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2011-2012-AP-Lang-and-Comp-Syllabus

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2011-2012-AP-Lang-and-Comp-Syllabus Powered By Docstoc
					              2011/2012 AP Language and Composition Course Syllabus
                       Mrs. Jones jonesj@dearborn.k12.mi.us
                      Mr. Atkins atkinsd@dearborn.k12.mi.us

General Course Goals and Overview of Objectives
AP Language and Composition will provide students with an opportunity to study various
forms of written discourse (narrative, expository, argumentation, etc.) by others from a
variety of historical periods and from different academic disciplines. The chief emphasis
will be non-fiction. Students will increase their awareness of how authors use their
rhetorical choices to particular aims and learn techniques in analyzing those texts using
rhetorical devices.

As this is a college-level course, performance expectations are appropriately high, and the
workload is challenging. Students are expected to commit to a minimum of four hours of
course work per week outside of class. Often, work involves writing and reading
assignments, so effective time management is important. Because of the demand of the
curriculum students must bring to the course sufficient command of mechanical
conventions and an ability to read and discuss prose.

This course is constructed in accordance with the guidelines described in the AP English
Course Description.

Writing
The Advanced Placement English Language and Composition course assumes that its
students already command Standard English grammar. Instruction and course readings
will help students develop stylistic maturity, characterized by the following:

      Wide ranging vocabulary used with denotative accuracy and respect for connotation.
      Variety in sentence structure (subordination and coordination)
      Logical organization coupled with techniques such as coherence, repetition, transactions and
       emphasis
      Rhetorical effectiveness: controlling tone, maintaining consistent voice, parallelism and
       antithesis.
      Awareness and stylistic effects created by various syntactical choices and levels of direction.
      Competency using MLA Documentation
      Test taking skills and preparation for the AP exam

Cultural and Media Literacy
Students will analyze graphics, visual images and a variety of media (radio, TV, internet)
and how they relate to written text and also serve as alternative forms of text themselves.

Course Texts
   The Norton Reader (10th edition)
   The Bedford Reader (9th edition)
   Everday Use: Rhetoric at Work in Reading and Writing (AP Edition)
   The Elements of Style (4th edition)
   Barron’s 601 Words You Need to Know to Pass Your Exam (4th edition)
Course Planner

Semester 1 (September – January)



                           I. The Mode of Narration

Reading:           Bedford: Narration – Telling a Story pp. 76-79
                   Everday Use: Rhetoric At Work in Reading and Writing:
                          Rhetoric in Narrative, pp. 179-206.

Analysis:          Bedford: Maya Angelou, “Champion of the World”
                             Amy Tan, “Fish Cheeks”
                             Jessica Cohen, “Grade A: A Market for a Yale
                                 Woman’s Eggs”
                             Shirley Jackson, “The Lottery”
                             George Orwell, “Shooting and Elephant”
                   Novels: John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath
                            Tim O’Brien, The Things They Carried
                   Visual Images: Photographs of Vietnam War
                                   Dust Bowl video stream
                   Movies: The Grapes of Wrath
                            Born on the Fourth of July

Language Strategies:      Point of view, style: detail, diction, dialogue, tone,
                         sentence fragments and run-on sentences


                           II. The Mode of Example

Reading:           Bedford: Example – Pointing to Instances pp. 188-191

Analysis:          Bedford: Barabara Lazear Ascher, “On Compassion”
                             Anna Quindlen, “Homeless”
                             Brent Staples “Black Men in Public Space”
                   Norton: Lars Eighner, “On Dumpster Diving”
                   Visual Image: Cartoon by Barry Blitt
                   Non-Fiction Book: Barbara Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed
                   Movie: With Honors

Language Strategies:      Generalization: using illustrative examples.
                          Focus on sentence variety.
                       III. The Mode of Compare and Contrast

Reading:               Bedford: Compare and Contrast pp. 230-235

Analysis:              Bedford: Suzanne Britt, “Neat People vs. Sloppy People”
                                Dave Barry “Batting Clean-Up and Striking Out”
                                David Sedaris “Remembering My Childhood on the
                                     Continent of Africa”
                                 Fatema Mernissi “Size 6: The Western Women’s
                                     Harem”
                       Visual Image: American Gothic painting by Grant wood
                                     Rural Rehabilitation Client photo by Ben Shahn
                                     American Gothic photo by Gordon Parks


Special Thematic Focus:              Brave, New, or Not?
                                     An examination of culture, media, and relationships
                                     in the Post-Modern Era

                                     Novels: Aldous Huxley, Brave New World
                                             George Orwell, 1984
                                     Norton: “Ethics of Cloning”
                                             “The Politics of Language,” Orwell
                                     Bedford: “Our Barbies Ourselves”
                                              “Drugs”
                                               “TV ADDICTION”
                                               “Porno Violence”
                                     Movie: The Truman Show

Language Strategies:          Sentence patterns: combining tone, diction, organization,
                              transitions, verb tense, and passive voice versus active
                              voice.


                                 IV. Cause and Effect

Reading:                      Bedford: The Method pp. 430-431

Analysis:                     Bedford: Naomi Klein, “A Web of Brands”
                                       Chitra Divakaruni, “Live Free and Starve”
                                       Meghan Daum, “Safe-Sex Lies”
                                       Don DeLillo, “Videotape”
                              Norton: Paul Fussell, “Thank God For the Atom Bomb”
                                       Henry David Thoreau, “The Battle of the Ants”
                                       George Orwell, “Politics and the English
                                            Language”
                                        Deborah Tannen, “Conversational Styles”

                             Visual Image: Garbage In, cartoon by Mike Thompson
                                            Media images online on the War in Iraq
                                            and Darfur, and the West Bank

Language Strategies:         Clarity and conciseness, avoiding wordiness, accuracy and
                             fairness, subordination and coordination, semi-colons,
                             analogy and rhetorical questions.




ASSIGNMENTS
   Reading/Writing Journal – Students are required to complete a two-column
     style journal entry format for every course reading, incorporating the SOAPS+
     Tone format. Students will average three to four entries per week. The RWJ is a
     running record of selections read outside of class. The purpose is two-fold:
     Firstly, it will capture the student’s thought processes, insights, questions,
     comments, reflections, connections, criticisms, and analyses as they read various
     works. Secondly, it is a record of the course content and study guide for course
     exams. On occasion, students will enter homework assignments into this journal,
     usually in the form of analytical selection questions. The journal will be graded
     three times during the semester.

      Vocabulary Development – Students will be required to learn vocabulary culled
       from course readings, novels, and Barron’s 601 Words and will be evaluated
       every two weeks on their knowledge and understanding of the vocabulary usage
       and meaning.

      Independent Reading – Students will be required to read one book of their
       choosing each month. Half of these books will be completely up to the student
       and the other half will be from a list of recommended books provided by Mr.
       Atkins and Mrs. Jones. Students are required to get these books themselves, either
       from home, from the school media center, from the local library, or from a book
       store. At the end of each month, students will have an in-class assessment of their
       reading for the month.

Writing Assignments
Students will write in two contexts, in class and at home. Classroom essays will often
follow the AP format (40-45 minutes for one essay question): more classroom timed
essays will be written during second semester. All papers will be graded using the AP
9-point rubric scale. Take home essays will allow for the unhurried development of style
and content.

Format for At-Home Writing Assignments
All papers prepared out of class must be typed. Documents need to be double-spaced:
typed in 10- or 12-point font, centered title, not underlined, and regular font style (Times
New Roman). All papers will have 1-inch margins and follow the MLA Documentation
style.

Models of student writing will be used to define and refine excellence. Students will
have opportunities to revise and rewrite their papers during the first semester. Students
will be given the opportunity to confer with the instructor outside of class (by
appointment) concerning their papers.

Written Assignments for Semester One

In-class timed writings: Students will write an impromptu AP-style essay every two
weeks.

Outside class writing assignments

Narrative Essay (Personal Reflective): Students will write a first-person memoir or a
story written in the third person, observing the experience of someone else. They must
define their purpose, the purpose of their paper as an anecdote, single narrative, or essay
that includes more than one story,

Example Essay: Students will write an essay in which they make a generalization about
the fears, joys, or contradictions that members of minority groups seem to share. To
illustrate their generalization they may draw examples from personal experience, outside
reading, or from two to three essays from course readings.

Compare and Contrast Essay: Students will write an essay in which they compare a
reality (what actually exists) with an ideal (what should exist). Possible topic example:
“The Affordable Car” or “The Perfect Society”.

Cause and Effect Essay: In an essay, students will explain either the causes or the
effects of a situation of personal concern. The topic should be narrow enough to treat it
in some detail and provide more than a mere list of causes or effects.

Rhetorical Analysis Paper and Author Study: Students will select a columnist who
writes for a national publication. They will read and annotate a minimum of five
columns. In writing, they will identify and discuss the columnist’s focus as political,
social, or cultural. They will highlight and identify the rhetorical appeals of ethos,
pathos, and logos and will identify effective rhetorical strategies to the overall purpose
and tone of the column as studied over the course of first semester.

Classroom Strategies: Students will have time in and out of class to conduct literary
research. They will meet with both peers and instructor during the course of drafting
their paper over several weeks. The secondary focus of this paper is to have students
understand and apply MLA Documentation. Readings from Everyday Use and The
Bedford Reader will provide support and models of MLA Documentation and readings
on rhetoric. Instructor will provide reading selections from various periodicals for the
examination and discussion of rhetorical analysis.

Brave New World and 1984 versus Contemporary Society: Students will write an
individual paper and create a group project which analyzes and synthesizes themes from
these two novels and their relationships to contemporary political and the cultural
landscape of today. Students will consider current events, film, art, music, technology,
and medicine in their discussion. They will answer the question: “How would Orwell
and Huxley satirize contemporary society?” Possible project ideas include creation of an
online magazine, original documentary, or a one act play. Use of MLA Documentation is
required.

Discussion
Students are required and encouraged to participate in class discussion regarding
readings, analysis of rhetoric, current events, themes, and other related topics.
Preparation of readings and diligent note taking prior to class discussion is critical to
student success. Sharing ideas enable students to sustain, develop, and better
comprehend the work studied.

Note taking
Students are required to take notes during class lecture and during class/group
discussions. The notes aid students as they study for tests, write in or out of class essays,
or prepare for the AP exam. Students are expected to have their notebook and pen or
pencil out at the beginning of each class period. They should copy down assignments
written on the board and write down any information that is given by the instructor daily.
Notes should be dated and have subject titles.


Multiple Choice Objective Tests
Students will take AP style multiple choice practice exams related to course readings and
impromptu practice tests published, AP released exams biweekly throughout the
semester. Students are strongly encouraged to take practice AP style tests at home.

Literary and Rhetorical Terms
Students will learn a comprehensive list of literary and rhetorical terms. Throughout the
course they will apply these terms to the reading selections.

Final Exam
At the end of the first semester, students will take a 3-hour exam featuring a released AP
multiple choice exam as well as a released AP argumentative essay and a synthesis essay.



Semester Two (January – June)


        Unit V: Argument and Persuasion – Stating Opinions and Proposals
Readings:          Bedford: Argumentation pp. 515-529. Purposes of Argument,
                   Inductive and Deductive Reasoning, Syllogism and Enthymeme,
                   Logical Fallacies,
                   Stephen Toulmin, The Toulmin Method, Data, Claim and
                                  Warrant – Internet Article.

Analysis:          Bedford:      Colleen Wenke, “Too Much Pressure”
                                 William F. Buckley Jr., “Why Don’t We Complain”
                                 Laura Fraser, “Why I Stopped Being a Vegetarian”
                                 Peter Singer, “A Vegetarian Philosophy”
                                 Katha Pollitt, “What’s Wrong With Gay Marriage?”
                                 Charles Colson, “Gay “Marriage”: Societal
                                   Suicide”
                                 Adnan Khan, “Close Encounters With US
                                   Immigration”
                                 Linda Chavez, “Everything Isn’t Racial Profiling”
                                 Zara Gelsey, “The F.B.I. Is Reading Over Your
                                   Shoulder”
                                 Viet Dinh, “How the USA Patriot Act Defends
                                   Democracy”
                   Norton:       Thomas Jefferson, “Declaration of Independence”
                                 Martin Luther King, Jr., “Letter From a
                                   Birmingham Jail”
                                 Jonathan Edwards, “Sinners in the Hands of an
                                   Angry God”
                                 William Jefferson Clinton, selected speeches
                   Books: Fast Food Nation, Eric Schlosser
                           The Jungle, Upton Sinclair
                   Movies: Supersize Me, documentary
                           Primary Colors
                   Visual Images: Corporate America Flag, Adbusters Media Fdn.
                                   Fast Food Marketing Products and Materials
                                   Magazine Advertisements
                                   News Media

Language Strategies:      Toulmin Method, Burke’s Pentad, deductive and inductive
                          reasoning, logical fallacies, tone, diction, syntax,
                          antithesis, anaphora, rhetorical questions, ethos, pathos,
                          logos, and thesis.


      Unit VI: Mixing the Methods (Narration, Example, Compare/Contrast,
        Cause/Effect, Argumentation/Persuasion, Description and Process)

Readings:          Bedford: Joan Didion, “Earthquakes”
                            Stephen J. Gould, “A Biological Homage to Mickey
                              Mouse”
                              Edward Said, “Clashing Civilizations?”
                              Jonathon Swift, “A Modest Proposal”
                              Virginia Woolf, “The Death of the Moth”
                      Norton: Jean-Paul Sartre, “Existentialism”
                              Robert Frost, “Education by Poetry”
                      Novel: Kate Chopin, The Awakening
                      Movie: The Age of Innocence

Language Strategies:         Review of the writing modes, themes, symbolism, and
                             motifs in literature and film, analysis of style in both
                             written and visual rhetoric.


Special Focus:        Looking at visual rhetoric and considering the Modern Novel

Readings:             Independent Reading Project: Students will select a novel from
                      a variety of genres: non-fiction, fiction: suspense, mystery,
                      romance, science fiction, fantasy, etc. They will draw parallels
                      from course readings throughout the year and write a paper,
                      complete a visual project, and deliver a presentation to the class.

                      Public Monument as Argument: Students will consider public
                      sculpture, art, and memorials as social commentary and argument.
                      Also, they will conduct an independent survey of monuments in
                      their local community, researching the purpose and enduring
                      significance as to why they were established. In addition, students
                      will analyze these visual texts that exist around them and conduct
                      discussions about their findings.

                      Film: A Social Commentary
                      Students will compare/contrast several films and consider common
                      social themes from both Modern and post-Modern Eras. They will
                      write a compare and contrast essay which analyzes theme, motif,
                      and symbolism.

                      Suggested Films:      Baraka
                                            Citizen Kane



AP Exam and ACT Test Preparation
Students will spend a large of amount of class time learning useful, time management and
test taking strategies for both the ACT and AP Examination. The focus will be on
impromptu essay writing and multiple choice practice.


Written Assignments for Semester Two
Persuasion and Argumentation Essays
1. Students will write an out of class paper arguing for or against an issue from course
readings and class discussions. See specific guidelines below.

2. They will also write an essay arguing something that they believe strongly about which
should be changed, removed, abolished, enforced, repeated, revised, reinstated, or
reconsidered. They must propose some plan for carrying out whatever suggestions they
make.



Guidelines for Writing an Argument Paper:

      Refer to Toulmin and/or other strategies of argumentation arrangement from
       course readings.
      Engage in both primary and secondary research by reading critically, annotating,
       summarizing, and synthesizing a variety of sources to provide evidence of support
       for claims made.
      Take notes, citing sources accurately using MLA format.
      Establish and claim/position and develop an argument based on research.
      Support the position with credible source, attributing credit for both direct and
       indirect citations, using MLA format.
      Conclude with minimal summary and an appeal to the audience for belief in your
       claim and/or action.
      Create a Work Cited page using MLA format.
      The writing process will include: prewriting, rough draft, revised draft, and final
       copy.


In-class Timed Writings: Students will write an impromptu AP-style essay every two
weeks.

Discussion
Students are required and encouraged to participate in class discussion regarding
readings, analysis of rhetoric, current events, themes, and other related topics.
Preparation of readings and diligent note taking prior to class discussion is critical to
student success. Sharing ideas enable students to sustain, develop, and better
comprehend the work studied.


Note taking
Students are required to take notes during class lecture and during class/group
discussions. The notes aid students as they study for tests, write in or out of class essays,
or prepare for the AP exam. Students are expected to have their notebook and pen or
pencil out at the beginning of each class period. They should copy down assignments
written on the board and write down any information that is given by the instructor daily.
Notes should be dated and have subject titles.
Multiple Choice Objective Tests
Students will take AP style multiple choice practice exams related to course readings and
impromptu practice tests published, AP released exams biweekly throughout the
semester. Students are strongly encouraged to take practice AP style tests at home.

Rhetorical Terms
Students will learn a comprehensive list of literary and rhetorical terms. Throughout the
course they will apply these terms to the reading selections.


Grading Policies and Scale

      ABSOLUTELY NO EXTRA CREDIT POINTS WILL BE ASSIGNED!
      If a pattern of excessive tardiness and absenteeism occurs, students will be given a
       warning and parents will be notified.
      This is a college-level course and students are expected to perform with
       excellence. Your attitude and participation in class group work and discussion is
       CRITICAL to your academic success.
      Timed Writings are worth 50 to 100 points depending on the amount of
       preparation required for prompt.
      Reading/Writing Journals will be graded every card marking.
      Homework must be turned in during the first five minutes of class.
      Major papers and projects may be turned in late with a grade-deduction penalty;
       ten percent reduction for each day, not to exceed 30 percent deduction.
      All assignments will receive a point value. Rounding up grades is at the teacher’s
       discretion. It is unlikely that a grade will be rounded up until the final card
       marking.

Grading Scale
      A         93-100%              C       73-76%
      A-        90-92%               C-      70-72%
      B+        87-89%               D+      67-69%
      B         83-86%               D       63-66%
      B-        80-82%               D-      60-62%
      C+        77-79%               E       59% and below

				
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