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Economics at the University of Sussex

VIEWS: 33 PAGES: 52

									Economics Programme Handbook
For Undergraduate Students
                                               Table of Contents

Introduction......................................................................................................3

l.        The Organisation of Economics at Sussex...........................................4

ll.       The Various Economics Degree Programmes......................................5

lll.      Aims and Intended Learning Outcomes of the Degree Programmes...8

lV.       Undergraduate Economics at Sussex.................................................14

V.        Teaching and Learning Economics at Sussex....................................15

Vl.       The Structure of the Economics Degree Programme.........................20

Vll.      Course Outlines in Brief......................................................................25

Vlll.     Assessment and Academic Progress.................................................34

lX.       Career Choices...................................................................................37

X.        How to Write an Economics Essay – Some Guidelines......................38

XI.       Academic Misconduct, Referencing, and Turnitin..............................42

XlI.      Assessment Criteria.…………….........................................................43

XIII.     Presentation Assessment Criteria.......................................................46

XIV.      Jargonbuster.......................................................................................48

XV.       Economics Department Staff Listings.................................................51




                                                              2
                                     Introduction
Welcome to the Department of Economics at Sussex. We hope that you will enjoy
reading Economics here and that you find the time to participate actively in the life of
the University and the Economics Department. The teachers of the Department are
the faculty and senior research students. Our major aim for BA and BSc
programmes is to provide you with the opportunities to achieve your potential and
obtain the best degree possible.

This document contains detailed information about the Economics degree at the
University of Sussex. It describes how Economics at Sussex is organised and details
the structure of the Economics Major on a year-to-year basis. It also provides short
descriptions of both compulsory and specialised options courses, and explains the
methods of teaching and assessment we use. It also offers hints about how to make
the best use of your time, outlines some of the teaching and learning resources
provided both by the Economics Department and the University, and offers some
advice on how to write an Economics essay.

In addition to this booklet, the Undergraduate Student Handbook provides you with
University-wide information. You will not need all the information contained in this
document immediately but you may need to refer to it from time to time.

Professor Andy McKay
Head of the Economics Department


                            ECONOMICS WEB PAGES
                      Explore the Economics Department website at:

                          http://www.sussex.ac.uk/economics/

           This contains useful information about the Economics programme and
                                   departmental activities.

      More detailed programme information will appear on your Sussex Direct pages,
       while course information (e.g. lecture notes and exercises) will appear on your
                                    Study Direct pages.




                                             3
I.    The Organisation of Economics at Sussex

The Department of Economics is located within the School of Business, Management
and Economics (BMEc), one of the twelve Schools of the University. The School and
Department share responsibilities for your education while a student at Sussex. A
separate School Student handbook details its role. The School Student handbook
can be found here: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/bmec/internal/forstudents/ug

The Head of the Economics Department has overall responsibility for the
organisation of teaching on all Economics courses at Sussex. However, on a day to
day basis you are more likely to communicate with the Economics Programme Co-
ordinators, who are key figures in the Department. The co-ordinators are located in
the Mantell Building, room 2B4 and have responsibility for all matters relating to the
administration of our Economics courses. They oversee the allocation of students to
Economics courses and tutors, and maintains e-mail groups for each undergraduate
year of study. Any queries you have about courses or their organisation should be
directed, in the first instance, to Gemma, Marci and Luke (ug-econ@sussex.ac.uk).

You will find that members of the Economics faculty rely heavily on communication
by e-mail as it represents a very efficient way of keeping in contact with students. It
is, therefore, imperative that you master the use of e-mail at an early stage of your
stay with us and we recommend you take a course with the Computing Service if you
are not already familiar with e-mail. Note that we only send e-mail to your university
e-mail address, not Hotmail accounts, etc. You can set up your university e-mail
account so that it forwards mail to another account, if you wish. Enquire at the
Computing Service about this (or consult
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/its/helpdesk/faq.php?faqid=500 ).

The e-mail addresses of the Economics faculty are listed at the back of this booklet
for your information and are also on the Department’s web site. It is useful to consult
the department notice-boards on a regular basis as information regarding special
lectures, careers fairs, job openings etc. are also posted there.




                                          4
II.   The various Economics degree programmes
Although you know which degree programme you are on, it may be of interest to see
what programmes your fellow students (with whom you share lectures, classes, etc.)
are following. It is also possible in certain circumstances for you to transfer from one
degree programme to another.

There are essentially three types of Economics degree programme: the single
honours, joint honours and major/minor combinations. These allow varying degrees
of choice in what you study and also vary in the proportion of Economics within the
programme.

Single honours programmes

         BA Economics
         BSc Economics

In these programmes you spend 75% of your time studying Economics. On the BA
there is a fairly free choice of how to construct the other 25% of your programme, but
your Academic Advisor will advise you if you wish. On the BSc the remaining 25% is
made up of mathematics or statistics courses that are complementary to Economics.

Joint programmes

         Economics and International Development (BA)
         Economics and International Relations (BA)
         Economics and Management Studies (BSc)
         Economics and Politics (BA)
         Finance and Business (BSc)



On these programmes you spend 50% of your time studying Economics and 50% the
non-Economics subject. The Economics courses are a subset of those taken by the
single honours students and you share lectures and classes with them.

Politics, International Relations and Management Studies are major disciplines, like
Economics. International Development is an ‘Interdisciplinary Programme’ (IDP)
which is made up of courses from a range of different disciplines but with a common
focus on the developing world. Finance and Business is a joint major programme
shared equally between the two subjects.




                                           5
Non-Economics components of your degree

Depending upon the degree programme you have chosen, you will take a range of
non-Economics courses. These might comprise courses from another major
discipline (e.g. Politics), from an IDP (e.g. International Development), or electives
(taken from anything available). You can obtain information about all of these in the
following ways.

For joint majors, information about your Politics, International Relations, or
Management Studies courses is available in the appropriate programme handbook
(you should be given one of these if you are on the joint degree programme). Further
information can be found on the departmental web sites:

         Politics: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/polces
         International Relations: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/ir/
         Business and Management: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/bam/
         International Development: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/development/


You will be informed about any choice of elective courses if and when that need
arises, usually by post prior to arrival at the university.


Mathematics with Economics degree programmes

Students registered in the School of Mathematics and Physical Sciences (MAPS) on
the Mathematics with Economics (major/minor programme – 75% Mathematics, 25%
Economics) take a range of Economics courses alongside Economics major
students. Details of the Economics courses you will take are documented in section
VI below. All administrative arrangements (e.g. seeing your Academic Advisor) are
dealt with by MAPS. You should have been given a MAPS School handbook and
this will detail your Mathematics courses.




                                          6
Administrative arrangements

Gemma Asbury and Marci Pollakova, the Programme Co-ordinators for
Economics, are responsible for the day-to-day running of the Undergraduate
Economics Programmes. They are joined by Luke Beale, the Clerical Assistant for
Economics. You can visit them in Mantell, room 2B4 for information, call them on
01273 678889, or email them at ug-econ@sussex.ac.uk.

Email: Tutors communicate frequently about timetables and other organisational
matters on the courses they are teaching by sending messages via email so it is
essential to check your email frequently (at least three times per week!). If you don’t
you may miss vital messages. You can pick up your email from off campus - see
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/its/help/faq.php?faqid=598 which tells you how to do this.
Important: messages will go to your Sussex e-mail account, not Hotmail etc. You can
set up automatic forwarding of your Sussex e-mail if you wish.

Most information you need (e.g. your timetable) will appear on your SxD page and
will be updated automatically. However, urgent information (e.g. a postponed class)
might be e-mailed to you as it is quicker. Hence, you must look at your e-mail!

You can opt in to receiving information by text message on Sussex Direct (go to the
Personal Tab then Contact Information). This will only be for urgent messages such
as a cancelled lecture; this is not a substitute for regularly checking your email.

econ1 is the group e-mail address for all first year students in Economics
econ2 is the group e-mail address for all second year students in Economics
econ3 is the group e-mail address for all third year students in Economics

If you suspect you are not on one of these lists please contact ug-
econ@sussex.ac.uk. Do not use e-mail to send abusive or offensive messages.
Students found to misuse this facility will, at the very least, have their e-mail access
terminated. Feel free to use it for legitimate purposes however; it is not just for
faculty to use. Note that some faculty will be members of the lists, if they teach that
particular year group, so be careful what you send!

Our web site is www.sussex.ac.uk/economics . A lot of useful information is available
here such as useful links, information about the department, staff, news and
activities. The general university website contains nearly all the information you may
need - from timetables, to welfare support, to past exam papers and the library
catalogue etc. (If in doubt – ask Gemma, Marci or Luke.)

Pigeonholes.     It is important to check your pigeonhole regularly. Important
messages will be sent there, not to your residential address. The undergraduate
pigeon holes are located at the (upper) entrance to the Mantell building, on the right.

Faculty pigeonholes: All members of faculty and associate tutors have pigeonholes
which are located in Mantell 2B5. You may also leave messages for your tutors
here.

Attending seminars. It is very important that you attend all the seminars for your
courses and that you stay in your assigned group. If you cannot make the seminar


                                           7
you must see either of the coordinators to change groups within the first two weeks of
term. If you do not go through the Programme Coordinators with any changes, you
will be marked absent which may affect your marks.

Events of general interest are publicised in the University Bulletin (this
includes university news and lists of seminars), which comes out fortnightly
on Fridays in term time; copies can be picked up at porters' desks, Bramber
House, etc.       It can also be found on the University’s Web site:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/press_office/bulletin/back.shtml



III. Aims of the Economics Degree Programmes

The general aim of our taught degree programmes is to provide suitably qualified
individuals from all age groups, both genders and all ethnic backgrounds, the
opportunity to study Economics at either undergraduate or postgraduate level. The
specific aims are to provide:

1.   our undergraduates with a training in the Economics discipline, develop their
     interest in the subject and encourage them to examine both economic and other
     social problems from an analytical and critical perspective;

2.   our undergraduates with a flexible curriculum that allows the approaches and
     methodologies of other disciplines to be explored through the interdisciplinary
     and multidisciplinary structures at Sussex, and instil in them an openness and
     flexibility to alternative views;

3.   our postgraduates with a rigorous and specialist training in either international
     economics, development economics, or European economic integration, and
     equip them with skills to pursue a career as a professional economist;

4.   all our students with a supportive educative environment;

5.   all our students with a set of general skills that require them to think analytically,
     express themselves clearly, work independently, meet deadlines, and
     encourage initiative;

6.   all our students with a set of subject-specific skills, appropriate to the level of
     their programme, that enable them to access, analyse, and appraise economic
     theories and related evidence, present and sustain coherent and logical
     argument, and implement and complete independent research in economics;

7.   all our students the opportunity to participate in processes of course review and
     evaluation.

Students who have successfully completed the undergraduate programmes of study
in Economics will have acquired:




                                            8
1.   the analytical skills to understand and construct cogent arguments in the basic
     principles of economic theory and apply these to a range of economic and other
     social problems;

2.   an appreciation of the strengths and limits of their discipline through following
     complementary interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary programmes of study;

3.   literacy skills enabling them to assemble and structure material, and write
     concisely and coherently with reference to scholarly sources;

4.   quantitative skills to interpret, understand, and evaluate economic data and
     appreciate both the limitations of the evaluation methods and the data used;

5.   the ability to undertake independent research involving basic economic
     theorising, data collection and empirical analysis;

6.   the skills to produce a dissertation that is structured, well written, presents
     analysis and conclusions in a logical, coherent and transparent fashion and
     makes adequate reference to scholarly sources;

7.   a range of general transferable skills including decision-making skills inherent in
     the study of the discipline, computer literacy skills, the organisation and
     management of time, and the meeting of deadlines;

8.   an awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses through feedback on their
     work;

9.    opportunities to participate in course review and evaluation.

Students who have successfully completed the BSc programme in Economics will
have acquired the attributes described in 1 to 9 above in conjunction with a deeper
knowledge of quantitative techniques and their applications.

Learning Outcomes
To view the learning outcomes online for your programme of study and the courses
within it, log on to Sussex Direct and click on ‘View My Study Pages’. Then click on
‘Syllabus’ and scroll down to the ‘Full Programme Description’ link.




Learning Outcomes for the Economics BA

On completion of the programme, the successful student will:

A: Knowledge and understanding

1. Have demonstrated knowledge of the core principles of economics (the core
   principles are based upon the subject benchmarks for economics, see:
   http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Pages/Subject-
   benchmark-statement-Economics.aspx


                                           9
2. Have demonstrated an understanding of those core principles as they relate to
   economic problems and issues.
3. Have demonstrated a more detailed knowledge and understanding of an
   appropriate number of specialised fields of economics (e.g. labour economics,
   development economics).
4. Have demonstrated a knowledge of quantitative techniques appropriate to the
   study of economics.


B: Intellectual Skills

5. Be able to use the power of abstraction to focus upon the essential features of an
   economic problem and to provide a framework for the evaluation of the effects of
   policy or other exogenous events.
6. Be able to analyse an economic problem or issue using an appropriate theoretical
   framework.

C: Practical Skills

7. Have displayed a knowledge of sources and content of economic information and
   data.
8. Have demonstrated a knowledge of how to conduct and evaluate empirical work.
9. Have demonstrated an ability to carry out empirical work using appropriate
   techniques.
10. Have demonstrated the ability to carry out self-directed study and research.

D: Transferable skills

11. Have an understanding of appropriate concepts in economics that may be of
   wider use in a decision-making context (e.g. opportunity cost).
12. Have learnt to communicate economic ideas, concepts and information using
   means of communication appropriate to the audience and the problem at issue.
13. Have learned to appreciate the importance of, and be able to construct, rigorous
   argument to help evaluate ideas.
14. Have demonstrated a facility in numeracy and other quantitative techniques,
   such as correctly interpreting graphs.
15. Have demonstrated competence in the use of a wide range of appropriate
   computer software.


Programme Learning Outcomes - Economics B.Sc.

On completion of the programme, the successful student will:


A: Knowledge and understanding

1. Have demonstrated knowledge of the core principles of economics (the core
   principles are based upon the subject benchmarks for economics, see:
   http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Pages/Subject-
   benchmark-statement-Economics.aspx).


                                         10
2. Have demonstrated an understanding of those core principles as they relate to
   economic problems and issues.
3. Have demonstrated a more detailed knowledge and understanding of an
   appropriate number of specialised fields of economics (e.g. labour economics,
   development economics).
4. Have demonstrated a detailed and in-depth knowledge of quantitative techniques
   appropriate to the study of economics and a facility with their use.

B: Intellectual Skills

5. Be able to use the power of abstraction to focus upon the essential features of an
   economic problem and to provide a framework for the evaluation of the effects of
   policy or other exogenous events.
6. Be able to analyse an economic problem or issue using an appropriate theoretical
   framework.

C: Practical Skills

7. Have displayed a knowledge of sources and content of economic information and
   data.
8. Have demonstrated a knowledge of how to conduct and evaluate empirical work.
9. Have demonstrated an ability to carry out empirical work using appropriate
   techniques.
10. Have demonstrated the ability to carry out self-directed study and research.

D: Transferable skills

11. Have an understanding of appropriate concepts in economics that may be of
   wider use in a decision-making context (e.g. opportunity cost).
12. Have learnt to communicate economic ideas, concepts and information using
   means of communication appropriate to the audience and the problem at issue.
13. Have learned to appreciate the importance of, and be able to construct, rigorous
   argument to help evaluate ideas.
14. Have demonstrated a facility in numeracy and other quantitative techniques,
   such as correctly interpreting graphs.

15. Have demonstrated competence in the use of a wide range of appropriate
    computer software.

The relationship between individual courses and learning outcomes is summarised in
the table below:




                                         11
                                                  Mic/Mac  Int.                        Adv
Single honours                         IE   CEI      1    Maths   Mic/Mac2   Stats   Mic/Mac   AET Etrics Options Diss

On completion of the programme,
the successful student will

Knowledge and understanding

1. Have demonstrated knowledge
of the core principles of economics    X    X       X                X                 X

2. Have demonstrated an
understanding of those core
principles as they relate to
economic problems and issues                X       X                X                 X                     X
3. Have demonstrated a more
detailed knowledge and
understanding of an appropriate
number of specialised fields of
economics (e.g. labour economics,
development economics)                                                                          X     X      X     X
4. Have demonstrated a
knowledge of quantitative
techniques appropriate to the study
of economics                                               X                  X                       X            X
Intellectual skills
5. Be able to use the power of
abstraction to focus upon the
essential features of an economic
problem and to provide a
framework for the evaluation of the
effects of policy or other
exogenous events.                      X    X       X                X                 X        X            X     X
6. Be able to analyse an economic
problem or issue using an
appropriate theoretical framework.                  X                X                 X        X            X     X
Practical skills

7. Have displayed a knowledge of
sources and content of economic
information and data                   X    X                                 X                 X     X            X

8. Have demonstrated a
knowledge of how to conduct and
evaluate empirical work                                                       X                 X                  X

9. Have demonstrated an ability to
carry out empirical work using
appropriate techniques                                                        X                       X            X

10. Have demonstrated the ability
to carry out self-directed study and
research                                                                      X                 X                  X




                                                            12
                                                 Mic/Mac Int.                         Adv
Transferable skills                   IE   CEI      1    Maths   Mic/Mac2   Stats   Mic/Mac   AET Etrics Options Diss

11. Have demonstrated an
understanding of appropriate
concepts in economics that may be
of wider use in a decision-making
context (e.g. opportunity cost)    X       X       X                X                 X
12. Have learnt to communicate
economic ideas, concepts and
information using means of
communication appropriate to the
audience and the problem at issue. X       X       X                X                 X              X      X     X

13. Have learned to appreciate the
importance of, and be able to
construct, rigorous argument to
help evaluate ideas.                               X                X                 X        X     X      X     X
14. Have demonstrated a facility in
numeracy and other quantitative
techniques, such as correctly
interpreting graphs.                               X      X                  X                 X
15. Have demonstrated
competence in the use of a wide
range of computer software.                                                  X                       X            X




                                                           13
IV.   Undergraduate Economics at Sussex

It is important to stress the cumulative nature of learning Economics. Before you can
become an economist, a lot of effort has to be put into understanding the vocabulary
of the discipline and the way economists think about issues. It can prove difficult to
master a later course if you have not understood the basics. Also, more advanced
courses can shed further light on and help you better understand material that was
covered earlier in the programme.

Economics is closer to a science than other social disciplines. Economists use a
scientific approach to uncover laws or principles that govern the behaviour of
individuals engaged in economic activity. Economists use the same logical ‘step-by-
step’ procedures adopted by the physical sciences. This starts by identifying a
particular problem through careful and systematic observation of the real world,
proceeds to the development of an economic theory (or ‘model’), and then to the
testing of this theory. It is, however, more difficult to conduct ‘experiments’ in
Economics than it is in the physical sciences, so testing a theory can be harder.

All sciences share two important features – one is observation and measurement,
and the other is the creation of theories. The learning of Economics requires,
therefore, the development of both empirical and analytical skills, and students
encounter courses designed to provide these skills in the first two years of their
study. It is important in an Economics degree to work consistently throughout the
programme. Economics is a challenging but rewarding discipline.

The teaching of Economics at Sussex emphasises the analytical methods of the
discipline, encouraging students both to understand the basic principles of economic
theory, and to apply them to a wide range of economic and other social problems. It
discourages learning by rote and the reproduction of abstract theories without a
proper understanding of their limits and applications.

Apart from subject-specific knowledge, Economics also provides a good medium for
acquiring a set of general educational skills. Economists learn to assess the logical
consistency of a theory or an argument, how to use simple formulations of ‘models’ to
present the essential features of a complex problem, and distinguish between
fundamental and simplifying assumptions underlying theories. Our students learn
how to write short answers to complex questions and how to identify the core of an
argument. The discipline also helps one to acquire basic numeracy, statistical and
econometric skills that are usable in a wide range of careers.

The Economics degree at Sussex offers students an excellent general education as
well as a specific training in the Economics discipline. We do not assume any prior
knowledge of the subject. We do assume, however, that you have chosen to study
Economics because you have an interest in it, which you wish to develop and work at
during your time at Sussex.




                                         14
V.     Teaching and Learning Economics at Sussex
1.     Self-Motivated Learning

At Sussex, students encounter many different modes of teaching. These include
lectures, seminars, classes, individual supervision and computing classes. However,
we place an emphasis on self-motivated learning. We assume that students have
chosen to study Economics at university because of a genuine intellectual interest in
the subject and a willingness to spend a significant amount of their time studying the
subject. We believe that effective learning requires personal effort and a willingness
to work. It is not just a passport to a well paid job, though that is one of the benefits
of a good degree!

The number of contact hours a student experiences at Sussex varies across the
years of study. In the first year, students should receive about eight contact hours per
academic week. This declines to about six hours in the third year and reflects a
movement from ‘close direction’ in year one to ‘self-direction’ in year three. It is
always expected that students read, think, discuss and write about the topics covered
in a lecture or seminar outside contact time. As a rough ‘rule of thumb’ to get
adequate benefit from Economics courses, students need to spend about four to five
hours studying per contact hour received in an academic week. Students derive more
from seminars when they have a fair knowledge of the subject matter under
discussion and are, as a consequence, able to contribute more effectively to the
discussion. The role of the tutor is not only to instruct but also to help the student
learn. This involves the student assuming responsibility for their learning. Most tutors
are more than willing to help with any problems if they feel a student has made some
effort to come to grips with the problem.



2.     Methods of Teaching

The Economics Department at Sussex uses a number of different methods of
teaching. Courses in first and second year are designed around core lecture series
complemented by a set of seminars. Our quantitative courses in years one and two
also use lectures and seminars but are sometimes augmented by computing classes.
The specialist options in third year are generally seminar-based but the majority of
options are accompanied by a dedicated lecture series. In the final year there is
individual supervision on the Applied Economics Dissertation course and there are a
minimum of four one-to-one meetings with a member of faculty.

(i)    Lectures

“Lectures were once useful; but now, when all can read and books are so numerous,
lectures are unnecessary.”
                                                                  Samuel Johnson.

Well, not quite. Lectures still perform an important role in the teaching and learning
of Economics. They enable a lecturer to bring together a wide range of material and
present it in an organised, focused and critical fashion. We expect our students to
attend lectures on a regular basis. Although lectures and classes are co-ordinated for
a particular course, material covered in a lecture is not necessarily duplicated in a


                                           15
class. Lectures provide students with an opportunity to maintain proper contact with
the course they are following. For the majority of courses in first and second year,
lecturers use SyD sites to provide materials such as lecture notes and exercise
sheets, answers, etc.

(ii)   Seminars

Seminars complement lectures and are designed to ensure the effective learning of
the basic tools of the discipline (i.e. the concepts, theories and techniques of
Economics and how to apply them). Students are required to prepare work in
advance of seminars and most of the emphasis is on ‘problem-solving’, designed to
familiarise students with how various economic principles and theories work. The
average seminar size is about eighteen students and meetings occur for most
courses on a weekly basis in term time.

Seminars are usually led by Associate Tutors, who are Economics DPhil students,
under the direction of the course lecturer. While Associate Tutors may be less
experienced than faculty they are (often much) closer to your own age group and can
still remember what it was like to encounter the topics for the first time! Seminars are
interactive events – the AT will try to involve you as much as possible in solving
problems or discussing issues. This may be (for example) by asking you to come to
the board to draw a diagram or asking you to summarise a particular piece of theory.

Students sometimes complain that the tutor did not cover all the questions/topics in
the seminar. This is pretty much inevitable and not a fault of the tutor. Classes
proceed at different speeds, depending on many things (but mainly student
contributions) and it is difficult to predict how much can be covered. We therefore err
on the side of giving you too much rather than too little. Answers to exercises are
routinely posted on-line (see later) so you will have the answers to any uncompleted
exercises.

Furthermore, if found questions 1-3 very easy but got stuck on question 4, ask the
tutor to begin the class with question 4. As long as everyone is happy to do that, the
tutor can oblige. Remember, classes are a co-operative venture.

Often, one or two students are chosen to make short presentations to open up a
general discussion. All students in the group, and not only the presenters, will be
expected to have done the reading, so that they can contribute to the discussion. The
main object of a seminar is to promote participatory learning, where students are
expected to learn something about an issue or a problem by interacting with one
another and with the tutor, and in the process learn to present, criticise or defend
particular or alternative points of view. Playing an active part in seminars provides an
opportunity for your personal development and represents a valuable transferable
skill when you find a job after graduation.

In several of the courses we stream students by some measure of ability. We have
found that having a very wide ability range within a seminar can sometimes be
discouraging for weaker students and better students may be held back. It makes it
easier to teach the whole group and this method can be especially useful on more
quantitative courses, when students can differ widely in their previous experience of
the material. Notwithstanding the streaming, all students are expected to cover the
same material and are assessed in the same way.


                                          16
(iii) Computing Classes

These are designed to provide you with appropriate IT and other (e.g. statistical)
skills for your degree programme. These classes take place in a computer lab in
groups of around 30 students, plus an Associate Tutor. You usually work though a
given exercise and can call for help when you need it.

Note that the Computing Service offers a range of courses on software packages and
other aspects of IT. You can also download some useful software, or buy it at cheap
prices (See http://www.sussex.ac.uk/its/ and http://www.sussex.ac.uk/its/training/.)


3.    Course Handbooks and Study Direct

All courses are accompanied by a course handbook, normally broken down into
weekly sections, listing and prioritising what you have to read for the week in
question. These are available on the SyD site for the appropriate course. You can
download and print a copy if you wish, or just refer to it on-line. (We are increasingly
reliant on on-line provision of information and do not routinely supply paper copies.
This is more environmentally friendly (OK, it’s cheaper too…) and is how people
increasingly access information. All reading lists are Word documents, so you can
download them to a USB stick, your phone, iPod, etc.)

Class worksheets are also available on SyD and it is worth your while printing a copy
of these (usually it’s just one page). You can then refer to it in class when going
through the exercises with the Associate Tutor. Answers to exercises are posted to
SyD following the classes for that week. Hence you have a record of what you
should have covered.

4.    Course Requirements

Attendance at seminars and classes is compulsory. Tutors take a register of those
who attend and file reports at the end of each term on your performance in class,
including the attendance record. You should meet with your Academic Advisor at the
end of each term to discuss the content of your tutorial reports (see sub-section V.5
below for information on the Academic Advisor system at Sussex). You may be
absent from a seminar/class either through ill-health or a personal problem. An
absence under such circumstances is clearly understandable but you should make
an effort to provide either your course tutor or Academic Advisor with an explanation
as soon as you can.

For all your Economics courses, you will have to submit written work of one kind or
another and these constitute what are called the course requirements. They take
several forms, including simple calculations, solving problems, an essay or a short
seminar presentation. Students can expect all work handed in on time to be returned
within fifteen working days of submission with access to marks and comments.
Failure to submit work requested for a specific course will mean that you have not
satisfied one of the requirements for the course and this may have serious
implications for your academic progression. There may be a legitimate reason as to
why work was not submitted on time and you need to bring this to the attention of
one of the Student Life Advisors.



                                          17
It is important to note that deadlines for submission of work are not negotiable and
must be observed. Tutors are not allowed (by university rules) to offer extensions to
submission deadlines. If work is submitted up to 24 hours late, the mark will be
reduced by five percentage points (e.g. 50% becomes 45%). If submitted between
24 hours and 7 days late, the mark will be reduced by 10%. Further information
regarding submission deadlines and penalties can be found here
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/academicoffice/1-3-2-4.html#Submission.         For     other
coursework (i.e. that does not count towards course assessments) tutors are not
obliged to mark or comment on it if submitted late without good reason. The
Economics Department’s policy is to return late work without comment or grade.
Again, there may be mitigating factors explaining a late submission and, if so, your
Student Life Advisor should be informed.


                 Assessed Coursework in First Year
     Please check your course documentation and SxD for the precise date
     and time of any relevant coursework assessment events. It is down to you
     to know what these are and when they actually occur. You will be
     seriously disadvantaged if you miss an assessment or fail to submit
     coursework on time without good reason.



5.    Academic Advisors

All students are allocated an Academic Advisor, who will normally continue in that
capacity for the duration of your time at the University. Your Academic Advisor will be
a member of the Economics faculty who is responsible for monitoring your academic
progress from term to term. You will meet your Academic Advisor several times in
the first term of your first year and you should use this opportunity to get feedback on
your work and on your approach to study. After that, your Academic Advisor will
invite you to review your progress, discuss the year ahead, option choices, career
plans etc. You can also see your Academic Advisor during their usual Office Hour, or
email them.

We recognise that academic progress may be adversely affected by personal
problems of various kinds. If this is the case, you should not be afraid to draw these
to the attention of your Academic Advisor. All such problems will be treated with the
strictest confidence and your Academic Advisor may be able to offer you general
advice about University facilities that may be helpful. However, you should remember
that the Student Life Advisors are more likely to be expert on some of these matters
(especially non-academic ones, such as medical issues) and may be a more
appropriate initial contact point (see Student Support and Advice information on page
20).

During your second year, your Academic Advisor can offer you guidance as regards
option choices for your third/fourth year. In your final year with us, you may be either
seeking employment or considering graduate study. An advantage of having a single
Academic Advisor is that there is at least one member of faculty who will be familiar
with your academic profile. For this reason, the Academic Advisor is often a very


                                          18
suitable person to ask to act as an academic referee. This of course does not
prevent you asking other course tutors who you may have had during your time at
Sussex but the Academic Advisor can provide a more rounded picture. It is worth
stating that any reference you get will reflect your effort and achievement on the
degree programme. Regardless of whom you intend to nominate as a referee, it is
important that you notify them in person that you are using them for this purpose.


6.    Student Involvement and Feedback

We strongly believe that it is important for students to have the opportunity to
comment upon and evaluate their courses of study, to assess the ways the teaching
is of benefit to them and how the methods of delivery and content of their courses
and programmes can be further improved. We regard this as an important part of the
teaching and learning process. We learn from teaching and part of the learning
process for us is to establish the students’ perspective on how courses have gone.
There are three ways in which students can make their opinions and views known to
Economics faculty.

For more information on student involvement and feedback, including about Course
Evaluation Questionnaires and Student Representatives, please see the School
Student Handbook http://www.sussex.ac.uk/bmec/internal/forstudents/ug (page 16).


7.    Faculty and Non-Faculty Office Hours

The best time to make contact with your course tutor is during the assigned office
hour. Each member of the Economics faculty allocates an hour per week during
academic term time for student use. The times are posted on the faculty member’s
office door but you should bear in mind that times may vary from term to term
depending on faculty teaching obligations. Times will also be published on SyD.

The office hours are times when you are guaranteed that the faculty member is
available. If your Economics tutor is a non-faculty member (for example, a
postgraduate research student) an office hour facility is also available for one hour
per week in term time to deal with any problems you may have. The times and
location of non-faculty office hours are posted on the Economics notice board, as are
their e-mail addresses. If you have any queries about office hour availability,
however, please contact our co-ordinators in Mantell 2B4. It is usually more
convenient to make an appointment with your tutor (either faculty or non-faculty)
through e-mail. Please refer to the e-mail addresses of faculty at the back of this
booklet.




                                         19
VI. The Structure of the Economics Degree Programme

The Economics degree programme can be broadly broken down into three types of
course: the core courses (such as the various flavours of Micro- and
Macroeconomics); quantitative and skills courses (such as Statistics and
Econometrics); and applied courses (such as Contemporary Economic Issues). How
much of each strand you do depends upon which programme you are on: single or
joint honours, or major-minor combination. Inevitably, if you are spending half your
time doing (e.g.) Politics you have to sacrifice some of the Economics courses.

All students take the core courses and therefore obtain a good grounding in the
fundamental principles and techniques of analysis, which all economists need to
understand. All students also get exposure to quantitative skills courses, though this
is somewhat limited for ‘joints’ students, who take Statistics and the Statistic Project
in the final year1. All other students take Statistics for Economists in year two and
Econometrics in the final year. Students on the BSc get the greatest exposure to
quantitative courses and should finish the degree programme with good technical
abilities. All students take Introduction to Economics in their first year, while BA and
BSc Economics students will also take Contemporary Economic Issues.

As you progress through the degree programme you are less directed and have
more scope to follow your own interests. In the final year you choose which options
courses to take and you may have to conduct your own piece of original research in
applied economics. The options allow you to make use of the economic principles
learned in the first two years and apply them to topics of interest. The dissertation
makes use of the technical skills you have learned, as well as encouraging you to
make and follow your own deadlines.

Table 1 provides a summary of the structure of the Economics degree programmes.
Note that these are only the Economics courses within each programme and you will,
depending upon programme, also take a variety of non-major courses.

The university is changing to a semester system from 2012-13, so the structure of
your second and final years will be very slightly different from that shown in Table 1,
which reflects the current arrangements. The courses you take will be the same,
what will differ slightly is the weight given to each and the fact that some material
might be moved from one course to another (e.g. from Advanced Microeconomics to
Microeconomics 2)




1
    Though note that joint majors may acquire different skills from the other half of the degree programme.


                                                         20
Table 1a: Structure of the single honours BA Programme in Economics

                      Autumn Term                   Spring/Summer Term

                 Introduction to Economics       Microeconomics I (L1053)
                            (L1028)
First Year        Contemporary Economic          Macroeconomics I (L1056)
                        Issues (L1051)
                Introduction to Mathematics    The World Economy since 1945
                   for Economists (L1054)                 (L1055)

                  plus two more elective courses (one Autumn, one Spring)

                      Autumn Term                   Spring/Summer Term

                Microeconomics 2 (L1031)        Advanced Microeconomics
                                                        (L1061)
 Second         Macroeconomics 2 (L1032)        Advanced Macroeconomics
  Year                                                  (L1059)
                 Statistics for Economists         Applied Economic Topics
                          (L1022)                          (L1063)

                     plus two elective courses (one Autumn, one Spring)

                      Autumn Term                   Spring/Summer Term

                  Econometrics (L1068)         Applied Economics Dissertation
                                                 or two Economics Options
                                                          (L1002)
Third Year         Economics Option                  Economics Option
                  Understanding Global               Economics Option
                    Markets (L1077)

Current Third Year Economic Options include:

      Autumn Term:
      Economics for European Integration (L1066)
      Labour Economics (L1039)
      Monetary Theory and Policy (L1040)

      Spring/Summer Term:
      Applied Economics Dissertation (L1002) Counts as two options
      Applied Econometrics (L1062) Pre-requisite: Students must have completed
      L1068 Econometrics
      Climate Change Economics (L1078)
      Behavioural Economics (L1083)
      Economics of Development (L1065)
      International Finance & Macroeconomics (L1067)
      International Trade (L1070)



                                        21
Table 1b: Structure of the BSc Programme in Economics (virtually 100%
Economics)

                      Autumn Term                    Spring/Summer Term

                 Introduction to Economics          Microeconomics I
                           (L1028)                       (L1053)
                  Contemporary Economic          Macroeconomics I (L1056)
                       Issues (L1051)
First Year    Introduction to Mathematics for   Principles of Finance (L1081)
                     Economists (L1054)
                       Elective course           The World Economy since
                                                      1945 (L1055)

                      Autumn Term                    Spring/Summer Term

                Microeconomics 2 (L1031)         Advanced Microeconomics
                                                         (L1061)
 Second        Macroeconomics 2 (L1032)          Advanced Macroeconomics
  Year                                                   (L1059)
                 Statistics for Economists        Applied Economic Topics
                          (L1022)                          (L1063)
                 Applied Mathematics for          Applied Statistics (L1064)
                   Economists (L1058)

                      Autumn Term                    Spring/Summer Term

Third Year        Econometrics (L1068)               Applied Economics
                                                 Dissertation (L1002) or two
                                                     Economics Options
                    Economics Option                 Economics Option
                Further Statistics (L1079)      Applied Econometrics (L1062)


    Third Year Economic Options are as for the BA.




                                       22
Table 1c: Structure of the Joint BA Programme in Economics (50% Economics)

                      Autumn Term                    Spring/Summer Term

                 Introduction to Economics         Microeconomics I (L1053)
                           (L1028)
First Year      Introduction to Mathematics        Macroeconomics I (L1056)
                   for Economists (L1054)

                                 plus four non-major courses

                      Autumn Term                    Spring/Summer Term

  Second        Microeconomics 2 (L1031)          Advanced Microeconomics
   Year                                                   (L1061)
                    Macroeconomics 2              Advanced Macroeconomics
                        (L1032)                           (L1059)

                                 plus four non-major courses

                      Autumn Term                    Spring/Summer Term

                 Statistics Project (L1069)      Applied Economics Dissertation
                                                   (L1002) or two Economics
                                                            Options
Third Year       Statistics for Economists
                          (L1022)

                                 plus four non-major courses



Third Year Economic Options are as for the BA.




                                         23
Table 1d: Structure of the BSc Finance and Business in Economics (50%
Economics)

                       Autumn Term                   Spring/Summer Term

                  Introduction to Economics       Principles of Finance (L1081)
                             (L1028)
First Year      Introduction to Mathematics*    The World Economy Since 1945
                             (L1054)                        (L1055)
                     Intro to Business Law          Tools for Business and
                             (N1072)                 Management (N1087)
                     Intro to Business and        Principles of Organisational
                    Management (N1065)               Development (N1062)


                       Autumn Term                   Spring/Summer Term

                Statistics for Economics and       Macroeconomics 1 (L1056)
  Second               Finance (L1022)
                Money and Banking (L1080)         Finance for Development
   Year
                                                          (L1082)
                         Financial and Managerial Accounting (N1066)
                Information Systems (N1039)       Operations Management
                                                          (N1078)


                       Autumn Term                   Spring/Summer Term

                   Understanding Global           Applied Statistics for Finance
                     Markets (L1077)                and Economics (L1064)
Third Year       Corporate Finance (L1085)         International Finance and
                                                   Macroeconomics (L1067)
                      Strategy (N1021)             Specialist Business course
                                                              option
                 Specialist Business course        Specialist Business course
                            option                            option


* “Introduction to Mathematics (for Economics and Finance)” will be offered at two
levels: for students with A-level Mathematics (or equivalent) and for students with
less experience in Mathematics.


Students taking Mathematics with Economics take the following courses:
       Year 1: Introduction to Economics (Autumn); Microeconomics I
          (Spring/Summer)
       Year 2: Microeconomics II (Autumn); Macroeconomic I (Spring/Summer)
       Year 3: Macroeconomics II (autumn); either Advanced Micro or Advanced
          Macro (Spring/Summer).




                                          24
VII.   Course Outlines in Brief
This section provides a brief outline of the content for all the courses taught by the
Economics Department and, where relevant, their website addresses. Please
consult the individual course documentation to find out more about the details of
each course. Note that course documentation relating to courses in subsequent
terms in the academic year may be incomplete if it is being updated.

   1. First Year

Contemporary Economic Issues (L1051)

Teaching Methods:                         Assessment Methods:
Lectures                                  Coursework

This course is delivered via a series of weekly lectures given by faculty about areas
of research of particular interest to them and, hopefully, you too. The first six lectures
cover the financing of higher education, privatisation, road pricing, immigration,
unemployment and the transition from communism to capitalism. The content of the
final four lectures is up to you – you will have the opportunity to vote on what you
would like to hear! The organisation of this course is a little unusual, for good
reason. There are no lecture notes supplied, you have to take your own notes.
There are no classes, but you will meet your Academic Advisor during the term to
discuss the two essays you write, which form the assessment units for this course.
In this way, your Academic Advisor will get to know you better and can help you
address any academic or other problems you may be having.


Introduction to Economics (L1028)

Teaching Methods:                         Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Workshops/Classes                Course Report

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of economics.
The first half of the course deals with microeconomic issues including the behaviour
of individuals and firms, their interaction in markets and the role of government. The
second half of the course is devoted to macroeconomics and examines the
determinants of aggregate economic variables, such as national income, inflation,
and the balance of payments, and the relationships between them.


Introduction to Mathematics for Economists (L1054)

Teaching Methods:                         Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Classes                          Coursework

This course covers the basic elements of mathematics necessary to the study of
Economics. Some of the material you may already have covered in school but, in
our experience, some revision is often useful! The later part of the course covers
material that will probably be new to you. Topics covered include: graphing and
solving equations; logarithms and indices; discounting and investment appraisal;
elementary calculus.



                                           25
Macroeconomics I (L1056)

Teaching Methods:                      Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Classes                       Coursework + Unseen Exam

This course examines the determinants of output, employment and the price level;
equilibrium in commodity, factor and money markets; fluctuations in output and
employment; the inflation problem; the balance of payments; the role of economic
policy.


Microeconomics I (L1053)

Teaching Methods:                      Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Classes                       Coursework + Unseen Exam

This course (along with Macro 1) commences the formal teaching of economics
principles. It develops the theories of consumer and producer behaviour, examining
the topics of consumer surplus, labour supply, production and costs of the firm,
alternative market structures, factor markets and explores the application of these
concepts to public policy.


Principles of Finance (L1081)

Teaching Methods:                       Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars                       Unseen Exam

This course introduces you to basic elements of finance, including principles based
on economic or finance theory, and mathematical or statistical techniques used to
implement or analyse such principles. A sound knowledge of these principles will be
important for many subsequent courses on your degree programme.



World Economy Since 1945, The (L1055)

Teaching Methods:                       Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars                       Coursework + Unseen Exam

The course will cover the history of the world economy since 1945 and will draw
mainly on work by historically oriented economists (e.g. Kindleberger, Eichengreen,
etc) but where appropriate will discuss contrasting interpretations offered by other
disciplines.




                                        26
2.    Second Year

Advanced Macroeconomics (L1059)

Teaching Methods:                       Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Classes                        Coursework + Unseen Exam

This Spring/Summer course has three main sections: the macroeconomics of the
open economy; acute macroeconomic problems; and the theory and practice of
macroeconomic policy.


Advanced Microeconomics (L1061)

Teaching Methods:                       Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars                       Unseen Exam

The study of microeconomics continues into the spring and summer terms. Topics
covered include: factor markets; general equilibrium; public policy and economic
welfare; externalities; asymmetric information and incentives. Most of these issues
arise when we relax the simplifying assumptions made in the earlier parts of the
micro courses. For example, it was assumed that everyone had perfect knowledge
about the products available. What happens when (as is more likely) sellers have
more information about the quality of a product than the buyer? Is there still a
satisfactory market equilibrium or is some kind of intervention required?


Applied Economics Topics (L1063)

Teaching Methods:                       Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Classes                        Coursework + Unseen Exam

This course introduces students to range of applied topics which illustrate the use of
economics principles. The topics covered may vary from year to year and are based
upon faculty interests and research. A typical topic might be the use of taxes or
quotas to limit pollution, as in the U.S. acid rain programme, limiting emissions of
SO2. The course will be useful preparation for the final year dissertation, when the
student has to carry out his or her own piece of research.


Applied Mathematics for Economists (L1058)

Teaching Methods:                       Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Classes                        Unseen Exam

This course is taken by BSc students only. It complements the IMFE course by
covering some more applied topics and also by extending the syllabus. Topics
covered include: functions; vectors and matrices; series and limits; differential and
integral calculus.




                                         27
Applied Statistics for Finance and Economics (L1064: BSc students only)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Classes                         Unseen Exam + Project

This course focuses on the application of statistical techniques and incorporates
project work. The topics covered include an in-depth exploration of non-parametric
testing, ANOVA, the ordinary least squares and the maximum likelihood principles,
sample survey methods, and an introduction to time series issues relating to de-
trending and de-seasonalising data.


Finance for Development (L1082):

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars                        Unseen Exam

This course discusses and analyses the major challenges and current initiatives in
the creation of finance industries appropriate to and effective in developing countries.
The course focuses on the private financial sector and issues relating to access to
finance. After a general overview, the course begins by examining the forms of
finance available for larger firms in developing countries, mainly the banking sector
and the stock market. Subsequently, it covers the evidence on the effects of financial
development on economic growth and the role of institutional factors, such as
corporate governance, in financial development. It then moves on to examine the
access to finance for smaller firms and households and the implications of a lack of
access. Finally, the course touches upon private international sources of finance,
namely private capital flows, FDI and remittances to developing countries.


Macroeconomics II (L1032)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Classes                         Unseen Exam

This autumn term course is in two parts. The first part is about the long run growth of
national economies. Once we have the basic analysis in place, we can answer the
really important question of why living standards are so variable around the world.
The second part of the course is an investigation of how expectations of the future
play a central role in economic decision-taking. Saving and investment decisions are
clear examples. We also introduce the analysis of stock, bond and money markets.


Microeconomics II (L1031)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Classes                         Unseen Exam

This course develops the microeconomics concepts introduced in the first year and
begins to apply them to a variety of issues. The course begins by examining models
of oligopoly, including the use of game theory as an analytical tool. The other topics
covered this term are inter-temporal choice (examining the implications of the past


                                          28
and future for behaviour today) and uncertainty (where individuals or firms have to
make decisions in a risky environment).


Money and Banking (L1080):

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars                        Unseen Exam

This course introduces students to the institutions and practice of money and banking
in a modern economy. It includes topics such as financial intermediation, credit
rationing, securitization, competition and regulation, risk management.


Statistics for Economics & Finance (L1022)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars/Classes                Coursework + Unseen Exam

This course provides an introduction to the statistical techniques used in economics,
and includes computer-based applications. Topics covered include summarising and
plotting data, basic probability theory, hypothesis testing, correlation analysis, and
bivariate and multiple regression analysis. You are introduced in greater detail to the
EXCEL spreadsheet package, which you will use for your assessed coursework.


3.    Third Year

Applied Econometrics (L1062)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lecture/Seminar                          Coursework + Unseen Exam

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to a variety of applied
econometric techniques enabling the confident and independent ‘hands-on’ use of
these techniques. An important emphasis of the course is to provide students with
‘hands-on’ experience of econometric analysis through using a variety of different
economic data sets. A successful student will be able to evaluate OLS regression
models and interpret precisely their estimates; understand the IV estimator and how
to determine relevant and valid instruments for this procedure; understand the nature
and limitations of ‘index number’ decompositions as used in the discrimination
literature; appreciate the importance of the time series properties of economic data
and how to model these series econometrically; be able to test for unit roots and
undertake dynamic modelling; understand the CAPM and the concept of GARCH
modelling. In each case, students will understand the use of these techniques
through selected econometric applications. These skills will be developed through
exposure to empirical applications in weekly classes in the spring term.




                                          29
Applied Economics Dissertation (L1002)

All Economics students (apart from joints) undertake a piece of independent research
on an assigned applied economics topic during their third/fourth year. This draws on
the skills acquired in the Statistics and Econometrics courses, in conjunction with the
knowledge gained in economic principles in your first and second years. You will be
expected to use economic theory and appropriate empirical techniques to develop an
informative piece of research on a topic you choose (from a list of topics). The
dissertation topic may be informed by the option courses that you are following but
this need not necessarily be the case. The dissertation is supervised by a member of
faculty.


Corporate Finance (L1085: Finance & Business in Economics BSc only)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars                        Unseen Exam

The aim of the course is to provide an introduction to issues in corporate finance and
for students to become competent at addressing quantitative questions relating to the
subject. Topics include: corporate balance sheets, portfolio analysis, risk and return,
capital structure, dividend policy, options, international finance issues.


Econometrics (L1068)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars/Workshops              Coursework + Unseen Exam

This is a compulsory course (except for joint majors, who take Statistics and the
Statistics Project, see below), extending material covered at the end of the Statistics
for Economists course in year two. The focus is on regression analysis based on the
ordinary least squares (OLS) method. Topics covered include model specification
and testing, analysing regression disturbance problems, the analysis of time series
data.


Further Statistics (L1079: BSc students only)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Classes                         Unseen Exam

This is a theoretical course that complements and extends the Statistics for
Economists course. It deals with sampling distributions, inference, joint distributions,
maximum likelihood, Bayesian methods, and non-parametric methods.


Statistics for Economists (L1022: joint majors only)

This is the same as the Statistics for Economists course taught in the second year to
single honours students. See above for details (page 34).



                                          30
Statistics Project (L1069: joint majors only)

This course complements the Statistics course taken concurrently. Students are
required to produce a project making use of the statistical techniques they have
learned. This will involve gathering and organising data, then using appropriate
techniques to summarise and analyse the information.


Understanding Global Markets (L1077)

Teaching Methods:                         Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars                         Unseen Exam

The course is comprised of three components. The first of these analyses the
conceptual and historical background to understanding global markets, as well as
examining the underlying causes, such as those in technology, which have
transformed economic relations between regions and nation states. The second part
focuses in more detail on the key features and characteristics of the globalised world
economy. It does so by examining the key changes and causal factors driving
changes in trade flows, capital flows, as well as the movement of people - migration.
The third part of the course will analyse in more detail the consequences and impact
- for people, countries, sectors, interest groups etc - of these changes in global
markets.


Options
All Economics students take options courses in the final year, the number depending
upon which programme you are on (see above). The options represent specialist
areas of study that reflect the research interests of the tutors delivering them. You
choose the options you wish to take towards the end of the second year of study.
We impose a minimum number of ten students for each option, so the less popular
ones do not run. This slight restriction on choice ensures that we can put sufficient
resources into each of the options we do run.

A brief description of the course content for each of the options is available below but
more comprehensive information can be obtained by consulting the appropriate SyD
page.

There may be changes to the content of an option’s syllabus from year to year but
the course handbook available generally provides a good indication of what you can
expect the following year. Prospective tutors are available for consultation and you
may wish to use their office hour (see section V.6 above) or make a special
appointment to see them. This may be a better way to find out more about an option
if it has not run in the previous year.


Applied Econometrics Dissertation (L1002)

This is the same as the Applied Econometrics Dissertation for single honours
students (see above). This counts as two options.




                                           31
Economics of Development (L1065)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars                        Unseen Exam

This course deals with the concept of ‘development’ and the recent development
experience of poor countries; the role of markets; problems of resource mobilisation
and the role of fiscal and monetary policy; poverty, employment and human capital;
agriculture (i) theories of peasant behaviour and labour allocation in rural economies;
(ii) impact of technological change; industrialisation and trade policy; structural
adjustment.


Economics of European Integration (L1066)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars                        Unseen Exam

This course examines issues arising from the process of integration in Europe and
the state of economic interdependence among related economies.


International Trade (L1070)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars                        Unseen Exam

This course develops the theory of international trade and explores contemporary
developments in the international trading systems; in particular, the underlying
causes and welfare effects of trade on countries and their implications for trade policy
are examined.


International Finance and Macroeconomics (L1067)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars                        Unseen Exam

This course examines alternative theories of international        and open-economy
macroeconomics; the determination of exchange rates and the       impact of alternative
exchange rate regimes; international policy co-ordination,         regional monetary
integration, macroeconomics linkages between developing and       developed countries
are also examined.


Labour Economics (L1039)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars                        Unseen Exam

The course examines the functioning of labour markets from a microeconomic
perspective. The topics covered include the demand for labour and the role of job


                                          32
protection legislation, labour supply with a particular focus on gender; the role of
human capital, the role of labour market institutions, the economics of discrimination,
the distribution of earnings, and labour mobility.


Monetary Theory and Policy (L1040)

Teaching Methods:                        Assessment Methods:
Seminars                                 Unseen Exam

This course examines the integration of monetary theory with value theory; the
demand for money and its determinants; the supply of money and its control;
monetary policy; banks and other financial intermediaries and their regulation;
international monetary co-operation.


Climate Change Economics (L1078)

Teaching Methods:                         Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars/Workshops               Unseen Exam

This course will deal with the Economics of anthropogenic climate change, which
apart from being the international policy issue of the present time will be a vehicle for
the illustration of a very wide range of ideas and techniques from economic analysis.



Behavioural Economics (L1083)

Teaching Methods:                         Assessment Methods:
Lectures/Seminars                         Unseen Exam

This course will examine the psychological underpinnings of economic behaviour and
examine recent theories and empirical results in behavioural economics. The starting
point in core economics courses the dominant model of choice in economics, in
which agents maximize expected utility given the information they possess and the
choice set they have. A growing body of empirical evidence has sought to challenge
the assumption of individuals as rational economic agents. This course will analyse
this recent empirical evidence across a range of fields of economics and will examine
the new theories of economic behaviour.



Applied Econometrics (L1062) Pre-requisite: Students must have completed L1068
Econometrics

This is the same as the Applied Econometrics course taught in the third year to single
honours BSc students (see above).




                                           33
VIII. Assessment and Academic Progress
Assessment in Economics

The Economics courses at Sussex use a number of different modes of assessment
including unseen examinations, coursework, project work and dissertation. In order
to pass a particular course you need a mark of at least 40%. This mark may be
derived from a single exam or, more likely, as the weighted average of several units
of assessment (exam, coursework, etc.). Coursework is submitted during the period
of the course and submission dates are notified to you in advance. Formal
submission dates are noted on your Sussex Direct pages. When submitting formally
assessed coursework, Students must submit 2 copies. Note that tutors are not
allowed to provide extensions to submission deadlines. Exams take place in the
second half of the summer term; first year exams are usually in weeks nine or ten.

In April, examination timetables are posted on the notice-boards in the School.
Please check this carefully to ensure there are no clashes with other courses you
may be following. It is up to you to ensure that you know when and where your
examinations take place. Please ensure that you do not rely exclusively for your
information on the provisional examinations timetable as this may be subject to
change.

The examinations handbook will be published online early in the summer term. This
contains all the information relevant to the examinations process.

Pass lists for each year are posted in the School in July and final year degree
classifications are posted normally at the end of June. Past examination papers are
available in the Main Library for all Economics courses and are also viewable on the
following website: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/USIS/pastexams/howitworks.shtml

Please note that past examination papers may not always reflect the syllabus content
of current courses as this may evolve.




                                        34
 Table 2 summarises the key features of assessment of the Economics courses.

 Table 2: Description of Assessment for Economics Courses

               COURSE                    CREDITS    ASSESSMENT MODE            % OF FINAL
                                                                               CLASSIFICAT
                                                                               ION³
                   Year 1
              Autumn (Term 1)
Introduction to Economics                12         CW (100%)                  0
Contemporary Economic Issues             12         CW (100%)                  0
Introduction to Mathematics for          12         CW (100%)                  0
Economists
        Spring/Summer (Term 2/3)
Microeconomics I                         18         EX (70%)+CW (30%)          0
Macroeconomics I                         18         EX (70%)+CW (30%)          0
The World Economy since 1945             18         EX (70%)+CW (30%)          0
Principles of Finance                    18         EX (100%)                  0
                   Year 2
              Autumn (Term 4)
Microeconomics II                        12         EX (70%)+CW (30%)          5
Macroeconomics II                        12         EX (70%)+CW (30%)          5
Statistics for Economists                12         EX (70%)+CW (30%)          5
Applied Mathematics for Economists       12         EX (100%)                  5
Money and Banking                        12         EX (100%)                  5
        Spring/Summer (Term 5/6)
Advanced Microeconomics                  18         EX (100%)                  7.5
Advanced Macroeconomics                  18         EX (100%)                  7.5
Applied Economics Topics                 18         EX (70%)+CW(30%)           7.5
Applied Statistics                       18         EX (75%)+CW(25%)           7.5
Finance for Development                  18         EX (100%)                  7.5
                   Year 3
              Autumn (Term 7)
Econometrics                             18         EX (80%)+CW (20%)          7.5
Option I                                 18         EX (100%)                  7.5
Statistics Project                       12         Project (100%)             5
Statistics for Economists                12         EX (70%)+CW (30%)          5
Further Statistics                       12         EX (100%)                  5
Understanding Global Markets             12         EX (100%)                  5
Corporate Finance                        12         EX (100%)                  5
        Spring/Summer (Term 8/9)
Applied Economics Dissertation           36         Diss (80%)+CW (20%)        15
Option II                                18         EX (100%)                  7.5
Applied Econometrics                     18         EX (80%)+CW(20%)           7.5
International Finance & Macroeconomics   18         EX (100%)                  7.5




                                         35
Notes to the table:
          EX=Unseen Examination. CW=Coursework. Diss=Dissertation project.
          The table does not represent any particular Economics degree programme. Rather, it
           shows all the courses running in each term, their credit weightings, method of assessment
           and weighting in final classification. Thus, for example, Applied Economics Topics is an
           18 credit course running in terms 5/6, assessed via an unseen exam (worth 70% of the
           mark) and coursework (worth 30%), and comprising 7.5% of the final classification
           (18/240 = 7.5%).
          Coursework can take a variety of forms so is not specified in the table. Individual course
           reading lists will specify the details of coursework requirements.

Intermission and withdrawal

There may be a number of reasons why a student cannot continue on a programme
of study and temporary withdrawal from the University (known as intermission) is
available. If this applies to you, see your academic or student life advisor at the
earliest opportunity.




                                                36
IX.   Career Choices
Some of you may already have a clear idea of what you want to do when you leave
university. For those who don't, economists are very 'marketable', have relatively
good job prospects and face a wide range of career choices. The most recent
empirical evidence on graduate earnings suggests that the average Economics
graduate secures a significant premium in the labour market. It is worth
remembering, however, that not all potential employers will be particularly interested
in your knowledge of Economics. In a competitive job market, they will certainly be
looking for a ‘good’ degree as evidence of your intellectual capacity and ability to
work hard. But they will also be looking at your ability to be articulate and to
communicate, to work on your own and to meet deadlines, to use computer software
competently, and to handle quantitative and qualitative information. The Economics
degree programmes at Sussex, if taken seriously and conscientiously, provide
opportunities to develop these skills. Look at the SkillClouds resource on Sussex
Direct to find out more about the skills that we think you will acquire on your degree
and how you might demonstrate these to a potential employer.

Economists go into many different kinds of jobs after graduation. Many enter the
financial services sector, such as banking, insurance, the ‘City’ etc. In most of these
jobs, you are more likely to be employed as an executive, who has a range of
relevant skills, e.g., statistical ability, rather than as a pure economist. The
Accountancy profession attracts a proportion of our graduates. Most of those who go
on to work as economists per se either join the Government Economic Service
(GES), the largest public sector recruiter of Economists in the United Kingdom, or a
research institute. Some go on to teach Economics at college or university level. For
most of these jobs it is essential to have some further academic training, such as a
Masters degree in Economics. This normally requires you to have obtained at least
an Upper Second Class Honours degree if you wish to study at a good university.

The University has an excellent Careers and Employability Centre (CEC), and those
working there are experts on career choices. So, as well as speaking to your
Academic advisor and the Economics Career Tutor in the Department, ask them for
advice on careers. They have a large selection of documentation and publications
on careers, which can be consulted. They also run workshops on presenting
yourself, on how to network and on careers in specific industries. They can also
provide feedback on draft applications and CVs and hold mock interviews.

The second year is the ideal time to explore the options for your future career, as you
are likely to be far too busy in your third year to devote sufficient time to this
important activity. As well as visiting CEC and discussing possibilities with them,
make sure you attend the Economics Careers Speed-Dating Party in the Autumn
term of your second or final year and meet graduates from the Department and find
out about the careers they have chosen.




                                          37
X: How to Write an Economics Essay – Some Guidelines

We appreciate that there is a transition from school to university and offer the
following guidelines that you may find useful in preparing your Economics essays.

The Purpose of the Essay

Submitted essays represent an important dimension to your study of Economics
while at Sussex. In addition to problem sets and unseen examinations, essays
provide a basis to judge your understanding of course material covered. Essays
allow both you and your tutor to ascertain your academic progress in the subject.
The essay is designed to evaluate your ability to understand, organise, and
communicate. It constitutes, therefore, an important part of the learning process.

Writing well and avoiding academic misconduct

Plagiarism, collusion, and cheating in exams are all forms of academic misconduct
which the University takes very seriously. Every year, some students commit
academic misconduct unintentionally because they did not know what was expected
of them. The consequences for committing academic misconduct can be severe, so it
is important that you familiarise yourself with what it is and how to avoid it.
The University’s S3 guide to study skills gives advice on writing well, including hints
and tips on how to avoid making serious mistakes.

Visit http://sussex.ac.uk/s3/writingwell and make use of the resources there. You will
also find helpful guides to referencing properly and improving your critical writing
skills.

If you are dealing with difficult circumstances, such as illness or bereavement, do not
try to rush your work or hand in something which may be in breach of the rules.
Instead you should seek confidential advice from the Student Life Centre.
The full University rules on academic misconduct are set out in the Undergraduate
Examination             and             Assessment             Handbook;           see
www.sussex.ac.uk/academicoffice/ughandbooks.

The University is introducing the use of ‘Turnitin’ (see section XI), software which can
detect plagiarised pieces of work. You can also use it to check your own work and
ensure that it is original. We therefore hope that we do not have to use it for detection
purposes.

Preparing an Essay

Prior to writing any essay, it is important to decide what the assigned essay topic is
actually about. A number of submitted essays include vast tracts of material not
directly relevant to the topic set. It is important that you read the question carefully,
understand what is being asked, and appreciate what is required to answer the
question.

Once the question is understood, the next step is to assemble the readings for the
essay. In many cases, the course documentation provides you with an adequate set


                                           38
of readings. However, you should not be afraid to venture outside this list for further
readings if you feel it necessary. This will often gain you extra marks, if done well. It
is important that you do not waste time transcribing lengthy passages verbatim. A
more effective approach is to write summaries on each piece you have read, which
will help you distil the essence of each reading. This approach will enhance your
understanding and prevent the possibility of unintended plagiarism occurring when
you proceed to write the essay.

It is important to plan your essay before writing it. One way this could be done is to
construct an essay plan, which outlines the framework to be used. You can use this
plan to ensure that you have dealt with the question in an adequate and systematic
fashion. In drawing up a plan, be aware of the word limit. Essays that exceed the
word limit are penalised!


Writing an Essay

In writing essays, regardless of the subject matter, it is important to develop good
habits. It is not our intention to influence style but good habits are likely to be
developed if your economics essay adheres to the following broad guidelines.

             Use the introductory paragraph(s) to indicate you have correctly
              identified the main theme(s), and briefly outline how you propose to
              tackle the topic.

             Use subsequent paragraphs to deal systematically with all the relevant
              points.

             Use a new paragraph for each new aspect of the question and, to
              ensure continuity of the argument, provide some meaningful link
              between each paragraph.

             Ensure that diagrams are integrated into the essay discussion. In
              addition, ensure that they are properly labelled with each illustration
              given a title and/or numbered, and appropriately cited (i.e., refer to the
              relevant page numbers of the textbook or the lecture notes from which
              they are taken, if relevant).

             Ensure that tables are integrated into the essay discussion. In addition,
              ensure that they are properly titled and/or numbered, and appropriately
              cited (i.e., refer to the relevant page numbers of the textbook or the
              lecture notes from which they are taken, if relevant).

             Summarise the main features of your argument(s) in your concluding
              paragraphs(s).

Footnotes and Endnotes
You can use either footnotes or endnotes in your essay. Regardless of which you
use, be consistent throughout your essay. Please note that the footnotes or
endnotes are subject to the overall word limit and, as a general rule, should be used
sparingly.


                                           39
The Bibliography

It is essential that you include in your essay proper citations to all academic works or
other source materials used in support of your argument(s). As a general point, do
not cite for the sake of citing, but to give emphasis to, or provide evidence for, a
particular point or argument. Each citation, irrespective of source, nature, length or
importance, must be fully acknowledged using an accepted convention for doing so.
The Harvard system is extensively used in economics for this purpose. This method
relies on a short citation in brackets in the text, which the reader can then check
against a bibliographic entry at the back of the essay. This method always requires a
bibliography, which should be listed alphabetically and consist of the author’s
surname, initials, the year of publication, and, where relevant, the publisher’s name.
Any book title should be in italics and any journal title should be underlined. As an
illustration of this, if you wish to refer to specific pages in the Begg, Fischer and
Dornbusch textbook, you would write in the text “…..(Begg, Fischer, and Dornbusch,
1997, pp. 93-94)..” and in the accompanying bibliography, you would write:

Begg, D., Fischer, S., and Dornbusch, R. (1997), Economics, Fifth Edition, McGraw-
Hill.

If you wished to cite a journal article written by, say, Peter Hart in 1995, you would
write in the text (Hart, 1995) and in the accompanying bibliography, you would write:

Hart, P. (1995), Galtonian Regression Across Countries and the Convergence of
Productivity, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Vol. 57, pp.287-293.

Deadlines for the Submission of Essays

Your course documentation provides you with the date, time and location for the
submission of your essays. Please note that it is Economics Department policy not
to grade or comment on non-contributory essays that are submitted late and without
good reason.

Essay Requirements

In writing an essay, pay particular attention to the word limit. Most essays for
Economics courses have a 1500 word limit but the assessed coursework essays in
second year have a limit of 2000 words. The word limit excludes diagrams, tables
and the bibliography but includes footnotes or endnotes. Tutors encourage you to
word-process your essays using either one-and-a-half or double-spacing.

The Quality of the Written English

A poorly written essay cannot be commented on in a worthwhile manner. It is
important to ensure that the quality of the written English used in your essay is to a
high standard and contains correct spelling and grammar usage. Tutors may
penalise essays that exhibit a poor or lazy command of the English language. Note
that Microsoft Word has a built-in spelling and grammar checker, so make use of it if
you are unsure (but be careful, as it is not infallible!).     Mis-spelled words are
underlined in red.




                                          40
Marking the Essay

In marking the essay, your tutor will be looking to see if your essay contains a
number of important elements. These include:

      The essay’s overall structure and the logic of the argument(s) presented.

      The clarity and quality of the overall argument(s) presented.

      The manner in which written and data evidence are presented, used and
       evaluated (i.e., are the cited sources understood, are they appropriate for the
       purpose at hand, are they treated in a sufficiently critical manner, are the
       conclusions reached by the author consistent with the evidence presented?).

The tutor will also ask the following questions:

      Is the essay sufficiently analytical?

      Is the essay focussed or does it contain redundant and irrelevant material?

      Does the essay show a sound grasp and knowledge of the issue(s)?

      Does the essay show any evidence of originality?

      Is a general conclusion, that is justifiable, reached at the end?

Feedback on the Essay
Provided your essay has been submitted on time, it will be returned to you within
fifteen working days of the deadline. In the first term, essays are returned by your
Academic Advisor, giving you the opportunity to discuss the essay (or any other
matter you wish to raise) with them.




                                               41
XI: Academic Misconduct, Referencing, and Turnitin


Contacts and resources

S3 website on Academic Misconduct
      http://sussex.ac.uk/s3/academicmisconduct
Advice on what academic misconduct is, and how to avoid it.

Students’ Union Education Officer
      education@ussu.sussex.ac.uk, office located on 1st Floor of Falmer House
Advice and representation for students accused of academic misconduct.

Undergraduate and Postgraduate Handbooks
       www.sussex.ac.uk/academicoffice/ughandbooks
       www.sussex.ac.uk/academicoffice/pghandbooks
Includes full text of University policy with regards to academic misconduct.

Referencing

S3 website on referencing
      http://sussex.ac.uk/s3/referencing
Advice on how to reference properly.

infoSuss website on referencing
       http://www.sussex.ac.uk/library/infosuss/referencing/index.shtml
Advice on how to reference using the Harvard, Vancouver, Numeric and MLA
referencing styles. For students who know how to reference and want to check the
formatting styles.

Sussex Centre for Language Studies
      http://www.sussex.ac.uk/languages/ , 01273 873234
Runs free ‘English Language and Study Skills Support’ sessions for International
students, including in-depth guidance on referencing.

Student Support Unit
      studentsupport@sussex.ac.uk , 01273 877466
The Student Support Unit is the base for the University's Dyslexia, Disability, Mental
Health and ASD support services.

Other key contacts: Tutor, Academic Advisor, or School / Department Handbook.

Turnitin

Study Direct Turnitin page
       https://studydirect.sussex.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=10904
or navigate: Student homepage > Study Direct > Turnitin – Essay Checking Tool
4-step guide and FAQ on using Turnitin.
Other key contacts: Tutor or Academic Advisor.




                                           42
XII: Generic Assessment Criteria

Year 1
Basis on which marks are awarded

0-19 A mark in this range is indicative that the work is far below the standard required
at the current level of your degree programme. It indicates that the work is extremely
weak and seriously inadequate. This will be because either the work is far too short, is badly
jumbled and incoherent in content, or fails to address the essay title or question asked. It will
show very little evidence of knowledge or understanding of the relevant course material and
may exhibit very weak writing and/or analytical skills.

20-39 A mark in this range is indicative that the work is below, but at the upper end is
approaching, the standard required at the current level of your degree programme. It
indicates weak work of an inadequate standard. This will be because either the work is too
short, is very poorly organized, or is poorly directed at the essay title or question asked. It will
show very limited knowledge or understanding of the relevant course material and display
weak writing and/or analytical skills. Essay work will exhibit no clear argument, may have
very weak spelling and grammar, very inadequate or absent references and/or bibliography
and may contain major factual errors. Quantitative work will contain significant errors and
incorrect conclusions.

40-49 A mark in this range is indicative that the work is of an acceptable standard at
the current the level of your degree programme. Work of this type will show limited
knowledge and understanding of relevant course material. It will show evidence of some
reading and comprehension, but the essay or answer may be weakly structured, cover only a
limited range of the relevant material or have a weakly developed or incomplete argument.
The work will exhibit weak essay writing or analytical skills. It may be poorly-presented
without properly laid out footnotes and/or a bibliography, or in the case of quantitative work, it
may not be possible to follow the several steps in the logic and reasoning leading to the
results obtained and the conclusions reached.

50-59 A mark in this range is indicative that the work is of a satisfactory to very
satisfactory standard at the current level of your degree programme. Work of this
quality will show clear knowledge and understanding of relevant course material. It will focus
on the essay title or question posed and show evidence that relevant basic works of
reference have been read and understood. The work will exhibit sound essay writing and/or
analytical skills. It will be reasonably well structured and coherently presented. Essay work
should exhibit satisfactory use of footnotes and/or a bibliography and in more quantitative
work it should be possible to follow the logical steps leading to the answer obtained and the
conclusions reached. Arguments and issues should be discussed and illustrated by
reference to examples, but these may not fully documented or detailed.

60-69 A mark in this range is indicative of that the work is of a good to very good
standard for the current level of your degree programme. Work of this quality shows a
good level of knowledge and understanding of relevant course material. It will show evidence
of reading a wide diversity of material and of being able to use ideas gleaned from this
reading to support and develop arguments. Essay work will exhibit good writing skills with
well organized, accurate footnotes and/or a bibliography that follows the accepted ‘style’ of
the subject. Arguments and issues will be illustrated by reference to well documented,
detailed and relevant examples. There should be clear evidence of critical engagement with
the objects, issues or topics being analyzed. Any quantitative work will be clearly presented,
the results should be correct and any conclusions clearly and accurately expressed.


                                                43
70 – 84 A mark in this range is indicative that the work is of an excellent standard for
the current level of your degree programme. The work will exhibit excellent levels of
knowledge and understanding comprising all the qualities of good work stated above, with
additional elements of originality and flair. The work will demonstrate a range of critical
reading that goes well beyond that provided on reading lists. Answers or essays will be
fluently-written and include independent argument that demonstrates an awareness of the
nuances and assumptions of the question or title. Essays will make excellent use of
appropriate, fully referenced, detailed examples.

85 - 100 A mark in this range is indicative of outstanding work. Marks in this range will
be awarded for work that exhibits all the attributes of excellent work but has very substantial
elements of originality and flair. Marks at the upper end of the range will indicate that the
work is of publishable, or near publishable academic standard.



Years 2 and 3
Basis on which marks are awarded


0-19 A mark in this range is indicative that the work is far below the standard required
at the current level of your degree programme. It indicates that the work is extremely
weak and seriously inadequate. This will be because either the work is far too short, is badly
jumbled and incoherent in content, or fails to address the essay title or question asked. It will
show very little evidence of knowledge or understanding of the relevant course material and
may exhibit very weak writing and/or analytical skills.


20-39 A mark in this range is indicative that the work is below, but at the upper end is
approaching, the standard required at the current level of your degree programme. It
indicates weak work of an inadequate standard. This will be because either the work is too
short, is very poorly organized, or is poorly directed at the essay title or question asked. It will
show very limited knowledge or understanding of the relevant course material and display
weak writing and/or analytical skills. Essay work will exhibit no clear argument, may have
very weak spelling and grammar, very inadequate or absent references and/or bibliography
and may contain major factual errors. Quantitative work will contain significant errors and
incorrect conclusions.


40-49 A mark in this range is indicative that the work is of an acceptable standard at
the current the level of your degree programme. Work of this type will show limited
knowledge and understanding of relevant course material. It will show evidence of some
reading and comprehension, but the essay or answer may be weakly structured, cover only a
limited range of the relevant material or have a weakly developed or incomplete argument.
The work will exhibit weak essay writing or analytical skills. It may be poorly-presented
without properly laid out footnotes and/or a bibliography, or in the case of quantitative work, it
may not be possible to follow the several steps in the logic and reasoning leading to the
results obtained and the conclusions reached.


50-59 A mark in this range is indicative that the work is of a satisfactory to very
satisfactory standard at the current level of your degree programme. Work of this
quality will show clear knowledge and understanding of relevant course material. It will focus



                                                44
on the essay title or question posed and show evidence that relevant basic works of
reference have been read and understood. The work will exhibit sound essay writing and/or
analytical skills. It will be reasonably well structured and coherently presented. Essay work
should exhibit satisfactory use of footnotes and/or a bibliography and in more quantitative
work it should be possible to follow the logical steps leading to the answer obtained and the
conclusions reached. Arguments and issues should be discussed and illustrated by
reference to examples, but these may not be fully documented or detailed.


60-69 A mark in this range is indicative of that the work is of a good to very good
standard for the current level of your degree programme. Work of this quality shows a
good level of knowledge and understanding of relevant course material. It will show evidence
of reading a wide diversity of material and of being able to use ideas gleaned from this
reading to support and develop arguments. Essay work will exhibit good writing skills with
well-organized, accurate footnotes and/or a bibliography that follows the accepted ‘style’ of
the subject. Arguments and issues will be illustrated by reference to well documented,
detailed and relevant examples. There should be clear evidence of critical engagement with
the objects, issues or topics being analyzed. Any quantitative work will be clearly presented,
the results should be correct and any conclusions clearly and accurately expressed.


70 – 84 A mark in this range is indicative that the work is of an excellent standard for
the current level of your degree programme. The work will exhibit excellent levels of
knowledge and understanding comprising all the qualities of good work stated above, with
additional elements of originality and flair. The work will demonstrate a range of critical
reading that goes well beyond that provided on reading lists. Answers or essays will be
fluently written and include independent argument that demonstrate an awareness of the
nuances and assumptions of the question or title. Essays will make excellent use of
appropriate, fully referenced, detailed examples.


85 - 100 A mark in this range is indicative of outstanding work. Marks in this range will
be awarded for work that exhibits all the attributes of excellent work but has very substantial
elements of originality and flair. Marks at the upper end of the range will indicate that the
work is of publishable, or near publishable academic standard.




                                              45
XIII: Generic Assessment Criteria: Presentations
Basis on which marks are awarded:


0-19 A mark in this range is indicative that the presentation is far below the
minimum standard expected. It indicates an extremely weak presentation that is
well below the minimum standard expected. This will be because either the
presentation is far too brief, very poorly organised and incoherent in content, or fails
to address the issue, topic or theme required. The presentation will exhibit minimal
evidence of knowledge or understanding of the material, may contain major factual
errors and presentation or speaking skills may be extremely weak.

20-39 A mark in this range is indicative that the presentation is below, but at
the upper end of the range is approaching, the minimum standard expected. It
indicates a weak presentation below the minimum standard expected. This will be
because either the presentation is too short, poorly organized and difficult to
comprehend, or is poorly focussed on the issue, topic or theme required. It will exhibit
minimal knowledge or understanding of the material covered and may display very
weak presentation or speaking skills, or contain substantial factual errors.

40-49 A mark in this range is indicative that the presentation meets the
minimum standard expected. A presentation of this quality will show limited
knowledge and understanding of the material covered. It will show evidence of some
preparation and comprehension, but the presentation may be weakly organised,
cover only a limited range of the relevant material or develop a weak theme or
argument. It may exhibit weak presentation or speaking skills, lack appropriate visual
aids and may contain some significant factual errors. It may not be possible to follow
several steps in the logic and reasoning or in any conclusions reached.

50-59 A mark in this range is indicative that the presentation is of a satisfactory
to very satisfactory standard. A presentation of this quality will show clear
knowledge and understanding of the material covered. It will be focussed and show
evidence of thoughtful preparation and clear comprehension of the material
delivered. The material will be reasonably well structured, coherently presented and
exhibit clear speaking skills supported, if relevant, by adequate use of clear visual
aids. There may be some omission of relevant material or limited develop of a topic,
theme or argument, it may contain minor factual errors and it may not be possible to
follow all steps in the logic and reasoning or in any conclusions reached.

60-69 A mark in this range is indicative of a good or very good presentation. A
presentation of this quality will show a good level of knowledge and understanding of
the material covered. It will be well focussed, show evidence of very thoughtful
preparation and a very clear comprehension of the material delivered. The material
will be well structured, accurate, very coherently delivered and exhibit high level
presentation and speaking skills well supported, if relevant, by good use of clear
visual aids. Most or all relevant material will be included, any relevant topic, theme or
argument will be clearly developed and it will be possible to follow all steps in the
logic and reasoning and in the conclusions reached. There should be clear evidence
of critical engagement with the theme, issue or topic being presented.


                                           46
70+ Such marks are given for an excellent or outstanding presentation. A
presentation of this standard will exhibit excellent levels of knowledge, understanding
and presentation skills comprising all the qualities stated above, with additional
elements of originality and flair. It will exhibit a critical engagement with the material
presented and include independent argument regarding the theme, issue or topic
being presented. It will be excellently presented in a fluent speaking style supported if
relevant by excellent visual aids.

Balance between content and presentation skills
The balance between content and presentation skills may vary between different
forms of presentation – e.g. between a seminar presentation delivering knowledge
and understanding of themes or issues and a presentation communicating the results
of a research project. The relative importance of content v-s-v presentation skills
must always be made clear and any allocation of marks for these different
components must always be provided.




                                           47
XIV. Jargon buster

One soon gets used to the jargon used in universities. So much so, that it is easy to
forget that new students may not be familiar with many of the terms, abbreviations,
etc. This guide should help you. Much of it is accurate.

AA - Academic Advisor – member of faculty who keeps in touch with your
academic progress. See him or her at the end of term, at a minimum. Your
Academic Advisor is quite likely to recognise you, as the computerised records
system contains student photos.

AT – associate tutor, sometimes D Phil students financing their way through
university.

BA – Bachelor of Arts, an undergraduate degree

BSc – Bachelor of Science. A better undergraduate degree, according to holders of
it!

CEC – Careers & Employability Centre. Located in the Library, and can help you find
a job (yes, you’ll have to get one eventually). Changes its name quite often (used to
be the Career Development Unit), so try to keep up.

Classification – the process of assigning degree outcomes (classes, q.v.) to
students, based on their performance. Degrees are classified as: First class (usually
an average mark over 70%); 2(i), 2(ii), Third, Pass. A 2(i) is also sometimes referred
to as an ‘upper second’ and a 2(ii) as a ‘lower second’.
Find out more in the Examinations Handbook. ‘Class’ is also a bit of an obsession of
sociologists, but in a different context.

Credit – “Credit is a quantified means of expressing equivalence of learning.” So
there you have it. It’s a way of adding up how much you’ve achieved. An autumn
term course is (usually) worth 12 credits, spring/summer courses are worth 18. You
take courses to a total of 120 credits each year.

D Phil – Doctor of Philosophy (also written PhD). A postgraduate degree requiring
(usually) three years of research following a Masters (q.v.) programme. Many of the
teaching assistants are studying for their doctorate.

Dean – a now antiquated term, meaning the head of a School such as BMEc. Now
replaced by the more prosaic ‘Head of School’ or HOS. An important person, as he
or she has a budget to spend (though is often prevented from doing so).

Faculty – those employed by the university to teach and/or do research. It can also
mean a grouping of academic departments, like a School (q.v.), though Sussex does
not use it in this way.

GTA – Graduate Teaching Assistant.




                                         48
HEFCE – (“hefkey”) The Higher Education Funding Council for England.               They
provide the money… (except for your fees, of course).

Honours – a slightly antiquated term. Originally degrees were either ordinary (also
known as pass or unclassified) or honours. The latter sometimes implied a longer
period of study. Nowadays everyone is on an honours programme but you might end
up with a Pass degree if you do not gain sufficiently high marks in the final year.

HOS or Head of School – what it says, the academic in charge of a School of study,
e.g. BMEc.

IDP – Interdisciplinary programme. A set of courses built around a common theme
(e.g. gender) with teaching by faculty from a range of different disciplines. For
example, sociologists, psychologists and media studies faculty might share an
interest in gender, but look at it from different perspectives.

International Relations – a discipline close to Economics in some ways, whose
members are easy to provoke into mild apoplexy. Try saying “I can’t see what’s
wrong with globalisation, more trade is bound to make everyone better off, surely?”.
Can be fun.

Joint – or joint major. A programme such as Economics and Politics where you
spend equal time studying two disciplines.

Lecture – “A device for transmitting knowledge and information from the notes of the
lecturer into the notes of the student, without it passing through the brain of either of
them.” More seriously, the lecturer talks while you listen and take notes. Some
lectures occur as early as 9 am!

M Phil – Master of Philosophy, a research degree qualification midway between an
MA and PhD.

MA/MSc – Master of Arts/Science. Postgraduate degree.

Major – your main subject of study, e.g. Economics or Philosophy.

Minor – a subsidiary subject. Rarely used now at Sussex.

Non-contributory – or not formally assessed. This is a piece of work, usually an
essay or set of exercises, which are not a part of your formal assessment for a
course. They are, however, still worth doing (!) as they often help you to better
understand the economics you are studying.

Non-economist – a useful, all-encompassing term to cover sociologists,
philosophers, etc.

PVC – not the raunchy clothing fabric, but a Pro-Vice Chancellor, a deputy to the
Vice Chancellor . There are three at Sussex and they seem to get the jobs the VC
would rather pass on!




                                           49
QAA – the Quality Assurance Agency. They check up on the quality of teaching.
You often hear a collective groan from faculty after this word.

Reader – faculty grade similar to senior lecturer but awarded for excellence in
research.

REF – research evaluation framework. Held every six years or so, to judge the
quality of research done by faculty. Likely to provoke fear or joy in the minds of
faculty, depending upon how much they’ve published recently.

Refectory – posh word for canteen.

School – a grouping of university departments, for administrative and academic
purposes. The school of Business, Management and Economics (a bit of a mouthful,
BMEc for short) encompasses, guess what?          Business, management and
economics. The other Schools are… well, you can find out if you’re interested
enough. Schools are often reorganised, as in 2003 and 2009, so don’t get too
attached.

Student Life Advisor – someone you should know about. Can advise on anything;
personal problems, money problems, academic problems, etc.

Submission deadline – a time when you must submit some assignment which is
part of your course. Do not miss this!! Make sure you know where to submit your
work and how it should be presented (does it need a cover sheet???). Remember,
you can submit work before the deadline; you don’t have to wait till the last minute…

Sussex House – the central administration of the university is located here, so is
commonly referred to as Sussex House, as in “Sussex House has messed it up
again.” a common faculty saying. Curiously, in Sussex House this becomes “Those
academics have messed it up again”. Can be very helpful, e.g. if you have trouble
paying fees due to late arrival of a cheque (though they don’t fall for this more than
twice).

Vice-Chancellor – ‘chief executive’ of the university (the Chancellor is an honorary
position, currently held by Sanjeev Bhaskar).




                                         50
XV. Economics Department Staff Listings


                      Name                        Office    Ext.          E-mail Addresses


Michael Barrow – Senior Lecturer                  Mantell   2459   m.m.barrow@sussex.ac.uk
Economics BA Programme Convenor                    3B13
BA (Warwick), MA (Sussex)


Richard Dickens – Professor and DPhil convenor    Mantell   8461   r.f.dickens@sussex.ac.uk
BA (Sussex) MSc Ph.D (London)                      3B12


Robert Eastwood – Senior Lecturer                 Mantell   2471   r.k.eastwood@sussex.ac.uk
Economics MSc Programme Convenor                   3B27
BA (Cantab.), B.Phil. (Oxford)


Sonja Fagernas – Lecturer                         Mantell   2266   s.a.e.fagernas@sussex.ac.uk
MSocSc, (Helsinki), MSc (Warwick). PhD             3B29
(Cambridge).


Michael Gasiorek – Senior Lecturer                Mantell   7101   m.gasiorek@sussex.ac.uk
BA (Sussex),MA (Toronto), Ph.D (Southampton)       3B20


Peter Holmes - Jean Monnet Reader                 Mantell   8832   p.holmes@sussex.ac.uk
MA, Ph.D (Cantab.)                                 3B15


Julie Litchfield – Senior Lecturer                Mantell   8725   j.a.litchfield@sussex.ac.uk
Economics and Development Studies                  3B19
Programme Convenor
BA (Surrey), MSc. (Oxford), MSc.(LSE), PhD
(London)


Andrew McKay – Professor and Head of              Mantell   8739   a.mckay@sussex.ac.uk
Department                                         3B16
MA, Ph.D (Cantab.)


Alexander Moradi – Lecturer                       Mantell   7141   a.moradi@sussex.ac.uk
                                                   3B23


Andrew Newell – Senior Lecturer                   Mantell   2866   a.t.newell@sussex.ac.uk
BA (Sussex), MSc (London)                          3B25


Panu Pelkonen - Lecturer                          Mantell   8628   P.O.Pelkonen@sussex.ac.uk
MSocSc, (Helsinki) , MSc (Warwick), PhD (UCL)      3a12


Dimitra Petropoulou - Lecturer                    Mantell   3540   d.petropoulou@sussex.ac.uk
                                                   2b12


Barry Reilly - Reader                             Mantell   2473   b.m.reilly@sussex.ac.uk
BA, MA (NUI), MA Ph.D (Warwick)                    3B10




                                                 51
Alasdair Smith – Associate Tutor                                           Alasdair.smith@sussex.ac.uk


Michael Sumner – Associate Tutor                     Mantell      5151     m.t.sumner@sussex.ac.uk
                                                      3a26


Paul Segal - Lecturer                                Mantell      8563     p.segal@sussex.ac.uk
D.Phil. (Oxford)                                      3a11


Shqiponja Telhaj – Lecturer                          Mantell      3359     s.telhaj@sussex.ac.uk
MA, Ph.D (Staffs.)                                    3B26


L. Alan Winters – Professor                          Mantell      8332     L.A.Winters@sussex.ac.uk
BA (Bristol), Ph.D (Cantab.)                          3B32


Gemma Asbury- Programme Co-ordinator                 Mantell      8889     ug-econ@sussex.ac.uk
Marci Pollakova - Programme Co-ordinator              2b4
Luke Beale – Clerical Assistant




The University of Sussex is committed to promoting equality and diversity, providing
an inclusive and supportive environment for all.

The aim is to promote diversity and equality for students and staff and value the
contributions made by individuals and groups of people from diverse cultural, ethnic,
socio-economic and distinctive backgrounds and promote an environment free of
harassment and bullying on any grounds.

If you experience any harassment on grounds of gender, sexual orientation, race,
religion, nationality, age, disability or part time status contact your student adviser
within your school or the welfare officer (welfare@ussu.sussex.ac.uk) at USSU on
extn 3354. For more advice and information go to the harassment and bullying page
at http://www.sussex.ac.uk/equalities/1-3-1-7.html
For information on disability support contact the Student Support Unit
(studentsupport@sussex.ac.uk) on extn 7466 and visit the disability page at
www.sussex.ac.uk/equalities

For the equality and diversity policy and other equalities information go to
www.sussex.ac.uk/equalities or contact the Equality and Diversity Co-ordinator
(a.m.brooke@sussex.ac.uk) on extn 6682.


Note: And, finally, the small print! This booklet is published by the University of Sussex Economics
Department. Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that the information given here is
correct at the time of writing (September 2011), but neither the University nor its employees can
accept responsibility for any errors which may appear. Higher education is going through a period of
rapid change, and the Economics Department is committed to innovation and seeks constant
improvement in its courses and its teaching, so there can be no guarantee that the courses, members
of staff, facilities or other items outlined in the booklet will remain as described here. It reserves the
right to change the information given at anytime.



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