program has approved




                   Mental Health and Wellness Criteria

   To complete the Mental Health and Wellness Criteria your school must continue
   implementing the Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete all three
   criteria.

é 1. faculty, yourstaff. If your school or district does not have aPolicy with teachers,
     Discuss
              and
                   district or School Medical Recommendations
                                                                    policy one must be
      written

   2. Identify ways your school can promote mental health and wellness by improving
      students self-worth and stress management skills

   3. Provide teachers, faculty, and staff resources about mental health and how they
      can recognize mental health concerns in students




                                               187             Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                                  Oral Health Criteria
  To complete the Oral Health Criteria your school must continue implementing the
  Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete three of the following
  criteria.

  1. Distribute a newsletter about oral health

  2. Do a fluoride rinse program for non-fluoridated areas

  3. Include oral health as a topic at an assembly

  4. Distribute an Oral Health Survey to parents/legal guardians

  5. Complete another project, with the Utah Department of Health Oral Health Program has
       approved



                                   Sun Safety Criteria
  To complete the Sun Safety Criteria your school must continue implementing the
  Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete four of the following
  criteria. Criterion #2 is required.

  1. Promote sun safety by having a funky hat day

é 2.   Write a policy that encourages students, teachers, faculty, and staff to promote
       sun safety

  3. Promote sun safety for all grades

  4. Become a SunWise School

  5. Complete another project, with the Utah Department of Health Cancer Control
       Program approved




                                                 188               Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                   Violence and Injury Prevention Criteria

    To complete the violence and Injury Prevention Criteria your school must continue
    implementing the Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete three of
    the following criteria. Criterion #4 is required.

    1. Promote helmet use for skating, biking, skateboarding, and riding scooters

    2. Assure all playground areas meet Consumer Product Safety Commission standards

    3. Take steps to prevent and control bullying

é 4. mandatory formaking the completion(required)
     Write a policy
                    all reportable injuries
                                            and submission of Student Injury Reports


    5. Complete another project, with the Utah Department of Health Violence and Injury
       Prevention Program has approved




                                                    189           Return to Platinum Focus Menu
    Asthma
Asthma Criteria

Asthma #1

Asthma #2

Asthma #3

Asthma #4

Asthma #5




            190   Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                                      Asthma Criteria

    To complete the Asthma Criteria your school must continue implementing the
    Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete four of the following
    criteria. Criteria 1 and 4 are required.

    1. Develop a system to track students with asthma (required)

    2. Teachers, faculty, and staff attend an asthma basics training

    3. Promote Utah’s Asthma Inhaler Law and use of the mandatory Self-Administration Form

é 4. Write a policy requiring all to complete the on-line extracurricular Asthma
     teachers, faculty, and staff
                                  Physical Education and
                                                          Winning with
                                                                          athletic

       program (required)

    5. Develop a system to track asthma action plans for students with asthma

    6. Complete another project, with the Utah Department of Health Asthma Program has
       approved

       When your school completes the Asthma criteria complete the online checklist http://
       health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/reports/focusrpt.php. Checklists will be available in March
       2012. Upon completion your school will be sent a certificate of completion.


    Kellie Baxter
    Utah Department of Health
    Asthma Program
    P.O. Box 142106
    Salt Lake City, UT 84114-2106
    801-538-6441
    kabaxter@utah.gov




                                                 191                   Return to Asthma Menu
                                           Asthma #1

   Develop a system to track students with asthma


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Develop a system to track students with asthma and communicate students status to appropriate teachers

Rationale
Asthma is the leading public health problem for children in Utah. Nearly 65,000 children under 18 have asthma
throughout the state. Although asthma attacks can turn deadly at any time there are medications that can control and
relieve them.1 Having a system in place to track students with asthma allows students to receive the proper support in
managing their asthma.

     1.   Utah Asthma Program, Asthma Fact Sheet, April 2009

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                        Kellie Baxter
                                                                 801-538-6441
                                                                 kabaxter@utah.gov
                                                                 www.health.utah.gov/asthma

Asthma School Resource Manual                                    www.health.utah.gov/asthma/schools/resource_manual




                                                           192                     Return to Asthma Menu
                                                                                           Asthma #1


                                                      Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Have secretary or Physical Education teacher(s) or specialist keep track
  •	 Add asthma information to Kindergarten registration packets
  •	 Distribute list of students with asthma to teachers, faculty, and staff




                                                      193                       Return to Asthma Menu
                                                                          Asthma #1


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe the system used to track students with asthma
   •	 Number of students with asthma

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe the system used to track students with asthma
   •	 Number of students with asthma




                                                     194       Return to Asthma Menu
                                              Asthma #2

   Teachers, faculty, and staff attend an asthma basics training



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Your school must offer asthma basics training for teachers, faculty, and staff

The Utah Department of Health Asthma Program will come to your school and instruct teachers, faculty, and staff
about asthma basics and what to do in case of an asthma attack at school. Training is approximately 20 minutes.

Rationale
Studies show that students who have asthma are more likely to miss school.1 By providing training to teachers,
faculty, and staff about how to help student improve their asthma management they are able to improve the learning
environment for children with asthma.2

     1.   Pediatrics Journal, School absenteeism, health status, and health care utilization among children with asthma: associations with
          parental chronic disease, January 2009

     2.   Utah Asthma Program, Asthma Trainings for Schools, 2008

Resources
Utah Department of Health (UDOH) Asthma Program                         Kellie Baxter
                                                                        801-538-6441
                                                                        kabaxter@utah.gov
                                                                        www.health.utah.gov/asthma

UDOH Asthma and Schools Resources                                       www.health.utah.gov/asthma/schools/resources.html

Asthma Action Plan                                                      www.health.utah.gov/asthma/pdf_files/asthma_action

Asthma School Resource Manual                                           www.health.utah.gov/asthma/schools/resource_manual

General Emergency Protocol                                              www.health.utah.gov/asthma/pdf_files/Fact_Sheet/




                                                                 195                             Return to Asthma Menu
                                                                              Asthma #2


                                                       Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Provide training during teacher, faculty, and staff meeting
  •	 Provide training on teacher development day




                                                      196          Return to Asthma Menu
                                                                            Asthma #2


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List date of the asthma basic training
   •	 Number of teachers, faculty, and staff that participated

End-Year (April)
   •	 List date of the asthma basic training
   •	 Number of teachers, faculty, and staff that participated




                                                       197       Return to Asthma Menu
                                           Asthma #3

   Promote Utah’s Asthma Inhaler Law and use of the mandatory Self-
   Administration Form


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Promote Utah’s Asthma Inhaler Law and use of the mandatory Self-Administration Form

Rationale
The Utah Asthma Inhaler Law allows students to self administer medications to control asthma. In 2007 there
were 24 deaths due to asthma in Utah. Asthma attacks can turn deadly at anytime, especially if medications are not
available. By using medications students can control and relieve symptoms of asthma.1

     1.   Utah Asthma Program, Schools, Fact Sheet, 2008

Resources
Utah Department of Health (UDOH)                                 Kellie Baxter
Asthma Program                                                   801-538-6441
                                                                 kabaxter@utah.gov
                                                                 www.health.utah.gov/asthma

Self-Administration Form                                         www.health.utah.gov/asthma/pdf_files/ (English)
                                                                 www.health.utah.gov/asthma/pdf_files/ (Spanish)

Utah’s Asthma Inhaler Law                                        le.utah.gov/~code/TITLE53A/htm/53A11_060200

School/District Nurse

Asthma Inhaler Posters (Contact the UDOH Asthma Program for free posters)




                                                           198                      Return to Asthma Menu
                                                                                                      Asthma #3


                                                       Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Distribute a letter and a copy of Asthma Inhaler Law to parents, teachers, faculty and staff
  •	 Hang asthma inhaler posters in visible spots in the school (i.e. in the office, at tables during registration, in
     the gym, etc.)
  •	 Host a poster contest to advertise the campaign and hang the students’ art work in the hallways
  •	 Involve the Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization at events to promote the Asthma Inhaler
     Law and the use of the Self-Administration Form
  •	 Host a forum for parents. Invite a pediatrician to speak about asthma and the importance of parents
     informing the school that their child has asthma.
  •	 Provide a short fact sheet about Utah’s Asthma Inhaler Law
  •	 Send an information letter home to parents about the mandatory Self-Administration Form




                                                       199                        Return to Asthma Menu
                                                                                        Asthma #3


                                On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how your school promoted the Asthma Inhaler Law
   •	 Describe how your school promoted the use of the Self-Administration Form

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe how your school promoted the Asthma Inhaler Law
   •	 Describe how your school promoted the use of the Self-Administration Form




                                                   200                       Return to Asthma Menu
                                          Asthma #4
   Write a policy requiring all Physical Education and extracurricular athletic
   teachers, faculty, and staff to complete the on-line Winning with Asthma
   program


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy requiring all Physical Education (PE) and extracurricular athletic teachers, faculty, or staff to
       complete the on-line Winning with Asthma program
    •	 All PE and extracurricular athletic teachers, faculty, and staff members must attend the on-line Winning
       with Asthma www.winningwithasthma.org program

The Winning with Asthma online educational program was created for Physical Education teachers, coaches, and
referees to learn more about asthma and what to do during an asthma attack that occurs in an athletic setting. The
program runs approximately 25-minutes.

Rationale
Nationally 15% of athletes have asthma. Recent studies show that exercise can induce an asthma attack.1 By
providing athletic faculty members with information can help students control and manage asthma during PE
classes.2

     1.   Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine, Exercise-induced asthma, January 2009

     2.   Utah Asthma Program, Winning With Asthma, April 2009

Resources
Utah Department of Health Asthma program                           Kellie Baxter
                                                                   801-538-6441
                                                                   kabaxter@utah.gov
                                                                   www.health.utah.gov/asthma

Winning with Asthma program                                        www.winningwithasthma.org




                                                            201                          Return to Asthma Menu
                                                                                                     Asthma #4


                                                      Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Provide a stipend for teachers, faculty, and staff who complete the program
  •	 Provide time during a staff meeting for teacher, faculty, and staff to take the program individually in the
     computer lab
  •	 Provide training as an in-service
  •	 Distribute flyers to faculty members involved in student athletics




                                                      202                         Return to Asthma Menu
                                                                                                     Asthma #4


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List date Physical Education and extracurricular athletic teachers, faculty, and staff members attended the
      training
   •	 Number of participants

Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Winning with Asthma Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attache Winning with Asthma Policy
   •	 List date Physical Education and extracurricular athletic teachers, faculty, and staff members attended the
      training
   •	 Number of participants




                                                       203                        Return to Asthma Menu
                                          Asthma #5

   Develop a system to track asthma action plans for students with asthma



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Develop a system to track asthma action plans for students with asthma and communicate with school
       secretaries and teachers to ensure easy access to these plans


Rationale
Asthma is the leading public health problem for children in Utah. Nearly 65,000 children under 18 have asthma
throughout the state. Although asthma attacks can turn deadly at any time there are medications that can control and
relieve them.1 Having a system in place to track asthma action plans for students with asthma allows students to receive
the proper support in managing their asthma.

     1.   Utah Asthma Program, Asthma Fact Sheet, April 2009

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                        Kellie Baxter
                                                                 801-538-6441
                                                                 kabaxter@utah.gov
                                                                 health.utah.gov/asthma

Asthma School Resource Manual                                    health.utah.gov/asthma/schools/resource_manual.html

Asthma Action Plan                                               health.utah.gov/asthma/pdf_files/asthma_actionplan.pdf




                                                           204                      Return to Asthma Menu
                                                                                           Asthma


                                                      Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Have secretary keep the asthma action plans on file in the office
  •	 Add asthma action plans to Kindergarten registration packets
  •	 Give teachers a copy of their asthmatic students’ asthma action plans




                                                     205                     Return to Asthma Menu
                                                                             Asthma #5


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in




                                                     206          Return to Asthma Menu
                                      Asthma #6
   Complete another project, which the Utah Department of Health Asthma
   Program has approved


Definition
To complete this criterion your school must complete another project that will improve asthma management in your
school. Contact the Asthma Program for approval and ideas.

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                  Kellie Baxter
                                                           801-538-6441
                                                           kabaxter@utah.gov

American Lung association of Utah                          Don Hooper
                                                           801-484-4456
                                                           dhooper@utahlung.org
                                                           www.lungutah.org

Open Airways for Schools Program                           www.lungusa.org/lung-disease/asthma/in-schools/




                                                     207
                                                                                Asthma


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in




                                                     208          Return to Asthma Menu
    Diabetes
Diabetes Criteria

Diabetes #1

Diabetes #2

Diabetes #3

Diabetes #4

Diabetes #5




           209      Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                             Diabetes Control Criteria
   To complete the Diabetes Criteria your school must continue implementing the
   Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete four of the following
   criteria. Criterion #1 is required.

é 1. Write a policyat school (required)
     management
                   that allows for individualized accommodation for diabetes


   2. Provide easy access to healthy food choices and information

   3. Increase awareness of diabetes risk factors, the relationship between obesity and the
      development of type 2 diabetes, prevention of diabetes, and its complications

   4. Arrange for a health care professional to train school personnel on diabetes

   5. Complete another project, with the Utah Department of Health Diabetes Control
      Program has approved

   When your school completes the Diabetes criteria complete the online checklist http://health.
   utah.gov/obesity/gms/reports/focusrpt.php. Checklists will be available in March 2012. Upon
   completion your school will be sent a certificate of completion.

   Jen Jacobson
   UDOH Diabetes Prevention and Control Program
   P.O. Box 142107
   Salt Lake City, UT 84114-2107
   801-538-6248
   jtjacobson@utah.gov




                                                210                  Return to Diabetes Menu
                                         Diabetes #1
   Write a policy that allows for individualized accommodation for diabetes
   management at school


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that allows for individualized accommodation for diabetes management at school

Rationale
A recent study indicated that schools should improve the environment and education of staff for students with type 1
diabetes.1 The most recent data indicates that approximately 124,000 Utahans have been diagnosed with diabetes and
45,000 have not yet been diagnosed.2

     1.   Journal of School Nursing, Managing type 1 diabetes at school, February 2009

     2.   Utah Department of Health Diabetes Program, Facts and Figures, April 2009

Resources
School Nurse

Utah Department of Health                                             Jen Jacobson
Diabetes Prevention and Control                                       801-538-6248
                                                                      jtjacobson@utah.gov
                                                                      www.health.utah.gov/diabetes

American Diabetes Association                                         1-800-DIABETES
                                                                      801-363-3024
                                                                      www.diabetes.org

Helping the Student with Diabetes Succeed:                            www.ndep.nih.gov/diabetes/pubs/Youth_SchoolGuide
A Guide for School Personnel

Senate Bill 08                                                        www.health.utah.gov/diabetes/resourcesmain/glucagon




                                                              211                        Return to Diabetes Menu
                                                                                                Diabetes #1


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Create a room in the office where students can test their blood sugar and inject insulin
  •	 Work with a diabetes specialist, school nurse, and/or school community council to write policy
  •	 Provide snacks to students with diabetes
         ◦ In lunchroom, classroom, and/or office




                                                    212                      Return to Diabetes Menu
                                                                     Diabetes #1


                                On-line Reports
Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach draft of Diabetes Management Policy

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Diabetes Management Policy




                                                   213   Return to Diabetes Menu
                                                                                                       Diabetes #1


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools TM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “Easy access of snacks between meals”
         •	 “Students will be provided with a private area for insulin injection and blood sugar testing”
         •	 “Teachers, faculty, and staff shall receive training regarding basic care and monitoring”
         •	 “Each child shall have an individual care plan on file”

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 Consequences to violating this policy should be listed here
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date




                                                         214                       Return to Diabetes Menu
                                                                                                      Diabetes #1


                                          Policy Sample
Intent
Effective August 15, 2010, all students with diabetes will be provided with necessary arrangements for diabetes
management. These students will have easy access to snacks between meal service. Students will also be provided
with a private area for insulin injection and blood sugar testing

In addition, teachers, faculty, and staff will be given yearly training regarding the basic care and management of
diabetes. Children with diabetes will also have an individualized care plan on file.

Rationale
A recent study indicated that schools should improve the environment and education of staff for students with type
1 diabetes.1 The most recent data indicates that approximately 124,000 Utahans have been diagnosed with diabetes
and 45,000 have not yet been diagnosed.2

Reinforcement
This policy will be reviewed each year and will be discussed with all teachers, faculty, and staff during faculty
meeting. Any teacher who is found not routinely following this policy will receive a warning from the principal.

Endorsement


________________________________________
Principal Name

________________________________________                              _______________
Principal Signature                                                   Date


     1.   Journal of School Nursing, Managing type 1 diabetes at school, February 2009

     2.   Utah Department of Health Diabetes Program, Facts and Figures, April 2009




                                                              215                        Return to Diabetes Menu
                                         Diabetes #2

   Provide easy access to healthy food choices and information



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Provide easy access to healthy food choices and information

Rationale
Studies show that students who eat foods that are high in fat are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes and other
chronic diseases.1 Complications from diabetes may cause a decrease in academic performance.2 By teaching
nutrition at school, students may show an increase in the amount of knowledge and control they have regarding
nutrition and physical activity.3

     1.   International Journal of Obesity, Synergy of nature and nurture in the development of childhood obesity, April 2009

     2.   Journal of Diabetes Care, Cognitive Function is Disrupted by Both Hypo-and Hyperglycemia in School-Aged Children with
          type 1 diabetes: A Field Study, March 2009

     3.   Journal of School Nurses, Childhood Obesity Study: A Pilot Study of the Effect of the Nutrition Education, April 2009

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                              Jen Jacobson
Diabetes Prevention and Control                                        801-538-6248
                                                                       jtjacobson@utah.gov
                                                                       www.health.utah.gov/diabetes

UDOH Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Obesity Program                 Patrice Isabella, MS, RD
                                                                       801-538-6269
                                                                       pisabella@utah.gov

Team Nutrition poster: “Read It Before You Eat It!”                    www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/readit_eatit.html

Team Nutrition’s The Power of Choice: “Are You Label Able?” www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/POC_topic4.pdf

Make Your Calories Count:                                 www.cfsan.fda.gov/~ear/hwm/labelman.html
Use the Nutrition Facts Label for Healthy Weight Management



                                                               216                           Return to Diabetes Menu
                                                                                    Diabetes #2


                                                 Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Discuss a method to teach children with School Community Council
  •	 Teach students how to read labels as part of a health lesson
  •	 Invite a chef or nutritionist in to discuss serving sizes




                                                 217                    Return to Diabetes Menu
                                                                               Diabetes #2


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how healthy food choices are provided to students
   •	 Describe how nutrition information is shared with students

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe how healthy food choices are provided to students
   •	 Describe how nutrition information is shared with students




                                                     218           Return to Diabetes Menu
                                        Diabetes #3
   Increase awareness of diabetes risk factors, the relationship between obesity
   and the development of type 2 diabetes, prevention of diabetes, and its
   complications

Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Increase the awareness of the diabetes risk factors, the relationship between obesity and the development of
       type 2 diabetes, prevention of diabetes, and its complications
    •	 Distribute pamphlets, write newsletters, and give announcements or other materials about diabetes risk
       factors and how it may be prevented.

Rationale
Almost 21 million Americans have diabetes. Diabetes is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the
United States.1 Studies show that physical activity, good nutrition, and education is one of the most effective ways
to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.2

     1.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Diabetes Education Program, April 2009, www.cdc.gov/diabetes/ndep/
          index.htm

     2.   National Diabetes Information Clearing House, Taking Steps to Lower Your Risk of Getting Diabetes, December 2006, www.
          diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/riskfortype2/index.htm

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                           Jen Jacobson
Diabetes Prevention and Control                                     801-538-6248
                                                                    jtjacobson@utah.gov
                                                                    www.health.utah.gov/diabetes

Diabetes Education Manuals                                          www.health.utah.gov/diabetes/resourcesmain/

Helping the Student with Diabetes Succeed:                          www.ndep.nih.gov/diabetes/pubs/Youth_SchoolGuide
A Guide for School Personnel

Helping Administer to the Needs of the Student with                 www.nasn.org/default.aspx?tabid=411
Diabetes in School (H.A.N.D.S)




                                                             219                          Return to Diabetes Menu
                                                                                                    Diabetes #3


                                                        Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Include diabetes in a health lesson
  •	    Provide information to teachers, faculty, and staff during staff meeting
  •	    Provide article in school newsletter or Web site
  •	    In the classroom, or during Physical Education class, discuss diabetes information with students




                                                        220                      Return to Diabetes Menu
                                                                                                   Diabetes #3


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how your school increased the awareness of the diabetes risk factors, the relationship between
      obesity, and development of type 2 diabetes, prevention of diabetes, and its complications
   •	 Attach a pamphlet, newsletter, or other materials distributed

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe how your school increased the awareness of the diabetes risk factors, the relationship between
      obesity, and development of type 2 diabetes, prevention of diabetes, and its complications
   •	 Attach a pamphlet, newsletter, or other materials distributed




                                                      221                      Return to Diabetes Menu
                                       Diabetes #4

   Arrange for a health care professional to train school personnel on diabetes


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Provide education sessions regarding diabetes for school personnel by competent diabetes educator

Rationale
Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. It can cause serious health complications and is
the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Symptoms of the disease include frequent urination, excessive
thirst, sudden vision changes, extreme hunger, and many more. By learning the signs of diabetes teachers, faculty,
and staff can recognize symptoms of the disease and help students who are showing them.1

     1.   Utah Department of Health, Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, About Diabetes, February 2009

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                          Jen Jacobson
Diabetes Prevention and Control                                    801-538-6248
                                                                   jtjacobson@utah.gov
                                                                   www.health.utah.gov/diabetes

Local Health Departments                                           Page 433

School Nurse

Helping the Student with Diabetes Succeed:                         www.ndep.nih.gov/diabetes/pubs/Youth_SchoolGuide
A Guide for School Personnel

Diabetes Training Sessions                                         Joy Khader, MS, APRN
                                                                   Joy.khader@intermountainmail.org




                                                            222                         Return to Diabetes Menu
                                                                                               Diabetes #4


                                                           Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Provide training during a meeting
  •	    Provide training after school
  •	    Invite parents/legal guardians and community to attend training
  •	    Ask local health professional, doctor, or diabetes specialist to present




                                                          223                      Return to Diabetes Menu
                                                                                 Diabetes #4


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List date of diabetes education session by diabetes educator
   •	 Number of teachers, faculty, and staff that participated

End-Year (April)
   •	 List date of diabetes education session by diabetes educator
   •	 Number of teachers, faculty, and staff that participated




                                                       224           Return to Diabetes Menu
                                   Diabetes #5

   Complete another project, which the Utah Department of Health Diabetes
   Prevention and Control has approved


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
Complete another project which the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) Diabetes Program has approved

Resources
Utah Department of Health                               Jen Jacobson
Diabetes Prevention and Control                         801-538-6248
                                                        jtjacobson@utah.gov
                                                        www.health.utah.gov/diabetes

American Diabetes Association                           Tara Demke
                                                        801-363-3024 ext.7071
                                                        www.diabetes.org/schoolwalk

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation                   www.walk.jdrf.org




                                                  225                       Return to Diabetes Menu
                                                                              Diabetes #5


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in




                                                     226          Return to Diabetes Menu
Environmental Quality
    Environmental Quality Criteria

    Environmental Quality #1

    Environmental Quality #2

    Environmental Quality #3

    Environmental Quality #4

    Environmental Quality #5

    Environmental Quality #6

    Environmental Quality #7

               227      Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                     Environmental Quality Criteria
To complete the Environmental Quality Criteria your school must continue
implementing the Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete two of
the following criteria.
1. Apply online to Adopt-a-Waterbody for your school to clean up

2. Learn how to conserve water at home and school

3. Have a school wide recycling program

4. Help improve air quality by taking the ten-week “I Choose Clean Air” pledge

5. Participate in the National Energy Foundation’s Energy Action program

6. Use the Project Learning Tree: Environmental Education Activity Guide

7. Complete another project, with the Utah Department of Environmental Quality has
   approved


When your school completes the Environmental Quality criteria complete the online checklist
http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/reports/focusrpt.php. Checklists will be available in March
2012. Upon completion your school will be sent a certificate of completion.

Lori Walker
Environmental Education Coordinator
Utah Department of Environmental Quality
168 North 1950 West
Salt Lake City, UT 84116
Phone 801-536-4246
Fax 801-536-4441
lwalker@utah.gov




                                                                   Return to Environmental
                                             228
                                                                              Quality Menu
                               Environmental
                                 Quality #1
   Apply on line to Adopt-a-Waterbody for your school to clean up



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Apply online to Adopt-a-Waterbody
    •	 Clean the area surrounding the waterbody

Rationale
Water is the most precious global commodity with its many uses for drinking, recreation, sanitation, hygiene,
agriculture, and industry.1 By cleaning the area around streams, lakes, and reservoirs you can prevent water illnesses,
such as cryptosporidium, from being spread.2

     1.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Healthy Water, January 2009, www.cdc.gov/healthywater

     2.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Oceans, Lakes and Rivers, December 2008

Resources
How To Adopt-a-Waterbody                                            www.adoptawaterbody.utah.gov

Utah Department of Environmental Quality                            Lori Walker
Division of Water Quality                                           801-538-4246
                                                                    lwalker@utah.gov
                                                                    www.deq.utah.gov/

Drinking Water and Ground Water information                         www.epa.gov/safewater/kids/index.html




                                                                                           Return to Environmental
                                                             229
                                                                                                      Quality Menu
                                                                            Environmental Quality #1


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Get school involved by presenting this topic at a school assembly
  •	 Raise money to buy plants that will reduce erosion of sediment into waterbodies
  •	 Involve parents/legal guardians and community in project




                                                    230
                                                                             Return to Environmental
                                                                                        Quality Menu
                                                             Environmental Quality #1


                                On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List waterbody your school adopted
   •	 List date area surrounding the waterbody was cleaned
   •	 Number of students that participated

End-Year (April)
   •	 List waterbody your school adopted
   •	 List date area surrounding the waterbody was cleaned
   •	 Number of students that participated




                                                    231
                                                             Return to Environmental
                                                                        Quality Menu
                               Environmental
                                 Quality #2
   Learn how to conserve water at home and school



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Teach students how to conserve water at home and school

Rationale
In August 2001, Governor Mike Leavitt called together major water wholesalers to work towards a 25 percent
reduction of water use throughout the state.1 The United States is fortunate to have one of the safest public drinking
water supplies in the world. The United States alone uses 408 billion gallons of water each day, approximately 1400
gallons of water per day.

     1.   Slow the Flow, Campaign, 2009, www.slowtheflow.org

     2.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Reduce Your Water Footprint: Less Is More!, April 2009, www.cdc.gov/Features/
          BeWaterWise

Resources
Water Conservation                                                   Rick Webster
Utah Department of Natural Resources                                 801-538-7299
Division of Water Resources                                          rickwebster@utah.gov
                                                                     www.watereducation.utah.gov

Slow the Flow                                                        www.slowtheflow.org




                                                                                            Return to Environmental
                                                              232
                                                                                                       Quality Menu
                                                                          Environmental Quality #2


                                                   Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Get school involved by presenting this topic at a school assembly
  •	 Raise money to buy drought resistant plants for your school
  •	 Make your water conservation campaign topics visible with posters, flyers, etc.
          ◦ Have students make posters in art class
  •	 Include water conservation topics in school newsletter
  •	 Create a campaign around school to promote water conservation at home and at school, campaign topics
     may include
          ◦ Inside
                ▪ Only running full loads of dishes in the dishwasher or clothes in the washer
                ▪ “Slow the flow” of water when washing your hands
                ▪ Turn water off while you brush your teeth
          ◦ Outside
                ▪ Don’t over water your lawn
                ▪ Wash cars on the grass
                ▪ Plant drought resistant plants




                                                   233
                                                                           Return to Environmental
                                                                                      Quality Menu
                                                                           Environmental Quality #2


                                On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List grades taught how to conserve water at home and school
   •	 Describe how students were taught about conserving water at home and school

End-Year (April)
   •	 List grades taught how to conserve water at home and school
   •	 Describe how students were taught about conserving water at home and school




                                                   234
                                                                            Return to Environmental
                                                                                       Quality Menu
                               Environmental
                                 Quality #3
   Have a school wide recycling program



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Participate in a school wide recycling program

Rationale
In 2007 approximately 2.4 million tons of non-hazardous solid waste was disposed in Utah landfills.1 It is estimated
that in America, loggers cut down two million trees every day, yet Americans throw away about 42 million
newspapers daily. Unlike landfills recycling removes waste completely, and then turns it back into something useful.2

     1.   Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Utah’s Environment-Land, 2009, www.deq.utah.gov

     2.   Utah Recycling Coalition, Why Recycle?, 2009, www.utahrecycles.org/whyrecycle.php

Resources
Utah Department of Environmental Quality                            Lori Walker
Office of Planning and Public Affairs                               801- 536-4246
                                                                    lwalker@utah.gov
                                                                    www.deq.utah.gov

Recycling Centers                                                   www.utahrecycles.org/recyclingguide.php

Fun Facts About Recycling                                           www.resourcefulschools.org/

EPA Kids Club                                                       www.epa.gov/kids/garbage.htm

EPA Interactive Recycle City                                        www.epa.gov/recyclecity/




                                                                                          Return to Environmental
                                                             235                                     Quality Menu
                                                                         Environmental Quality #3


                                                  Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Get school involved by presenting this topic at a school assembly
  •	 Tell students importance of recycling
  •	 Contact www.utahrecycles.org and ask them to list your school as a recycling place, so others in the
     community may know
  •	 Partner with local Boy Scout or Girl Scout troops in recycling
  •	 Order the book Gumfounded by Sherry B. Garr from www.gumfounded.com
          ◦ Read book to students as an introduction to talking about garbage and recycling
          ◦ Participate in activities that can be found on Web site
          ◦ Have the students make Tia’s Recycling Club promise www.gumfounded.com/games/coloring6.pdf




                                                  236
                                                                          Return to Environmental
                                                                                     Quality Menu
                                                     Environmental Quality #3


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List recycling center your school uses
   •	 Describe how recycling is promoted

End-Year (April)
   •	 List recycling center your school uses
   •	 Describe how recycling is promoted




                                               237
                                                     Return to Environmental
                                                                Quality Menu
                               Environmental
                                 Quality #4
   Help improve air quality by taking the ten-week “I Choose Clean Air” pledge



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Take the ten-week “I Choose Clean Air” pledge

Rationale
The Utah Clean Air Act identifies common air pollutants that are found all over the United States and can injure
health, harm the environment, or cause property damage. The pollutants include Carbon Monoxide, Ozone,
Particulate Matter, and Sulfur Oxides. 1 Studies are showing that health is being impacted by the amount of air
pollutants.2

     1.   Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Choose Clean Air, 2009, www.cleanair.utah.gov

     2.   Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Tips and Trends, www.cleanair.utah.gov/tips_and_trends.htm

Resources
Office of Planning and Public Affairs                               Lori Walker
                                                                    801-536-4246
                                                                    lwalker@utah.gov

Utah’s Choose Clean Air                                             www.cleanair.utah.gov




                                                                                         Return to Environmental
                                                            238
                                                                                                    Quality Menu
                                                                            Environmental Quality #4


                                                    Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Use lesson plans listed at www.cleanair.utah.gov/resources/resources.htm
  •	 Invite a scientist from the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to present in the classroom or at a
     school assembly
  •	 Contact DEQ to receive free informational video on air quality
  •	 Hold assembly to begin or end pledge




                                                    239
                                                                             Return to Environmental
                                                                                        Quality Menu
                                                                       Environmental Quality #4


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List dates of participation in the “I Choose Clean Air” pledge
   •	 Number of points received
   •	 Number of students that participated

End-Year (April)
   •	 List dates of participation in the “I Choose Clean Air” pledge
   •	 Number of points received
   •	 Number of students that participated




                                                      240
                                                                       Return to Environmental
                                                                                  Quality Menu
                                Environmental
                                  Quality #5
   Participate in the National Energy Foundation’s Energy Action In Schools™
   program


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Participate in the National Energy Foundation’s (NEF) Energy Action In Schools™ program

Rationale
About 71.5 percent of electricity in America is generated from nonrenewable sources, and about 19.5 percent of
electric power is generated by nuclear power plants. The amount of nonrenewable energy sources on earth is limited.
It is important to conserve our current supply or to use renewable sources so that our natural resources will be
available in the future.1

      1.   United States Environmental Protection Agency, Energy Conservation Education Toolbox, January 2009 www.epa.gov/
           reg5rcra/wptdiv/p2pages/toolbox.htm

Resources
NEF                                                                 www.nef1.org
                                                                    1-800-616-8326
                                                                    info@nef1.org

Utah Energy Office                                                  www.energy.utah.gov




                                                                                          Return to Environmental
                                                             241
                                                                                                     Quality Menu
                                                                               Environmental Quality #5


                                                       Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Present topic at assembly
  •	    Support and encourage teachers, faculty, and staff as they implement the program
  •	    Organize an Energy Action Team and hold a goal setting/planning meeting
  •	    Involve students in energy saving decisions
             ◦ Student Council
             ◦ Focus Group




                                                       242
                                                                                Return to Environmental
                                                                                           Quality Menu
                                                                             Environmental Quality #5


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Date school signed-up to participate in the National Energy Foundation’s (NEF) Energy Action In SchoolsTM
      program
   •	 Describe the activities your school participated in

End-Year (April)
   •	 Date school signed-up to participate in the National Energy Foundation’s (NEF) Energy Action In SchoolsTM
      program
   •	 Describe the activities your school participated in




                                                     243
                                                                              Return to Environmental
                                                                                         Quality Menu
                               Environmental
                                 Quality #6
   Use the Project Learning Tree: Environmental Education Activity Guide


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Use the Project Learning Tree (PLT): Environmental Education Activity Guide

PLT workshops are six hours in length and credit and re-licensure points are available. Many of the PLT activities
correlate with the Utah State Office of Education’s core curriculum.

Rationale
The US Environmental Protection Agency found that environmental education programs are an effective tool in
helping to improve air quality in North America.1 With PLT students learn environmental content that correlates to
nation and state curriculum.2

     1.   US Environmental Protection Agency, Quantifying a Relationship Between Place-based Learning and Environmental Quality
          Final Report, February 2009

     2.   Project Learning Tree, About PLT, 2004, www.plt.org

Resources
Utah Society for Environmental Education                              Andree Walker
                                                                      801-328-1549
                                                                      andree@usee.org
                                                                      www.usee.org

PLT Program                                                           www.plt.org




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                                                                                                    Quality Menu
                                                                             Environmental Quality #6


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Create a Project Learning Tree (PLT) committee
  •	 Invite the Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization to participate in PLT




                                                    245
                                                                              Return to Environmental
                                                                                         Quality Menu
                                                                     Environmental Quality #6


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Date of the Project Learning Tree (PLT) workshop
   •	 Number of teachers, faculty, and staff that participated
   •	 List the three activities your school did from the PLT guide

End-Year (April)
   •	 Date of the Project Learning Tree (PLT) workshop
   •	 Number of teachers, faculty, and staff that participated
   •	 List the three activities your school did from the PLT guide




                                                      246
                                                                     Return to Environmental
                                                                                Quality Menu
                           Environmental
                             Quality #7
   Complete another project, which the Department of Environmental Quality
   has approved


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
Complete another project which the Department of Environmental Quality has approved.

Resources
Environmental Education Coordinator                      Lori Walker
                                                         801-536-4246
                                                         lwalker@utah.gov




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                                                   247
                                                                                       Quality Menu
                                                                  Environmental Quality #7


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in




                                                     248
                                                                  Return to Environmental
                                                                             Quality Menu
Fruits and Vegetables Galore
      Fruits and Vegetables Galore Criteria

      Fruits and Vegetables Galore #1

      Fruits and Vegetables Galore #2

      Fruits and Vegetables Galore #3

      Fruits and Vegetables Galore #4




                     249     Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                        Fruits and Vegetables Criteria
  To complete the Fruits & Vegetables Criteria your school must continue
  implementing the Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete two of
  the following criteria. The first criterion is required.

é 1.   Write a policy focusing on presentation of fruits and vegetables in the cafeteria
       (required)

  2. Write a policy incorporating fruit and vegetable standards from the HealthierUS School
     Challenge into the school lunch

  3. Participate in a garden-based learning activity

  4. Complete another project, which the Utah Department of Health Physical Activity,
     Nutrition, and Obesity Program has approved

  When your school completes the Fruits and Vegetables criteria complete the online checklist
  http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/reports/focusrpt.php. Checklists will be available in March
  2012. Upon completion your school will be sent a certificate of completion.

  Patrice Isabella MS, RD, CD
  PANO Nutrition Coordinator
  P.O. Box 142107
  Salt Lake City, UT 84114-2107
  Phone 801-538-6269
  Fax 801-538-9495
  pisabella@utah.gov




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                                                                            Vegetables Menu
                                     Fruits &
                                  Vegetables #1
   Write a policy focusing on the presentation of fruits and vegetables in the
   cafeteria


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that school nutrition personnel make fruits and vegetables a visible and appealing part of the
       school meal
           ◦ Principal signature

Rationale
In the State School Foods Report Card in 2007 Utah got an “F”.1 A growing body of research shows that fruits
and vegetables are critical to promoting good health. Fruits and vegetables contain essential vitamins, minerals,
and fibers that help protect against chronic diseases.2 Healthy eating in childhood and adolescence is important
for proper grown and development and can prevent many health problems and help children maintain a healthy
weight.3 Good presentation of fruits and vegetables makes them more appealing to children and will result in
increased consumption.

     1.   Center for Science in the Public Interest, State School Foods Report Card 2007, November 2007

     2.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Nutrition, January 2009

     3.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Healthy Youth! Nutrition, October 2008

Resources
Team Nutrition Resources                                             www.teamnutrition.usda.gov/library.html

Fruits & Vegetables Galore: Helping Kids Eat More                    www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/fvgalore_order.htm
                                                                     www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/fv_galore.html

Smarter Lunchrooms                                                   http://smarterlunchrooms.org/index.html

Let’s Move Salad Bars to Schools                                     http://saladbars2schools.org

Let’s move Chefs to Schools                                          www.letsmove.gov/chefs-move-schools

Produce for Better Health                                            www.pbhfoundation.org/foodservice/schools/

School Nutrition Association                                          www.schoolnutrition.org
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                                                                                                     Vegetables Menu
                  Fruits and Vegetables #1
Utah Department of Health                                 Patrice Isabella MS, RD, CD
Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Obesity Program         801-538-6269
                                                          pisabella@utah.gov




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                                                                                    Vegetables Menu
                                                                             Fruits and Vegetables #1


                                                    Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Order Fruits & Vegetable Galore: Helping Kids Eat (Allow 6-8 weeks for delivery) or download Meal Appeal
     booklet from Team Nutrition Web site
  •	 Read “Focusing on the Presentation” in Fruits & Vegetable Galore: Helping Kids Eat
  •	 Ask food service personnel which category they would like to work on
          ◦ Have each meal include at least two colors
          ◦ Use garnishes in center, side edges, or corners of the pans
          ◦ Make an outdoor or courtyard cafe
          ◦ Make fruits and vegetables the most attractive part of the line
          ◦ Move fresh fruits to front of serving line
          ◦ Feature a new fruit or vegetable every month
  •	 Work with School Community Council
  •	 Once you have made change, spread the word and inform others about the changes happening in cafeteria
  •	 Use the Smarter Lunchrooms Web site for ideas on how to make fruits and vegetables appealing
  •	 Work with the principal to apply for a Let’s Move Salad Bars to Schools grant
  •	 Bring a local chef to the classroom to assist with ideas
          ◦ Sign up for Let’s Move Chefs to Schools




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                                                                                     Vegetables Menu
                                                                                     Fruits and Vegetables


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how your school focused on the presentation of fruits and vegetables in the cafeteria

Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Presentation of Fruits and Veggies Policy draft


End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Presentation of Fruits and Veggies Policy
   •	 Describe how your school focused on the presentation of fruits and vegetables in the cafeteria




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                                                       254
                                                                                         Vegetables Menu
                                                                                         Fruits and Vegetables


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools TM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of
the policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is
required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “Fruits and Vegetables will be displayed in the cafeteria”

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date




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                                                                                             Vegetables Menu
                                                                                                 Fruits and Vegetables


                                          Policy Sample
Intent
To increase the amount of fruits and vegetables consumed during lunch and breakfast at Green Meadow Elementary
fruits and veggies will be displayed in the cafeteria. In addition they will be displayed at eye level so students are
more aware of them. Fruits and Vegetables will be promoted in the classroom as well.

Rationale
In the State School Foods Report Card in 2007 Utah got an “F”.1 A growing body of research shows that fruits
and vegetables are critical to promoting good health. Fruits and vegetables contain essential vitamins, minerals,
and fibers that help protect against chronic diseases.2 Healthy eating in childhood and adolescence is important
for proper grown and development and can prevent many health problems and help children maintain a healthy
weight.3 Good presentation of fruits and vegetables makes them more appealing to children and will result in
increased consumption.

Reinforcement
This policy will be reviewed each year by the principal and food service personnel. Information regarding this policy
will be promoted on food service menu’s sent home with students and in back to school packets.

Endorsement

_____________________________________________
Principal Name

_____________________________________________                                   _______________
Principal Signature                                                              Date


     1.   Center for Science in the Public Interest, State School Foods Report Card 2007, November 2007

     2.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Nutrition, January 2009

     3.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Healthy Youth! Nutrition, October 2008




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                                                                                                     Vegetables Menu
                                     Fruits &
                                  Vegetables #2
   Write a policy incorporating fruit and vegetable standards from the
   HealthierUS School Challenge into the school lunch


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that school lunches include fruits and vegetables as specified in the HealthierUS School
       challenge
            ◦ Principal signature

Rationale
In the State School Foods Report Card in 2007 Utah got an “F”.1 A growing body of research shows that fruits
and vegetables are critical to promoting good health. Fruits and vegetables contain essential vitamins, minerals,
and fibers that help protect against chronic diseases.2 Healthy eating in childhood and adolescence is important
for proper grown and development and can prevent many health problems and help children maintain a healthy
weight.3 Good presentation of fruits and vegetables makes them more appealing to children and will result in
increased consumption.

     1.   Center for Science in the Public Interest, State School Foods Report Card 2007, November 2007

     2.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Nutrition, January 2009

     3.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Healthy Youth! Nutrition, October 2008

Resources
HealthierUS School Challenge Checklist -for standards                www.fns.usda.gov/tn/healthierus/checklist.pdf

HealthierUS School Challenge - for technical assistance              www.fns.usda.gov/tn/healthierus/index.html
materials and link to other resources

Let’s Move Salad Bars to Schools                                     http://saladbars2schools.org/

Let’s Move Chefs to Schools                                          www.letsmove.gov/chefs-to-schools

Produce for Better Health                                            www.pbhfoundation.org/foodservice/schools/

School Nutrition Association                                         www.schoolnutrition.org


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                                                                                                     Vegetables Menu
                Fruits and Vegetables #2
Utah Department of Health                                 Patrice Isabella MS, RD, CD
Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Obesity Program         801-538-6269
                                                          pisabella@utah.gov




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                                                                                    Vegetables Menu
                                                                          Fruits and Vegetables #2


                                                  Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Download the HealthierUS School Challenge Checklist from the HealthierUS School Challenge Web site.
  •	 Meet with school nutrition personnel to train them on the fruit and vegetable standards
         ◦ Offer a different vegetable each day of the week
         ◦ Offer dark green or orange vegetables three or more days each week
         ◦ Offer dry beans and peas one or more days each week
         ◦ Offer a different fruit each day of the week (at least one being fresh)
  •	 Involve students in taste testing fruits and vegetables
  •	 Incorporate policy on fruits and vegetables into school wellness policy
  •	 Work with principal to apply for a Let’s Move Salad Bars to Schools grant
  •	 Bring a local chef to the school to showcase fruits and vegetables
         ◦ Sign up for Let’s Move Chefs to Schools




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                                                                                  Vegetables Menu
                                                       Fruits and Vegetables


                                 On-line Reports
Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Fruit and Veggie Standards Policy

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Fruit and Veggie Standards Policy




                                                        Return to Fruits and
                                                 260
                                                          Vegetables Menu
                                                                                         Fruits and Vegetables


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools TM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “All foods served in the cafeteria will match guidelines in the HealthierUS School Challenge”

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date




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                                                                                             Vegetables Menu
                                                                                                 Fruits and Vegetables


                                           Policy Sample
Intent
In attempt to improve nutrition in students at Green Meadow Elementary all food served in the cafeteria will match
the guidelines outlined in the HealthierUS School Challenge. Healthy foods will also be provided at all other foods
served outside of school meal services to support this policy

Rationale
In the State School Foods Report Card in 2007 Utah got an “F”.1 A growing body of research shows that fruits
and vegetables are critical to promoting good health. Fruits and vegetables contain essential vitamins, minerals,
and fibers that help protect against chronic diseases.2 Healthy eating in childhood and adolescence is important
for proper grown and development and can prevent many health problems and help children maintain a healthy
weight.3 Children consume a significant portion of their meals at school and the school meal should provide
fruits and vegetables to meet ½ - 1/3 of their daily requirement.

Reinforcement
This policy will be reviewed each year by the principal, teachers, faculty, staff, and food service personnel.
Information regarding this policy will be promoted on food service menu’s sent home with students and in back to
school packets.

Endorsement

_____________________________________________
Principal Name

_____________________________________________                                   _______________
Principal Signature                                                              Date


     1.   Center for Science in the Public Interest, State School Foods Report Card 2007, November 2007

     2.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Nutrition, January 2009

     3.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Healthy Youth! Nutrition, October 2008




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                                                                                                     Vegetables Menu
                                     Fruits and
                                   Vegetables #3
   Participate in a garden-based learning activity



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Participate in a garden-based learning activity

Rationale
Numerous studies have proven that garden-based education improves academic performance and may lead to higher
test scores in student populations. (1) Gardening has many amazing benefits for children. (2) Studies have shown that
students who participate in gardening:
     •	 Have an increased interest in eating fruits and vegetables
     •	 Learn to like healthy foods
     •	 Have greater positive attitudes about environmental issues
     •	 Develop better interpersonal relationships
     •	 Score significantly higher on science achievement tests.

     1.   California School Garden Network http://www.csgn.org/research.php

     2.   Cornell University http://www.hort.cornell.edu/gbl/groundwork/researchsupports.html



Resources
Cornell University Garden-Based Learning                                http://blogs.cornell.edu/garden/

Eat Smart – it’s in the Garden                                          http://agriculture.sc.gov/content.aspx?ContentID=789
(South Carolina Department of Agriculture)

California School Garden Network                                        www.csgn.org

USU Extension; Utah School and Youth Garden Network:                    http://utahgardennetwork.org/index.htm

Center for ecoliteracy:                                                 www.ecoliteracy.org/change/school-gardens

Wasatch Community Gardens                                               www.wasatchgardens.org



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                                                                                                    Vegetables Menu
                 Fruits and Vegetables #3
Utah Department of Health                                 Patrice Isabella MS, RD, CD
Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Obesity Program         801-538-6269
                                                          pisabella@utah.gov




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                                                                                    Vegetables Menu
                                                                                 Fruits and Vegetables #3


                                                      Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Seek administrative approval for a school garden project
  •	 Create a support network or garden team. Potential members include teachers, maintenance staff, school
     nutrition personnel, students, parents and community volunteers.
  •	 Meet with school community council to coordinate efforts with the community. Students may be able to
     learn in a local community garden.
  •	 Identify goals and link the garden to your curriculum
  •	 Design the garden. A garden can be as small as a few containers in a courtyard or as large as a vegetable bed.
  •	 Identify supply needs and funding needs. Obtain supplies and funds. A local retailer or nursery may be
     willing to donate seeds, plants, or supplies.
  •	 Make plans for planning, maintaining and sustaining the garden
  •	 Work with local 4-H or USU Extension office to identify garden-based learning opportunities for students
  •	 You can borrow the book Gardens for Learning: Creating and Sustaining Your School Garden from Patrice
     Isabella, PANO Nutrition Coordinator, 801-538-6269 or pisabella@utah.gov




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                                                                                         Vegetables Menu
                                                                   Fruits and Vegetables #3


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 What garden based activity did your school participate in?
   •	 Describe how you carried out the activity

End-Year (April)
   •	 What garden based activity did your school participate in?
   •	 Describe how you carried out the activity




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                                                      266
                                                                         Vegetables Menu
                                 Fruits &
                              Vegetables #4
   Complete another project, which the Utah Physical Activity, Nutrition, and
   Obesity Program has approved


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Complete another project which the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) Utah Physical Activity,
       Nutrition, and Obesity Program has approved

Resources
HealthierUS Schools Challenge, fruit and vegetable training www.fns.usda.gov/tn/HealthierUS/NFSMI/lesson3.
pdf

Healthy Meals Resource System                             healthymeals.nal.usda.gov/nal_display/index.php

Chefs Move to Schools                                     www.letsmove.gov/chefs-move-schools

Center for Food and Justice, Farm to School               www.farmtoschool.org

Utah Department of Health                                 Patrice Isabella MS, RD, CD
Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Obesity Program         801-538-6269
                                                          pisabella@utah.gov




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                                                                                     Vegetables Menu
                                                                  Fruits and Vegetables #5


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in




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                                                     268
                                                                        Vegetables Menu
Immunization
Immunization Criteria

Immunization #1

Immunization #2

Immunization #3

Immunization #4




           269     Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                             Immunization Criteria
To complete the Immunization Criteria your school must continue implementing
the Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete two of the following
criteria. Criterion #1 is required.

1. Have school staff responsible for completing annual immunization state reports
   (example school secretary, school administrator, school nurse) document online
   training for monitoring compliance with immunization requirements reporting
   (required)

2. Sign your school up to use the Utah Statewide Immunization Information System to track
   immunization compliance

3. Distribute information about the Vaccines for Children program

4. Complete another project, which the Utah Immunization Program has approved


When your school has completed the Immunization Criteria complete the online checklist
http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/reports/focusrpt.php. Checklists will be available in March
2012. Upon completion your school will be sent a certificate of completion.

Linda Abel
UDOH Immunization Program
P.O. Box 142001
Salt Lake City, UT 84114-2001
Phone 801-538-9450
www.immunize-utah.org




                                               270            Return to Immunization Menu
                         Immunization #1
   Have school staff responsible for completing annual immunization state
   reports (example school secretary, school administrator, school nurse)
   document online training for monitoring compliance with immunization
   requirements and reporting.

Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 School staff with responsibility for completing the annual immunization state report - usually school
       secretary or school administrator - document completion of online training for monitoring compliance with
       immunization requirements and reporting. Annual school immunization reports are due November 30 and
       follow-up reports on any children not in compliance by June 15.
    •	 Online education modules: “Understanding the Utah Immunization Rule for Students” is available at
       www.immunize-utah.org/providers/school/School_edu_modules.html. The modules are intended to help
       school personnel responsible for submitting school reports understand how to apply the Rule to reporting
       procedures.
    •	 Ensure that a Utah School Immunization Record (USIR) or “Pink Card” is filed in every student’s file,
       appropriately completed and signed
    •	 School staff will monitor 6th graders immunization records before transfer of files to middle school. Provide
       parents with information on immunizations that may be needed as required.

Rationale
Immunizing children is a great way to keep them healthy. In Utah parents may be granted an exemption from
immunization for religious, medical, or personal reasons.1 Immunizations decrease the risk of catching or spreading
disease.2

     1.   Utah Department of Health, Immunization Program, 2010, www.health.utah.gov/immu

     2.   National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Vaccine Benefits, August 2008, www.niaid.nih.gov/topics/vaccines/
          understanding/vaccineBenefits.htm

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                               Linda Abel or Nasrin Zandkarimi
Immunization Program                                                    801-538-9450
                                                                        www.immunize-utah.org

2011-2012 Utah School Immunization Guidebook                            www.immunize-utah.org/provider/school




                                                                271                  Return to Immunization Menu
                                                                                            Immunization #1


                                                      Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Provide appropriate school staff with online training link
  •	 Offer a small incentive for completing training prior to school opening for the year




                                                      272              Return to Immunization Menu
                                                                   Immunization #1


                               On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List date staff completed online training
   •	 Number that completed training
   •	 Date annual kindergarten immunization report was completed

End-Year (April)
   •	 List date staff completed online training
   •	 Number that completed training
   •	 Date annual kindergarten immunization report was completed




                                                  273
                         Immunization #2

   Distribute information about the Vaccines for Children program



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Distribute information about Vaccines for Children (VFC) program in kindergarten registration packets or
       throughout your school

Rationale
Many people do not get immunized because they do not have insurance or are worried of the cost of the
vaccination.1 Approximately 76% of the US population is either not immunized or under immunized.2

     1.   Utah Department of Health, Immunization Program, 2006, www.health.utah.gov/immu

     2.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Vaccines and Immunizations, April 2009, www.cdc.gov/vaccines

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                            Linda Abel or Nasrin Zandkarimi
Immunization Program                                                 801-538-9450
                                                                     www.immunize-utah.org




                                                             274                  Return to Immunization Menu
                                                                Immunization #2


                                              Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Set up display at Back to School Night
  •	 Include information in
          ◦ School Newsletter
          ◦ Report Cards
          ◦ Flyers




                                              275   Return to Immunization Menu
                                                                                       Immunization #2


                                On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how information on the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program was distributed

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe how information on the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program was distributed




                                                    276
                         Immunization #3

  Distribute information about the Vaccines for Children program



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion school:
    •	 Distribute information about Vaccines for Children (VFC) program in kindergarten registration packets or
       throughout your school

Rationale
Many people do not get immunized because they do not have insurance or are worried of the cost of the
vaccination.1 Approximately 76% of the US population is either not immunized or under immunized.2


     1.   Utah Department of Health, Immunization Program, 2006, www.health.utah.gov/immu

     2.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Vaccines and Immunizations, April 2009, www.cdc.gov/vaccines



Resources
Utah Department of Health Immunization Program                       Linda Abel or Nasrin Zandkarimi
                                                                     801-538-9450
                                                                     www.immunize-utah.org




                                                             277                  Return to Immunization Menu
                                                                Immunization #3


                                              Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Set up display at Back to School Night
  •	 Include information in
          ◦ School Newsletter
          ◦ Report Cards
          ◦ Flyers




                                              278   Return to Immunization Menu
                                                                                       Immunization #3


                                On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how information on the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program was distributed

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe how information on the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program was distributed




                                                    279
                    Immunization #4

  Complete another project, which the Utah Immunization Program has
  approved


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Complete another project which the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) Immunization Program has
       approved

Resources
Utah Department of Health                              Linda Abel or Nasrin Zandkarimi
Immunization Program                                   801-538-9450
                                                       www.immunize-utah.org




                                                 280             Return to Immunization Menu
                                                                  Immunization #4


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in




                                                     281
  Mental Health & Wellness
Mental Health & Wellness Criteria

Mental Health #1: Medical Recommendations

Mental Health #2: Promote Mental Health and Wellness

Mental Health #3: Mental Health Resources

Mental Health & Wellness Resources




                          282       Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                    Mental Health and Wellness Criteria

    To complete the Mental Health and Wellness Criteria your school must continue
    implementing the Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete all three
    criteria.

é 1. Discuss your district or School Medical Recommendations Policy with teachers,
       faculty, and staff. If your school or district does not have a policy one must be
       written

    2. Identify ways your school can promote mental health and wellness by improving
        students self-worth and stress management skills

    3. Provide teachers, faculty, and staff resources about mental health and how they
       can recognize mental health concerns in students


    When your school has completed the Mental Health and Wellness Criteria complete the
    online checklist http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/reports/focusrpt.php. Checklists will
    be available in March 2012. Upon completion your school will be sent a certificate of
    completion.




                                                 283           Return to Mental Health Menu
                            Mental Health &
                             Wellness #1
   Discuss your district or School Medical Recommendations Policy with teachers,
   faculty, and staff. If your school or district does not have a policy one must be
   written


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Discuss your district or School Medical Recommendations Policy with teachers, faculty, and staff
    •	 Write a Medical Recommendations Policy If your school or district does not have a policy one must be
       written. It is important to follow your district or school medical recommendations policy when school
       personnel would like to talk to a parent about mental health concerns. This criterion will ensure that your
       teachers, faculty, and staff know what they can and cannot do if they notice signs of a mental health concern
       in their student(s).

Rationale
Recent studies show that students who demonstrate good mental health are more successful in school.1 Teachers,
faculty, and staff who are aware of the signs of mental health are more likely to respond to students with mental
health concerns and help them succeed in their school work. These teachers must also know how to respond to
parents/guardians regarding mental health issues.2

     1.   Journal of School Health, Do social behavioral characteristics targeted by preventative interactions predict standardized test
          scores and grades?, 2005

     2.   American Counseling Association, Removing barriers and improving student outcomes: The importance of school based-
          mental health services, 2006, www.nasponline.org/advocacy/briefinghandout0306.pdf

Resources
District Office or Web site

Utah Administrative Code 53A-11-605
   •	 Go to www.le.state.ut.us
   •	 Click on Utah Code/Constitution on left hand side
           ◦ Click on Utah Code/Constitution-by Keyword
   •	 Search the Utah Code type
           ◦ 53A-11-605
           ◦ Click Search
   •	 On the right hand side scroll down until you match 53A-11-605




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                                                Mental Health & Wellness #1

                            Mental Health &
                             Wellness #1
Utah State Office of Education
   •	 Go to www.usoe.k12.ut.us
   •	 Click on departments
   •	 Click on Law & Legislation
   •	 Click on Papers of Interest
   •	 Click on Medical Recommendations




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                                                      Ideas
Ideas
  •	 If your school or district does not have a policy use the Utah Administrative Code 53A-11
  •	 Invite the school psychologist or another mental health professional to a meeting
  •	 If policy is a district policy invite a district employee to come discuss policy
  •	 Create a flow sheet that teachers, faculty, and staff can follow when they have identified a student with a
     mental health concern
  •	 Make sure counselors have copies of the flow sheet, fact sheets, and referral numbers in their offices
  •	 Contact the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) to get pamphlets detailing how teachers, faculty,
     and staff can talk to parents about mental health concerns




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                                                           Mental Health & Wellness #1


                               On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Attach Medical Recommendations Policy
   •	 Date Medical Recommendations Policy was discussed


End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Medical Recommendations Policy
   •	 Date Medical Recommendations Policy was discussed




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                                                                            Mental Health & Wellness #1


                                Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

Template
Policy must include...
    □ What teachers can do if they notice signs of mental health concern in students
    □ What teachers cannot do if they notice signs of mental health concern in students




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                                                                              Mental Health & Wellness #1


                                       Policy Sample
Davis School District Policy and Procedures
Subject: 5S-602 Medical Recommendations by School Personnel to Parents
Index: Student Services
Revised: June 19, 2007

1. PURPOSE & PHILOSOPHY
The Davis School District Board of Education recognizes that the decision for a student to see a health care
professional or use medication is a parental concern. In working with students, school personnel may be in a
position to make or give recommendations to parents/guardians which impact their children’s education. The
purpose of this policy is to clarify for school personnel and parents/guardians the recommendations or directions
that school personnel may make or give to parents/guardians about seeing health care professionals or using specific
medications for their children.

2. POLICY
2.1 School personnel may provide information and observations to parents/guardians about their children. Such
information or reports may include observations and concerns in the following area:
2.1.1 progress;
2.1.2 health and wellness;
2.1.3 social interactions;
2.1.4 behavior; and
2.1.5 topics consistent with the Utah Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (UCA
§53A-13-302(6)), and District policy 41-102 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.
2.2 School personnel may communicate information and observations between school personnel regarding a child.
2.3 In accordance with District guidelines and procedures, school personnel may refer students to other appropriate
school district personnel and agents, including referrals and communication with a school counselor or mental
health professionals working within the school system.
2.4 School personnel may consult or use appropriate health care professionals in the event of an emergency while the
student is at school consistent with student emergency information provided at student enrollment.
2.5 School personnel may exercise their authority relating to the placement within the school or readmission of
a child who may be or has been suspended or expelled for a violation of District Policy 5S-401 Safe and Orderly
Schools.
2.6 School personnel may not:
2.6.1 recommend to a parent or guardian that a child take or continue to take a psychotropic medication;
2.6.2 require that a student take or continue to take a psychotropic medication as a condition for attending school;
2.6.3 recommend that a parent/guardian seek or use a type of psychiatric or psychological treatment for a child; or
2.6.4 conduct a psychiatric or behavioral health evaluation or mental health screening,
test, evaluation, or assessment of a child except where this conflicts with the
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. § 1400 et seq.).
2.7 In compliance with State law (UCA §62A-4a-403), school personnel are required to report suspected child
abuse, however; unless failure to take action would present a serious, imminent risk to the child’s safety or the safety
of others; school personnel may not make
a child abuse or neglect report to authorities solely or primarily on the basis that a parent
or guardian refuses to consent to:

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                                       Policy Sample
2.5.1 a psychiatric, psychological, or behavioral treatment for a child, including the administration of a psychotropic
medication to a child; or
2.5.2 a psychiatric or behavioral health evaluation of a child.
2.8 A school counselor or other mental health professional acting in accordance with Title 58,
Chapter 60, Mental Health Professional Practice Act, or licensed through the State Board of Education, working
within the school system may:
2.8.1 recommend, but not require, a psychiatric or behavioral health evaluation of a child;
2.8.2 recommend, but not require, psychiatric, psychological, or behavioral treatment for a child;
2.8.3 conduct a psychiatric or behavioral health evaluation or mental health screening, test, evaluation, or assessment
of a child in accordance with the Utah Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (UCA § 53A-13-302), and
District Policy 4I-102 Family educational Rights and Privacy Act; or
2.8.4 provide to a parent/guardian, upon the specific request of the parent/guardian, a list of three or more health
care professionals or providers, including licensed physicians, psychologists, or other health specialists.
2.9 Nothing in this policy shall be interpreted as discouraging general communication not prohibited by this policy
between school personnel and a student’s parent/guardian.

3. TRAINING
Appropriate school personnel shall receive training from their supervisor on the provisions of this policy.

4. PENALTIES FOR VIOLATION
Intentional violation of this policy may subject school personnel to discipline consistent with state law and District
policy.

5S-602 Medical Recommendations by School Personnel to Parents
Document History:
Adopted: March 16, 2004
Revised: June 19, 2007 - Updated to reflect new law enacted in the 2007 Legislative Session (§53-11-605).
Utah
Administrative Rule R277-611 repealed.

DEFINITIONS
“Health care professional or provider” means a physician, physician assistant, nurse, dentist, or mental health
therapist.
“Medication” means any medicine, whether over-the-counter or prescription.
“School personnel” means any school district employee, including licensed, part-time, contract and non-licensed
employees.

REFERENCES
20 U.S.C.A § 1412(a)(25) - IDEA - Prohibition on Mandatory Medication
Utah Code Ann. § 53A-11-605 - Medical Recommendations for Children.




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                          Mental Health &
                           Wellness #2
   Identify ways your school can promote mental health and wellness by
   improving students self-worth and stress management skills


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Identify ways to promote mental health and wellness by improving students’ self-worth and stress
       management skills

Rationale
Like adults, children can have mental health disorders that interfere with the way they think, feel, and act. When
untreated, mental health disorders can lead to school failure, family conflict, and drug abuse. Studies show that at
least one in five children and adolescents have mental health disorders.1 By promoting self-worth students can learn
to overcome barriers that may cause more severe mental health concerns.

     1.   Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, Child and Adolescent Mental Health, November 2003, www.
          mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/child/childhealth.asp

Resources
What Every Child Needs for Good Mental Health                     www.mentalhealthamerica.net/go/get-info

Ten Activities to Improve Students’ Self Concept                  www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson/lesson085

Child Adolescent School Health                                    Lori Smith LCSW
                                                                  801-538-9158
                                                                  losmith@utah.gov

Stress Management                                                 Eric Trunnell, Ph.D.
                                                                  801-581-4462
                                                                  eric.trunnell@health.utah.edu




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                                                       Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Promote Mental Health Month (May)
  •	 Teach Prevention Dimensions in each grade; they have lessons plans encouraging exploration and acceptance
     of self, anger, stress management and more www.utahpd.org/curriculum.htm
  •	 Ensure that mental health components of the Utah State Office of Education (USOE) Health Education
     core curriculum are being taught http://www.uen.org/core/health
          ◦ Grades K-2 Core
                  ▪ Standard I: Students will develop a sense of self
                  ▪ Standard II: Students will develop a sense of self in relation to families and community
          ◦ Grades 3-6 Health Education
                  ▪ Standard I: Healthy Self
                  ▪ Standard III: Human Development and Relationships
  •	 Use the mind-mapping activity in class (see page 298)
  •	 Promote an open door policy at Principals office where students may go talk about their problems and
     concerns in a safe environment
  •	 Provide notebooks for teachers, faculty, and staff to track irregular behavior in students
  •	 Include a mental health section in your school newsletter or create a mental health and wellness newsletter
          ◦ Include zen quotes for inspiration
                  ▪ www.heartsandminds.org/quotes/quotes.htm
                  ▪ www.coolquotes.com/categories.php
  •	 Incorporate mental health into other subjects
          ◦ Have students write a poem or story about feelings
          ◦ Encourage students to read books that promote mental health
          ◦ Include a word relating to peace, happiness, harmony on each spelling list
  •	 Teach students, teachers, faculty, and staff about the importance of sleep
  •	 Read one of these children’s books and discuss how they relate to mental health
          ◦ Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst
          ◦ My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss

  Self-Worth
  •	 Establish a “Random Act of Kindness” award; find reward ideas in the Rewards Kids Will Crave booklet
  •	 Teach students to focus on their own progress and achieving their own personal best rather than grades
  •	 Pick one activity from the article Ten Activities to Improve Students’ Self Concept that would work best in your
      classroom www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson/lesson085.shtml
  •	 There are many cooperative PE games that include everyone (ie: Traditional PE Activities document in the
      Physical Activity Folder)
  •	 In competitions don’t exclude the losers, find a way for them to participate
  •	 Include students when changes or important decisions are being made
  •	 Give leadership responsibilities to everyone in the classroom
  •	 There are a number of books with ideas about teaching Self-worth in the classroom here are just a few to get
      you started
           ◦ Building Self-Esteem through the Museum of I by Linda R. Zack

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                Assignments and Ideas
        ◦ I Make a Difference by Michele C. Tamaren
        ◦ Positive Risks, Challenges and Other Paths to Success
        ◦ Jumpstarters
        ◦ 104 Activities That Build by Alanna Jones
•	 Use “Complimentary Points” from Rewards Kids Will Crave to build morale in the classroom
        ◦ Students earn a point when they are caught giving another student a compliment
        ◦ Keep track of each students’ progress on an individual chart, individual 3x5 card or classroom chart
        ◦ For every five points earned, the class can be rewarded by earning time to watch an educational
           video, extra walking time, or recess time
•	 Use “Mini-Messages” from Rewards Kids Will Crave to teach children to do nice things for one another, and
   increase their self-worth
        ◦ Each student has a “mailbox”
        ◦ When students have extra time, they can write mini-messages on white paper to each other and put
           them in their “mailboxes”.
        ◦ When you see them doing good things, write them a mini-message on pink paper with specific
           praise. Students LOVE seeing the pink papers from you

Stress Management
•	 Teach students about stress and how they can learn to create their own coping skills
•	 Educate teachers, faculty, and staff about childhood stress
•	 Provide classes to teachers, faculty, and staff about stress management, time management, yoga, etc.
•	 Teach students about using exercise as a stress relief and then go run/walk the Gold Medal Mile™
•	 Order posters about stress from www.hopehealth.com/posters-template.asp?cat=Stress
•	 There are a number of books dealing with stress
        ◦ Coping Skills Interventions for Children and Adolescents by Susan G. Forman
        ◦ How to take the GRRR Out of Anger by Elizabeth Verdick and Majorie Lisovskis
        ◦ Stress can really get on your Nerves! by Trevor Romain and Elizabeth Verdick




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                                                                     Mental Health & Wellness #2


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe activities that promote mental health and wellness

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe activities that promote mental health and wellness




                                                      294           Return to Mental Health Menu
                           Mental Health &
                            Wellness #3
   Provide teachers, faculty, and staff resources about mental health and how
   they can recognize mental health concerns in students


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Provide teachers, faculty, and staff resources about mental health and how they can recognize mental health
       concerns in students

Rationale
Schools are often the place where student’s mental health needs are discovered and where support is provided.
The National Association of School Psychologists recommends that schools build the capacity of staff members to
respond to the mental health needs of students and they provide continuing education to teachers, faculty, and staff
who work with students.1

     1.   National Association of School Psychologists, Responding to the Mental Health Needs of Students, September 2006

Resources
National Alliance for the Mentally Ill in Utah (NAMI)                www.namiut.org
                                                                     801-323-9900

Find Mental Health Services in Your Area                             www.Mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/databases

Mental Health Fact Sheets for the Classroom                          www.schoolmentalhealth.org

Children’s Mental Health Fact Sheets                                  www.mentalhealthamerica.net/go/information/

Child and Adolescent Mental Health                                   www.mentalhealth.org/child/childhealth.asp

Mental Health Information                                            www.nimh.nih.gov

Mental Health Fact Sheets                                            www.aacap.org




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                                                       Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Participate in National Mental Health Month (May)
          ◦ National Mental Health Association www.nmha.org/index.cfm
          ◦ National Mental Health Information Center www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov
  •	 Involve local mental health experts
  •	 Find fact sheets discussing specific areas of mental health at www.aacap.org/page.ww?section=Facts+for+Fam
     ilies&name=Facts+for+Families
  •	 Make a power point presentation for teacher, faculty, and staff
  •	 Create age appropriate poster, flyers, etc. to make students aware of mental health
  •	 Teach the importance of good mental health
  •	 Include a mental health topic at each faculty meeting
  •	 Distribute a newsletter throughout the year focusing on different mental health issues or include mental
     health as a topic in the schools current newsletter
  •	 Distribute a list of resources for teachers, faculty, staff, and school counselors to give to parents when they
     discuss a students mental health concern
  •	 Contact NAMI Utah, 877-230-6264, to set up a teacher in-service
  •	 Help students identify who they can talk to when they feel sad or depressed
          ◦ Have students trace their hand on a piece of paper. Have them write the name of someone they trust
             and feel they can talk to.
          ◦ Younger students can draw a picture representing the people they trust on each finger
  •	 Distribute one of the following handouts
          ◦ www.mentalhealthamerica.net/go/information/get-info/children-s-mental-health/recognizing-
             mental-health-problems-in-children
          ◦ www1.nmha.org/children/children_mh_matters/promoting.cfm




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                                                                          Mental Health & Wellness #3


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how teachers were informed of mental health issues
   •	 Attach resources used to inform teachers of mental health issues

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe how teachers were informed of mental health issues
   •	 Attach resources used to inform teachers of mental health issues




                                                      297                Return to Mental Health Menu
 Mental Health &
Wellness Resources
  Mind Mapping




           298   Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                              Mental Health &
                             Wellness Resources
Mind Mapping

Mind Mapping is a valid and useful exercise to help an adult identify where a child might be struggling with stress in
their lives. This exercise can be done in groups or one-on-one.
Instructions:
      1. Give each child a piece of paper and writing tool. Start by showing an example of a mind map and what it
            looks like. Make a sample of a mind map before hand for students to see what one looks like.

     2.   Start with a symbol that best represents themselves. The symbol can be anything but help with some ideas
          like a heart, star, soccer ball, or Religious symbol. Make sure to encourage the child that there is no wrong
          answer and they are free to draw whatever they would like.

     3.   Designate the upper left corner for the children as they see themselves in school. Draw symbols of
          anything that they feel represent their lives at school (i.e. what they like to do in school, activities,
          teachers, class assignments and friends,).

     4.   Next designate the upper right corner for their family life. Once again encourage symbols that the
          students feel represent their families (i.e. homes, family pets, or vacations they might have taken) Make
          sure the emphasis is to draw whatever they would like and the symbols don’t necessarily have to be all
          happy.

     5.   Finally leave the last two corners to be whatever the students would like to draw. Ideas could be a sport
          they play, an after school activity, or a special talent they might have. Give the students at least 10 minutes
          of free draw time to finish up their mind maps.

     6.   Afterwards, ask for volunteers to share their drawings. Ask children to explain the different areas, but don’t
          push them if they aren’t sharing a particular symbol or area.

     7.   Review all the mind maps created and look for any red flags of unhappy scenes or symbols to check for
          stressful areas of the child’s life or a particular incident. Share any interesting findings with the school
          counselor.

Mind mapping is a good stress relief tool for children and adults because it helps them to express themselves in
an open environment where they are free to express any pent up emotions and feelings positive or negative. This
exercise also allows them to participate in a fun activity where there is no right or wrong answer. It is sometimes hard
for a child to come out and ask for help when they’re experiencing trouble. When given another outlet like drawing
they are better able to express frustrations and insecurities that they might be feeling. Make sure to document any
findings and inform the School Counselor, Principal or parent/guardian.




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                                                           299
                                                                                               Resources Menu
 Mental Health &
Wellness Resources




            Return to Mental Health
      300
                    Resources Menu
 Oral Health
Oral Health Criteria

Oral Health #1

Oral Health #2

Oral Health #3

Oral Health #4

Oral Health #5




           301         Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                                Oral Health Criteria
To complete the Oral Health Criteria your school must continue implementing the
Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete three of the following
criteria.

1. Distribute a newsletter about oral health

2. Do a fluoride rinse program for non-fluoridated areas

3. Include oral health as a topic at an assembly

4. Distribute an Oral Health Survey to parents/legal guardians

5. Complete another project, with the Utah Department of Health Oral Health Program has
   approved


When your school has completed the Oral Health Criteria complete the online checklist
http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/reports/focusrpt.php. Checklists will be available in March
2012. Upon completion your school will be sent a certificate of completion.

Steven Steed, DDS
UDOH Oral Health Program
P.O. Box 142001
Salt Lake City, UT 84114-2001
Phone 801-538-6757
Fax 801-538-9440
stevensteed@utah.gov




                                               302               Return to Oral Health Menu
                                 Oral Health #1

   Distribute a newsletter about oral health



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Distribute a newsletter to students, teachers, faculty, staff, and parents

Rationale
Tooth decay affects more children in the United States than any other chronic disease. Children can reduce their
chance of tooth decay by eating healthy meals, brushing teeth, and getting sealants.1

     1.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Children’s Oral Health, March 2009, www.cdc.gov/OralHealth/topics/child.htm

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                           Steve Steed, DDS
Oral Health Program                                                 801-538-6757
                                                                    stevensteed@utah.gov
                                                                    www.health.utah.gov/oralhealth




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                                                                                             Oral Health #1


                                                      Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Distribute newsletter
          ◦ Mind Your Mouth Newsletter sent to schools in February
          ◦ Newsletter includes activities to do in classroom, a dental health message, and information about
            fluoride mouth rinse




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                                                      Oral Health #1


                                On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how newsletter was distributed
   •	 Attach a copy of newsletter

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe how newsletter was distributed
   •	 Attach a copy of newsletter




                                                305
                                 Oral Health #2

   Do a fluoride rinse program for non-fluoridated areas


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Participate in a fluoride rinse program for non-fluoridated areas

Rationale
Water fluoridation allows community members to get fluoride through the water they drink.1 Daily fluoride
supplements are recommended for children who reside in areas where drinking water is fluoride-deficient. Daily use of
fluoride supplement is effective in preventing cavities in children.2

     1.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Oral Health Resources, My Water’s Fluoride, October 2008, http://apps.nccd.cdc.
          gov/MWF/Index.asp

     2.   Utah Department of Health, Oral Health Program, Preventing Oral Disease in Children, www.health.utah.gov/oralhealth/
          Prevention.htm

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                             Steve Steed, DDS
Oral Health Program                                                   801-538-6757
                                                                      stevensteed@utah.gov
                                                                      www.health.utah.gov/oralhealth

American Dental Association                                           www.ada.org

American Dental Hygienists’ Association                               www.adha.org

ADHA Fluoride Facts                                                   www.adha.org/oralhealth/fluoride_facts.htm

Oral-B Teaching Tools Lesson Plans                                    www.oralb.com/us/learningcenter/teaching/

Bright Futures in Practice: Oral Health                               www.mchoralhealth.org/Toolbox/professionals.html

No Cavities Clubhouse                                                 www.colgate.com/app/Kids-World/US/HomePage.cvsp




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                                                                      Oral Health #2


                             Oral Health #2
Open Wide and Trek Inside              www.science.education.nih.gov/supplements/nih2/

Crest Classroom Activities             www.pgschoolprograms.com/oral_care/




                                 307                Return to Oral Health Menu
                                                                                         Oral Health #2


                                                   Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Educate students about fluoride in water
          ◦ Encourage teachers, faculty, and staff to talk about this in their classrooms
  •	 Invite a dentist or dental hygienist to talk to students about importance of fluoride
  •	 Have students contact their local authorities about putting fluoride in their water
  •	 Order mouth rinse manual with materials from the Oral Health Program, 801-538-6757




                                                   308                Return to Oral Health Menu
                                                            Oral Health #2


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List fluoride program your school participated in
   •	 Number of students that participated

End-Year (April)
   •	 List fluoride program your school participated in
   •	 Number of students that participated




                                                      309
                                Oral Health #3

   Include oral health as a topic at an assembly


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Teach students what oral health is and why it is important at an assembly

Rationale
Tooth decay affects more children in the United States than any other chronic disease. Children can reduce their
chance of tooth decay by eating healthy meals, brushing teeth, and getting sealants.1 Early tooth loss disrupts a
students ability to learn by causing impaired speech development, inability to concentrate, and reduced self-esteem.2

     1.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Children’s Oral Health, March 2009, www.cdc.gov/OralHealth/topics/child.htm

     2.   National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Learning Fact sheet, 2003, www.mcoralhealth.org/PDFs/
          learningfactsheet.pdf

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                           Steve Steed, DDS
Oral Health Program                                                 801-538-6757
                                                                    stevensteed@utah.gov
                                                                    www.health.utah.gov/oralhealth

American Dental Association Activities                              www.ada.org

American Dental Hygienist Association activities                    www.adha.org

Oral-B Teaching Tools Lesson Plans                                  www.oralb.com/us/learningcenter/teaching

Crest Classroom Activities                                          www.pgschoolprograms.com/oral_care

Bright Futures in Practice: Oral Health                             www.mchoralhealth.org/Toolbox/professionals.html

No Cavities Clubhouse                                               www.colgate.com/app/Kids-World/US/HomePage.cvsp

Open Wide and Trek Inside                                           www.science.education.nih.gov/supplements/nih2/



                                                             310                     Return to Oral Health Menu
                                    Oral Health #3
Dixie State College Dental Hygiene Program
435-879-4905

Salt Lake Community College Dental Hygiene Program
801-957-2710

Utah College of Dental Hygiene
801-226-1081

Utah Valley State College Dental Hygiene Program
801-863-7536

Weber State University Dental Hygiene Program
801-626-6130




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                                                                           Oral Health #3


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Invite dental hygienist student to com to your assembly
  •	 Invite a dentist to speak on oral health




                                                    312        Return to Oral Health Menu
                                                                   Oral Health #3


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Date the assembly was held
   •	 Who participated in the assembly?
   •	 Describe how was oral health and its importance was taught

End-Year (April)
   •	 Date the assembly was held
   •	 Who participated in the assembly?
   •	 Describe how was oral health and its importance was taught




                                                    313
                                 Oral Health #4

   Distribute Oral Health Survey to parents/legal guardians



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Distribute Oral Health Survey to parents/legal guardians
    •	 Submit surveys to the Utah Department of Health Oral Health Program

Rationale
Preventative home oral hygiene health care begins at home. Parents/legal guardians are the first to show children how
to care for their teeth.1 Results from surveys help identify ways to improve.

     1.   Utah Department of Health, Oral Health program, Preventing Oral Disease in Children, www.health.utah.gov/oralhealth/
          Prevention.htm

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                           Steve Steed, DDS
Oral Health Program                                                 801-538-6757
                                                                    stevensteed@utah.gov
                                                                    www.health.utah.gov/oralhealth

Oral Health Survey                                                  Page 317




                                                             314                     Return to Oral Health Menu
                                                                                      Oral Health #4


                                                    Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Provide incentive to parents/legal guardians for turning in survey
  •	 Tell students about survey and encourage their parents to complete
  •	 Educate parents




                                                    315                   Return to Oral Health Menu
                                                                                         Oral Health #4


                               On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Date surveys were distributed to parents/legal guardians
   •	 Number of surveys submitted to the Utah Department of Health Oral Health Program

End-Year (April)
   •	 Date surveys were distributed to parents/legal guardians
   •	 Number of surveys submitted to the Utah Department of Health Oral Health Program




                                                  316
                                                                                                   Oral Health #4


                                  Oral Health Survey
Below are questions about healthy dental habits that parents can help their children do. Please answer to the best of
your knowledge. Information from these surveys will be shared as a group and not individually. Survey results will
help the school identify which area the child needs to improve.


Student Name (Last, First) ______________________________________________

Age ____ Grade ____ School __________________________________ Gender: M                       F



Yes     No
                 My child drinks water with enough fluoride or takes daily fluoride tablets

                 My child swishes with weekly school fluoride rinse or daily home fluoride rinse

                 My child has dental check-ups at least once a year

                 My child brushes daily with a fluoride toothpaste

                 My child flosses daily

                 My child has had sealants placed on biting surfaces of the back teeth

                 My child has insurance for dental treatment



Parent/Legal Guardian Signature                                           Date




                                                   Please return survey to:
                                                Utah Department of Health
                                                    Oral Health Program
                                                      P.O. Box 142001
                                              Salt Lake City, UT 84114-2001




                                                         317                     Return to Oral Health Menu
                            Oral Health #5
   Complete another project, which the Utah Department of Health Oral Health
   Program has approved


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Complete another project, which the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) Oral Health Program has
       approved

Resources
Utah Department of Health                               Steve Steed, DDS
Oral Health Program                                     801-538-6757
                                                        stevensteed@utah.gov
                                                        www.health.utah.gov/oralhealth




                                                  318                Return to Oral Health Menu
                                                                  Oral Health #5


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in




                                                     319
Sun Safety
Sun Safety Criteria

Sun Safety #1

Sun Safety #2

Sun Safety #3

Sun Safety #4

Sun Safety #5




         320      Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                                     Sun Safety Criteria
    To complete the Sun Safety Criteria your school must continue implementing the
    Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete four of the following
    criteria. Criterion #2 is required.

    1. Promote sun safety by having a funky hat day

é 2. sun safety (required)
     Write a policy that encourages students, teachers, faculty, and staff to promote


    3. Promote sun safety for all grades

    4. Become a SunWise School

    5. Complete another project, with the Utah Department of Health Cancer Control
       Program approved


    When your school has completed the Sun Safety Criteria complete the online checklist
    http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/reports/focusrpt.php. Checklists will be available in March
    2012. Upon completion your school will be sent a certificate of completion.

    UDOH Cancer Control Program
    1-800-717-1811
    www.ucan.cc
    www.cancerutah.org




                                                   321                Return to Sun Safety Menu
                                  Sun Safety #1

   Promote sun safety by having a funky hat day


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Promote sun safety by having a funky hat day

Rationale
Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States. The best way to prevent skin cancer is to
protect yourself from the sun. One of the best ways to protect yourself is to wear long sleeves of tightly woven
fabrics, a hat, and sunglasses.1

     1.   National Cancer Institute, What you need to know about skin cancer, August 2005, www.cancer.gov

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                           1-800-717-1811
Cancer Program                                                      www.ucan.cc
                                                                    www.cancerutah.org

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention                          www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/pdf/sunsafety_v0908.pdf
Sun Safety at Schools

Shade Planning for America’s Schools                                www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/pdf/shade_planning.pdf




                                                             322                       Return to Sun Safety Menu
                                                                                                  Sun Safety #1


                                                       Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Have funky hat day during Olympic field day
  •	 Have students, teachers, faculty, and staff wear their funkiest hats to school. The hat that provides the hat
     that provides the most shade or covers the most skin wins a prize
  •	 Involve the Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization in judging the funkiest hats
  •	 Have different categories (i.e. biggest hat, covers most skin, most colorful, etc.)
  •	 Announce funkiest hat at end of the day




                                                       323                    Return to Sun Safety Menu
                                                                           Sun Safety #1


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Date “Funky Hat Day” was held
   •	 Number of students, teachers, faculty, and staff that participated

End-Year (April)
   •	 Date “Funky Hat Day” was held
   •	 Number of students, teachers, faculty, and staff that participated




                                                       324
                                Sun Safety #2
   Write a policy that encourages students, teachers, faculty, and staff to
   promote sun safety


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
Write a policy that encourages students, teachers, faculty, and staff to protect them selves from the sun when they are
outside

Rationale
Not all forms of sun protection comes from a bottle. Just a few serious sunburns can increase a child’s risk of skin
cancer later in life. Unprotected skin begins to be damaged after only 15 minutes in the sun, although it may take
up to 12 hours for the skin to show the full effect of sun exposure. It is important to help children keep their skin
protected from the sun1.

     1.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Play it Safe in the Sun: A Guide for Parents, December 2006, www.cdc.gov/
          cancer/skin/chooseyourcover/guide.htm

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                             1-800-717-1811
Cancer Program                                                        www.ucan.cc
                                                                      www.cancerutah.org

Utah Cancer Action Network’s Resources for Teachers                   health.utah.gov/ucan/
(Lesson plans, coloring pages, posters)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention                            www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/pdf/sunsafety_v0908.pdf
Sun Safety at Schools

Shade Planning for America’s Schools                                  www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/pdf/shade_planning.pdf




                                                              325                        Return to Sun Safety Menu
                                                                      Sun Safety #2


                                                 Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Work with School Community Council to write policy




                                                326       Return to Sun Safety Menu
                                                Sun Safety #2


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Attach draft of Sun Safety Policy

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Sun Safety Policy




                                          327
                                                                                                         Sun Safety


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with the school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal SchoolsTM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “All students will be allowed to wear visors, hats, sunglasses, and sunscreen while outside”

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 Consequences to violating this policy should be listed here
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date




                                                         328
                                                                                                                      Sun Safety


                                            Policy Sample
Intent
Effective August 15, 2009 all students will be allowed to wear hats, visors, sunglasses, and sunscreen while outside.
This includes recess and activities held during the school day.

In addition, students will receive education on sun dangers at the beginning of each school year.

Rationale
Not all forms of sun protection comes from a bottle. Just a few serious sunburns can increase a child’s risk of skin
cancer later in life. Unprotected skin begins to be damaged after only 15 minutes in the sun, although it may take
up to 12 hours for the skin to show the full effect of sun exposure. It is important to help children keep their skin
protected from the sun.1


Reinforcement
The Principal, PE specialist, and Recess Monitors will review policy at the beginning of each year. This policy
will be discussed with teachers, faculty, and staff at the beginning of the school year. Anyone found not routinely
participating in this policy will receive a warning from the principal.

Endorsement


________________________________________
Principal Name

________________________________________                                _______________
Principal Signature                                                           Date


    1.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Play it Safe in the Sun: A Guide for Parents, December 2006, www.cdc.gov/cancer/
         skin/chooseyourcover/guide.htm




                                                                329
                                 Sun Safety #3

   Promote sun safety for all grades


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Promote sun safety for all grades

Rationale
Skin Cancer is the leading type of cancer in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
recommend that schools recognize the importance of sun safety during the school day. By encouraging teachers to
practice sun safety in the classroom students are more likely to remain sun safe throughout the school day.1

     1.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, What You Can Do, March 2009, www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/pdf/sunsafety_v0908.
          pdf

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                          801-717-1811
Cancer Program                                                     www.ucan.cc
                                                                   www.cancerutah.org

Resources for Teachers                                             health.utah.gov/ucan/
(Lesson plans, coloring pages, posters)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention                         www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/pdf/sunsafety_v0908.pdf
Sun Safety at Schools

Shade Planning for America’s Schools                               www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/pdf/shade_planning.pdf




                                                            330                      Return to Sun Safety Menu
                                                                                          Sun Safety #3


                                                        Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Provide activities in shade
  •	    Provide classrooms with big bottles of sunscreen
  •	    Pass out sunglasses to students as they go to recess
  •	    Allow students to bring hats, visors, and sunglasses to wear when going outside




                                                        331                   Return to Sun Safety Menu
                                                           Sun Safety #3


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how sun safety was promoted in all grades

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe how sun safety was promoted in all grades




                                                    332
                                 Sun Safety #4

   Become a SunWise School



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Become a SunWise School in the SunWise Program
    •	 Complete activities from SunWise materials

Rationale
Children spend lots of time outdoors during recess, Physical Education classes, and sports programs. While some
exposure to sunlight can be enjoyable and healthy, too much can be dangerous. In 2008 approximately 8,400 people
died of melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. In a majority of studies, researchers have found a positive
relationship between childhood sunburns and the risk of melanoma.

     1.   US Environmental Protection Agency, Skin Cancer Facts, May 2008

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                          1-800-717-1811
Cancer Program                                                     www.ucan.cc
                                                                   www.cancerutah.org

Becoming a SunWise School                                          www.epa.gov/sunwise/becoming.html
                                                                   https://cfpub.epa.gov/sunwise/index.cfm

E-mail US EPA SunWise Program                                      sunwise@epa.gov




                                                            333                   Return to Sun Safety Menu
                                                                                            Sun Safety #4


                                                       Ideas
School Coordinator Assignments
  •	    Visit SunWise Web site
  •	    Learn about how to become a SunWise School
  •	    Register school https://cfpub.epa.gov/sunwise/index.cfm
  •	    Implement one of four SunWise activities

Ideas
  •	 Use student council to implement SunWise program
  •	 Involve Parent Teacher Association (PTA)/Parent Teacher Organization (PTO) in planning activities
  •	 Include SunWise information in school newsletters




                                                       334               Return to Sun Safety Menu
                                                                                  Sun Safety #4


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Date school signed-up to become a Sun-Wise school
   •	 Describe activities from the Sun-Wise program your school participated in

End-Year (April)
   •	 Date school signed-up to become a Sun-Wise school
   •	 Describe activities from the Sun-Wise program your school participated in




                                                     335
                            Sun Safety #5

  Complete another project, which the Utah Department of Health Cancer
  Control Program has approved


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Complete another project which the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) Cancer Control Program has
       approved

Resources
Utah Department of Health                              1-800-717-1811
Cancer Program                                         www.ucan.cc
                                                       www.cancerutah.org




                                                 336                  Return to Sun Safety Menu
                                                                  Sun Safety #5


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in




                                                     337
Violence and Injury Prevention
      Violence and Injury Prevention Criteria

      Violence and Injury Prevention #1

      Violence and Injury Prevention #2

      Violence and Injury Prevention #3

      Violence and Injury Prevention #4

      Violence and Injury Prevention #5




                     338      Return to Platinum Focus Menu
                    Violence and Injury Prevention Criteria

    To complete the Violence and Injury Prevention Criteria your school must continue
    implementing the Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum Criteria and complete three of
    the following criteria. Criterion #4 is required.

    1. Promote helmet use for skating, biking, skateboarding, and riding scooters

    2. Assure all playground areas meet Consumer Product Safety Commission standards

    3. Take steps to prevent and control bullying

é 4. mandatory formaking the completion(required)
     Write a policy
                    all reportable injuries
                                            and submission of Student Injury Reports


    5. Complete another project, with the Utah Department of Health Violence and Injury
       Prevention Program has approved


    When your school completes the Violence and Injury Prevention criteria complete the online
    checklist http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/reports/focusrpt.php. Checklists will be available
    in March 2012. Upon completion your school will be sent a certificate of completion and
    receive media recognition.

    Whitney Johnson
    UDOH Violence and Injury Prevention Program
    P.O. Box 142106
    Salt Lake City, UT 84114-2106
    801-538-6183
    wjohnson@utah.gov
    health.utah.gov/vipp




                                                                    Return to Violence and Injury
                                                    339
                                                                                Prevention Menu
                        Violence & Injury
                         Prevention #1
   Promote helmet use for skating, biking, skateboarding, and riding scooters



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Promote wearing of helmets for skating, biking, skateboarding, and riding scooters

Rationale
In an average year six bicyclists are killed each year in Utah and 850 are involved in motor vehicle crashes. Head
injury is the most common serious injury from bicycle and car collisions. Bicycle helmets can reduce the risk of head
injury by as much as 85%.

     1.   Utah Department of Health, Violence and Injury Prevention Program, Bicycle Safety, 2009, www.health.utah.gov/vipp/
          bicycleSafety/overview.html

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                            Whitney Johnson
Violence and Injury Prevention Program                               801-538-6183
                                                                     wjohnson@utah.gov


Bicycle Safety Overview                                              www.health.utah.gov/vipp/bicycleSafety/overview.html

Local Health Departments                                             Page 433

SAFE KIDS Utah                                                       www.utahsafekids.org

How to Promote Helmet Use                                            www.minnesotasafetycouncil.org/bicycle/programs/




                                                                                    Return to Violence and Injury
                                                             340
                                                                                                Prevention Menu
                                                                    Violence and Injury Prevention #1


                                                       Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Teach students importance of wearing helmets
  •	 Teach students how to wear a helmet properly:
          ◦ Eyes: Rim of helmet should be one to two finger-widths above eyebrows
          ◦ Ears: Straps should form a “V” just beneath ear lobe
          ◦ Mouth: Buckle should be flush against the skin under the chin
  •	 Host a bike rodeo. Contact Local Health Department
  •	 Work with a local bike shop or distributor to sell helmets at a special event
  •	 Distribute coupons for low-cost purchase of helmets
  •	 Put posters in school hallways, classrooms, or the lunchroom
  •	 Give presentations on helmets to elementary school classes
          ◦ See these presentation ideas from the Minnesota Safety Council www.minnesotasafetycouncil.org/
             bicycle/programs/promote/present.cfm
  •	 Reward students who wear a helmet every time they ride
  •	 Conduct a poster contest on helmet use and display posters at school, the local mall, city hall or city libraries
  •	 Help parents/legal guardian understand that they are being good parents when they insist that children wear
     their helmets every time they ride
  •	 Help parents understand that their personal helmet use not only protects them, but also serves as a model for
     their children’s behavior
  •	 Conduct an observation study for one week: Stand quietly at the bicycle racks and count how many children
     (out of the total number of bike/skateboard/skates/scooter riders) use helmets
  •	 Do an activity for National Bike Safety Month (May)
  •	 Write a policy mandating helmet use for children riding their bikes to school




                                                                           Return to Violence and Injury
                                                       341
                                                                                       Prevention Menu
                                                                  Violence and Injury Prevention #1


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how wearing of helmets for skating, biking, skateboarding, and riding scooters was promoted

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe how wearing of helmets for skating, biking, skateboarding, and riding scooters was promoted




                                                                        Return to Violence and Injury
                                                     342
                                                                                    Prevention Menu
                        Violence & Injury
                         Prevention #2
   Assure all playground areas meet Consumer Product Safety Commission


standards
Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Assure all playground areas meet Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) standards

Rationale
Every hour a student is injured at school in the state of Utah. A reportable injury is one that causes the student to
miss one-half day or more of school or one that is serious enough to require doctor care. The Utah Department of
Health tracks these injuries to help schools identify problem areas and reduce student risk for injury.

     1.   Utah Department of Health, Violence and Injury Prevention Program, School Injuries Overview, April 2009, www.health.utah.
          gov/vipp/schoolinjuries/overview.html

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                            Whitney Johnson
Violence and Injury Prevention Program                               801-538-6183
                                                                     wjohnson@utah.gov

Local Health Departments                                             Page 433

Consumer Product Safety Commission Standards                         www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/325.pdf

Supervision Guidelines for Playgrounds                               www.playgroundsafety.org/elementary/tips.htm

Safe Use of Playground Equipment                                     www.kidshealth.org/parent/firstaid_safe/outdoor/

Playground Injuries: Fact Sheet                                      health.utah.gov/vipp/pdf/FactSheets/SIRplayground




                                                                                   Return to Violence and Injury
                                                             343
                                                                                               Prevention Menu
                                                               Violence and Injury Prevention #2


                                                  Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Work with School Community Council to check Consumer Product Safety Commission standards
  •	 Work with Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization to raise funds for new equipment




                                                                     Return to Violence and Injury
                                                   344
                                                                                 Prevention Menu
                                                                Violence and Injury Prevention #2


                                On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Do all playground areas meet Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) standards?
          ◦ If yes, describe how playground areas were evaluated
          ◦ If no, describe how playground areas were evaluated and what changes need to be made

End-Year (April)
   •	 Do all playground areas meet Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) standards?
          ◦ If yes, describe how playground areas were evaluated
          ◦ If no, describe how playground areas were evaluated and what changes need to be made




                                                                     Return to Violence and Injury
                                                   345
                                                                                 Prevention Menu
                       Violence & Injury
                        Prevention #3
   Take steps to prevent and control bullying


Criteria Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Take steps to prevent and control bullying

Rationale
Students who bully are more likely than other students to be engaged in other antisocial, violent, or troubling
behavior. Bullying can negatively affect students who see bullying going on around them–even if they aren’t targeted
themselves. Students should be able to attend school and take part in community activities without fear of being
harassed, assaulted, belittled, or excluded.1

     1.   Utah Department of Health, Violence and Injury Prevention Program, April 2009

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                           Teresa Brechlin
Violence and Injury Prevention Program                              801-538-6888
                                                                    tbrechlin@utah.gov

What Adults Can Do: Prevention Tips and Resources                   www.extension.unl.edu/c/document_library/

Tips for School Personnel                                           www.stopbullying.gov/educators/index.html

Intervening in Bullying                                             www.stopbullying.gov/educators/

Documenting Bullying at Your School:                                www.stopbullying.gov/educators/monitor/index.html
Tips for School Administrators




                                                                                  Return to Violence and Injury
                                                            346
                                                                                              Prevention Menu
                                                                    Violence and Injury Prevention #3


                                                       Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Distribute What Adults Can Do: Prevention Tips and Resources to teachers, faculty, staff, or parents
  •	    Share bully prevention resources with teachers, faculty, and staff
  •	    Ask students to assess the nature and location of bullying problems
  •	    During an open house or Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization meeting, get parent
        feedback on their perceptions of bullying and the need for prevention




                                                                          Return to Violence and Injury
                                                       347
                                                                                      Prevention Menu
                                                             Violence and Injury Prevention #3


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe steps taken to prevent and control bullying

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe steps taken to prevent and control bullying




                                                                 Return to Violence and Injury
                                                      348
                                                                             Prevention Menu
                          Violence & Injury
                           Prevention #4
  Write a policy making the completion and submission of Student Injury
  Report forms mandatory for all reportable injuries


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy making the completing and submission of Student Injury Report (SIR) forms mandatory for all
       reportable injuries

A reportable school injury is defined as one that causes the student to miss one-half day or more of school, or is serious
enough to require treatment by a health care professional (i.e. school nurse, MD, EMT, etc.). This includes injuries
that occur going to or from school, during all school-related activities and anywhere on school property during normal
school hours.

Rationale
Fifth and sixth grade students have the highest number of injuries in the state of Utah. Approximately 17,109 injuries
to elementary school students occur each year. Most injuries happen in the playground during recess1. By submitting
student injury report forms schools can help prevent injuries from happening.

     1.     Utah Department of Health, Elementary School Injury Report, www.health.utah.gov/vipp/schoolInjuries/overview.html

Resources
Utah Department of Health                                             Whitney Johnson
Violence and Injury Prevention Program                                801-538-6183
                                                                      wjohnson@utah.gov

School Injuries Overview                                              health.utah.gov/vipp/schoolInjuries/overview.html

Utah Student Injury Reporting System                                  health.utah.gov/vipp/schoolInjuries/reporting.html

Local Health Departments                                              Page 433

SIR forms                                                             801-538-6141




                                                                                     Return to Violence and Injury
                                                               349
                                                                                                 Prevention Menu
                                                                  Violence and Injury Prevention #4


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Include Student Injury Report (SIR) duties as a job responsibility for staff members who oversee reporting
  •	 Develop a timeline to complete and submit all SIR forms to the Utah Department of Health Violence and
     Injury Prevention Program for processing
  •	 Review completed forms on a regular basis to determine problem areas
  •	 Develop ways to prevent injuries based on the data you have collected




                                                                        Return to Violence and Injury
                                                     350
                                                                                    Prevention Menu
                                                        Violence and Injury Prevention #4


                                On-line Reports
Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Student Injury Report Policy Draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Student Injury Report Policy




                                                            Return to Violence and Injury
                                                  351
                                                                        Prevention Menu
                                                                       Violence and Injury Prevention #4


                                Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines action a school will take to improve the school’s health environment. Policies make lasting changes
and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal SchoolsTM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The school’s copy of the
policy must include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include...
    □ Intent
          •	 “Student Injury Report (SIR) forms will be completed for all injuries”
          •	 “SIR form will be submitted to the Utah Department of Health Violence and Injury Prevention
              Program.”
          •	 “A reportable school injury is defined as one that causes the student to miss one-half day or more of
              school, or is serious enough to require treatment by a health care professional (i.e. school nurse, MD,
              EMT, etc.)”
          •	 “This includes injuries that occur going to or from school, during all school-related activities and
              anywhere on school property during normal school hours.”

    □ Rationale
         •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”
         •	 How policy will be communicated

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date




                                                                             Return to Violence and Injury
                                                         352
                                                                                         Prevention Menu
                                                                            Violence and Injury Prevention #4


                                          Policy Sample
Intent
In order to ensure safety for all students at Green Meadow Elementary Student Injury Report (SIR) forms will
be completed for all injuries that occur going to or from school, during all school-related activities and anywhere
on school property during normal school hours. SIR forms will be submitted to the Utah Department of Health
Violence and Injury Prevention Program.

A reportable school injury is defined as one that causes the student to miss one-half day or more of school, or is
serious enough to require treatment by a health care professional (i.e. school nurse, MD, EMT, etc.)

Rationale
Fifth and sixth grade students have the highest number of injuries in the state of Utah. Approximately 17,109
injuries to elementary school students occur each year. Most injuries happen in the playground during recess1. By
submitting student injury report forms schools can help prevent injuries from happening.

Reinforcement
The principal will review this policy each year. Teachers, faculty, and staff will be informed of this policy at the
beginning of the school year and at the faculty meeting following winter break. Any teachers who do not submit SIR
forms will be given a warning by the principal.

Endorsement


________________________________________
Principal Name


________________________________________                             _______________
Principal Signature                                                  Date


     1.   Utah Department of Health, Elementary School Injury Report, http://www.health.utah.gov/vipp/schoolInjuries/reporting.html




                                                                                   Return to Violence and Injury
                                                             353
                                                                                               Prevention Menu
                     Violence & Injury
                      Prevention #5
  Complete another project, which the Utah Department of Health Violence
  and Injury Prevention Program has approved


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Complete another project which the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) Violence and Injury Prevention
       Program has approved

Resources
Utah Department of Health                               Whitney Johnson
Violence and Injury Prevention Program                  801-538-9360
                                                        wjohnson@utah.gov


Local Health Departments                                Page 433




                                                                    Return to Violence and Injury
                                                  354
                                                                                Prevention Menu
                                                                  Violence and Injury Prevention #5


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe the approved project your school participated in




                                                                      Return to Violence and Injury
                                                     355
                                                                                  Prevention Menu
                Criteria Menu
Criteria Menu          Criteria Menu #10

Criteria Menu #1       Criteria Menu #11

Criteria Menu #2       Criteria Menu #12

Criteria Menu #3       Criteria Menu #13

Criteria Menu #4       Criteria Menu #14

Criteria Menu #5       Criteria Menu #15

Criteria Menu #6       Criteria Menu #16

Criteria Menu #7       Criteria Menu #17

Criteria Menu #8       Criteria Menu Resources

Criteria Menu #9

                     356         Return to Criteria Breakdown
                                       Criteria Menu

   1. Participate in Walk to School Day

   2. Participate in the American Heart Association’s physical activity and community service
      programs, Jump Rope for Heart or Hoops for Heart

   3. Participate in a Grocery Store Tour or Albertsons Healthy Eaters™ Field Trip

   4. Participate in a health related walk

   5. Participate in Truth From Youth advertising contest

   6. Teach a proven effective tobacco prevention program and/or curriculum in the classroom

   7. Utilize the National Dairy Councils Classroom - Cafeteria Connections program to
      market and promote the link between the cafeteria and the classroom

   8. Participate in United States Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service
      program, HealthierUS Challenge

   9. Participate in one health campaign

   10. Hold a Field Day

   11. Allow the community to use the school’s facilities for physical activity outside school
       hours

   12. Establish a School Health Council that discusses ways to meet Gold Medal Schools
       criteria

é13. Write a policyrecessrequires teachers, faculty, and staff to not withhold Physical
     Education or
                    that
                          as a punishment

é14. Write a policy that provides continuing education and training in the areas of physical
     education, tobacco prevention, and nutrition

é15.Write a policy that requires both lunch and breakfast programs
   16. Participate in the President’s Challenge

   17. Participate in the Governor’s Golden Sneaker Award Program



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                         Criteria Menu #1

   Participate in Walk to School Day


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Promote and participate in Walk to School Day

Rationale
Lack of physical activity is a major cause of chronic illness and death for our county’s adults. Research shows that
physically inactive kids are more likely to grow up to be physically inactive adults and are at a high risk for obesity
and related illnesses. Walking to school is a way for students to get active on a daily basis.1

     1.   International Walk to School, USA, December 2008, www.walktoschool.org

Resources
Walk to School Day                                                www.walktoschool.org
                                                                  www.iwalktoschool.org

Safe Routes to Schools                                            www.saferoutestoschools.org

Utah Department of Health                                         Brett McIff
Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Obesity Program                 801-538-9362
                                                                  bmciff@utah.gov




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                                                      Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Start your Gold Medal MileTM walking program
  •	 Invite athletes, law enforcement officials, or local authorities to attend your Walk to School Day. Ask them
     to speak on importance of physical activity and being safe.
  •	 Have a nutritious breakfast ready for students who walk to school
  •	 Give incentives to students who walked
  •	 If students are dropped off at school have a “Walk Around the School Day”
  •	 Let students who live too far away to walk participate in the day’s events. Arrange for buses to drop students
     off a mile from school and have them walk to school
  •	 Encourage parents to participate
  •	 Introduce Safe Routes to School map and plan and promote pedestrian safety education before Walk to
     School Day
  •	 Make it last
           ◦ Participate in Walk to School Week
           ◦ Start a morning walking club
  •	 Partner with your Local Health Department to get ideas and support for event
  •	 Get community involved by sending out a news release




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                                    On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	   Date of Walk to School Day
   •	   Describe how the event was promoted
   •	   Number of students that participated
   •	   Describe activities offered during the event

End-Year (April)
   •	   Date of Walk to School Day
   •	   Describe how the event was promoted
   •	   Number of students that participated
   •	   Describe activities offered during the event




                                                       360   Return to Criteria Menu
                         Criteria Menu #2
   Participate in the American Heart Association’s physical activity and
   community service program Jump Rope for Heart or Hoops for Heart


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Participate in the American Heart Association’s (AHA) physical activity and community service program
       Jump Rope for Heart or Hoops for Heart

Rationale
Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and is a major cause of disability. Knowing the signs
and symptoms of a heart attack can increase chances of getting help before it is too late.1 Jump Rope for Heart
and Hoops for Heart teaches physical fitness and promotes the value of community service to students and their
families.2

     1.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Heart Disease is the Number Once Cause of Death, January 2011, www.cdc.
          gov/features/heartmonth

     2.   American Heart Association, Jump Rope for Heart, December 2008, www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=2360

Resources
American Heart Association                                          Cassidie Fenton
                                                                    801-484-3838
                                                                    cassidie.fenton@heart.org

Jump Rope for Heart and Hoops for Heart                             www.americanheart.org




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                                                    Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Get parents/legal guardian involved
          ◦ Send home a flyer
          ◦ Invite to participate in event
          ◦ Include information in newsletter
  •	 Invite local athletes to attend
          ◦ Discuss importance of physical activity
          ◦ Participate in event
  •	 Showcase different jump rope tricks
          ◦ Double dutch, rope tricks while jumping, etc.
          ◦ Have a group of students who love to jump rope put on a show
  •	 Showcase different basketball tricks
          ◦ Dunking, dribbling tricks, etc.
          ◦ Have a group of students who love to play basketball put on a show
  •	 Have a contest between classes or grade levels




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                                   On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	   Date of event
   •	   Describe how the event was promoted
   •	   Number of classes and students that attended
   •	   Describe activities offered during the event

End-Year (April)
   •	   Date of event
   •	   Describe how the event was promoted
   •	   Number of classes and students that attended
   •	   Describe activities offered during the event




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   Participate in a Grocery Store Tour or Albertsons Healthy Eaters™ Field Trip



Definition
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Have at least one grade level participate in a Grocery Store Tour or Albertsons Healthy Eaters Field Trip

Rationale
Eating more fruits and vegetables may reduce your risk of certain chronic diseases. Whether they are fresh, frozen,
canned, dried, or 100% juice fruits and vegetables will help keep you healthy all year round.1A recent study showed
that teacher education helps to reduce the prevalence of obesity in children.2 By participating in tours students will
learn how to eat fruits and vegetables all year.

     1.   Fruits & Veggies—more matters®, March 2011, www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org

     2.   Journal of the Medical Association Tailand, The effect of teacher education on the prevalence of obesity in Kindergarten
          children, October 2008

Resources
Nutrition Resources: Grocery Store Tours                                GMS Guide Additional Resources Page 23

Healthy Eaters Field Trips (St. George area)                            www.fieldtripfactory.com




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                                                       Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Have teachers teach the importance of fruits and vegetables before the grocery store tour
  •	 Invite parents to attend the grocery store tour
  •	 Have a grocery store representative give a presentation at your school instead of going to the grocery store




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                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Dates of tour(s)
   •	 List store(s) visited
   •	 Number of classes and students that attended

End-Year (April)
   •	 Dates of tour(s)
   •	 List store(s) visited
   •	 Number of classes and students that attended




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                           Criteria Menu #4

   Participate in a health related walk event



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Participate in a health related walk event
    •	 Provide information about the health topic you are walking for

Rationale
Participating in a health related walk gives students the opportunity to learn about different diseases. When
adolescents learn about chronic diseases they are more likely to eat more nutritiously and be physically active. They
also understand the signs and symptoms of such diseases and are more likely to see a doctor if they notice them.1

     1.   Journal of Adolescent Health. Assessment of Knowledge, awareness, and self reported risk factors for type II diabetes among
          adolescents, August 2008

Resources
American Diabetes Association                                              Tara Demke
                                                                           801-363-3024 ext. 7071
                                                                           1-800-DIABETES ext. 7071
                                                                           www.diabetes.org/schoolwalk

Susan K Huntsman Race for the Cure                                         Tracy Kelley
                                                                           801-363-3367
                                                                           www.komenslc.org

American Lung Association                                                  Don Hooper
                                                                           801-484-4456
                                                                           dhooper@lungutah.org
                                                                           www.lungutah.org

Utah Department of Health                                                  Whitney Johnson
Violence and Injury Prevention Program                                     801-538-6183
                                                                           www.health.utah.gov/vipp/pedestriansafety/overview

March of Dimes                                                             801-746-5540
                                                                           www.marchofdimes.com/utah

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                                                       Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Find local athletes, civic authorities, and parent volunteers to support and attend walk event
  •	 Use your Gold Medal Mile™ track
  •	 Have students, teachers, faculty, and staff dedicate walk event to a community member




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                                    On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	   Date of walk event
   •	   Name of the walk event
   •	   Describe how the event was promoted
   •	   Number of students that participated
   •	   Describe activities offered during the event

End-Year (April)
   •	   Date of walk event
   •	   Name of the walk event
   •	   Describe how the event was promoted
   •	   Number of students that participated
   •	   Describe activities offered during the event




                                                       369   Return to Criteria Menu
                          Criteria Menu #5

  Participate in Truth From Youth advertising contest



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 All fourth and fifth grade classes must participate in Truth From Youth advertising contest
    •	 Provide tobacco-free information to students

Rationale
Despite major national movements to undermine tobacco companies and tobacco marketing, tobacco is still the
leading cause of preventable death, disease, and disability in the United States.1 Tobacco use is addictive. Illnesses
caused by tobacco use increase demands on the U.S. healthcare system. Statistics show most people who use tobacco
begin before they reach the age of 18.2 Many children and adolescents do not understand health consequences of
tobacco use. Evidence shows that school health programs can be an effective means of preventing tobacco use among
youth.3

     1.   Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, Smoking Cessation Resource Directory, October 1996

     2.   Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Youth risk behavior surveillance, August 1998

     3.   Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guidelines for school health programs to prevent tobacco use and addiction,
          MMWR, February 1994

Resources
Contest Information                                                    www.youthagainsttobacco.com

Crowell Advertising                                                    801-456-1916

Truth From Youth Tobacco Presentation                                  Adam Bramwell
4th and 5th graders                                                    801-531-0533
                                                                       abramwell@crowelladv.com

Utah Department of Health                                              Addy Moreno
Tobacco Prevention and Control Program                                 801-538-6177
                                                                       admoreno@utah.gov




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                                                        Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Display posters that promote statewide contest in halls
  •	    Have students act out their television ads
  •	    Make a graffiti wall (with butcher paper) where students can write anti-tobacco messages
  •	    Coordinate a competition between classes or grades
  •	    Involve teachers, faculty, and staff to help promote contest
  •	    Award prizes for each ad category




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                                   On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	   Number of classes and students that participated
   •	   Describe how the event was promoted
   •	   Describe how students received education
   •	   Describe activities offered during the event

End-Year (April)
   •	   Number of classes and students that participated
   •	   Describe how the event was promoted
   •	   Describe how students received education
   •	   Describe activities offered during the event




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                          Criteria Menu #6
   Teach a proven, effective tobacco prevention program and/or curriculum in
   the classroom


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Teach a proven tobacco prevention program and/or curriculum

DARE does not qualify for this criterion

Rationale
Tobacco is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States.1 On average, adults who smoke cigarettes die
14 years earlier than nonsmokers.2 Today’s young people are bombarded with persuasive messages about tobacco.
By teaching students about tobacco and the messages they sent they are more likely to evaluate those messages and
make healthy choices.3

     1.   U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General, September 2001.

     2.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Health United States, 2005 with Chartbook on Trends in the Health of Americans,
          September 2006

     3.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, MediaSharp, June 2007, www.cdc.gov/tobacco/mediasharp.htm

Resources
Tobacco Curriculum                                                     GMS Guide Additional Resources page 78




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                                                Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Work with Local Health Department (LHD) to determine which program to use
  •	 Provide training to those who will be teaching the program
         ◦ Have LHD teach or train on new material




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                                On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Number of classes and students that participated
   •	 List tobacco prevention program or curriculum taught
   •	 Which grade level(s) followed the program or curriculum?

End-Year (April)
   •	 Number of classes and students that participated
   •	 List tobacco prevention program or curriculum taught
   •	 Which grade level(s) followed the program or curriculum?




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                          Criteria Menu #7
   Utilize the National Dairy Councils Classroom-Cafeteria Connections program
   to market and promote the link between the cafeteria and classroom


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Utilize the National Dairy Councils Classroom-Cafeteria Connections program to market and promote the
       link between the cafeteria and classroom

Rationale
Schools are an ideal place for children to learn and practice good nutrition. With childhood obesity on the rise it
is important for children to learn about good nutrition. Childhood obesity can lead to complications such as high
blood pressure, joint problems, Type 2 diabetes, gall bladder disease, asthma, anxiety, and depression.1 By teaching
nutrition in the Classroom and Cafeteria students will learn healthy behaviors.

     1.   Journal of the American Medical Association, Health Related Quality of Life of severely obese children and adolescents, April
          2003

Resources
National Dairy Council                                                  www.familyfoodzone.com/educators




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                                                    Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Introduce the Classroom-Cafeteria Connections program in a teacher, faculty, and staff meeting
  •	 Incorporate nutrition into daily lesson plans
          ◦ Use fruit instead of pies or pizza when teaching fractions
          ◦ Promote a fruit or vegetable of the week or month
  •	 Choose healthy foods when celebrating
  •	 Hang posters in the cafeteria that encourage healthy eating
  •	 Designate a bulletin board for nutrition information
  •	 Encourage communication between teachers, faculty, staff, and food service personnel
  •	 Create a nutrition newsletter or a nutrition article for school newsletter
  •	 Go on a field trip to cafeteria




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                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe how the classroom and cafeteria were connected
   •	 Describe activities your school participated in from the Classroom-Cafeteria Connections program

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe how the classroom and cafeteria were connected
   •	 Describe activities your school participated in from the Classroom-Cafeteria Connections program




                                                     378                           Return to Criteria Menu
                         Criteria Menu #8
   Participate in the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food and
   Nutrition Service program, HealthierUS Challenge


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Participate in the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) food and nutrition service program,
       HealthierUS Challenge

To be certified as a HealthierUS Challenge school your school must complete criteria such as:
    •	 Be enrolled as a Team Nutrition School
    •	 Offer reimbursable lunches that demonstrate healthy menu planning practices and principles of Dietary
       Guidelines for Americans and that meet USDA nutrition standards
    •	 Provide nutrition education to students
    •	 Provide students opportunity for physical activity
    •	 Maintain an average daily participation of 70 percent or higher of school enrollment for reimbursable
       lunches
    •	 Adhere to guidelines established by Food and Nutrition Services (FNS) for foods served/sold in schools
       outside the National School Lunch Program


Rationale
Obesity is a growing concern for school children in the United States. HealthierUS is an initiative is a national effort
to improve peoples lives, prevent disease, and promote community wellness.1 By participating in the HealthierUS
school challenge schools will receive more healthy and nutrition choices and students will benefit from the health
education provided.

     1.   HealthierUS Challenge, March 2011, www.fns.usda.gov/tn/healthierus/index.html

     2.   HealthierUS Challenge, School Challenge, March 2011, www.fns.usda.gov

Resources
HealthierUs School Challenge                                       www.teamnutrition.usda.gov/HealthierUS/index.html

Utah State Office of Education                                     Kimberly Loveland
                                                                   801-538-7562
                                                                   kimberly.loveland@schools.utah.gov



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                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Make a chart to show the schools progress towards becoming a certified HealthierUS Challenge school
  •	 Celebrate when certification is complete
  •	 Involve students when making changes in cafeteria. Ask students which nutritious foods they like best.




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                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 Describe activities offered while being a HealthierUS Challenge school
   •	 Date received HealthierUS School Challenge award
   •	 Attach HealthierUS School Challenge award

End-Year (April)
   •	 Describe activities offered while being a HealthierUS Challenge school
   •	 Date received HealthierUS School Challenge award
   •	 Attach HealthierUS School Challenge award




                                                     381                       Return to Criteria Menu
                         Criteria Menu #9

   Participate in one health campaign



Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Participate in one health campaign

Rationale
Tobacco is the leading cause of death, illness, and disability in the United States.1 Obesity is becoming an epidemic.2
Approximately 370 children and adolescents are kit or killed in an automobile/pedestrian accident each year.3
Participating in a health campaigns will increase awareness to adolescents of these issues and encourage them to live
a more healthy lifestyle.

     1.   Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, Smoking Cessation Resource Directory, October 1996

     2.   Utah Department of Health, Physical Activity, Nutrition and Obesity Program, March 2011, http://health.utah.gov/obesity/
          pages/News/FAQ.php

     3.   Utah Violence and Injury Prevention Program, August 2010, http://health.utah.gov/vipp/pedestrianSafety/greenRibbonMonth.
          html



Resources
Red Ribbon Week (October)                                             www.nfp.org

National Nutrition Month (March)                                      www.eatright.org

Green Ribbon Month (September)                                        health.utah.gov/vipp/pedestrianSafety/greenRibbonMonth.html




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                                                        Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Involve Parent Teacher Association (PTA)/Parent Teacher Organization (PTO)
  •	    Hold a different activity each day of the week to promote the health campaign
  •	    Add information to monthly newsletters
  •	    During morning announcements include information about the health campaign
  •	    Promote the health campaign in the classroom
  •	    National Health Observance Calendar
             ◦ Health observances are special days, weeks, or months that raise awareness of important health
                topics. Go to www.healthfinder.gov/nho/default.aspx to find a national health observance your
                school would like to promote awareness of.
  •	    Fruits & Veggies—More Matters Month®
             ◦ September is national Fruits & Veggies—More Matters Month. School can explore the world of
                fruits and vegetables while learning about health benefits. Federal guidelines now suggest more than
                five servings of fruits and vegetables each day for most people. For more information on Fruits &
                Veggies—More Matters Month go to www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org
  •	    National School Breakfast Week
             ◦ National School Breakfast Week(NSBW) is in March. NSBW started in 1989 to raise awareness of
                the School Breakfast program. School can celebrate NSBW by helping students learn how important
                breakfast is. For more information on NSBW go to www.schoolnutrition.org
  •	    Go Red for Women
             ◦ The first Friday of February is Go Red for Women. Heart disease is the number one killer in
                America. Nearly 1 in 4 women are diagnosed with heart disease. By celebrating Go Red for
                Women schools can help students learn about heart disease and how they can prevent it. For more
                information go to www.goredforwomen.org. Your school can get families involved with Go Red for
                Women by using the “Lover Your Heart Activity”
  •	    Unplug ‘n Play/TV Turn-Off Week
             ◦ Unplug ‘n Play/TV Turn-Off Week is held in September and April. Schools can celebrate Unplug ‘n
                Play/TV Turn-Off Week by encouraging students to turn-off the TV, video games, and computer and
                go outside to play. For more information on Unplug ‘n Play/TV Turn-Off Week go to health.utah.
                gov/obesity or www.screentime.org.
  •	    Mental Health Month
             ◦ May is Mental Health Month. Mental Health Month was created more than 50 years ago to create
                awareness about mental health conditions and the importance of mental wellness for all. For more
                information on Mental Health Month go to www.mentalhealthamerica.net
  •	    World No-Tobacco Day
             ◦ May 31 is World No-Tobacco Day. Schools can celebrate World No-Tobacco Day by learning about
                the effects of tobacco and how to prevent it. For more information on World No-Tobacco Day go to
                www.who.int
  •	    National Physical Fitness and Sports Month
             ◦ May is National Physical Fitness and Sports Month. Schools can celebrate National Physical Fitness
                and Sports Month by being more active. Encourage teachers, faculty, staff, and the community to
                be more active during the month of May. For more information on National Physical Fitness and
                Sports Month go to www.fitness.gov
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                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	   Number of classes and students that participated
   •	   Name of the health campaign
   •	   Date of the health campaign
   •	   Describe how the campaign was promoted
   •	   Describe activities offered throughout the campaign

End-Year (April)
   •	   Number of classes and students that participated
   •	   Name of the health campaign
   •	   Date of the health campaign
   •	   Describe how the campaign was promoted
   •	   Describe activities offered throughout the campaign




                                                       384    Return to Criteria Menu
                       Criteria Menu #10

   Hold a field day


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Hold a field day

Rationale
According to the U.S. Surgeon General, regular physical activity is one of the most important things people can do
to maintain and improve their physical health, mental health, and overall well-being.1 The National Association for
Sport and Physical Education and the Utah State Office of Education recommend that students receive 150 minutes
of structured physical activity each week.2

Schools have a responsibility to help students and staff members establish and maintain lifelong habits of physical
activity. Physical activity in schools contributes to the total growth and development of all children. Physical activity
provides opportunities for students to gain knowledge, skills, and attitudes which promote physical activity as part
of their everyday lives. Regular Physical Activity reduces the risk of dying from heart disease and of developing
diabetes, high blood pressure, and colon cancer.3

     1.   U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent and Decrease Overweight
          and Obesity, January 2001

     2.   National Association for Sport and Physical Education, Moving into the Future: National Standards for Physical Education, 2nd
          Edition, 2004. www.aahperd.org/naspe/standards/nationalStandards/PEstandards.cfm.

     3.   U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Physical Activity and Health: A Report of the Surgeon General, April1996

Resources
PE Central                                                              www.pecentral.org

International Olympic Committee                                         www.olympic.org

Field Day Ideas                                                         Page 417




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                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Focus on the country where upcoming Olympics will be held
  •	    Focus on Ancient Olympics
  •	    Play Olympic theme song, use medals, etc.
  •	    Invite Olympic or Paralympic athletes to participate
  •	    Hold multiple events that show students fun ways to be active
  •	    Get support from Parent Teacher Association (PTA)/Parent Teacher Organization (PTO)




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                                     On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	   Date of the field day
   •	   Number of classes and students that attended
   •	   Describe how the event was promoted
   •	   Describe activities offered during the field day

End-Year (April)
   •	   Date of the field day
   •	   Number of classes and students that attended
   •	   Describe how the event was promoted
   •	   Describe how the event was promoted
   •	   Describe activities offered during the field day




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                       Criteria Menu #11
   Allow the community to use the school’s facilities for physical activity outside
   schools hours


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Allow the community to use the school’s facilities for physical activity outside schools hours

Rationale
Role modeling is one of the most powerful influences on behavior.1 Evaluation has found that community
participation in school health promotion programs can increase morale, participation in vigorous activity, and
improve physical fitness. Allowing the community to use the schools physical activity facilities will allow parents or
guardians to show their adolescents their love for exercise.

Students who have quality time with their parents they are more likely to be accepted by their peers and have a
positive attitude towards authority. Students who spend time with parents are also less likely to be involved in
violent behavior at school.2

     1.   Health Is Academic, School-site health promotion for staff, January1998

     2.   Adolescence Journal, Adjustment problems in the family and school context, attitude towards authority, and violent behavior at
          school in adolescence, December 2007

Resources
Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn                                       D-23




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                                                         Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Allow school facilities to be used for extracurricular sports, (i.e. basketball, soccer, baseball)
  •	 Encourage students to use playground and outdoor facilities after school hours
  •	 Allow community members to use or rent school facilities for community events




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                                    On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List facilities the community is allowed to use
   •	 List the organizations that use school facilities

End-Year (April)
   •	 List facilities the community is allowed to use
   •	 List the organizations that use school facilities




                                                          390   Return to Criteria Menu
                      Criteria Menu #12
   Establish a School Health Council that discusses ways to meet Gold
   Medal Schools™ criteria

Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Establish a School Health Council (SHC) that discusses ways to meet Gold Medal Schools™ (GMS) criteria
    •	 The SHC must meet at least once a month to discuss important issues related to health, the school
       community, and ways to meet and maintain GMS criteria

The School Community Council will not qualify as a SHC.

Rationale
The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that schools create School Health Councils to discuss health
concerns.1 School Health Councils primary focus is to allow students to grow-up healthier, achieve academic success,
and have a healthy lifestyle.2

     1.   American Academy of Pediatrics, AAP Council on School Health, March 2009

     2.   Maryland State School Health Council, April 2009, www.marylandstateschoolhealthcouncil.org

Resources
Promoting Healthy Youth, Schools, and Communities:                  www.schoolwellnesspolicies.org/resources/
A Guide to Community-School Health Councils

Effective School Health Advisory Councils:                  www.schoolwellnesspolicies.org/resources/
Moving from Policy to Action, Public Schools of North Carolina

Healthy Youth Advocate, Factsheet, 2009                             www.healtheducationadvocate.org/factsheets




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                 Assignments and Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Discuss a different Gold Medal SchoolsTM criterion at each meeting throughout the year
  •	 Coordinate health topics with Parent Teacher Association (PTA) or Parent Teacher Organization (PTO)
  •	 Include students and make sure their ideas are accepted and used




                                                   392                           Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                      Criteria Menu #12


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	   List members on the School Health Council
   •	   How did the Council meet the Gold Medal Schools criteria?
   •	   How often did the Council meet?
   •	   Attach School Health Council meeting minutes

End-Year (April)
   •	   List members on the School Health Council
   •	   How did the Council meet the Gold Medal Schools criteria?
   •	   How often did the Council meet?
   •	   Attach School Health Council meeting minutes




                                                     393            Return to Criteria Menu
                        Criteria Menu #13

   Write a policy that requires teachers, faculty, and staff to not withhold
   Physical Education or recess as a punishment


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that requires teachers, faculty, and staff to not withhold Physical Education or recess as a
       punishment
           ◦ Principal signature

Rationale
Regardless of a student’s behavior it is essential that they have time to release energy. Students that are physically
active do better in the classroom. A lack of physical activity leads to behaviors requiring punishment. Studies show
that students who do not participate in recess are not able to focus and become disruptive in the classroom.1 The
longer a student sits in a classroom the more likely they are to misbehave. If a student is allowed to release energy in
P.E. or at recess they will come back to the classroom more focused and better behaved.2

     1.   National Association for Sport and Physical Education, Speak II, Physical Education Advocacy Kit II, April1999

     2.   New York Times, Trend towards no-recess policy is accelerating in the nation’s schools, April 7, 1998

Resources
Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn                                        D33

American Association for the Child’s Right to Play                      www.ipausa.org/recess.html

Healthy Lifestyles, Childhood Obesity:                                  Page 26
Update of Policy Options and Research




                                                                394                                    Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                                      Criteria Menu #13


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Provide teachers, faculty, and staff with ideas for alternative punishments
  •	 List reasons why withholding Physical Education or recess is not a good idea




                                                     395                            Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                             Criteria Menu #13


                                On-line Reports
Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach No Withholding of Physical Education or Recess Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach No Withholding of Physical Education or Recess Policy




                                                    396                    Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                                              Criteria Menu #13


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools TM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include...

    □ Intent
         •	 “PE and recess will not be withheld from a student or class as a punishment”
         •	 Include alternate options

    □ Rationale
        •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




                                                         397                              Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                                                                  Criteria Menu #13


                                              Policy Sample
Intent
Physical Education and recess will not be withheld from a student or class as a punishment. Other options for
punishment for misbehavior may include:
    •	 Loss of additional computer time (not computer class)
    •	 Additional homework
    •	 Restriction from assemblies

Rationale
Regardless of a student’s behavior it is essential that they have time to release energy. Students that are physically
active do better in the classroom. A lack of physical activity leads to behaviors requiring punishment. Studies show
that students who do not participate in recess are not able to focus and become disruptive in the classroom.1 The
longer a student sits in a classroom the more likely they are to misbehave. If a student is allowed to release energy in
P.E. or at recess they will come back to the classroom more focused and better behaved.2

Reinforcement
This policy will be reviewed each year. We will give each teacher a copy of this policy and discuss it at the next
faculty meeting. To ensure continuation of this policy we will discuss it and alternative methods of punishment at
the first faculty meeting of each school year.

Endorsement

_____________________________________________
Principal Name

________________________________________                                    _______________
Principal Signature                                                         Date


     1.   National Association for Sport and Physical Education, Speak II, Physical Education Advocacy Kit II, 1999

     2.   New York Times, Trend towards no-recess policy is accelerating in the nation’s schools, April 7, 1998




                                                                   398                                      Return to Criteria Menu
                       Criteria Menu #14
   Write a policy that provides continuing education and training in the areas of
   physical education, tobacco prevention, and nutrition


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that provides continuing education and training in the areas of physical education, tobacco
       prevention, and nutrition for teachers, faculty, and staff who teach these subjects.
           ◦ Principal signature
    •	 Teachers, faculty, and staff who teach physical education, tobacco prevention, and nutrition must attend a
       continuation education training, class, or seminar

Rationale
It is important for teachers to have up-to-date knowledge in the subjects they are teaching. Trainings provide
information and techniques that can improve teaching in a classroom or gym. By attending one training each year
teachers can learn of these changes and use them in ways that will best meet the needs of their students.1

     1.   Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guidelines for school and community programs to promote lifelong physical
          activity among young people, August 2006

Resources
Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn                                     C46

Utah State Office of Education, Core Curriculum                      www.schools.utah.gov/curr/core/page2.htm

American Association for Health Education                            www.aahperd.org/aahe




                                                              399                                  Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                                           Criteria Menu #14


                                                       Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Create a list of trainings, classes, and seminars that teachers, faculty, and staff can attend during year
  •	 Encourage teachers, faculty, and staff to find trainings, classes, and seminars that they would be interested in
     attending




                                                       400                              Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                                          Criteria Menu #14


                                   On-line Reports
Mid-Year Progress (November)
   •	 List the training, class or seminars that teachers, faculty, and staff attended
           ◦ Submit an agenda

Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Continuing Education Policy draft

End-Year Report
   •	 List the training, class or seminars that teachers, faculty, and staff attended
           ◦ Submit an agenda
   •	 Attach Continuing Education Policy




                                                         401                            Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                                              Criteria Menu #14


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools TM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “All teachers who teach physical education, tobacco use prevention, or nutrition will attend one
             training or in-service annually.”
         •	 Describe who determines appropriate trainings or in-services

    □ Rationale
        •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How policy will be communicated
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




                                                         402                              Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                                                            Criteria Menu #14


                                             Policy Sample
Intent
All teachers who teach physical education, tobacco use prevention, or nutrition will attend one training or in-service
annually. The principal should approve trainings sponsored by other organizations. Appleton School District will
compensate teachers for their time at these trainings or in-services. They will also provide a substitute teacher for
their class. The school encourages all teachers to continue their education in all forms and will be supportive in such
efforts.

Rationale
It is important for teachers to have up-to-date knowledge in the subjects they are teaching. Trainings provide
information and techniques that can improve teaching in a classroom or gym. By attending one training each year
teachers can learn of these changes and use them in ways that will best meet the needs of their students.

Reinforcement
This policy will be reviewed each year. Teachers who teach physical education, tobacco use prevention, or nutrition
will receive a copy of this policy at the beginning of each year.

Endorsement

_____________________________________________
Principal Name

________________________________________                                  _______________
Principal Signature                                                       Date

     1.   Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guidelines for school and community programs to promote lifelong physical activity
          among young people, MMWR Vol.46 No RR-6




                                                                 403                                    Return to Criteria Menu
                       Criteria Menu #15

   Write a policy that provides both lunch and breakfast programs


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 Write a policy that provides both lunch and breakfast programs
           ◦ Principal signature

Rationale
There is a documented link between nutrition and learning.1 Those students who are undernourished continually
earn lower test scores. While the feeding of children is primarily a family responsibility, many students do not get
adequate nutrition at home. This causes them to be distracted in the classroom and prevents them from performing
at their highest level.2, 3 Schools have the opportunity to promote healthy eating by providing consistent nutritious
meals.

     1.   U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Nutrition and your health: Dietary
          Guidelines for Americans, May 2008

     2.   Minnesota Department of Children, Families, and Learning, School Breakfast Programs, Energizing the Classroom: A
          Summary of the Three Year Study of the Universal School Breakfast Pilot Program in Minnesota Elementary Schools, March
          1998

     3.   Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, The relationship of school breakfast to psychosocial and academic functioning,
          November 1998

Resources
Utah State Office of Education                                         Kimberly Loveland
                                                                       801-538-7562
                                                                       kimberly.loveland@schools.utah.gov

Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn                                       E1, E17

School Nutrition Association                                           www.schoolnutrition.org




                                                               404                                   Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                                        Criteria Menu #15


                                                     Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Send flyers home reminding parents that both breakfast and lunch are offered at your school
  •	 Encourage students to eat breakfast at school and let them wear their pajamas to promote breakfast at your
     school
  •	 Participate in National School Breakfast Week and National School Lunch Week
  •	 Hold a parent or grandparent breakfast and lunch day




                                                     405                            Return to Criteria Menu
                                                        Criteria Menu #15


                                On-line Reports
Policy Drafts (February)
   •	 Attach Breakfast and Lunch Policy draft

End-Year (April)
   •	 Attach Breakfast and Lunch Policy




                                                406   Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                                              Criteria Menu #15


                                 Policy Guidelines
Instructions
A policy defines an action a school will take to improve the schools health environment. Policies make lasting
changes and stay with school through teacher, faculty, and staff changes.

A Gold Medal Schools TM policy must include an Intent, Rationale, and Reinforcement. The schools copy of the
policy must also include the Principal’s signature. Use this template to write your policy. All information is required.

Template
Policy must include…

    □ Intent
         •	 “All students shall have the opportunity to receive breakfast and lunch at school.”

    □ Rationale
        •	 Support for policy

    □ Reinforcement
         •	 How this policy will be communicated
         •	 “This policy will be reviewed each year.”

    □ Endorsement
        •	 Principal Signature
        •	 Date


Open a sample policy in Word




                                                         407                              Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                                                          Criteria Menu #15


                                            Policy Sample
Intent
All students shall have the opportunity to receive breakfast and lunch at school. If students cannot afford these meals
they will be offered to them at a discounted rate.

Qualified, well-trained food personnel will serve breakfast and lunch in the cafeteria. Both meals will include healthy
food choices that are appealing to students.

    •	 Breakfast will be served from 7:30am to 8:00am
    •	 Lunch will be served from 11:15am to 12:45pm

Rationale
There is a documented link between nutrition and learning.1 Those students who are undernourished continually
earn lower test scores. While the feeding of children is primarily a family responsibility, many students do not get
adequate nutrition at home. This causes them to be distracted in the classroom and prevents them from performing
at their highest level.2, 3 Schools have the opportunity to promote healthy eating by providing consistent nutritious
meals.

Reinforcement
This policy will be reviewed each year. Faculty will discuss this policy in faculty meeting. We will send a letter home
with all students to inform their parents of this new policy. If necessary, new personnel will be hired to help provide
breakfast.

Endorsement

_____________________________________________
Principal Name

________________________________________                                _______________
Principal Signature                                                     Date

     1.   U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Nutrition and your health: Dietary
          Guidelines for Americans, May 2008

     2.   Minnesota Department of Children, Families, and Learning, School Breakfast Programs, Energizing the Classroom: A
          Summary of the Three Year Study of the Universal School Breakfast Pilot Program in Minnesota Elementary Schools, March
          1998

     3.   Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, The relationship of school breakfast to psychosocial and academic functioning,
          November1998




                                                                408                                  Return to Criteria Menu
                        Criteria Menu #16

   Participate in the President’s Challenge


Criterion Requirements
To complete this criterion:
    •	 At least one grade level must participate in the Physical Fitness Testing, Health Fitness Testing, Active
       Lifestyle, or Presidential Champions of the President’s Challenge

Rationale
The President’s Challenge is a program that encourages all Americans to make being active part of their every day
lives. Adolescents who are engaged in physical activity are more likely to be active in their adulthood.1

     1.   President’s Challenge, April 2009, www.presidentschallenge.org

Resources
President’s Challenge                                                 www.presidentschallenge.org




                                                               409                           Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                                        Criteria Menu #16


                                                    Ideas
Ideas
  •	 Have students practice testing before actual test
  •	 Let parents know about testing and encourage them to help their children at home
  •	 Get the whole family involved. There are activities for all age groups.




                                                   410                            Return to Criteria Menu
                                                               Criteria Menu #16


                                 On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List grades and number of students that participated
   •	 Which test did they participate in?
           ◦ Physical fitness
           ◦ Health fitness
           ◦ Active Lifestyle
           ◦ Presidential Champions
   •	 Date students received participation certificates

End-Year (April)
   •	 List grades and number of students that participated
   •	 Which test did they participate in?
           ◦ Physical fitness
           ◦ Health fitness
           ◦ Active Lifestyle
           ◦ Presidential Champions
   •	 Date students received participation certificates




                                                     411     Return to Criteria Menu
                      Criteria Menu #17

   Participate in the Governor’s Golden Sneaker Award program


Criterion Requirements
To meet this criterion:
   •	 At least one grade level must participate in the Governor’s Golden Sneaker Award program

Rationale
The Golden Sneaker Awards program is designed to be a fun way to promote individual and family health.
Physical activity done during and outside of school counts towards this award.1 Sixty minutes of physical activity is
recommended for children and adolescents.2

     1.   Utah Education Network, April 2008, www.uen.org

     2.   Journal of the American Medical Association, Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity from ages 9 to 15,
          July 2008

Resources
Utah State Office of Education                                    Frank Wojtech
                                                                  801-538-7732
                                                                  frank.wojtech@schools.utah.gov




                                                            412                          Return to Criteria Menu
                                                                                          Criteria Menu #17


                                                        Ideas
Ideas
  •	    Award prizes
  •	    Encourage teachers and parents to get involved
  •	    Create a competition between classes or grades
  •	    Spray paint a pair of sneakers gold and award to the student with the most number of points at the end of
        each month




                                                       413                             Return to Criteria Menu
                                                               Criteria Menu #17


                                  On-line Reports
Mid-Year progress (November)
   •	 List grades and number of students that participated
   •	 Date students received participation certificates

End-Year (April)
   •	 List grades and number of students that participated
   •	 Date students received participation certificates




                                                     414     Return to Criteria Menu
Criteria Menu Resources

   Addition Resources for Criteria Menu #6

   Additional Resources Criteria Menu #10




                  415              Return to Criteria Menu
                                    Resources for
                                   Criteria Menu #6
Prevention Dimensions
Prevention Dimensions
Grade Pre-K-12

Objective
To give students a strong foundation of effective violence and substance abuse prevention skills.

Overview:
Provides teachers with lesson ideas and activities in teaching prevention concepts. The resource lessons are age-
appropriate and meet the objectives through a scope and sequence methodology. They are based on the risk and
protective factors prevention model identified through research by Drs. David Hawkins and Richard Catalano of the
University of Washington. Studies have shown that young people with these identified risk factors are more likely to
engage in substance abuse and other antisocial behaviors.

Contact
You can find your Substance Abuse Prevention Coordinator(s) at the following Web site www.utahpd.org/contact.htm

Cost
Free, order your materials through your Substance Abuse Prevention Coordinator.


Life Skills Training
Life Skills Training
Grade 3-6

Objective
Provide students with personal self-management skills, general social skills, and drug resistance skills.

Overview
The Botvin LifeSkills Training Elementary School program is a comprehensive, dynamic, and developmentally
appropriate substance abuse prevention program designed for upper elementary school students. This highly effective
curriculum has been proven to help increase self-esteem, develop healthy attitudes, and improve their knowledge of
essential life skills – all of which promote healthy and positive personal development. There are three seperate levels to
cover grades 3-6.

Contact
To order the Life Skills Training program, order online at www.lifeskillstraining.com/lst_elementary.php or call at
1-800-293-4969.
If you have any questions you can e-mail them at lstinfo@nhpamail.com.

Cost
$455.00 - $655 includes one teacher manual and 30 student guides per level.

                                                          416         Return to Criteria Menu Resources Menu
                                 Resources for
                               Criteria Menu #10
Ideas for Events
Egg Relay Race
Set up a course with cones. Divide students into teams of four. At the whistle, the first member of the team will run
to the first cone with an egg on a spoon. They must circle the cone then return to the starting line. They will then
pass the egg and spoon to the next teammate who will run to the cone, circle around, and pass it off to the next
teammate. This continues until all teammates are to the finish line. The team with the fastest time wins. If the egg is
dropped the runner must return to the finish line, get another egg, and then run to the cone and back.

Potato Sack Race
At the whistle, students must hop to the finish line while standing in a potato sack. First to the finish line wins.

Three-Legged Race
Students will divide into groups of two. Each pair of students will stand side-by-side and tie their inner legs together.
This should be done with a soft cloth. At the whistle, the students will run towards the finish line together. First to
the finish line wins.

Soccer Ball Shot Put
A course must be set up with measured distances. Each student will stand at the starting line and throw the soccer
ball as far as they can. The distance can be marked from the end of the roll. The student who throws the ball the
farthest is the winner.

Discus
A course must be set up with measured distances. Each student will stand at the starting line and throw a Frisbee as
far as they can. The student who throws the Frisbee the farthest is the winner.

Cardboard Bobsled Race
This race requires large cardboard boxes to fit four students. Students should be divided into groups of four. All four
of the students must stand inside of the cardboard bobsled and walk to the starting line. At the whistle students will
race to the finish line. The students to the finish line first are the winners.

Cross Country Ski Race
This race requires long boards with four holes drilled in them about two feet apart. Four pieces of shoulder length
rope should be knotted on one end and placed through the holes. Another knot should be tied to keep the rope in
place. Two boards will be needed for each group of four students. The students should position one foot on each of
the boards and walk together to the starting line. At the whistle, the students will race to the finish line. The students
must work together to coordinate the movement of the boards. The first group of students to the finish line wins.

Slalom Course
This game works best if your playground has a hill. Set up cones in a zigzag pattern. Students must race to the finish
line by weaving in and out of the cones. The first student to the finish line without missing a cone is the winner.




                                                          417         Return to Criteria Menu Resources Menu
                               Resources for
                             Criteria Menu #10
Grass Skating Contest
This contest requires four judges with scorecards from 1 to 10. Students will “skate” on the grass to music. At the
end of the performance each judge will give the student a score between 1 and 10. The student with the highest
score is the winner.

Flag Making
Students will create a flag representing their fictional country. Flags can be judged at the end of the day and a winner
can be chosen from each grade level.

Obstacle Course
Create an obstacle course for students to race through. Obstacles could include running through tires or hula hoops,
jumping over buckets of water, going across the monkey bars, crawling through barrels, jumping rope, etc. Students
can go through the obstacles as a team or individually. First to the finish line wins.




                                                         418         Return to Criteria Menu Resources Menu
School Coordinator Logistics
       Getting Started

       Policy Resources

       Resources

       Stipend

       Timelines

       Webinars

       LHD Contact Info




                   419    Return to Main Menu
                         Getting Started
Getting Started List
New Teacher Information
Photo Consent
School Coordinator Responsibilities
Getting Started List
General (Should be done for all schools)
   •	 Determine schools current Gold Medal SchoolsTM (GMS) level
   •	 Review school and district polices
   •	 Review GMS policies
           ◦ Make changes to policies if necessary
           ◦ Contact your Local Health Department to obtain copies of GMS policies
   •	 Plan a GMS Kick-off assembly
   •	 Determine if the school has a GMS bulletin board
           ◦ If so, find out where it is, size, and who will be responsible for updating
   •	 Identify the schools photo consent policy
           ◦ Does the school have a form already signed by parents? If not, discuss with the Principal how to
              gather permission from parents for photo use.
                  ▪ Photos may be used for the GMS Web site, promotional materials, and media recognition
                  ▪ For an example of a photo consent see the Photo Consent Form
   •	 Meet with the Principal ato determine the level your school will achieve this year




                                                                              Return to School Coordinator
                                                      420                                   Logistics Menu
                                      Getting Started
New Teacher Information
What is Gold Medal SchoolsTM?
A Gold Medal School is a school committed to changing their schools health environment.
The Gold Medal Schools (GMS) program works by assisting schools in developing strong health policies and
changes to the environment that support good nutrition, physical activity, and tobacco prevention. By implementing
the GMS program your school is creating a sustainable and healthy school environment for students, teachers,
faculty, and staff to enjoy for years to come. Schools can achieve various levels in the program: Bronze, Silver, Gold,
Platinum, and Platinum Focus. Schools will receive several awards including monetary incentives for completion of
levels.

Why should schools participate?
With obesity on the rise among children1, schools have become the ideal place to teach students about physical
activity, nutrition, and staying tobacco free. Through the policies established by GMS and changes made to your
schools environment, your students will not only learn healthy habits to last a life time, but will also demonstrate
better overall mental health, behavior, self-esteem, and academic success.2 Being a GMS will send a strong message
to your community that your school is committed to the overall well-being of your students. Go to health.utah.gov/
obesity/gms/testimonials.html to find out why other schools feel it is important to participate in the Program.

     1.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Obesity Trends, November 2009, www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/trends.html

     2.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinated School Health Programs, September 2008, www.cdc.gov/
          HealthyYouth/CSHP

What is my role as a teacher?
  •	 Support the GMS program and the School Coordinator
  •	 Walk the Gold Medal MileTM with your class and encourage students to walk during their free time
  •	 Participate in the teacher, faculty, and staff wellness program
  •	 Understand and abide by schools policies
  •	 Provide non-food rewards to students, Gold #2

How do I find out what my school has already done?
Talk with your Principal and School Coordinator. They can tell you what your school has already accomplished and
what level your school has achieved.




                                                             421                      Return to Getting Started Menu
                                    Getting Started
Photo Consent Form
Pictures
Pictures are used for the Gold Medal Schools Web site health.utah.gov/gms and other promotional materials.

Parental permission
It is good practice, and required by law, to obtain the students name and permission from their parents/legal
guardian before using pictures in any publication or Web site.

Schools have different policies
Some schools require that parents sign a waiver at the beginning of the year that stays in the student file. Other
schools require permission from parents for each event where pictures will be taken. Find out your school policy.

Talk with the Principal
During your first meeting with the Principal you will want to explain to them that you will be taking pictures
throughout the year. Together you can decide when to send out a photo consent form

Example Photo Consent Form
You can use our Photo Consent Form as a guideline to create your own or make photocopies for distribution.

Other Ideas
Distribute the form at back to school night, Parent Teacher Association (PTA)/Parent Teacher Organization (PTO)
meetings, or with registration packets. Remember to talk to the Principal early on and do what works best for the
school.




                                                        422                    Return to Getting Started Menu
                                          Getting Started
[DATE]

Dear Parent/legal guardian,

Your child attends a school that participates in the Gold Medal SchoolsTM (GMS) program, a statewide program to
increase opportunities for kids to be physically active, make healthy food choices, and stay tobacco-free.

From time to time teachers, faculty, and staff and Utah Department of Health employees will take photographs of
students to be used on the GMS Web site, promotional materials, and media recognition. Please indicate below
if you give permission for your child’s picture to be used in Gold Medal School materials, and return with your
student to the school.

If you have any questions or concerns about your child’s photograph being taken, please contact the school.

Sincerely,
[PRINCIPAL NAME AND TITLE]

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     □ I authorize [SCHOOL NAME] and the Gold Medal School program to use my child’s picture in
       promotional materials.
     □ Please do not use my child’s photograph in GMS materials.


Child name ____________________________________________________________

Parent name ___________________________________________________________

Parent signature__________________________________________________________

Date _______________________

Parent Contact Info: (in case we need to reach you about pictures being taken)

Home phone _______________ Cell _______________ Work ______________

Street address ____________________ City __________ State _____ Zip __________

E-mail address ___________________________________________________________




                                                                   423                       Return to Getting Started Menu
                                Getting Started
School Coordinator Responsibilities
   •	 Plan the Kick-Off and Awards Assemblies
   •	 Attend at least five webinars that will provide tools and resources needed to assist your school in
      implementing the Gold Medal SchoolsTM (GMS) criteria. A list of the webinars provided can be found on
      page 432
   •	 Complete a School Coordinator Survey in December and May
   •	 Write policies
   •	 Complete Mid-Year progress and End-Year Reports
   •	 Provide articles for school newsletter
   •	 Inform teachers, faculty, and staff about GMS
   •	 Act as a liaison between the school and Local Health Department




                                                    424                  Return to Getting Started Menu
                        Policy Resources
District Wellness Policy and Gold Medal SchoolsTM Requirements

Wellness Policies                                   Gold Medal Schools

I. School Health Councils: The school district      Criteria Menu #12:
and/or individual schools within the district       Establish a School Health Council that
will create, strengthen, or work within existing    discusses ways to meet Gold Medal Schools
school health councils to develop, implement,       (GMS) criteria at each meeting. The Council
monitor, review, and, as necessary, revise school   must be on the school, not district, level to
nutrition and physical activity policies.           qualify for GMS.
II. Nutritional Quality of Foods and Beverages      Criteria Menu #15:
Sold and Served on Campus: Breakfast                Write a policy that requires both lunch and
     	 Schools will, to the extent possible,       breakfast programs
         operate the School Breakfast Program
II. Nutritional Quality of Foods and Beverages      Gold #3D:
Sold and Served on Campus: Meal Times and           Write a policy that requires lunch to be at least
Scheduling                                          twenty minutes long from the time students are
    	 Will provide students with at least 10       seated and held between 11am and 1pm
        minutes to eat after sitting down for
        breakfast and 20 minutes after sitting
        down for lunch                              Platinum #5B:
    	 Should schedule meal periods at              Write a policy that requires lunch to be at least
        appropriate time (lunch between 11am        twenty minutes long from the time students are
        and 1 pm)                                   seated and held between 11am and 1pm
II. Nutritional Quality of Foods and Beverages      Gold #3F:
Sold and Serviced on Campus: School Food            Write a policy that requires food service
Service Staff                                       staff to have appropriate pre-service training
    	 As part of the school district’s             and regular participation in professional
        responsibility to operate a food service    development activities
        program, we will provide continuing
        professional development for all            Criteria Menu #7:
        nutrition professionals in schools.         Utilize the National Dairy Councils Classroom-
                                                    Cafeteria Connections program to market and
                                                    promote the link between the cafeteria and the
                                                    classroom.




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                                 Policy Resources

II. Nutritional Quality of Foods and Beverages      Gold #3A:
Sold and Serviced on Campus: Elementary             Write a policy that requires healthy food and
Schools                                             beverage choices to be available whenever food
    	 If available, foods and beverages sold       is available outside of school meal services
        individually should be limited to low-
        fat and non-fat milk, fruits, and non-      Platinum #2:
        fried vegetables.                           Write a policy that requires healthy food and
                                                    beverage choices to be available whenever food
                                                    is available outside of school meal services
II. Nutritional Quality of Foods and Beverages      Gold #3G: Encourage organizations to raise
Sold and Serviced on Campus: Fundraising            funds by selling non-food items
Activities
    	 School fundraising activities will not       Criteria Menu #2:
         involve food or will use only foods that   Participate in the American Heart Association’s
         meet the nutrition and portion size        physical activity and community service
         standards for foods and beverages sold     programs, Jump Rope for Heart or Hoops for
         individually. Schools will encourage       Heart
         fundraising activities that promote
         physical activity.                         Criteria Menu #4:
                                                    Participate in a School Walk Event
II. Nutritional Quality of Foods and Beverages      Gold #2:
Sold and Services on Campus: Rewards                Write a policy for all teachers, faculty, and
    	 Schools will not use foods or beverages      staff that food is not to be used as a reward or
        as rewards for academic performance or      punishment for students, and include methods
        good behavior                               to ensure faculty awareness of and compliance
                                                    with the policy
III. Nutrition and Physical Activity Promotion      Gold Medal School 5 minute energizers
and Food Marketing: Integrating Physical
Activity into the Classroom Setting
     	 Classroom teachers will provide short
         physical activity breaks between lessons
         or classes, as appropriate
III. Nutrition and Physical Activity Promotion      Gold #3E:
and Food Marketing: Food Marketing in Schools       Write a policy that bans advertising of less
     	 School based marketing of brands            nutritious food choices and promotes healthy
        promoting predominantly low-                food choices
        nutrition foods and beverages is
        prohibited



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                                                         426
                                                                                                Logistics Menu
                                  Policy Resources

III. Nutrition and Physical Activity Promotion       Silver #2:
and Food Marketing: Staff Wellness                   Write a policy for teacher, faculty, and staff
     	 School District highly values the health     wellness activities, and include methods to
        and well being of every staff member         ensure faculty awareness of these activities
        and will plan and implement activities
        and policies that support personal           Platinum #3:
        efforts by staff to maintain a healthy       Plan and carry out a yearly teacher, faculty, and
        lifestyle.                                   staff wellness program.
IV. Physical Activity Opportunities and Physical     Bronze #1:
Education: Daily Physical Education                  Write a policy requiring grades K-2 receive
    	 All students will receive daily physical      45-75 minutes and grades 3-6 receive 90-150
        education (or its equivalent of 150          minutes of structured physical activity each
        minutes/week for elementary aged             week using the Utah State Office of Education’s
        students) for the entire school year.        Physical Education Core Curriculum. Include
    	 All physical education will be taught by      methods to ensure faculty awareness of the
        a certified physical education teacher       policy.


                                                     Gold #1:
                                                     Write a policy that requires all pre K-12
                                                     Physical Education (PE) and physical activity
                                                     courses to be overseen by a certified Physical
                                                     Education teacher or PE specialists employed by
                                                     the school or district
IV. Physical Activity Opportunities and Physical     Bronze #3:
Education: Daily Recess                              Establish a Gold Medal MileTM walking
    	 Schools should encourage moderate to          program on or around school grounds and a
        vigorous physical activity during a 20-      goal for student participation.
        minute recess.
IV. Physical Activity Opportunities and Physical     Silver #3:
Education: Physical Activity Opportunities Before    Offer a variety of competitive and non-
and After School                                     competitive physical activity programs
    	 All schools will offer extracurricular        accessible to all students
        physical activity programs. Schools
        will offer a range of activities that meet
        the needs, interests, and abilities of all
        students.




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                                                                                                   Logistics Menu
                                 Policy Resources

IV. Physical Activity Opportunities and            Criteria Menu #13:
Physical Education: Physical Activity and          Write a policy that discourages withholding PE
Punishment                                         or recess as a punishment; include methods to
    	 Teachers and other school and               ensure faculty awareness of the policy.
       community personnel will not use
       physical activity or withholding
       opportunities for physical activity as
       punishments
IV. Physical Activity Opportunities and Physical   Bronze #4:
Education: Safe Routes to School                   Promote Safe Routes to School by requiring
    	 The school district will assess and, if     the development and distribution of a Student
        necessary and to the extend possible,      Neighborhood Access Program (SNAP) plan,
        make needed improvements to make           SNAP map, and safe drop-off/pick-up map
        it safer and easier for students to walk
        and bike to school
IV. Physical Activity Opportunities and Physical   Criteria Menu #11:
Education: Use of School Facilities Outside of     Allow students and community members to
School Hours                                       use the physical activity facilities outside school
    	 School spaces and facilities should         hours
        be available to students, staff, and
        community members before, during,
        and after the school day, on weekends,
        and during school vacations.
V. Monitoring and Policy Review: Policy Review     Gold Medal Schools Baseline Assessment
    	 Each school in the district will conduct
       a baseline assessment of the school’s
       existing nutrition and physical activity
       environments and policies.




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                                                        428
                                                                                                 Logistics Menu
                                           Resources
Resources
5 Minute Energizers
    •	 Book featuring short activities that teachers can use in the classroom to provide physical activity for students.
       These energizers will help your students get 90-150 minutes of physical activity each week to complete
       Bronze Criteria #1.
    •	 Download 5-Minute Energizers.

Rewards Kids Will Crave
   •	 Book that provides teachers with ideas for alternatives to food rewards. This book supports Gold Criteria #2.
      This book will be provided for each teacher the year the school is working on the Gold level. Contact your
      Local Health Department to receive hard copies of the book.

Gold Medal SchoolsTM (GMS) Web site
    •	 health.utah.gov/obesity/gms provides support and recognition to Gold Medal Schools. The Current News
        section is updated with information to help schools implement the Program on the 1st and 15th of each
        month.
Listserv
    •	 E-mail reminders are sent to schools from the Utah Department of Health on the 1st and 15th of each
        month. Messages from this Listserv keep members updated on Current News. If you would like to receive
        the GMS listserv send a blank e-mail to join-goldmedal@list.utah.gov

Money
  •	 Awarded upon successful completion of each award level
         ◦ Bronze - $200
         ◦ Silver - $300
         ◦ Gold - $500
         ◦ Platinum - $300
         ◦ Platinum Focus Mini Grant - $200
               ▪ Schools must apply online before October 1st to be eligible for the mini grant

Local Health Departments
   •	 Local Health Departments support schools in achieving levels in the GMS program. Each school can
       contact their Local Health Department for support, resources, and tools to help implement GMS.




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                                               Stipend
School Coordinator Stipend
The School Coordinator stipend will be distributed in December 2011 and May 2012 after Mid-Year progress and
End-Year reports are complete. Checks take up to four weeks to arrive once they are issued by the Utah Department
of Health finance department. You will need to e-mail the following information to saroundy@utah.gov by
November 28, 2011.

    •	   School Name
    •	   Your Name
    •	   Your Home Address
    •	   Social Security Number

If you have questions please contact Sarah Roundy at 801-538-9454 or saroundy@utah.gov




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                            Timelines
Bronze
Silver
Gold
Platinum
Platinum Focus-Mental Health
Platinum Focus-Asthma
Platinum Focus-Diabetes
Platinum Focus-Environmental Quality
Platinum Focus-Fruits and Vegetables Galore
Platinum Focus-Immunizations
Platinum Focus-Oral Health
Platinum Focus-Sun Safety
Platinum Focus-Violence and Injury Prevention




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                                 431                          Logistics Menu
                                                     Webinars
Gold Medal School Webinars 2011-2012
Training                                             Date Available      Webinar Link
School Coordinator Orientation                       August 8            https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/557354194
Criteria-Bronze                                      August 8            https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/249731250
Criteria-Silver                                      August 8            https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/719306427
Criteria-Gold                                        August 8            https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/804153906
Criteria Menu                                        August 8            https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/817146122
Criteria-Platinum                                    August 8            https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/466562514
Criteria-Platinum Focus Asthma                       August 29           http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/webinars.html
Criteria-Platinum Focus Diabetes                     August 29           http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/webinars.html
Criteria-Platinum Focus Environmental Quality        August 29           http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/webinars.html
Criteria-Platinum Focus Fruits & Vegetables Galore   August 29           http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/webinars.html
Criteria-Platinum Focus Immunization                 August 29           http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/webinars.html
Criteria-Platinum Focus Mental Health and Wellness   August 29           http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/webinars.html
Criteria-Platinum Focus Oral Health                  August 29           http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/webinars.html
Criteria-Platinum Focus Sun Safety                   August 29           http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/webinars.html
Criteria-Platinum Violence and Injury Prevention     August 29           http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/webinars.html
Mid-Year Progress Report                             October 10          http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/webinars.html
Policy Drafts                                        January 10          http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/webinars.html
End-Year Reports                                     February 28         http://health.utah.gov/obesity/gms/webinars.html




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                                                                   432
   Local Health Department Contacts
Health Department          GMS staff                      Address                          Phone                      Email
                          Allen Grunig              655 East 1300 North                 435-792-6506            agrunig@brhd.gov
     Bear River
                           Kim Bales                 Logan, UT 84341                    435-792-6521             kbales@brhd.gov
                                                    70 Westview Drive
                          Valyn Leavitt                                            435-896-5451 Ext. 340        vleavitt@utah.gov
                                                   Richfield, UT 84701
 Central Utah Public
                                                428 East Topaz Blvd. Suite D
                         Pam Goodrich                                                   435-864-4124           pgoodrich@utah.gov
                                                     Delta, UT 84624
                                                     22 S State Street
    Davis County        Tiffany Leishman           Clearfield, UT 84025                 801-451-3399       tleishma@daviscountyutah.gov

                           Terri Sory          2001 South State Street S-2400           801-468-2740              tsory@slco.org
   Salt Lake Valley
                        Heather Richards         Salt Lake City, UT 84190                                       hrichards@slco.org
                                                      28 South 1st East
                           Jessie Huff                  PO Box 800                      435-637-3671            jessiehuff@utah.gov
  Southeastern Utah                                   Price, UT 84501
                                                       25 West Main
                          Dana Olsen                                                    435-381-2252           danaolsen@utah.gov
                                                   Castledale, UT 84513
                                               620 South 400 East, Suite 400
Southwest Utah Public    Shalyce Oman                                                   435-986-2563          shalyceoman@utah.gov
                                                   St. George, UT 84770
                                                  650 Round Valley Drive
Summit County Public       Geri Essen                                                   435-333-1505             gessen@utah.gov
                                                    Park City, UT 84060
                                                  151 North Main Street
   Tooele County            Liz Heap                                                    435-277-2369             lsheap@utah.gov
                                                     Tooele, UT 84074
                                                    281 East 200 North
     TriCounty             Kirby Avila                                                  435-722-6304             tavila@utah.gov
                                                    Roosevelt, UT 84066
                                             151 South University Ave Suite 2700
    Utah County            Patty Cross                                                  801-851-7528         pattyc.uchlth@state.ut.us
                                                     Provo, UT 84601
                                                     55 South 500 East
  Wasatch County        Jonelle Fitzgerald                                              435-657-3260             jfitzger@utah.gov
                                                Heber City, UT 84032-1918
                                                       477 23d Street                   801-399-7187
   Weber-Morgan         Rochelle Creager                                                                       rgates@co.weber.ut.us
                                                     Ogden, UT 84401                   801-432-5268 c


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