CAREER PATHWAYS INSTITUTE 2011

Document Sample
CAREER PATHWAYS INSTITUTE 2011 Powered By Docstoc
					             CAREER PATHWAYS INSTITUTE 2011  
             TEAM TIME & SME SESSION NOTES FOR MONTANA 
             April 26‐28, 2011  

SUMMARY OF TEAM TIME TAKE‐AWAYS 

INTRODUCTION 

During the week of April 25, 2011, organizational 
and agency representatives from Montana 
participated in the federal Department of Labor’s 
Career Pathways Institute held in Washington D.C.  
Building upon the accomplishments of teams 
following the winter 2010 institute, the spring 
institute focused on the theme, “Credentials that 
Count”.  Accordingly, teams were challenged to 
take the next step in the career pathway 
development to explore with the aid of subject 
matter experts what was needed to develop 
career pathway systems that lead to employer‐

validated credentials in high‐demand careers.   

Like the winter institute, the institute design was structured         Montana Institute Team 
around “Team Time” in which the Montana team members                   Leisa Smith, SWIB Director, DLI  
met with subject matter experts from around the country and 
                                                                       Suzanne Ferguson, WIA Unit Supervisor, DLI 
spent focused time conducting strategic planning.   
                                                                       Programs and Oversight Bureau 

                                                                       Wolf Ametsbichler, Manager, Missoula Job 
FACILITATORS & STAFF                                                   Service Workforce Center & Missoula One‐Stop 
                                                                       System Operator  
The Montana team coach, Chandra Larsen, from Social Policy 
Research Associates, and David Camporeale from the                     Margaret Bowles, Adult Basic & Literacy 
Department of Health and Human Services, facilitated the               Education Specialist, Office of Public Instruction  

strategic planning sessions. Ellen Holland from the Department         Sheila Hogan, Executive Director, Career Training 
of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, took           Institute  
notes for the event.                                                   Kris Juliar, Director, MT Office of Rural Health & 
                                                                       Area Health Education Center MSU 
SUBJECT MATTER EXPERTS                                                 Margaret Girkins, Chief ABE Examiner, Flathead 
The Montana team met with four subject‐matter experts                  Valley Community College 
during the institute:                                                  Dan Bernhardt, SWIB Program Specialist, DLI 

    Gloria Mwase, Jobs for the Future (JFF)                        Susan Jones, Special Projects Manager, Office of 
    Debra Mills, Center for Occupational Research and              the Commissioner of Higher Education 
     Development (CORD)  
    Evelyn Ganzglass and Heath Prince, Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) 



U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                                Page 1 of 14 
                                             Career Pathways Spring Institute 2011 – Team Time Notes for Montana 


The subject matter experts provided information and ideas concerning a full range of topics related to career 
pathways development: 

        Engaging partners – 
         employers and state level 
         leadership 
        Marketing and messaging for 
         career pathways 
        Developing Career Pathways – 
         models and promising 
         practices 
        Engaging and collaborating 
         with community colleges  
        Funding Career Pathways  
        Designing Career Pathways for 
         the Healthcare Sector 

On the final day of the institute, the 
Montana team developed an action plan to guide their next steps following the institute (see Attachment A).   

What follows is a transcription of notes taken during “Team Time” sessions, including highlights from 
conversations with subject matter experts and team brainstorming activities.  In addition, all notes taken on flip 
chart paper during the Team Time sessions were shipped back to the team for future reference. 

KEY TAKEAWAYS AND NEXT STEPS 

The subject matter experts provided information and ideas concerning a full range of topics related to career 
pathways development: 

        Strategies for recruiting and retaining low‐income populations 
        Structuring professional development for front line staff 
        Engaging champions – employers and state level leadership 
        Identifying pipelines and fixing “leaks” 
        Identifying funding streams 
        Identifying in‐demand careers 
        Securing the support and advocacy of employers by organizing them 
        Supporting low‐performing students with accessing careers 

By the final day of the institute, the Montana team developed a framework for systemic change and a tool to 
support the team with moving their plan forward (see Appendix A).  They also completed an action plan to guide 
their next steps following the institute (see Appendix B).   

What follows is a summary of notes taken during “Team Time” sessions, including highlights from conversations 
with subject matter experts and team brainstorming activities.  Detailed minutes taken by Ellen Holland during the 
meeting are also available for review. 




U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                          Page 2 of 14     
                                            Career Pathways Spring Institute 2011 – Team Time Notes for Montana 



DAY ONE – APRIL 26, 2011 

SUMMARY OF DAY ONE ACTIVITIES 

The Montana team launched their team time with clear goals to guide their planning time and work with SMEs.  By 
the end of day one, the team unaminously agreed to spending time working on developing a framework for 
systemic change they can use for developing mulitiple career pathways.  They also met with Gloria Mwase from 
Jobs for the Future, which led to discussions about strategies for recruiting and retaining target populations. 

TEAM WORK 

The team opened with a discussion of what to focus on for the next few days:  

    1.   something they can realistically do 
    2.   develop a pipeline for low skilled adults* 
    3.   include staff development  
    4.   this program should work into a workforce plan* 
    5.    look at what’s already there and not invent the wheel 
    6.   “pathways” can be a game changer for poor people 
    7.    take something concrete and measurable—we want success at the end 
         of the day 
    8.   stackable and portable outcomes 


TARGET POPULATION 

The team revisited a discussion about who are their target populations.  They decided that a goal of the program 
should be to target “low skilled” and “dislocated” workers over age 18, though more towards “dislocated” in 
Montana.  A goal should be to try to honor the skills workers already have through prior learning assessments.  
(Wisconsin has made progress in this area).  Tasks to include: 

        Identify  needs and make a plan for movement out of poverty 
        Distinction:  some people were successful workers now out of work; some have always wandered from 
         job to job—these are very different populations that need different approaches (unemployed and 
         underemployed). 
        Identify the best pathway for moving people into the jobs 
        Create a process that is driven by the employer and the industry having the needed job skills—this is 
         where the jobs are. 
        You have to look at where the person comes into the system. 

Questions identified to address: 

        How do you reach target audience?  
        What are your outreach plans? 
        Find out how to plug the workers in—need a pathway into the pathways. 




U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                       Page 3 of 14     
                                            Career Pathways Spring Institute 2011 – Team Time Notes for Montana 



FRAMEWORK FOR SYSTEMIC CHANGE 

Team discussion led to the concept that what they would work on are the 
elements of systemic change “It’s about systemic change; it’s about the 
process”. 

       Tipping points/momentum points are very key 
       What we learn should be a process that can be applied to all 
        pathways. 
       Need to develop a system that is pretty streamlined.  It only takes 
        one failure for the system to fail—we don’t want to get hung up on 
        one curriculum 
       We could identify the basic skills you need to get into one industry. 
       We don’t want to develop one pathway; we want to develop a 
        system. 
       There are common elements to all pathways 
       What are the common points/common issues? 
       We should develop something that can be replicated;  a tool to use 
        in the future that could be replicated would be wonderful.   

What are the elements of the “tool”? 

       This system has to bring many partners into it;  
       it must be nimble; 
       Community Management Teams should be able to be engaged in the One‐Stop business; look for other 
        partnerships 
       Business folks need to be there too 
       (Local level business people won’t sit through long knock down drag out meetings; they have to be 
        brought in carefully.  For them tool needs to be beautiful and you need a crisp elevator speech.) 

Some considerations in creating the system: 

       How do you get a person stuck in low‐level place into a higher‐level job? 
       It’s more important to have people in health care who are appropriate for the health care industry. 
       How do you train people to move up in an industry? 
       Continuing education is an important “mind set” that they need to have 

The Career Pathway Tool Elements should include: 

        1.   Identify demand jobs 
        2.   Identify career track/training/education programs/identification of certificates/development of soft 
             skills 
        3.   Identify wages/outcomes 
        4.   Connect to partners 
        5.   Start over/feedback 
              



U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                        Page 4 of 14     
                                           Career Pathways Spring Institute 2011 – Team Time Notes for Montana 



GLORIA MWASE, JOBS FOR THE FUTURE                                                
SUBJECT MATTER EXPERT VISIT #1 

What follows are highlights and notes from the discussion with Gloria Mwase, Program Director, Jobs for the 
Future (JFF).   


STRATEGIES FOR RECRUITMENT (ESPECIALLY IN A RURAL STATE) 
 
Outreach 
     Look at Labor market information.  Build into the Montana pathway design how to get at this information.  
        Look into funding a position to do the basic work to determine how to be responsive to business. 
     Need to pay attention to the supply pipeline.   
     Confirm which credentials are actually necessary.  For example, the GED is not required by many 
        community colleges and many students would benefit by bypassing the GED all together. 
     Clarify the profile of your target population(s).  Outreach to them where they are (churches, etc.) – 
        especially those that are out of sight/out of reach. 
     Deepen referral process by educating partners.   
     Develop digital literacy and support career exploration for work that supports telecommuting lifestyles.  
 
Retention 
     Look for cross‐cutting skills and core competencies that can apply to several pathways and to remain 
        flexible to changing job demand. 
     Accelerate the pace of learning for adults (compression/contextualization/customization that focuses on a 
        student’s gaps) 
     Provide supports for the student (financial/emotional/child care).  
     Adult Ed providers need to do more about work contextualization.  Support exploring the continuum of 
        adult education and identify strengths of individuals.  
     Help students connect to strong partners that match student needs.  Potential partners: Community 
        Management Teams (CMT), SKC and Little Big Horn (both involved in Breaking Through Initiative). 
     Younger adults need more time to figure out their lives; older adults need to focus faster (Help them to be 
        realistic about selecting a career path) 
     Stackable credentials are needed as well. 


PROFESSIONAL DEVLEOPMENT STRATEGIES 

       Staff development needed in every area—just decide where you want to start. 
       Look at labor data to see where the jobs will be and focus on gaps. 
       Expand capacity 
       Advisor training (case management) for advisors within colleges so they can support students 
       Counseling to Careers—focuses on advising 
       Identify appropriate advisors for the student 
         




U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                         Page 5 of 14     
                                           Career Pathways Spring Institute 2011 – Team Time Notes for Montana 



RECOMMENDED DOCUMENTS OR RESOURCES 

       Better Together: Realigning Pre‐College Skills Development Programs to Achieve Greater Academic 
        Success for Adult Learners.  Gloria Cross Mwase, November 2008  
        Web Link: http://www.jff.org/publications/workforce/better‐together‐realigning‐pre‐college‐s/176  
       Breaking Through Practice Guide.  JFF, Spring 2010 
        Web Link: http://www.jff.org/publications/education/breaking‐through‐practice‐guide/1059 
       Breaking Through Contextualization Toolkit.  JFF, Spring 2010 
        Web Link: http://www.jff.org/sites/default/files/BT_toolkit_June7.pdf 
       Jobs to Careers Practice Brief (Hitachi) 
        Web Link: http://jobs2careers.org/wp‐content/uploads/2011/02/J2C_SSTARExcels_111510.pdf 
       La Guardia Community College ‐ contextualized bridge program. 
        Web Link: http://www.lagcc.cuny.edu/home/ 
       Davidson Community College In Lexington, KY  (bridge program) 


CONTACT INFORMATION  
 
Gloria Mwase, Program Director 
 Jobs for the future (JFF) 
Boston, MA 
Email: gmwas@jff.org 
Telephone: 617‐728‐4446 
 
 

DAY ONE ‐ DEBRIEF/REFLECTIONS 

During the closing debrief, the Montana team members shared their final reflections for the day: 

       Bring it back to the typical student 
       Don’t reinvent the wheel 
       Have SMEs help us with what we have 
       Nice to have something concrete 
       On‐ramps – works! 
       Work on the tool (it has been a lot of listening) 
       Know a lot – time to put work to paper 
       Still very broad – what do we need to do to get good career information? 

 

 

 

 




U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                     Page 6 of 14     
                                             Career Pathways Spring Institute 2011 – Team Time Notes for Montana 



DAY TWO – APRIL 27, 2011 

SUMMARY OF DAY TWO ACTIVITIES 

The Montana team launched into the second day of team time with a clear focus on fleshing out individual 
elements of the framework for systemic change discussed on day one.  They aimed to engage subject matter 
experts in helping them with this process.  They met with Debra Mills from the Center for Occupational Research 
and Development (CORD) and Evelyn Ganzglass and Heath Prince from the Center for Law and Social Policy 
(CLASP).  The team closed the day with a draft framework and several action steps in place. 

The following table highlights key elements of the framework for systemic change and key activities and tasks 
discussed by the team.  Appendix A includes a draft framework for systemic change built off this model 

Outcome              Activity                 Key Tasks 
Secure Buy‐In        Engage state level          Engage champions and secure buy‐in 
from Champions       leadership                  Solicit their leadership to address systemic barriers 
                                                 Organize their involvement, but let them lead 
                                                   
Identify In‐         Engage employers         Convene employers (twice a year):
Demand Careers                                 Get CEO there 
and secure                                     Use the team that’s in place 
employer                                       Get intermediaries involved 
leadership of                                  Describe what you’ll do for them 
efforts                                        Confirm their workforce/industry needs and occupational focus 
                                               Communicate what you’re building and why (using data) 
                                               Surface any barriers in systems or policies that they can 
                                                  intervene/assist with 
                                               Engage them with leading the process 
                                                   
Identify Pipeline    Target populations        Support and expand existing pipelines 
and Fix Leaks        and identify on‐          Identify populations that are “leaking” or not connecting with 
                     ramps                        existing pipelines 
 
Deliver Education    Identify education          Align education and training to real time labor market needs. 
and Training that    and training                Develop bridge programs as needed for specific populations. 
Meet Supply and      programs                    Provide wrap‐around supportive services for adults. 
Demand Pipeline                                  Include life skills curriculum in training. 
                                                   
Award Industry‐      Research certificate        Research existing certificates awarded by training programs. 
Recognized           programs and                Ask employers which certificates they require and/or validate 
Certificates         validate with               Work with education and training providers align curriculum/ 
                     employers                    certification with that required by employers. 
                                                 Look to make credential programs stackable. 
                                                   
Career pathway       Support pipelines to        Identify businesses and jobs 
leads to living‐     jobs and careers            Locate “on ramps” to careers 
wage jobs 
 


U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                        Page 7 of 14     
                                            Career Pathways Spring Institute 2011 – Team Time Notes for Montana 



TEAM WORK 

Chandra and David opened the team time session 
asking Montana team members to share 
reflections and any “ah‐has” after the previous 
day’s discussions.  Most team members agreed 
that they continue to feel good about the moving 
in the direction of completing the framework for 
systemic change to establish a foundation for 
Montana’s work on pathways.  Other points raised 
during the discussion:  

   A good deal of follow up is needed regarding 
    policies and procedures to make the work here 
    actually happen—this is a major action item. 
   One team member reflected that he was concerned that it was still not concrete enough and the agenda still 
    appears to be too broad to act on. 
   Chandra reflected that the group was talking about different aspects of the framework; some were discussing 
    specific operational functions, while others were discussing higher level systemic functions.  This will need to 
    be sorted out as the framework is fleshed out and being used. 
   Unless the industry experts say what’s needed, we’re just “making it up”.  It may not be a relevant pipeline if 
    we make up what is the pipeline in Montana. 
   Create a process/system for each part of the tool/framework.  Create something that can be replicated.  


IDENTIFY IN‐DEMAND CAREERS AND SECURE EMPLOYER LEADERSHIP OF EFFORTS 

The Montana team had a discussion about one of the first elements in the framework, “Identify in‐demand careers 
and secure employer leadership efforts”.  The following notes highlight some key points in their discussion. 

   Kris mentioned that one of her colleagues (an economist) has been hired who can collect data for the team.  
    Just need to provide him with guidance on what to research. 
   Other sources of information—US DOL O’NET/My skills My Future/ 

Employer Summit/Convening 

   Process:  pull together necessary professionals/ associations/local unions/ business associations like Kiwanis—
    convene this group touch these bases about twice yearly. 
   David mentioned that federal agencies provide technical assistance (TA) to groups by either providing 
    facilitation support or funding to pay for outside TA support.  For example, the regional DOL/ETA office may be 
    able to provide this kind of support.  DOL discretionary grants provides money to convene groups. 
   Local hospital provides free food and space for meetings. 
   Must target a broad industry to gain their involvement and convene them. 
   Connect to the tribes as well (they have their own funding streams as well). 
   Identify the champions that can make this happen.  The group discussed potentially having the Colleges of 
    Technology (CCTs) put it on, but eventually concluded that the State Workforce Investment Board (SWIB) 



U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                          Page 8 of 14     
                                            Career Pathways Spring Institute 2011 – Team Time Notes for Montana 


    should be the lead convener because it’s their job to look at broad needs.  The team also discussed involving 
    the Chamber of Commerce.  
   In the right context, the groups may be more open—Deans and CEOs may do this voluntarily if it’s not 
    mandated and it’s presented in the right context. 
   Chandra suggested that the team think about their function in operational terms, as an intermediary and as 
    the “Coveneners”.  While they may have other stakeholders or champions in front as leads, they may need to 
    come together to actually coordinate the event and make it happen.  This is the model has been 
    demonstrated as successful by school‐to‐career cross‐system networks over the last decade. 
   A culture shift needs to happen through this transitional stage.  Expanding the work of this group is important.  
   A specific important next step is to get the governor’s office involved so they can bring it back to the SWIB—
    get governor’s buy‐in; that will then grab the other agencies. 


IDENTIFY PIPELINE AND FIX LEAKS 

Some of the following points were raised in discussion about identifying the target populations within the pipeline. 

   How do you incentivize people who have been trained to go to small, remote areas? 
   Target is “low‐skilled adults”  (keep the focus narrow) 
   Chandra mentioned that outreach strategies will be different for each target population. 
   Goal is to catch everybody—name every part of the whole‐‐ 
   Annual meetings may focus on getting a list of specific action items. 
   In general, when you get out of the cities, people are lowly educated/low skill level.  They blow what little 
    money they make.  They are primarily high schools graduates only—they’re “gray economy” (earning money 
    doing small jobs here and there).  Some may not want “real jobs”. 
   In very sparsely populated areas, you can’t aggregate enough people to generate education programs, etc. 

Chandra mentioned that SPR hosted a webinar and wrote an issue brief on the topic of developing career 
pathways and ladders for disadvantaged populations: 

Link to SPR webinar on “Jobs and Career Ladders for the Hard to Serve” ‐ 
https://www.workforce3one.org/view/5001014459487414917/info 
 
Link to SPR issue brief on “Career Ladders and Pathways for the Hard‐to‐Employ” ‐ 
https://www.workforce3one.org/view/2001027338263742261/info 


FUNDING STREAMS 

The team also briefly discussed funding streams.  Chandra offered to send the team an issue brief and matrix of 
federal funding sources developed by SPR for the WIRED initiative (see link below). 

    ‐   Workforce Innovation 
    ‐   Adult Ed block grants to the States (may be more to apply for under AFLA) 
    ‐   TANF 
    ‐   Perkins 
    ‐   Fatherhood Grants 
    ‐   ARRA grant money (is any left over??) 



U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                         Page 9 of 14      
                                            Career Pathways Spring Institute 2011 – Team Time Notes for Montana 


    ‐    Money available through private industry—they have lots of money for training if you can 
    ‐    Philanthropic divide 

Link to SPR’s Federal Funding for Disadvantaged Populations (Issue Brief and Funding Matrix) 
https://www.workforce3one.org/view/2001027337891370541/info  
 

DEBRA MILLLS, CENTER FOR OCCUPATIONAL RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT (CORD) 
SUBJECT MATTER EXPERT VISIT #2 

The Montana team met with Debra Millls, Director, Partnerships, Center for Occupational Research & 
Development (CORD) on Tuesday morning.  Leisa Smith provided an overview of the career pathway work in 
Montana and walked her through the systemic framework the team developed.  The following notes highlight key 
discussion points. 


START WITH EMPLOYERS – END WITH EMPLOYERS 
    1.   Form a team of different agencies to work together around pathways.  

    2.   Begin with business and industry.  You can be the catalyst, but industry has to have “ownership”.  
         Business and industry will draw the picture of what career ladder looks like.   

    3.   Business and industry has the power.  This team has no actual power.  You have to get buy in and let 
         them attack the barriers.  The team has to be in the back office.  We’re building something for them, but 
         we have to have their input 

    4.   Get them organized.  Someone takes lead to bring entities together.  Employers have to be organized to 
         run the show. 
    5.   Use data to tell businesses what you’ll do for them and what you’re building.  Debra offered to research 
         EMSI data on Montana for the team (re. health industry in Kalispell region.  This can be used to crosswalk 
         that data they’ve researched using DOL tools with the framework.  Then, they can begin to flesh out their 
         plan. 
    6.   Find out what their labor market needs are.  You have to ask industry about their labor market needs. 
         Have to check out data with employers; data must be validated.  A state typically runs on small 
         businesses. 
    7.   Discuss barriers within the system they can help with.  Need high‐level leader.  Often it’s the CEO of the 
         Community College (for example, Jane Karas).  That CEO can lay out the barriers.  Often the barriers are 
         solved by changing policy rather than needing money.  Personalities often drive what happens.  Debra will 
         send resource on how cc colleges work with the local level. 
    8.   Team will add what parts they have.  Will need bridge programs; team can chunk in what they have and 
         then the gaps will be easily seen.  Soft skills are always needed. 
    9.   Must provide contextualized learning.  Faculty has to have buy in; the way they teach the students has to 
         change to reach this population. 60‐80% of students do not learn in the traditional manner.  How it’s 
         taught will make or break it—must be taught contextually.  All faculty needs to get out to business and 
         industry.  The professors don’t see how the world has changed. 




U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                       Page 10 of 14     
                                             Career Pathways Spring Institute 2011 – Team Time Notes for Montana 



RECOMMENDED DOCUMENTS OR RESOURCES 

   National Career Pathways Network – http://www.cord.org/ncpn‐index.cfm 
   Center for Occupational Research and Development – www.cord.org 
   Adult Career Pathways (Model & Book) – www.adultcareerpathways.org  
   Adult Career Pathways Bridge Resources – www.acp‐sc.org (Bridge resources) 
   Books:   Minnesota Handbook and Colorado Handbook.(Debra will send Lisa copies) 
   Book:  Adult Career Pathways, by Richard Hinckley, Debra Mills and Hope Cotner –  
    http://www.adultcareerpathways.org/book.php  


CONTACT INFORMATION  
 
Debra Mills 
Center for Occupational Research & Development (CORD) 
Waco, Texas 76710 
Email: dmills@CORD.org 
Phone: 254‐772‐8756 


DEBRIEF 

The team shared the following reflections during a debrief following Debra’s visit. 

   System must be employer‐driven   
    ‐ Get CEO there 
    ‐ Use team that’s in place 
    ‐ Get intermediaries 
    ‐ Help employers bridge the gap between trainings and recruitment 
   Integrate Soft Skills training: 
    ‐ Soft skills are always needed—has to be built in because adults won’t take it separately. 
    ‐ Concern that students will be trained to do tasks they aren’t interested in. 
    ‐ There’s a curriculum collaboration Suzette Fox developed for aging populations‐‐ has soft skills built in. 
         

EVENYN GANZGLASS AND HEATH PRINCE, CLASP 
 SUBJECT MATTER EXPERT VISIT #3 

What follows are highlights and notes from the discussion with Evelyn Ganzglass, Director of Workforce 
Development, and Heath Prince, Senior Policy Analyst for the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP). 


SUPPORTING LOW‐PERFORMING STUDENTS WITH ACCESSING CAREERS 
   Common goals.  There has to be a common goal and a common program for partners to work together.  WIA 
    doesn’t do that well at serving those that need the most services, although Utah has a totally integrated 
    system. 




U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                       Page 11 of 14     
                                             Career Pathways Spring Institute 2011 – Team Time Notes for Montana 



   Funding participation.  A lot of people have basic skills deficiencies and need money to go to evening classes 
    to get skills.  There are some instances of tuition reimbursement. 
    ‐ Sector partnerships have a 2‐tiered approach: Learning in the workplace—sometimes this has business 
         funding.  There are industry partnerships in PA where a group of industries will pool together for training.  
    ‐ The sale of bonds has been done to raise training funds.  Iowa and Missouri have done this successfully. 
    ‐ North Dakota had banks give loans for training 
    ‐ This is easier to do if you have state taxes to back it. 
    ‐ Colleges often don’t have the money to address retention; they need other monies 
   Transforming federal/state training programs.  WIA needs to place more emphasis on training.  Ironically, the 
    people who get training are the people who already have higher‐level skills; sometimes people can’t get 
    training if they don’t already have a diploma.  WIA money can’t be used for more basic training.   Recovery 
    money has been used for having more flexible use of WIA. 
   The system needs to provide training support, programs for targeted populations: 
    ‐ Training has to be structured to begin where people are. 
    ‐ Modules have to be broken down so people will experience some success.  Need to create bridge and 
         accelerated programs. 
    ‐ Need to provide increased connections to ABE. 
    ‐ Need to restructure what exists: chunking, stacking, and accelerated. 
    ‐ Revise what’s out there—there are not flexible programs that meet people’s needs now.  WIA has 
         influence in the community to do this.  
    ‐ Partnerships provide support services that are articulated to college curriculum and support/collaborate 
         on program effectiveness, 
   Career counseling.  TANF and WIA funds can be used for community college counseling. 
   Need to support culture shift and address stigma 
    ‐ Being in a remedial setting has a stigma attached.  One strategy for dealing with that is to keep them in a 
         cohort for at least the first year.  Mutual support comes out of this. 
    ‐ Terminology is always important:  refer to “upgrading” skills—don’t ever call it “getting basic skills”—
         don’t even suggest that.  Build teaching basic skills into training programs. 


RECOMMENDED DOCUMENTS OR RESOURCES 
   See the Wisconsin program (postsecondary) 
   See the South Texas College/Mott foundation collaboration: Breaking Through 
   Jobs for the Future – www.jff.org 
   Shifting Gears (Basic Skills Programs) – CLASP website – http://www.shifting‐gears.org/transforming‐basic‐
    skills‐services/53‐transforming‐basic‐skills‐services.html 
   Northwest Area Foundation – http://www.nwaf.org/Home.aspx  


CONTACT INFORMATION  
 
Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP)                            Evelyn Ganzglass
Washington, D.C.                                                    eganzglass@clasp.org 
Website:   www.clasp.org                                            Heath Prince 
Phone: 202‐906‐8000                                                 hprince@clasp.org 
 



U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                         Page 12 of 14      
                                             Career Pathways Spring Institute 2011 – Team Time Notes for Montana 



DAY TWO ‐ KEY TAKEAWAYS AND NEXT STEPS 

Closing the day, Chandra and David presented a draft systemic framework tool for the team to review and discuss 
during the closing session (see Appendix A).  The team decided they wanted to focus their time the final day 
discussing next steps with using the framework tool and building their action plan. 

 


DAY THREE – APRIL 28, 2011 

SUMMARY OF DAY THREE ACTIVITIES 

The teams spent the final day of the institute discussing ideas for spending their remaining resources and next 
steps using the systemic framework.  The team closed the session discussing specific action steps (see Appendix B) 
and planning their remarks for the closing session. 

TEAM WORK 

The team opened the final day of planning discussing ideas for spending down the remaining project resources.  
They decided that individuals would submit information about their recommended programs to Leisa by 05/06.   


SPENDING DOWN FUNDING 

   Summer I‐BEST – healthcare curriculum ($2K) – MG  
   Big Sky High School Health Science Academy – WA  
   Health Science Summer Camp – WA 
   Deb Mills Workshop – CL 
   Tribal 2+2 Pathway – KJ  
   Healthcare Core Curriculum – KJ 
   Kansas Summit attendance – CL 
   SME support (TBD based on team goals) 
   Facilitator (David, Chandra, TBD based on team goals) 
   Bridge model demonstration. 

The group had an active discussion concerning spending resources and discussing the summit (contact Chandra if 
you would like to see the detailed notes from this discussion.) 


NEXT STEPS 

The team worked on filling out an action plan with specific action steps to carry forward following the institute 
(See Appendix B). Among the most immediate next steps: 

        Schedule next team meeting and meet regularly, every other week. 
        Determine how the team plans to spend remaining grant funds. 



U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                         Page 13 of 14     
                                              Career Pathways Spring Institute 2011 – Team Time Notes for Montana 



        Support efforts to build leadership by engaging champions (including the Governor’s Office, Pat Weiss, 
         John Cect, Larry White, Keith Kelly, and the Superintendent of Schools. 
        Continue to collaborate with and build on efforts with the Health Care Industry Council. 
        Research real‐time labor market data for health care careers. 
        Use/rework systemic framework tool and share with the Health Care Industry Council. 
        Leverage efforts to engage employers and plan employer symposium. 


CLOSING REMARKS 

Leisa Smith gave a brief presentation during the closing session to the federal 
agency assistant secretaries and initiative participants.  She drew her remarks 
from the following “key takeaways” shared by her colleagues on the Montana 
team. 

Key Takeaways 

        Bringing together diverse partners 
        Redefining our work 
        Didn’t let roadblocks stop the process 
        Employer‐driven career pathway tool 
        Wealth of materials and research 
        Need for flexibility – not cookie‐cutters 
        Be prepared 

Recommendations 

        Bring employers to the table 
        More flexibility/time for spending grant money 
        Have successful career pathways program present 


 




U.S. Department of Labor  Washington, D.C.  April 26‐28, 2011                                      Page 14 of 14     
                                                                                             Appendix A: Montana Career Pathways Systemic Framework Tool




Montana Career Pathway Tool

      Identify Careers           Match Demand to Pipeline          Assess Clients & Connect                                        Identify Existing Training Programs and Curriculum         Program Design             Employers         Identify
                                                                                                                                                                                                                           specific employers to
         in Demand                    of Employees                   to Support Services                                      List training and education programs for in-demand careers         Elements
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  engage
1) Examine Broad Data            K-12                             Workforce Navigators                Training/Education                                                                       Flexible scheduling
2) Identify specific industry    Self Employed                    Mentors                                                                                                                       Chunked curricula
3) Convene Meeting               SNAP/ENT/TANF clients            Case Managers                             Duration                                                                          Progressive curricula
4) Identify Champions            Unemployed                       Soft Skills                          Estimated Salary                                                                          Contextualized
5) Report Out                    Dislocated Workers               Job-placement                      Tuition/Training Costs                                                                    Partner articulation
6) Support their leadership      Graduation Matters               Career counseling                                                                                                          Accelerated programs
                                                                  Financial aid counseling                                                                                                   Individual career plans
                                                                  Drop-out prevention                                                                                                         Accommodate needs
     Engage and Convene           Be mindful of "leaks"& target   Child care                              Credentials                                                                        Address indiv. barriers
          Employers                    outreach strategies
Describe what you'll do for      Adults without HS/GED            Transportation assistance           Employer-validated                                                                   Check with higher ed to see
them                                                                                                                                                                                        if program already exists
Confirm workforce/ industry      College Dropouts                                                          Stackable
needs
Communicate what you're          Welfare population                                                        Portable
doing and why
Surface system/policy barriers   Tribal
they can address
Convene twice annually           Grey economy                                                             Outcomes



         Champions
                                                                                                          Jean Karas
                                                                                                            WIBa
                                                                                                          One-Stops

           Funders




        Stakeholders
           SWIB
    Chamber of Commerce
     Community Colleges
                    Appendix B: CAREER PATHWAY ACTION PLAN FOR: MONTANA                                                             DATE: 04/28/11

KEY ELEMENT: ENGAGE AND CONVENE LEADERS

Priority Objectives                  Tactics/Activities                       Lead        Expected                 Due        Progress & Adjustments
   What we will do                    How we will do it                       Who is      Outcomes                 Date       What have we accomplished?
                                                                           responsible? What is the result?
Governor’s office          •    Meet and brief Gov. and discuss            Leisa/Dan       Get buy-in/establish   5/06
involvement                     framework                                  SWIB            role


Get champions on board     •    Pat Weiss                                  Leisa           Get buy-in/establish   5/02
                           •    John Cect                                                  role
                           •    Larry White
                           •    Keith Kelly/Supt. Of Schools (TJ)
                           •    Identify others
Convening employer         •    Flesh our full employer engagement         Leisa/Dan and   Get buy-in             5/02
partners/industry               strategy and discuss connections with      Team
                                the HCIC
                           •    Discuss hosting an employer
                                summit/academy, including the
                                following details: Identify leads/roles,
                                Discuss dates, ID Participants, plan
                                logistics
Convene employers -        •    Convene health care industries and         Kris            Leverage existing      5/02 next
Health Care Industry            discuss implementation                                     relationships to       meeting
Council                    •    Share systemic framework                                   inform the
                                                                                           development of
                           •    Innovation grant/plan for                                  career pathways and
                                employer/inventory of potential                            get champions
                                funding
                           •




      Career Pathways Technical Assistance Initiative                                                                                    April 2011
      Six Key Steps of Career Pathways – Action Planning Tool                                                                            Page 1 of 3
                CAREER PATHWAY ACTION PLAN FOR: MONTANA                                                                          DATE: 4/28/11



KEY ELEMENT: OTHER ACTIVITIES

Priority Objectives                    Tactics/Activities                     Lead        Expected                 Due         Progress & Adjustments
   What we will do                      How we will do it                     Who is      Outcomes                 Date        What have we accomplished?
                                                                           responsible? What is the result?
Coordinate funding efforts   •    Discuss workforce innovation grant       Leisa/Dan                              Discuss at
                             •    Plan for employer contributions                                                 upcoming
                                                                                                                  team mtg
                             •    Develop inventory of potential funding


Research LMI for             •    Discuss and identify data sources        Team/ Kris    Gather reliable LMI to   Agenda for
Healthcare                   •    Review data from Deb Mills                             share with employers     next
                                                                                         and guide CP efforts     meeting
                             •    Decide how additional data will be
                                  gathered (online research and/or
                                  informal/formal surveys)
                             •    Assign research to William
Convene team                 •    Determine a regular meeting schedule     Dan                                    TBD—
                                  and schedule meetings                                                           week of
                                                                                                                  5/9


Collaborate on a valuable    •    Write up “blubs of suggestions           Leisa         Decide how to spend      5/06
project and spend            •    Make a decision about a project                        $$
remaining grant resources
                             •    Develop action plan to follow-through

Research soft skills training •   Research Suzette Fox’s Life Skills       Margaret B                             Discuss at
                                  curriculum and share with the team                                              upcoming
                             •    Review and discuss usefulness for                                               team mtg
                                  including in other training programs




       Career Pathways Technical Assistance Initiative                                                                                    April 2011
       Six Key Steps of Career Pathways – Action Planning Tool                                                                            Page 2 of 3
             CAREER PATHWAY ACTION PLAN FOR: MONTANA                                               DATE: 4/28/11

Minnesota Team            •    Visit with Gary                          Margaret B.   Discuss at
connections               •    Review materials; provide overview for                 upcoming
                               the team about potential connections                   team mtg

                          •




                          •




     Career Pathways Technical Assistance Initiative                                                     April 2011
     Six Key Steps of Career Pathways – Action Planning Tool                                             Page 3 of 3

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:5
posted:11/28/2011
language:English
pages:18