Docstoc

Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension

Document Sample
Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension Powered By Docstoc
					                                 Dufferin Aggregates
                                 Acton Quarry Extension
     MHBC
Regional and Urban Planning
  & Resource Development
                                 Aggregate Resources Act Summary
Ian F. MacNaughton
MA, FCIP, RPP
                                 Statement and Planning Report
Bernard P. Hermsen
MUDS, MCIP, RPP

Paul R. Britton
BES, MCIP, RPP

W. Brent Clarkson
MA, MCIP, RPP

James D. Parkin                  February 2009
BES, MCIP, RPP
                                 Our File “9061 V”
Carol M. Wiebe
BES

Kris Menzies
BES, BEd, MCIP, RPP

David A. McKay
MSc, MCIP, RPP

Brian A. Zeman
BES, MCIP, RPP




200-540 Bingemans Centre Drive
Kitchener, ON N2B 3X9
T: (519) 576.3650
F: (519) 576.0121

7050 Weston Road, #230
Woodbridge, ON L4L 8G7
T: (905) 761.5588
F: (905) 761.5589

630 Colborne Street, #202
London, ON N6B 2V1
T: (519) 858.2797
F: (519) 858.2920

10 Davey Crescent
Kingston, ON K7N 1X6
T: (613) 384.7067
F: (613) 384.8959

13 Poyntz Street
Barrie, ON L4M 3N6
T: (705) 728.0045
F: (705) 728.2010


www.mhbcplan.com
                                             TABLE OF CONTENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ......................................................................................1
1.0       INTRODUCTION........................................................................................7
  1.1 Acton Quarry Extension .................................................................................................. 7
  1.1.1 Aggregate Resources Act ............................................................................................... 7
  1.1.2 Niagara Escarpment Planning & Development Act ........................................................ 7
  1.1.3 Planning Act .................................................................................................................... 7
  1.2 Overview of the Planning Report .................................................................................... 8
2.0       OVERVIEW OF THE ACTON QUARRY EXTENSION ...........................10
3.0       POLICY CONTEXT..................................................................................12
  3.1 Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, 2006 ............................................... 12
  3.2 Provincial Policy Statement (2005)............................................................................... 14
  3.3 Niagara Escarpment Plan (2005)................................................................................... 15
  3.4 Greenbelt Plan (2005)..................................................................................................... 17
  3.5 Region of Halton Official Plan (2006) ........................................................................... 19
  3.6 Town of Halton Hills Official Plan (2008)...................................................................... 21
4.0       THE ACTON QUARRY EXTENSION ......................................................26
  4.1 Land Use Designations.................................................................................................. 29
  4.1.1 Provincial Plans............................................................................................................. 29
  4.1.2 Regional Plan ................................................................................................................ 29
  4.1.3 Local Plan...................................................................................................................... 30
  4.2 Quality and Quantity of the Aggregate Resource On-Site ......................................... 30
  4.3 Provincial Interest in Close to Market Supply of Aggregate...................................... 32
  4.4 Proximity of the Acton Quarry Extension to Market ................................................... 34
  4.5 Extension of an Established Use .................................................................................. 37
  4.6 On-site Agricultural Resources .................................................................................... 40
  4.7 On-site Natural Heritage Features ................................................................................ 41
  4.7.1 Mitigation Measures to Protect and Enhance the Greenlands System ........................ 45
  4.7.2 Summary of Natural Heritage Features ........................................................................ 49
  4.8 On-site Cultural Heritage Resources............................................................................ 50
  4.9 Other On-site Considerations ....................................................................................... 50
  4.10 After Use of Dufferin’s Land Holdings ........................................................................ 51
  4.11 Local Economy ............................................................................................................... 56
5.0       SURROUNDING LAND USES ................................................................57
  5.1.1     Domestic Water Supplies .............................................................................................. 59
  5.1.2     Noise ............................................................................................................................ 59
  5.1.3     Blasting.......................................................................................................................... 60
  5.1.4     Air Quality...................................................................................................................... 60
  5.1.5     Visual............................................................................................................................. 61
  5.1.6     Transportation ............................................................................................................... 62
6.0      SURROUNDING NATURAL HERITAGE FEATURES ............................64
  6.1 Mitigation Measures to Protect and Enhance Surrounding Natural Heritage
      Features........................................................................................................................... 65
7.0      POLICY ANALYSIS.................................................................................68
  7.1 Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, 2006 ............................................... 69
  7.2 Provincial Policy Statement (2005)............................................................................... 71
  7.3 Niagara Escarpment Plan, 2005 .................................................................................... 80
  7.4 Greenbelt Plan, 2005 ...................................................................................................... 94
  7.5 Region of Halton Official Plan ..................................................................................... 104
  7.6 Town of Halton Hills Official Plan, 2008 ..................................................................... 114
  7.7 Town of Halton Hills, Esquesing Zoning By-law 74-51............................................. 134
8.0      CONCLUSIONS.....................................................................................135
                                                          APPENDICES

Figures...............................................................................................................................................A
Summary of Required Land Use Amendments .............................................................................B
Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement............................................................................C
Curriculum Vitae ...............................................................................................................................D
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              1
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


Executive Summary

Dufferin Aggregates, a business unit of St. Lawrence Cement Inc. is applying to
expand the Acton Quarry. The Acton Quarry Extension is located in Part of Lots
19, 20, 21, 22, and 24 Concession 3 and Part of Lots 20, 21 and 22, Concession
4, Town of Halton Hills, Regional Municipality of Halton.

The proposed Extension represents good planning and carefully balances
economic, environmental and social considerations. The application is consistent
with the Provincial Policy Statement and conforms to the Greenbelt Plan, Growth
Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, Niagara Escarpment Plan, Region of
Halton Official Plan and the Town of Halton Hills Official Plan. The proposed
Extension represents the wise use of an essential resource and is in the public
interest for the following reasons:

1. Over the next 25 years the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) is projected to grow
   by another 2.5 million people and 1.2 million jobs. During this timeframe the
   Region of Halton’s population will double. This growth and the current
   infrastructure deficit will require a substantial amount of aggregate:

      It is projected the GTA will consume on average 62 million tonnes of
      aggregate per year.

      On average each person in Ontario consumes 13 – 15 tonnes of
      aggregate per year.

      Public demand for aggregate is in the form of roads, schools, hospitals,
      houses, offices, etc. Aggregate resources are also used by the
      manufacturing sector to produce steel, vinyl, glass, paint, paper,
      pharmaceuticals, fertilizers, cement, insulation and landscaping products.

2. Ensuring an adequate supply of close to market aggregate is essential for
   economic, social and environmental reasons.            The Provincial Policy
   Statement requires “as much of the mineral aggregate resource as is
   realistically possible shall be made available as close to market as possible.”
   The Ministry of Natural Resources States:

      “Approximately 85% of total aggregate production takes place in southern
      Ontario where the demand for aggregates and aggregate-derived
      products is the highest.”

      “Extracting aggregate resources close to where they are being utilized can
      also be considered the most environmentally sensitive alternative.
      Trucking resources long distances increases greenhouse gas emissions,
      which is one of the top environmental concerns in the world today.”
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              2
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


       “The cost of transportation is estimated to be approximately 60% of the
       total cost of aggregate. Therefore, the economic value of an aggregate
       deposit is based not only on the quantity and quality of the deposit, but
       also how close the deposit is to its final destination.”

       “Aggregates provide the critical resources for the $37 billion construction
       industry that employs 292,000 people in Ontario. The aggregate industry
       is estimated to directly employ 7,000 people. In addition, more than
       34,000 people are indirectly employed in sectors such as transportation
       and equipment.”

       “The value increases as the raw material is processed into the various
       construction materials and then utilized to build our infrastructure such as
       hospitals and roads. For example the commodities produced by the
       aggregate industry make a significant contribution to the $1.9 billion
       cement and concrete manufacturing industry, the $1.3 billion glass and
       glass products industry, and a $2.9 billon pharmaceutical and medicine
       manufacturing industry in Ontario.”

       “Ontario has also benefited socially from accessible aggregate resources,
       thereby providing affordable infrastructure and housing costs.”

       “The wise management of aggregate resources and balancing of resource
       interests will ensure a continued close to market supply.” 1

3. The Region of Halton is an integral source of aggregate in the GTA based on
   the quality, quantity and proximity to market:

       The GTA consumes one-third of Ontario’s total aggregate production. The
       Region of Halton averages over 12 million tonnes of aggregate production
       per annum (1989-2006). This represents over 40% of the GTA’s total
       production and 25% of the GTA’s total consumption.

       The Region of Halton’s existing licensed reserves are at a critical low.
       New supply is not being replaced in the Region of Halton / GTA at
       sustainable rates. Since the enactment of the Pits and Quarries Control
       Act in 1972 only two crushed stone licenses and three sand and gravel
       licenses have been issued in the Region of Halton. In the GTA more than
       two-thirds of aggregate operations are over 35 years old.




1
    http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/MNR/aggregates / resources.html
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                 3
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


4. The Acton Quarry is an important part of the local economy.

      The current and future demand for aggregate will continue to be high in
      the Region. The Region of Halton’s population is projected to double
      from 390,000 (2001) to 780,000 (2031) people.

      The proposed Extension will make available 71 million tonnes of an
      identified provincially significant aggregate resource that is suitable for the
      production of a wide range of construction products. The aggregate is the
      strongest and most durable aggregate in Southern Ontario.

      The proposal will extend the life of the Acton Quarry by 18 – 24 years.
      The quarry employs 60 people and indirectly 150 people through various
      contractors and suppliers working on-site. The quarry spends over $12
      million annually on services, municipal taxes and levies.

5. The Acton Quarry Extension is appropriately designated in the Provincial,
   Regional and Local Plan to consider an expansion to the Acton Quarry:

      Provincial Plans: The Greenbelt Plan designates the site “Protected
      Countryside” which permits the extension of the Acton Quarry. The
      Niagara Escarpment Plan designates the site “Escarpment Rural Area”
      and it is an objective of this designation to provide for new Mineral
      Resource Extraction Areas.

      Regional Plan: The majority of the site is designated Escarpment Rural
      Area and Agricultural Area. The Regional Plan directs new or expanded
      quarries to locate within these designations. A portion of the site is
      designated as part of the Greenlands System and mineral aggregate
      operations are permitted within the Greenlands System subject to
      demonstrating consistency with Provincial Policy and providing an overall
      net gain to the Greenlands System.

      Local Plan: The majority of the site is designated Escarpment Rural Area
      and Protected Countryside. The Local Plan directs new or expanded
      quarries to locate within these designations. A portion of the site is
      designated as part of the Greenlands System and mineral aggregate
      operations are permitted within the Greenlands System subject
      demonstrating a net gain to the Greenlands System and the site will be
      rehabilitated to uses that benefit the community.
       Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                4
       Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
       February, 2009


6. The Acton Quarry Extension has been designed to protect and enhance the
   natural environment:

      Dufferin Aggregates has assembled +/- 301 ha generally north and south
      of its existing Acton Quarry. On 66% of the land no extraction will take
      place. These lands will be protected and enhanced for conservation uses
      based on the recommendations of the natural environment technical
      report.     Activities in these areas will be limited to monitoring,
      environmental mitigation, and ecological enhancement. Dufferin proposes
      to re-designate +/- 60 ha of these lands to a more restrictive
      environmental designation (Greenlands B and Escarpment Natural Area);

      The proposed extraction area is 99 ha. The majority of this area is
      adjacent to the existing quarry and was historically cleared and cultivated
      for agricultural purposes dating back to the 1860s.       Of the proposed
      extraction area, 21.6 ha consist of low function, degraded, and / or
      isolated natural heritage features. These features are proposed for
      removal consistent with Provincial, Regional and Local policies.

      Overall, the application protects the natural environment and results in a
      net gain and overall increase to the size, diversity and function of the
      Greenlands system. The application includes an immediate off-site
      enhancement plan and the final rehabilitation plan that will result in:

         49.4 ha of new woodlands that enlarge existing significant woodlands;

         56.7 ha of active forest management with the goal of improving
         vegetation characteristics and securing habitat for specific bird and
         amphibian species;

         6.8 ha of new wetlands that will create linkages and provide habitat for
         amphibians;

         4.0 ha of wetland enhancement to improve the extent, quality,
         hydrology and connectivity of retained wetlands;

         2.7 km of limestone cliff which is one of the most prominent features of
         the Niagara Escarpment;

         680 m of talus slopes which provide a variety of subterranean features
         and are important habitat for snakes, invertebrates and small
         mammals;
       Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             5
       Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
       February, 2009


         90 ha of lakes with varied shorelines with shallow near shore habitats
         and shoal features to include aquatic habitat and provide a future
         fisheries resource; and

         11.8 ha of grassland / thicket management which will provide habitat
         for bird species, small mammals and snakes.

      A comprehensive mitigation and monitoring plan has been prepared to
      ensure that off-site natural heritage features and water resources are
      protected.

7. The Acton Quarry Extension has been designed and buffered to ensure it is
   compatible with surrounding land uses:

      it is an extension of an established use with infrastructure in place to
      support the continuation of the operation;

      the existing haul routes will continue to be used;

      the quarry has been designed to ensure provincial guidelines for noise,
      blasting and air quality are met;

      domestic wells will be protected and a comprehensive monitoring program
      implemented; and

      visual impacts will be minimized by screening the operation by maintaining
      the existing vegetation in the setbacks, as well as creating berms where
      existing vegetation is not sufficient.

8. Dufferin’s Acton Quarry land holdings will provide an important long term
   recreational, educational, water management and conservation asset in the
   Town of Halton Hills:

      Dufferin Aggregates will convey +/- 600 ha of its land (quarry and buffer
      lands) into public ownership following extraction. These lands provide a
      significant opportunity to enhance the Niagara Escarpment Parks and
      Open System in the Town of Halton Hills.

      The projected increase in population in the GTA and the surrounding area
      will create more demand for recreational uses. Dufferin’s land holdings
      include a diverse range of landforms and features that provide unique
      opportunities for passive and active recreational uses.
 Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               6
 Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
 February, 2009


The site would provide a year-round day use park that could be used by
day camps, school educational programs, local organizations and the
general public. It would be comparable in size and use to the Kelso
Conservation Area and Bronte Creek Provincial Park.

The rehabilitated landform also includes an enhanced water management
system. This system provides the flexibility to store and release water as
desired to surrounding natural heritage features and / or local and regional
water supply systems.
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              7
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


1.0      INTRODUCTION
Dufferin Aggregates, a business unit of St. Lawrence Cement Inc. is applying to
expand its Acton Quarry, in the Town of Halton Hills, Regional Municipality of
Halton. The proposed Extension is located to the north and south of the existing
operation.

1.1      Acton Quarry Extension

The Acton Quarry Extension is located in Part of Lots 19, 20, 21, 22, and 24
Concession 3 and Part of Lots 20, 21 and 22, Concession 4, Town of Halton
Hills, Regional Municipality of Halton. The proposed licence area is 124.4 ha and
the proposed extraction area is 99 ha. See Figure 1.

The following applications are required to permit the Acton Quarry Extension:

1.1.1 Aggregate Resources Act

      An application for a Class A License, Category 2 – Quarry Below Water.

1.1.2 Niagara Escarpment Planning & Development Act

      An amendment to the Niagara Escarpment Plan (2005) for lands within the
      Niagara Escarpment Plan boundary.

      An application for a Niagara Escarpment Development Permit for lands within
      the Niagara Escarpment Development Control Area.

1.1.3 Planning Act

      An amendment to the Regional Plan, Regional Municipality of Halton (2006).

      An amendment to the Town of Halton Hills Official Plan (2008).

      An amendment to the Town of Halton Hills Zoning By-law for the lands
      outside of the Niagara Escarpment Development Control Area.

See Appendix B for a table summarizing the details of the required applications.
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                          8
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009



1.2      Overview of the Planning Report

The purpose of the Planning Report is to assess the application relative to the
policies and provisions of the:

      Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe , 2006

      Provincial Policy Statement, 2005

      Niagara Escarpment Plan, 2005

      Greenbelt Plan, 2005

      Region of Halton Official Plan, 2006

      Town of Halton Hills Official Plan, 2008

      Town of Halton Hills Zoning By-Law 74-51, 1976

This report has been prepared to satisfy the requirements of a Planning Impact
Assessment and an Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement (See
Appendix C). This report relies upon information contained in the following
technical reports prepared for this application:

      “Aggregate Resources Act Site Plans - Acton Quarry Extension”, MHBC
      Planning, January 2009.

      “Geology and Water Resources Assessment Report (3 Volumes) Acton
      Quarry Extension Town of Halton Hills, Ontario”, Conestoga-Rovers &
      Associates, November 2008.

      “Level 1 and II Natural Environment Technical Report Acton Quarry Extension
      Town of Halton Hills, Ontario”, Stantec Consulting Ltd., Goodban Ecological
      Consulting and Ecoplans Limited, December 2008.

      “Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Expansion Project Noise Impact Study”,
      Aercoustics Engineering Limited, November 2008.

      “Blasting Impact Assessment Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Proposed
      Extension”, Golder Associated Ltd., November 2008.

      “Air Quality Assessment Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension Halton
      Hills, Ontario”, RWDI Consulting Engineers and Scientists, December 2008.
    Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            9
    Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
    February, 2009


Traffic Impact Assessment Proposed Acton Quarry Extension Town of Halton
Hills”, MMM Group, January 2009.

“Archaeological Assessment (Stages 1, 2 & 3) Dufferin Aggregates, a
Business Unit of St. Lawrence Cement Inc. Acton Quarry Extension Part of
Lots 19, 20, 21 and 22, Concession 3 and Part of Lots 20, 21 & 22,
Concession 4 Town of Halton Hills Region of Halton, Ontario”, Archaeologix
Inc., November 2008.

“Archaeological Assessment (Stage 4) Dufferin Aggregates, a Business Unit
of St. Lawrence Cement Inc. Acton Quarry Extension Part of Lots 19, 20, 21
and 22, Concession 3 and Part of Lots 20, 21 & 22, Concession 4 Town of
Halton Hills Region of Halton, Ontario”, Archaeologix Inc., November 2008.

“Archaeological Assessment (Stages 1, 2 & 3) Dufferin Aggregates, a
Business Unit of St. Lawrence Cement Inc. Acton Quarry Extension Part of
Lot 24, Concession 3 Town of Halton Hills Region of Halton, Ontario”,
Archaeologix Inc., October 2008.

“Cultural Landscape Study and Built Heritage Assessment Dufferin
Aggregates, a Business Unit of St. Lawrence Cement Inc. Acton Quarry
Extension Part of Lots 19, 20, 21, 22 and 24, Concession 3 and Part of Lots
20, 21 and 22, Concession 4 Town of Halton Hills Region of Halton, Ontario”,
Archaeologix Inc., November 2008.

“Agricultural Impact Assessment, Acton Quarry Extension”, MHBC Planning,
January 2009.

“Performance-Based Adaptive Management Plan Acton Quarry Extension –
Town of Halton Hills, Ontario”, Conestoga-Rovers & Associates, Stantec
Consulting Ltd., Goodban Ecological Consulting and Ecoplans Limited
November 2008.
          Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                        10
          Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
          February, 2009


2.0     OVERVIEW OF THE ACTON QUARRY EXTENSION
Dufferin has assembled 301.5 ha2 generally north and south of its existing Acton
Quarry. The Acton Quarry Extension is located in Part of Lots 19, 20, 21, 22,
and 24, Concession 3 and Part of Lots 20, 21 and 22, Concession 4, Town of
Halton Hills, Regional Municipality of Halton.

The proposed licence area is 124.4 ha and the proposed extraction area is 99
ha. See Figure 2. The remaining 202.5 ha (301.5 ha minus 99 ha) of Dufferin’s
lands will be maintained and protected for conservation uses. No extraction will
occur on these lands. Activities in these areas will be limited to monitoring,
environmental mitigation and ecological enhancement.

The extraction area and operational design of the proposed Acton Quarry
Extension is based on the recommendations of a multi-disciplinary technical
team to address provincial, regional and local policies.

The proposed Extension will operate as a continuation to the existing quarry. The
proposed quarry will not result in an increase in permitted production levels.
Dufferin is applying for a tonnage limit of 4 million tonnes per annum, which is the
same as the existing quarry.

The proposed hours of operation are consistent with the existing operation.
Extraction and processing is proposed from 5:45 am to 11:30 pm Monday to
Saturday. Shipping is proposed from 6:00 am – 5:00 pm Monday to Friday. On
Saturday, shipping is proposed from 6:00 am to 12:00 pm on 4th Line and 6:00
am – 4:00 pm on 22nd Sideroad. There will be no operations or shipping on
Sunday. If required, for a Ministry of Transportation contract the site is proposed
to ship longer hours.

The Acton Quarry Extension is proposed to be operated in 4 Phases. The
existing operation includes Phases 1 - 3 and the proposed Extension includes
Phases 4 – 7.

Phase 4 is located to the north of Phase 1 and will have a sinking cut / access
ramp in the southeast corner. There will be no processing in Phase 4. Blasted
aggregate will be transported by quarry trucks to the existing processing plant
using a proposed at grade crossing at 3rd Line. Shipping to market will be status
quo and utilize the existing 4th Line and 22nd Sideroad entrance / exit and
established haul routes.




2
    The 301.5 ha does not include the buffer lands north of the Lower Plant Area or lands
    immediately east of Phase 2.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              11
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


Phase 5 is a continuation of the existing quarry from Phase 2 and 3 (no sinking
cut is required). A site plan amendment will be submitted for the existing quarry
to reduce the setback from 15 m to 0 m.

Blasted aggregate will be transported by quarry trucks to the existing processing
plant using the same internal routes in place for Phase 2 and 3 of the existing
operation. Shipping to market will be status quo and utilize the existing entrance/
exit and established haul routes.

Phase 6 east of 3rd Line is located south of a proposed rock pillar. A sinking
cut/access ramp will be required. Phase 6 west is a continuation of Phase 5
west and no sinking cut is required. Blasted aggregate will be transported by
quarry truck to the existing processing plant. Phase 6 east quarry trucks will
travel over the rock pillar, north through Phase 2 to the at-grade crossing at 22nd
Sideroad and through Phase 1 to the processing area.

West of 3rd Line quarry trucks will follow the same route as Phase 5 West.
Shipping to market will be status quo and utilize the existing entrance / exit and
established haul routes.

Phases 5 and 6 include the ability to operate a portable processing plant,
including a wash plant. If processing occurs in Phases 5 / 6, material will be
shipped directly to market.

Phase 7 is the southernmost cell and a sinking cut/access ramp is required.
Phase 7 can only produce and ship approximately 1 million tonnes annually due
to its size and configuration. Phase 7 will be extracted with a portable processing
plant, including a wash plant and shipping to market is directly from Phase 7.
Trucks travel north on 3rd Line to 22nd Sideroad and than use existing haul
routes.

Concurrent extraction of any two Phases is proposed to occur to allow for
efficient operations and to maximize progressive rehabilitation of the site.

For additional details on the proposed Extension please refer to the Aggregate
Resources Act Site Plans. The site plans include all of the operational conditions
to ensure the proposed Extension operates in accordance with applicable
Provincial regulations and guidelines.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              12
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009



3.0   POLICY CONTEXT

The Acton Quarry Extension has been designed based on the recommendations
of a multi-disciplinary technical team to address provincial, regional and local
policies.

The following is a summary of the policy context of the Growth Plan for the
Greater Golden Horseshoe, Provincial Policy Statement, Niagara Escarpment
Plan, Greenbelt Plan, Region of Halton Official Plan and Town of Halton Hills
Official Plan as it relates to the Acton Quarry Extension. See Section 7.0 of this
report for a detailed policy analysis.

3.1   Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, 2006

The Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, 2006 was prepared and
approved under the Places to Grow Act.

The Growth Plan is a provincial plan that has been prepared to implement the
Province’s vision for building stronger, prosperous communities by better
managing growth in the Greater Golden Horseshoe (GGH). The Plan will guide
decisions on a wide range of issues, such as transportation, infrastructure
planning, land use planning, urban form, housing, natural heritage and resource
protection in the interest of promoting economic prosperity. The Growth Plan is
intended to create a clear environment for investment decisions and to secure
the future prosperity of the GGH (Section 1.1).

The subject site is located within the Greater Golden Horseshoe and is located in
close proximity to the largest urban area and designated growth areas (See
Figure 3). The Growth Plan recognizes that:

      “Decades of neglect and lack of sufficient investment have resulted in the
      current infrastructure deficit. Tens of billions of dollars beyond current
      levels of investment will be required before the situation is back in
      balance. All levels of government under pressure to meet public
      infrastructure needs. Additional support from federal partners; innovative,
      alternative partnership arrangements that protect the public interest; and
      the strategic staging of infrastructure investments are all required to
      respond to these challenges. Ultimately, better investment in our cities will
      help to mitigate sprawl.        Enhancing infrastructure, integrating and
      improving transit systems, protecting valuable natural resources and
      strengthening local government will all go far towards the implementation
      of this Plan.” (Section 1.1)
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             13
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


      “The GGH is one of the fastest growing regions in North America. By
      2031, the population of this area is forecasted to grow by an additional 3.7
      million (from 2001) to 11.5 million people, accounting for over 80 percent
      of Ontario’s population growth. The magnitude and pace of this growth
      necessitates a plan for building healthy and balanced communities and
      maintaining and improving our quality of life.”

      “The GGH is blessed with a broad array of unique natural heritage
      features and areas, irreplaceable cultural heritage sites, and valuable
      renewable and non-renewable resources that are essential for the long-
      term economic prosperity, quality of life, and environmental health of the
      region. These valuable assets must be wisely protected and managed as
      part of planning for future growth. […..] A balanced approach to the wise
      use and management of all resources, including heritage, agriculture, and
      mineral aggregates, will be implemented.” (Section 4.1)

The mineral aggregate policy of the Growth Plan states:

      “Through sub-area assessment, the Ministers of Public Infrastructure
      Renewal and Natural Resources will work with municipalities, producers of
      mineral aggregate resources, and other stakeholders to identify significant
      mineral aggregate resources for the GGH, and to develop a long-term
      strategy for ensuring the wise use, conservation, availability and
      management of mineral aggregate resources in the GGH, as well as
      identifying opportunities for resource recovery and for co-ordinated
      approaches to rehabilitation where feasible.” (Section 4.2.3.1)
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              14
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009



3.2   Provincial Policy Statement (2005)

The Provincial Policy Statement (PPS) was issued under Section 3 of the
Planning Act and came into effect March 1, 2005.

The PPS provides policy direction on matters of Provincial interest related to land
use planning and development (Part 1 Preamble).

The PPS is a policy-led planning system recognizing and addressing the
complex interrelationships among environmental, economic and social factors in
land use planning. It supports a comprehensive, integrated and long-term
approach to planning, and recognizes linkages among policy areas (Part III- How
to read the Provincial Policy Statement).

The Provincial Policy Statement is more than a set of individual policies. The
PPS should be read in its entirety and the relevant policies should be applied to
each situation. (Part III- How to read the Provincial Policy Statement). No single
resource should automatically take priority or another due to the complex
interrelationships among environmental, economic and social factors in land use
planning.

The PPS recognizes the Province’s natural heritage resources, water,
agricultural lands, mineral resources, cultural heritage and archaeological
resources provide important environmental, economic and social benefits. The
wise use and management of these resources over the long term is a key
Provincial interest (Part IV: Vision for Ontario’s Land Use Planning System).

Section 3 of the Planning Act requires that decisions affecting planning matters
“shall be consistent with” policy statements issued under the Act (Part II:
Legislative Authority).

The lands that are being considered for the extension of the Acton Quarry are
located in the Rural Area as defined by the PPS and the management or use of
resources are a permitted use in this area.

The PPS protects mineral aggregate resources for long term use (2.5.1) and
requires that as much of the mineral aggregate resources as is realistically
possible shall be made available as close to market as possible (2.5.2.1).

In consideration of the requirement to protect and make available mineral
aggregate resources the following is a summary of other items the PPS requires
consideration of:
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             15
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


      Extraction be undertaken in a manner which minimizes social and
      environmental impacts (2.5.2.2);

      The operation be designed and buffered to prevent adverse effects from
      odour, noise, and other contaminants (1.7.1.e);

      The site be rehabilitated to accommodate subsequent land uses, to promote
      land use compatibility, recognizing the interim nature of extraction (2.5.3.1);

      Natural features and areas shall be protected for the long term (2.1.1);

      The diversity and connectivity of natural features in an area, and the long
      term ecological and biodiversity of natural heritage systems should be
      maintained, restored or where possible improved (2.1.2);

      Prohibit development in significant habitat of endangered species and
      threatened species, significant wetlands, and significant coastal wetlands
      (2.13);

      Ensure no negative impact on significant habitat of endangered species and
      threatened species, significant wetlands, significant coastal wetlands,
      significant woodlands, significant valleylands, significant wildlife habitat,
      significant areas of natural and scientific interest and fish habitat (2.1);

      Protect municipal drinking water supplies and designated vulnerable areas
      (2.2.1.d.1);

      Protect, improve or restore sensitive surface water features and sensitive
      ground water features (2.2);

      Conservation of significant built heritage resources, significant cultural
      heritage landscapes and significant archaeological resources (2.6); and

      Protect prime agricultural land (2.5.4).

3.3      Niagara Escarpment Plan (2005)

The Niagara Escarpment Plan is a provincial plan which governs land use within
the Niagara Escarpment Plan Area. The legislative authority for the Plan is the
Niagara Escarpment Planning and Development Act. The Niagara Escarpment
Plan serves as a framework of objectives and policies to strike a balance
between development, preservation and the enjoyment of this important
resource.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            16
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The purpose of the Niagara Escarpment Plan is to provide for the maintenance of
the Niagara Escarpment and lands in its vicinity substantially as a continuous
natural environment and to ensure only such development occurs as is
compatible with the natural environment.

Proposed plan amendments must be consistent with the purpose and objectives
of the Niagara Escarpment Planning and Development Act and the Niagara
Escarpment Plan and shall be consistent with other relevant Provincial policies
(1.2.1).

The principle as to whether new aggregate operations should be permitted in the
Niagara Escarpment Plan Area has been thoroughly reviewed. As a result of this
review policies were included in the Niagara Escarpment Plan that:

   prohibit new mineral aggregate operations in the Escarpment Natural Area
   and Escarpment Protection Area; and

   permit new mineral aggregate operations in the Escarpment Rural Area
   subject to an amendment.

Objective 5 of the Escarpment Rural Area is:

“5. To provide for the designation of New Mineral Resource Extraction Areas
which can be accommodated by amendment to the Niagara Escarpment Plan.”

Permitted uses in the Escarpment Rural Area include new licensed pits and
quarries producing more than 20,000 tonnes annually subject to Part 1.9
(requiring an amendment to the Niagara Escarpment Plan), and Part 2.11 of the
Plan.

A portion of the subject site is within the Niagara Escarpment Plan and the lands
that are being considered for the extension of the Acton Quarry are designated
Escarpment Rural Area. See Figure 4.

The following is a summary of the policies that must be considered when
evaluating an application to re-designate Escarpment Rural Area to Mineral
Resource Extraction Area (Part 1.5, 1.9 and 2.11):

   Protection of the natural and cultural environment, namely: groundwater and
   surface water systems on a watershed basis; habitat of endangered
   (regulated), endangered (not regulated), rare, special concern and threatened
   species; adjacent Escarpment Protection and Escarpment Natural Areas;
   adjacent rural area natural features; existing and optimum routes of the Bruce
   Trail; provincially significant wetlands; provincially significant ANSIs; and
   significant cultural heritage features;
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                   17
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


      Opportunities for achieving the objectives of Section 8 of the Niagara
      Escarpment Planning and Development Act through the final rehabilitation of
      the site;

      Capability of the land for agricultural uses and its potential for rehabilitation for
      agricultural uses, in accordance with the Provincial Policy Statement;

      The protection of sensitive ecological, geological, historic and archaeological
      sites or areas;

      The protection of surface and groundwater resources;

      The minimization of the adverse impact of extractive and accessory
      operations on existing agricultural or residential development;

      The preservation of the natural and cultural landscapes as much as possible
      during extraction and after rehabilitation;

      The minimization of the adverse impact of extractive and accessory
      operations on parks, open space and the existing and optimum routes of the
      Bruce Trail;

      No extraction shall take place at any point nearer to the brow of the
      Escarpment than 200 metres (600 feet); and

      The extractive operation shall be screened while it is in progress and, where
      possible, prior to extraction in a manner that is compatible with the
      surrounding visual environment.

3.4      Greenbelt Plan (2005)

The Greenbelt Plan is a provincial plan which governs land use within the
Greenbelt Plan Area, which includes the Niagara Escarpment Plan and Oak
Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan Area. The Greenbelt Plan was established
under Section 3 of the Greenbelt Act. The Greenbelt is a broad band of
permanently protected land which provides for a diverse range of economic and
social activities associated with rural communities, agriculture, tourism,
recreation and resource uses (1.2.1).

The lands that are being considered for the extension of the Acton Quarry are
located within the Greenbelt Plan area. For the lands within the Niagara
Escarpment Plan Area the policies of the Niagara Escarpment Plan apply. For
lands within the Protected Countryside Area the policies of the Greenbelt Plan
apply.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              18
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The portion of the site within the Greenbelt Plan is designated Protected
Countryside Area, within the Natural Heritage System. The Greenbelt Plan
permits new or expanded quarries in this designation and supports the
availability of aggregates close to market for economic and environmental
reasons (4.2.3). See Figure 5.

The Greenbelt Plan recognizes the benefits of protecting renewable and non-
renewable natural resources and has provision for the availability and
sustainable use of those resources critical to the region’s social, environmental,
economic and growth needs (1.2.2.5).

In evaluating an application to expand a quarry in the Protected Countryside, the
Greenbelt Plan requires consideration of the following key natural heritage and
key hydrogeological features: significant habitat of endangered species,
threatened species and special concern species; fish habitat; wetlands; life
science areas of natural and scientific interest (ANSIs); significant valleylands;
significant woodlands; significant wildlife habitat; sand barrens, savannahs and
tallgrass prairies; alvars; permanent and intermittent streams; lakes (and their
littoral zones); and seepage areas and springs;

Within the Natural Heritage System, the Greenbelt Plan makes a distinction
between new aggregate operations and expansions to existing operations. For
expansions the policies are more permissive and extraction may be permitted in
above noted key natural heritage features and key hydrologic features if the
decision is consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement (4.3.2.d). In contrast,
new aggregate operations are prohibited in significant wetlands; significant
habitat of endangered species and threatened species; and significant
woodlands unless the woodland is occupied by young plantation or early
successional habitat (4.3.2.a).

The Greenbelt Plan requires that (4.3.2):

   Maximum allowable disturbed areas be established;

    Rehabilitated area be maximized and disturbed area minimized on an
   ongoing basis during the life-cycle of the operation;

   Progressive and final rehabilitation efforts contribute to the goals of the
   Greenbelt Plan;

   The quantity and quality of groundwater and surface water will be maintained
   as per Provincial Standards under the Aggregate Resources Act;
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               19
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


      The disturbed area of a site will be rehabilitated to a state of equal or greater
      ecological value, and for the entire site, long-term ecological integrity will be
      maintained or restored, and to the extent possible, improved;

      If there are key natural heritage features or key hydrologic features on the
      site, or if such features existed on the site at the time of application:

      o The health, diversity and size of these key natural heritage features and
        key hydrologic features will be maintained or restored and, to the extent
        possible, improved to promote a net gain of ecological health; and

      o Any permitted extraction of mineral aggregates that occurs in a feature will
        be completed, and the area will be rehabilitated, as early as possible in
        the life of the operation.

      Aquatic areas remaining after extraction are to be rehabilitated to aquatic
      enhancement, which shall be representative of the natural ecosystem in that
      particular setting or ecodistrict;

      Where there is underwater extraction, no less than 35% of the non-aquatic
      lands are to be rehabilitated to forest cover, which shall be representative of
      the natural ecosystem in that particular setting or ecodistrict;

      Rehabilitation will be implemented so that the connectivity of the key natural
      heritage features and the key hydrologic features on the site and on adjacent
      lands will be maintained or restored, and to the extent possible improved; and

      Operators are encouraged to consider and provide for public access to former
      aggregate sites upon final rehabilitation.

3.5      Region of Halton Official Plan (2006)

The Region of Halton Official Plan was approved under Section 3 of the Planning
Act. The Regional Plan governs land use within the Region of Halton. The
Regional Plan requires planning decisions to be based on a proper balance of
protecting the environment, enhancing the Region’s economic competitiveness,
and fostering a healthy, equitable society.

“Halton Region acknowledges the need to consider its own planning area as part
of a larger physical, social and economic entity such as the GTA and the Golden
Horseshoe……. Particular attention must be paid by Regional Council to inter-
regional issues and forces affecting the GTA and the surrounding area in an
effort to apply Regional resources strategically to those matters over which it
does have some control” ( 40).
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              20
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The Region of Halton contains some of the highest quality and closest to market
aggregate resources in the GTA and Golden Horseshoe. The Regional Plan
requires the Region to ensure that as much of the mineral aggregate resources
as is realistically possible are made available to supply mineral resource needs
while having regard to other Regional goals and objectives (107.1).

All of the lands being considered for the Acton Quarry Extension are within the
boundaries of the Regional Municipality of Halton. The lands being considered
for the extension of the quarry are currently designated Escarpment Rural Area
and Agricultural Rural Area and a small portion is designated Greenlands A and
Greenlands B. See Figure 6.

The Regional Plan prohibits new or expanded quarries from locating in the
Escarpment Natural or Escarpment Protection Areas. The Plan directs new or
expanded quarries to locate in the Escarpment Rural Area and / or Agricultural
Area. If the proposal includes or negatively affects areas designated Greenlands
A or B, the Regional Plan requires the application to be consistent with Provincial
Policy and to result in a net gain to the natural environment (110.7.2). Protection
of areas designated Greenlands A are a priority for the Region.

In evaluating consistency with the Provincial Policy Statement the Region of
Halton has confirmed that a proposal that meets the net gain or enhancement
provisions of the Regional Plan also meets the no negative impact test of the
2005 Provincial Policy Statement.

The Regional Plan includes specific policies to evaluate new Mineral Resource
Extraction taking into consideration all of the following factors:

   availability of mineral aggregates to meet demand at reasonable costs in
   accordance with Provincial policies,

   economic benefits to Halton,

   impact on, and proposed measures to minimize such impact:

   o the Greenlands System through an Environmental Impact Assessment,
     where applicable, and in accordance with the requirement to demonstrate
     net gain if the proposal includes or negatively affects the Greenlands
     system,

   o quality and quantity of surface and ground water,

   o adjacent land uses,

   o any heritage resources or significant geologic formations,
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                           21
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


      o transportation, and

      o the surrounding farming and rural communities; and

      proposed rehabilitation plan and compatibility of the proposed after-use with
      the goals and objectives of the Regional Plan.

3.6      Town of Halton Hills Official Plan (2008)

The Town of Halton Hills Official Plan was approved under Section 3 of the
Planning Act. The Official Plan establishes a vision for the future land use
structure of the Town and is intended to serve as the basis for managing change
until 2021. The Official Plan establishes an ‘environment-first’ philosophy which
is a land use planning approach that is considered in making all planning
decisions in the Town. The ‘environment-first’ philosophy recognizes the
importance of maintaining, restoring and where possible, enhancing or improving
natural heritage features and ecological functions in conjunction with other
interests in accordance with Provincial Policy and legislation (Section A1).

The Community Vision section of the Official Plan recognizes that mineral
aggregate extraction is a rural based activity and an important component of the
local economy. The Plan requires mineral aggregate extraction to be undertaken
in a manner that minimizes social and environmental impacts. In keeping with the
‘environment-first’ philosophy, the Official Plan permits mineral extraction
operation within the Greenlands system provided the application results in a net
environmental gain to the features or functions of the Greenlands system through
a combination of compensation and enhancements that are initiated prior to
and/or during extraction, and the proposed progressive and final rehabilitation of
the site to uses that benefit the community (Section A1).

All of the Acton Quarry Extension lands are within the boundaries of the Town of
Halton Hills. The lands being considered for the extension of the quarry are
currently designated Escarpment Rural Area and Protected Countryside and a
small portion is designated Greenlands A, Greenlands B and Greenbelt
Greenlands. See Figure 7.

The Town of Halton Hills includes locational criteria for new or expanded mineral
aggregate operations. The Halton Hills Official Plan:

      directs new or expanded mineral aggregate operations to locate in the
      Agricultural Area, the Escarpment Rural Area and the Protected Countryside
      Area;
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            22
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


   prohibits new or expanded mineral aggregate operations from locating in the
   Escarpment Natural Area, Escarpment Protection Area, Urban Area, Hamlet
   Area and Rural Cluster Area; and

   permits new or expanded mineral aggregate operations within the Greenlands
   system where it can be demonstrated that there will be no negative impact on
   significant natural heritage features and related ecological functions in
   keeping with the principle of net environmental gain (Section E6.4.3.2).

The strategic objectives of the Official Plan as they relate to mineral aggregate
resources include:

   a) To ensure that as much of the mineral aggregate resources in the Town
      as is realistically possible shall be made available to supply mineral
      aggregate needs as close to markets as possible provided the extraction
      can occur in a manner that minimizes environmental and social impacts.

   b) To ensure the proper management of mineral aggregate operations to
      minimize potential negative environmental and social impacts.

   c) To protect areas having high potential aggregate resource deposits from
      incompatible development that would preclude or hinder access to the
      resource.

   d) To ensure that all operations are progressively rehabilitated in an
      environmentally responsible fashion.

   e) To ensure that roads are appropriate and built to a standard that can
      accommodate truck traffic associated with mineral aggregate extraction
      operations.

   f) To foster a strategic partnership with all the approval agencies to ensure
      that the objectives of this Plan can be met.

   g) To recognize existing mineral aggregate operations and protect them from
      activities that would preclude or hinder their expansion or continued use;
      and

   h) To promote the conservation of mineral aggregate resources through the
      recovery of these resources wherever feasible. (Section A.2.10.2)

An application for a new or expanded mineral aggregate shall be supported by
studies that are based on predictable, measurable, objective effects on people
and the environment. Such studies will be based on provincial standards,
regulations and guidelines, where they exist and will consider and identify
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                23
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


methods of addressing the anticipated impacts in the area affected by the
extractive operation. The Official Plan requires an application to address the
following (E6.4.3.4).

   a) the impact of the operation of the mineral aggregate resource use on:

         i.   the natural heritage features and ecological functions on the site
              and in the area;

        ii.   nearby communities;

       iii.   agricultural resources and activities;

       iv.    the quality and quantity of groundwater and surface water;

        v.    the built or cultural heritage resources in the area;

       vi.    significant geologic formations on the site and in the area;

       vii.   the groundwater recharge and discharge functions on the site and
              in the immediate area;

      viii.   surface water features in the area; and,

       ix.    nearby wells used for drinking water purposes.

   b) the effect of the additional truck traffic on the ability of an existing haul
      route to function as a safe and efficient haul route considering among
      other matters the following:

         i.   the types of operations proposed;

        ii.   current road standards and an assessment of the proposed haul
              route relative to those standards;

       iii.   anticipated type of truck traffic; and

       iv.    increases in background traffic levels together with current levels of
              truck traffic and other traffic;

   c) the suitability of any new haul route. It is a policy of this Plan to encourage
      the establishment of new aggregate operations on established haul
      routes…. If a new haul route is proposed, it shall only be approved if it
      has been demonstrated that:
    Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               24
    Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
    February, 2009


     i.    The new haul route is, or can be made, safe and capable of
           handling the volume of traffic proposed;

    ii.    The selection and design of the proposed haul route has taken into
           consideration and addressed impacts on existing and permitted
           sensitive land uses along the proposed haul route;

    iii.   The design of the new haul route has taken into consideration the
           existing road right-of-way characteristics including existing trees
           and vegetation within the road right-of-way, wood, wire, stump and
           stone fence lines within or adjacent to the right-of-way or other
           historical landscape remnants and where practical has identified
           means by which such features will be retained in order to minimize
           the impacts on the character of the area;

   iv.     The design of the new haul route has taken into consideration the
           physical characteristics of the potential route including road
           classification, load limits, road surfacing and the identification of
           any physical constraints to heavy truck traffic, such as vertical or
           horizontal curves, sight lines or shoulders and the means to
           address any deficiencies;

    v.     The design of the haul route has taken into consideration the traffic
           impacts (both operational and physical) resulting from the truck
           traffic generated by the proposed operation, including impacts on
           road structure, traffic flow and safety and the mitigation measures
           that will be employed to address these impacts;

d) the impact of the noise, odour, dust and vibration generated by the
   proposed use on adjacent land uses;

e) how the policy of no negative impact on significant natural heritage
   features and related ecological functions on the site and in the area can
   be satisfied taking into account the net environmental gain provisions of
   this Plan. This may be achieved, for example, through the progressive
   rehabilitation or design of a pit or quarry.

f) how the impacts from the proposed pit or quarry on adjacent uses will be
   mitigated in order to lessen those impacts; and,

g) how the site will be progressively rehabilitated to accommodate
   subsequent land uses after the extraction is completed; and,

h) how the visual impacts of the proposed aggregate extraction operation
   will be minimized through the preparation of appropriate studies that
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             25
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


       considers potential visual impacts from adjacent roads and from those
       properties that may be potentially impacted.

Where a policy in the Halton Hills Official Plan requires that mineral aggregate
extraction not have a negative impact on a significant natural heritage feature or
related ecological function the principle of net environmental gain, including
compensation and enhancements initiated by the applicant prior to and/or during
extraction and the proposed progressive and final rehabilitation of the site shall
be taken into account (Section E.6.4.3.5).

Prior to the approval of a new or expanded mineral aggregate operation the
applicant is required to demonstrate that (Section E.6.4.4):

   a) the quality of sensitive groundwater and sensitive surface water features
      in the area will be protected, improved or restored taking into account any
      mitigative measures initiated by the proponent prior to and/or during
      extraction and the proposed rehabilitation plan, in accordance with the
      recommendations of appropriate studies;

   b) the quantity of water available for other uses in the area and as base flow
      for sensitive surface water features will be protected, improved or
      restored taking into account any mitigative measures that are initiated by
      the proponent prior to and/or during extraction and the proposed
      rehabilitation plan, in accordance with the recommendations of
      appropriate studies;

   c) there is no negative impact on significant natural heritage features or
      related ecological functions in accordance with the principle of net
      environmental gain taking into account any compensation and
      enhancements that are recommended in an EIS and initiated by the
      proponent prior to and/or during extraction and the proposed progressive
      and final rehabilitation of the site;

   d) as much of the site as possible will be rehabilitated by establishing or
      restoring natural self-sustaining vegetation; and,

   e) other environmental and social impacts such as noise, dust, odour and
      visual impacts are minimized.

For new or expanded mineral aggregate operations within the Protected
Countryside of the Greenbelt Plan the Town of Halton Hills includes policies
consistent with the Greenbelt Plan.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              26
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


4.0   THE ACTON QUARRY EXTENSION

The proposed Acton Quarry Extension is located in Part of Lots 19, 20, 21, 22,
and 24 Concession 3 and Part of Lots 20, 21 and 22, Concession 4, Town of
Halton Hills, Regional Municipality of Halton. The proposed licence area is 124.4
ha and the proposed extraction area is 99 ha. The area proposed for extraction
has been defined based on the recommendations of a multi-disciplinary technical
team taking into account provincial, regional and local policies. See Figure 8.

The following factors were considered when assessing the Acton Quarry
Extension relative to provincial, regional and local policies:

   Land use designations;
   Quality and quantity of the aggregate resource on-site;
   Provincial interest in close to market supply of aggregate;
   Proximity of the site to market;
   Extension of an established use;
   On-site agricultural uses
   On-site natural heritage features
   On-site cultural heritage resources
   Other on-site considerations;
   Long term after uses;
   Local economy;
   Surrounding land uses;
   Compatibility with surrounding land uses;
   Surrounding natural heritage features; and
   Mitigation measures to minimize impacts and enhance surrounding natural
   heritage features;

The above noted factors are summarized below and described in more detail in
Sections 4.1 to 6.1.

The Acton Quarry Extension lands are appropriately designated within provincial,
regional, and local plans to consider an expansion to the Acton Quarry.

The subject site is in an indentified aggregate resource area that is protected for
future use in provincial, regional and local plans. The proposed Extension
contains approximately 71 million tonnes of a provincially significant aggregate
resource that is suitable for the production of a wide range of construction
products including crushed stone, concrete aggregate and building stone.

The Acton Quarry Extension is located within the GTA which is the largest and
fasting growing area in Ontario. From 2001 – 2031, the GTA’s population is
projected to grow by 2.66 million people and employment will grow by 1.29
million jobs. The Provincial Policy Statement requires that “As much of the
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                 27
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


mineral aggregate resources as is realistically possible shall be made available
as close to markets as possible”. (2.5.2.1).

The GTA is the highest demand area for aggregates in Ontario. The GTA is
projected to consume an average of 62 million tonnes of aggregate per year.
This represents an increase in aggregate consumption of nearly one-third from
the previous 12 year period. This increase is attributed to growth and the
infrastructure renewal programs in the GTA.

Halton has its own aggregate requirements to maintain and build new
infrastructure. From 2001 – 2031 the Region of Halton’s population is projected
to double from 390,000 to 780,000 people and employment will more than double
from 190,000 – 390,000 jobs.

The proximity of the Acton Quarry Extension to market will reduce the economic
and environmental costs associated with transporting aggregates long distances.

The Acton Quarry Extension is the expansion of an established land use and will
be able to utilize the infrastructure that has been put in place at the existing
quarry. This includes but is not limited to utilizing established: haul routes; exit /
entrances; the processing plant and associated infrastructure; internal haul
routes and road crossings; water management system; truck queuing area; truck
wash and operational techniques.

The subject site and surrounding area has been subject to extensive multi-year
environmental and water resources investigations. Based on the findings and
recommendations of these studies, important natural heritage and hydrologic
features have been excluded from the extraction area and will be protected.
These features will be protected through setbacks and monitoring / mitigation in
accordance with the Adaptive Management Plan.

The majority of the proposed extraction area was historically cleared and
cultivated for agricultural purposes dating back to the 1860’s. A portion of the
subject site is still actively used for agricultural purposes (cash crops). The site
and surrounding area is not considered a Prime Agricultural Area as defined by
Provincial Policy or the Region of Halton Official Plan.

Approximately 21.6 ha of the site contain low function, degraded, and/or isolated
natural heritage features. To mitigate for the loss of the these features the
rehabilitation plan for the Acton Quarry Extension in combination with a proposed
off-site ecological enhancement plan will result in: 49.4 ha of new woodlands;
56.7 ha of active forest management; 0.3 ha of new wetland that will provide
amphibian breeding habitat; 6.5 ha of new wetland located between the
proposed lakes and surrounding natural areas; enhancement of 4.0 ha of existing
wetlands; 2.7 km of limestone cliff, 680 m of talus slopes; and 90 ha of lakes
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               28
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


which will include aquatic habitat and provide a future fisheries resource; and
11.8 ha of grassland / thicket management.

Overall, the application results in a net environmental gain to the Greenlands
System while making available as much mineral aggregate resources as close to
market as possible.

The proposed Acton Quarry Extension is located in a rural area. Within 1
kilometre of the proposed Extension the predominant land uses include the
existing Acton Quarry, agricultural operations, natural heritage features, rural-
residential uses, commercial uses, the Town of Acton and another aggregate
extraction operation.

The Acton Quarry Extension is appropriately designed and buffered to minimize
impacts on surrounding land uses. Technical reports have been completed
addressing residential wells, blasting, noise, air quality, visual and traffic. The
technical recommendations have been incorporated into the Aggregate
Resources Act Site Plans to ensure provincial guidelines for water, noise, and
blasting and air quality will be met. The Aggregate Resources Act Site Plans list
all of the operational controls and will govern the operation of the proposed
extension. With the implementation of these mitigation measures the Acton
Quarry Extension is compatible with and does not adversely affect surrounding
land uses.

The Acton Quarry Extension will be an important part of the local economy.
Licensing 71 million tonnes will extend the life of the Acton Quarry by
approximately 18 – 24 years. On average the Acton Quarry employs 60 people
and indirectly 150 people through various contractors and suppliers working on-
site. On average the quarry spends over $12 million annually on services,
municipal taxes and levies. The quarry also provides the critical resource to
support other industries in Halton such as the construction industry, cement and
concrete manufacturing industry and other associated industries

In the long term Dufferin land holdings will provide an important recreational,
water management and conservation asset in the Town of Halton Hills. In total,
Dufferin has assembled over 28 properties, totaling 615 ha.

Subject to approval of the Acton Quarry Extension as proposed, Dufferin
Aggregates will convey +/- 600 ha of its land (quarry and buffer lands) into public
ownership for recreational, educational, water management and conservation
opportunities after extraction is complete. Due to the location and diversity of the
landform this site provides a unique opportunity to meet the growing demand for
passive and active recreational uses.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                          29
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


4.1   Land Use Designations

The Acton Quarry Extension is appropriately designated within provincial,
regional, and local plans to consider an expansion to the Acton Quarry.
Amendments are required to the Niagara Escarpment Plan, Region of Halton
Official Plan and the Town of Halton Hills Official Plan. The amendments have
been structured to re-designate the proposed License Area (124 ha) to Mineral
Resource Extraction Area and portions of Dufferin’s additional lands to a more
restrictive environmental designation (60 ha).

See Appendix B for a copy of the proposed land use schedules and a detailed
summary of the requested amendments by area.

4.1.1 Provincial Plans

The proposed Extension is located within the Greenbelt Plan and the Niagara
Escarpment Plan.

The lands within the Niagara Escarpment Plan are designated Escarpment Rural
Area (77 ha). The Niagara Escarpment Plan has an objective to provide for new
Mineral Resource Extraction Areas in the Escarpment Rural Area subject to an
amendment. In total +/- 77 ha are proposed to be re-designated from
Escarpment Rural Area to Mineral Resource Extraction Area. The amendment
also includes     re-designating +/- 56 ha of Dufferin’s additional lands from
Escarpment Rural Area to Escarpment Natural Area.

The lands within the Greenbelt Plan but outside of the Niagara Escarpment Plan
are designated Protected Countryside within the Natural Heritage System (+/- 47
ha). The Greenbelt Plan permits new or expanded quarries in the Protected
Countryside, Natural Heritage System without the need for an amendment.

4.1.2 Regional Plan

The proposed Extension is located within the Region of Halton. The Regional
Plan designates the proposed Extension as Escarpment Rural Area (75 ha),
Agricultural Rural Area (42 ha), Greenlands B (3 ha) and Greenlands A (4ha).
These lands are proposed to be designated Mineral Resource Extraction Area.
The amendment also includes re-designating +/- 60 ha of land to a more
restrictive environmental designation. Approximately 27 ha are proposed to be
re-designated from Agricultural Rural Area to Greenlands B, +/- 30 ha from
Greenlands B to Escarpment Natural Area and 3 ha from Escarpment Rural Area
to Escarpment Natural Area.

The Regional Plan directs new or expanded mineral aggregate operations to the
Escarpment Rural Areas and Agricultural Rural Area and if the proposal includes
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             30
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


or negatively affects Greenlands A or B, extraction may be considered provided
the application is consistent with Provincial Policy and results in a net
environmental gain. Protection of Greenlands A is considered a priority.

Based on the data presented in the natural environment technical report the area
currently designated Greenlands A and a portion of the area designated
Escarpment Rural Area and Agricultural Area should be designated Greenlands
B. See Section 4.7.

4.1.3 Local Plan

The proposed Extension is located within the Town of Halton Hills. The Local
Official Plan designates the proposed Extension as Escarpment Rural Area (75
ha), Greenlands A (1 ha), Greenlands B (1 ha), Protected Countryside Area,
Natural Heritage System (42 ha) and Greenbelt Greenlands (5 ha) in the Town of
Halton Hills Official Plan. These areas are proposed to be designated Mineral
Resource Extraction Area. The amendment also includes re-designating +/-60
ha of land to a more restrictive environmental designation. Approximately 3 ha
are proposed to be re-designated from Escarpment Rural Area to Escarpment
Natural Area, +/- 27 ha from Protected Countryside Area to Greenbelt
Greenlands and +/- 30 ha from Greenlands B to Escarpment Natural Area.

The Halton Hills Plan Official Plan directs new or expanded quarries to locate
within the Protected Countryside Area, Natural Heritage System and the
Escarpment Rural Area. The Official Plan also permits new or expanded mineral
aggregate operations within the Greenlands system where it can be
demonstrated that there will be no negative impact on significant natural heritage
features and related ecological functions in keeping with the principle of net
environmental gain.

Based on the data presented in the natural environment technical report the area
currently designated Greenlands A and a portion of the area designated
Escarpment Rural Area should be designated Greenlands B and a portion of the
site designated Protected Countryside should be designated Greenbelt
Greenlands. See Section 4.7.

4.2   Quality and Quantity of the Aggregate Resource On-Site

The existing Acton Quarry extracts bedrock from the Amabel dolostone
formation. The proposed Extension contains approximately 71 million tonnes of
the same high quality dolostone.

The Amabel resource is a provincially significant aggregate resource and is
suitable for the production of a wide range of construction products including
crushed stone, concrete aggregate and building stone. It is well suited for the
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                        31
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


production of road building and construction aggregate, and for high performance
concrete.3

The bedrock is considered to have superior hardness, toughness, crushability,
workability and durability.4 It is these physical properties that make the Amabel
dolostone a high quality aggregate resource. The resource becomes increasingly
valuable from a public interest perspective when it is located within close
proximity to major population concentrations with high order specialized
infrastructure and construction requirements.

The proposed Extension area has a long standing history of being recognized as
an important aggregate resource for the GTA:

    1969, Aggregate Resources Inventory Paper (MNR).

    1974, Mineral Aggregate Study, Central Ontario Planning Region, Ministry of
    Natural Resources (Proctor and Redfern).

    1980, Niagara Escarpment Planning Area, High Priority Mineral Resource
    Protection Area (MNR). The majority of the proposed Extension within the
    Niagara Escarpment Planning Area was identified as a “High Priority Mineral
    Aggregate Resource Area”.

    1983, Aggregate Resources Inventory Paper (MNR).

    1996, Aggregate Resources Inventory Paper (MNR). See Figure 9.

    2006, Region of Halton Official Plan; and

    2008, Town of Halton Hills Official Plan

The Acton Quarry Extension is an indentified resource area that is protected for
future use in provincial, regional and local plans.




3
    Golder Associates Ltd. & D.J. Rowell. Aggregate Resources Inventory of the Regional
    Municipality of Halton, Ontario Geological Survey Aggregate Resources Inventory Paper 164.
    1996 pg. 75.
4
    Ministry of Natural Resources. Response of the Ministry of Natural Resources to the
    Proposed Revisions to the Niagara Escarpment Plan and Aggregate Resources Technical
    Addendum. June 1991.
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                         32
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


4.3      Provincial Interest in Close to Market Supply of Aggregate

Aggregates play a vital role in all aspects of daily life.
Mineral aggregates provide the raw materials that
are necessary to build the infrastructure and services
that are demanded by the public in order to maintain
a high quality of life and vibrant economy. On
average each person in Ontario consumes 13 - 15
tonnes of aggregate per annum to build and maintain
Ontario’s infrastructure5. Aggregates are used:

      to construct homes, high rises, offices, schools,
      roads, highways, transit routes, walkways,
      hospitals etc;

      by the manufacturing sector to produce steel,
      vinyl, glass, paint, paper, pharmaceuticals,
      fertilizers, cement, insulation, landscaping
      products etc.; and

      in environmental applications such as filtering
      water in sewage plants, stream rehabilitation,
      shoreline erosion, fish habitat projects, etc.

The Ministry of Natural Resources states:

      “Aggregates provide the critical resources for the
      $37 billion construction industry that employs
      292,000 people in Ontario.         The aggregate
      industry is estimated to directly employ 7,000
      people. In addition, more than 34,000 people are
      indirectly employed in sectors such as
      transportation and equipment.

      The freight on board (at the point of extraction) value of the mineral aggregate
      resource in 2006 is approximately $1.4 billion. The value increases as the
      raw material is processed into the various construction materials and then
      utilized to build our infrastructure such as hospitals and roads. For example
      the commodities produced by the aggregate industry make a significant
      contribution to the $1.9 billion cement and concrete manufacturing industry,
      the $1.3 billion glass and glass products industry, and a $2.9 billion
      pharmaceutical and medicine manufacturing industry in Ontario.”


5
         This is based on Ontario’s total population divided by total aggregate production.
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            33
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


    Public demand for aggregate is in the form of new roads, schools, hospitals,
    houses and businesses. There is also demand for aggregate resources by
    the manufacturing sector to produce steel, vinyl, glass, paint, paper,
    pharmaceuticals, fertilizers, cement, insulation and landscaping products.
    Ontario has also benefited socially from accessible aggregate resources,
    thereby providing affordable infrastructure and housing costs. The wise
    management of aggregate resources and balancing of resource interests will
    ensure a continued close to market supply.” 6

The Acton Quarry Extension is located within the GTA which is the largest and
fasting growing area in Ontario. The Provincial Policy Statement requires that
“As much of the mineral aggregate resources as is realistically possible shall be
made available as close to markets as possible”. (2.5.2.1). The Greenbelt Plan
states “the availability of aggregates close to market is important both for
economic and environmental reasons” (4.3.2.2).

The proximity of the Acton Quarry Extension to market will reduce the economic
and environmental costs associated with transporting aggregates long distances.

Transporting aggregates long distances not only increases the cost to the
consumer but there are associated economic costs such as job site delays,
infrastructure upgrades and increased congestion on highways. The Ministry of
Natural Resources States:

    “Approximately 85% of total aggregate production takes place in southern
    Ontario where the demand for aggregates and aggregate-derived products is
    the highest. The cost of transportation is estimated to be approximately 60%
    of the total cost of aggregate. Therefore, the economic value of an aggregate
    deposit is based not only on the quantity and quality of the deposit, but also
    how close the deposit is to its final destination.” 7

Reducing the distance between the aggregate operation and the job-site where
the material is used also reduces greenhouse gas emissions and fuel
consumption associated with transporting the material. The Ministry of Natural
Resources states:

“Extracting aggregate resources close to where they are being utilized can also
be considered the most environmentally sensitive alternative. Trucking resources
long distances increases greenhouse gas emissions, which is one of the top
environmental concerns in the world today.”8


6
    http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/MNR/aggregates / resources.html
7
    http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/MNR/aggregates / resources.html
8
    http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/MNR/aggregates / resources.html
            Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                            34
            Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
            February, 2009


4.4       Proximity of the Acton Quarry Extension to Market

The Acton Quarry Extension is located in the GTA where the demand for
aggregates is the highest in Ontario. In the GTA and surrounding area
infrastructure is not keeping up with the pace of growth and this is having an
impact on the quality of life for residents. 9

In 2005 the Province announced a comprehensive long-term strategy to manage
infrastructure planning and investment. The strategy called for a five-year, $30-
billion plus strategic plan to upgrade Ontario infrastructure to strengthen the
economy and communities.10

In June 2007, the Province also announced “MoveOntario 2020” which is a 12-
year, $17.5 billion project being overseen by the Greater Toronto Transportation
Authority. The intent of the project is to deliver 52 rapid transit initiatives in the
GTA and Hamilton, beginning in 2008 with the building of 902 km of new or
improved rapid transit lines11.

A substantial amount of aggregate is required help build and maintain new
infrastructure to accommodate the projected population and employment growth
in the GTA. From 2001 – 2031, the GTA’s population is projected to grow by
2.66 million people and employment will grow by 1.29 million jobs. See Figure
10. Ensuring a close to market supply of aggregate will reduce the cost of the
aggregate resource and assist the public sector is maximizing its investment
dollars.

    Distribution of Population and Employment for the Greater Golden Horseshoe 2001-2031
                                      (figures in 000s)12
                                  Population                       Employment
    GTA                2001      2011    2021      2031   2001     2011    2021    2031
    Region          of  530      660      810      960     490     260      310     350
    Durham
    Region of York      760      1060    1300      1500    390     590     700      780
    City of Toronto    2590      2760    2930      3080   1440     1540    1600    1640
    Region of Peel     1030      1320    1490      1640    530     730     820      870
    Region of Halton    390      520      650      780     190     280     340      390
    Total              5300      6320    7180      7960   3040     3400    3770    4030




9
      ReNew Ontario Progress Report, 2007 pp 3
10
      ReNew Ontario Progress Report, 2007 pp3
11
      ReNew Ontario Progress Report, 2007 pp12
12
      Ministry of Public Infrastructure Renewal, “Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe,
      2006, Schedule 3.
          Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                             35
          Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
          February, 2009


The GTA consumes one third of Ontario’s total aggregate production. The GTA’s
annual consumption was 560 million tonnes from 1991 – 2002 or an average of
47 million tonnes per year.13 This annual aggregate consumption is projected to
rise to 738 million tonnes between 2003 – 2014, or an average of 62 million
tonnes per year. This represents an increase in aggregate consumption of
nearly one-third from the previous 12 year period.14 This increase is attributed to
growth and the infrastructure renewal programs in the GTA.

             The supply problem will be compounded by
             higher demand for aggregate in the GTA in the
             future
                       Millions of Tonnes
                  1000                            Total Consumption of Aggregates (Demand)


                    800                                                           738

                    600                     560

                    400

                    200

                       0
                                Estimated 1991-2002                        Projected 2003-2014

                 Source: MNR, TOARC and estimates/projections by Clayton




The Region of Halton is an integral part of the GTA and contains an established
source of high quality aggregate that is recognized as a provincially significant
resource due to its quality, quantity and proximity to major urban centres.

Historically, the Region of Halton has been the largest aggregate producer in the
GTA. Halton averaged over 12 million tonnes of aggregate per annum (1989 –
2006) which represented over 40% of the GTA’s total production and 25% of the
GTA’s total consumption. In Halton, aggregate production has declined from 16
million tonnes in 2001 to less than 9 million tonnes in 2006 (40 % reduction).
During the same timeframe total demand for aggregate in the Province increased
from 167 million tonnes to 177 million tonnes per annum (a 5% increase).

The decline in aggregate production in the Region of Halton and the subsequent
increase in production from Region’s further from market is a reflection of the
diminishing supply in the GTA.


13
     MHBC and Clayton Research, The Implications of Restricting Aggregate Supply in the GTA,
     April 2004.
14
     Ibid
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                         36
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


In Halton, there are 12 mineral aggregate operations (18 licenses – Class A)
supplying both crushed stone and sand and gravel. Based on Halton maintaining
the average annual production levels of 12 million tonnes per year, sand and
gravel deposits will be depleted within the next few years and all but one of the
crushed stones quarries will be depleted within the next 5 years. The Region of
Halton continues to rely on grandfathered licenses issued prior to 1975. Since
the enactment of the Pits and Quarries Control Act, 1972 only two crushed stone
licenses and three sand and gravel licenses have been issued in the Region of
Halton.

The same trend exists elsewhere in the GTA. More than two-thirds of GTA
licenses (Class A) are over 35 years old. See Figure 11. New licenses in and
around the GTA are urgently needed. Over the years many provincial studies
have warned about the impending aggregate supply crisis in the GTA.

The State of the Resource Study (1992, Planning Initiatives et al.) projected that
at expected demand levels and no new licensed supply of aggregate in the GTA,
the resource would be depleted during the current decade.              The main
conclusions of the study were:

     “For the period 1990 to 2010, Southern Ontario is moving towards a critical
     economic, social, and environmental situation in terms of protection of, and
     access to, aggregate resources required to meet the increasing demands of
     Ontario residents.

     Total existing licensed aggregate reserves within the major Market Areas of
     Southern Ontario examined in this report would be depleted as early as 1995
     in some areas if new reserves are not licensed.

     The majority of the Market Areas of Southern Ontario are not self-sufficient,
     and this is illustrated by their reliance on imports and trade links with other
     areas.

     Without the continued licensing of new aggregate reserves, the depletion of
     existing reserves would result in aggregate reserve shortages in the specific
     Market Areas. While reserves from outside the Market Areas will be still
     available, greater reliance on them would not only increase transportation
     costs but also related environmental impacts.”15

The Province of Ontario is currently updating the State of the Resource Study.

Not only is it important for Halton to maintain its role in supplying the GTA, Halton
has its own aggregate requirements to maintain and build new infrastructure.
15
     Planning Initiatives Ltd. and Associates, Aggregate Resources of Southern Ontario, A State
     of the Resource Study, Executive Summary December 1992, Page i
            Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                            37
            Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
            February, 2009


From 2001 – 2031 the Region of Halton’s population is projected to double from
390,000 to 780,000 people and employment will more than double from 190,000
– 390,000 jobs.16

The Region of Halton recognizes that a significant amount of infrastructure is
required to accommodate the projected population and this will require a
substantial amount of aggregate.      In addition to the required homes, offices,
industries and local roads the Region estimates that accommodating this growth
will require, among other things:

      50 new Elementary schools and 14 new Secondary Schools;

      25 Community Centers, and 8 Libraries;

      22 Fire Halls, 4 Ambulance Stations, 6 Police Stations and 11 transit facilities;
      and

      2,000 km of major municipal roadways plus expansions to highway’s, bridges
      and interchanges; 17

Every one of these infrastructure projects requires aggregate. Ensuring that the
aggregate is available close to market means lower cost to tax payers, lower
greenhouse gas emissions associated with hauling the material to market, local
economic benefits and after use opportunities.

4.5       Extension of an Established Use

The Acton Quarry is an extension of a longstanding and established use in the
area since the mid-1850. In 1856, the Grand Trunk Railway built a rail line
through the Limehouse area. Laying tracks for this railway required large
amounts of dolomitic limestone to be extracted. This extraction benefited the
local lime industry in the coming decades, and in 1872, lime kilns were
established on the lands that the processing area for the Acton Quarry now
occupies.

This historic extraction operation became known as the “Dolly Varden Mine”.
During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the “Dolly Varden Mine”, with other
lime operations in the area, supported the industrial village of Glen Lawson.

In 1885, the kilns and the nearby works at Limehouse were purchased by the
Toronto Lime Company. In 1929, Toronto Lime was, in turn, purchased by

16
      Ministry of Public Infrastructure Renewal, “Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe,
      2006, Schedule 3.
17
      Region of Halton “The Provincial Places to Grow Plan Is This Fair for Halton”, 2007
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                  38
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


Canada Gypsum and Alabastine Limited. Lime burning ceased at the Dolly
Varden Mine in 1932 and the quarry lay derelict until a quarry re-opened in 1962.

In 1962, Acton Quarries, Ltd., purchased a portion of the existing Acton Quarry
lands and opened the quarry in the east half of Lot 23, Concession 3. Over the
next decade land was purchased by various companies for aggregate extraction
on the east half of Lot 22, Concession 3; and large portions of Lots 21 to 24,
Concession 4.

In 1972, Indusmin Limited licensed the Acton Quarry under the Pits and Quarry
Control Act. The Acton Quarry is located on Part of Lots 21, 22, 23 and 24,
Concession 3 and 4, Town of Halton Hills (former Geographic Township of
Esquesing) in the Regional Municipality of Halton. The 1972 Site Plans indicate
the extraction area is 232.7 ha (575 acres).

In 1985, United Aggregates Ltd. purchased the Acton Quarry. In 1993 the site
was licensed under the Aggregate Resources Act and the license area and
extraction area was revised to exclude 3rd Line and 22nd Sideroad. The license
area is now 222.3 ha (549 ac) and the extraction area is 193.3 ha (478 ac).
Dufferin Aggregates purchased the Acton Quarry in November 2001.

The Acton Quarry is licensed to extract a maximum of 4 million tonnes per
annum.      The Acton Quarry has 3 extraction phases. Phases 1 and 2 are
essentially depleted and aggregate extraction is currently located in Phase 3.

The Acton Quarry is permitted to extract below the water table and the operation
is de-watered to allow the quarry to operate in a dry state. Dewatering involves
collecting groundwater in a sump on the quarry floor and the water is discharged
off-site in accordance with its Certificate of
Approvals and Permit To Take Water.

The aggregate at the Acton Quarry is extracted by
stripping the overburden and topsoil to expose the
bedrock resource. The stripped overburden and
topsoil is used for progressive and final rehabilitation
of the site. The exposed bedrock is drilled and then
blasted.
                                                           Stripping of Overburden
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                                   39
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


Since Dufferin began operating the quarry in 2001 they have implemented
several measures to minimize the impacts of blasting operations on the
surrounding community. These measures include:

     the use of smaller drill holes to reduce the
     ground level vibration and noise levels;

     smaller and more compact drill patterns were
     implemented to blast more efficiently with
     smaller quantities of explosives;

     electronic detonators are used as extraction                 Drilling of the site to prepare for
     proceeds closer to adjacent receptors, resulting             blasting
     in more effective blasts;

     5 fixed seismographs were installed at various locations around the property
     to monitor every blast for ground vibration to ensure compliance with Ministry
     of Environment guidelines; and

     a portable seismograph is set up at each blast location.

The blasted rock is transported to the upper and
lower processing plant area18 by quarry trucks. The
material is transported from Phase 3 via internal
haul routes across 3rd Line to Phase 2. From
Phase 2 the quarry trucks cross 22nd Sideroad at a
signalized intersection to Phase 1 to the upper and
lower plant areas.
                                                                 Blasted rock is transported by quarry
                                                                 trucks
The blasted rock is taken to the primary crusher
where the stone is crushed to less than 8 inches in
size and is transported by a conveyor belt to a large
stockpile called a primary surge pile. Stone is
transported from the surge pile by a conveyor belt
to secondary and tertiary crushers. This material is
transferred by conveyor and graded through
screens to create the required end product. Some
products are further processed through a wash Blasted rock is crushed to create
                                                      marketable products
plant. No chemicals are used to process aggregate
and the water used for processing is in a close looped system to recycle and
reuse the water. Final products are shipped by highway trucks to the consumer.



18
     The lower plant area is located outside of the Acton Quarry License Area.
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                            40
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


Highway trucks utilize two entrances / exits at the Acton Quarry to ship the
material to market. The entrance / exits are located on 4th Line and 22nd
Sideroad.

The majority of highway trucks use the 4th Line entrance / exit and travel south on
4th Line, east on 17th Sideroad. From 17th Sideroad highway trucks go south on
Trafalgar Road to Highway 401 or east on Maple Ave. The remainder of trucks
use the 22nd Sideroad entrance / exit and travel west to Regional Road 25 and
south on Regional Road 25 to access Highway 401. Each of these routes is an
established haul route designed to accommodate truck traffic. During the spring
season (March to April), all the highway trucks leaving the site use the 22nd
Sideroad entrance / exit to Regional Road 25 because of the half load restrictions
along 4th Line. Dufferin Aggregates has implemented the following measures to
minimize the impact of truck traffic on the surrounding community:

      A truckers safety policy;
      Onsite signage;
      The installation of a wheel wash for trucks;
      Continued maintenance of hard               road
      surfacing on all internal haul routes;
      Road washing at the quarry entrance/exit as
      required;
                                                         Wheel wash at Acton Quarry exit to
      Repaving of quarry entrance to minimize mud        remove debris before trucks leave the
      from getting onto surrounding haul routes;         site.

      Installed a speed bump at the main entrance / exit on 4th Line; and

      In conjunction with the Town of Halton Hills widened the shoulders on 22nd
      Sideroad in early 2007 to allow truck queuing prior to the quarry opening.

The Acton Quarry Extension is the expansion of an established land use and will
be able to utilize the infrastructure that has been put in place at the existing
quarry. This includes but is not limited to utilizing established: haul routes; exit /
entrances; the processing plant and associated infrastructure; internal haul
routes and road crossings; water management system; truck queuing area; truck
wash and operational techniques. See Figure 12.

4.6      On-site Agricultural Resources

The majority of the proposed extraction area was historically cleared and
cultivated for agricultural purposes dating back to the 1860’s. A portion of the
subject site is still actively used for agricultural purposes (cash crops) and it is
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              41
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


Dufferin’s intent to continue farming the remainder of the cleared area since
agricultural activities are an existing and permitted use on site.

The site is mapped predominately as Class 2 and 6 agricultural land and a small
portion is mapped as organic soils. Class 2 lands have moderate limitations that
restrict the range of crops or require moderate conservation practices. Class 6
lands are only capable of producing perennial forage crops and improvement
practices are not feasible. Organic soils are not placed in capability class.19.
See Figure 13.

Although the site contains Class 2 soils, the overall area is not considered a
Prime Agricultural Area as defined by Provincial Policy or the Region of Halton
Official Plan. Mineral extraction is permitted on agricultural land and if the site is
not a prime agricultural area rehabilitation back to agriculture is not required.

4.7      On-site Natural Heritage Features

The Acton Quarry Extension is subject to consideration of the following natural
heritage features as outlined in the Provincial Policy Statement, Greenbelt Plan
(where applicable), and the Niagara Escarpment Plan (where applicable), the
Regional Plan and the Town of Halton Hills Official Plan:

      significant habitat of endangered species, threatened species and special
      concern species;
      significant wetlands;
      wetlands / regionally significant wetlands;
      significant coastal wetlands;
      significant woodlands;
      significant valleylands;
      significant wildlife habitat;
      significant areas of natural and scientific interest;
      sand barrens, savannahs and tall grass prairies;
      alvars;
      fish habitat;
      regulatory flood plains;
      environmentally sensitive areas;
      regionally significant areas of natural and scientific interest;
      Carolinian Canada sites; and
      Halton regional forests.

In Halton, there is a high degree of overlap between natural heritage features
and the underlying Amabel resource. Both of these resources are protected in

19
      Ontario Soil Survey, Canada Department of Forestry and Rural Development
          Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             42
          Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
          February, 2009


provincial, regional and local plans therefore, a balanced approach must be
implemented to ensure the wise use and management of all rural resources.

The subject site and surrounding area has been subject to extensive multi-year
environmental and water resources investigations by Conestoga-Rovers &
Associates, Stantec Consulting Ltd., Goodban Ecological Consulting, Ecoplans
Limited and other consulting experts.        Based on the findings and
recommendations of these investigations, important natural heritage and
hydrologic features have been excluded from the extraction area and will be
protected.

The majority of the proposed extraction area has been cleared since the 1860’s
and has been used for agricultural purposes and does not contain any significant
natural heritage features. Approximately 21.6 ha of the site contain low function,
degraded, and / or isolated natural heritage features consisting of:

     a small portion of the Acton Swamp Environmentally Sensitive Area;
     two wetlands that were historically mapped as part of the provincially
     significant wetland complex but do not warrant inclusion within the complex;
     seven other small wetlands that have low function;
     a small portion of a much larger significant woodland; and
     low sensitivity drainage/aquatic features that are not considered to constitute
     a fishery or fish habitat.

The site also contains 9 Butternut trees that are suffering severely from butternut
canker and would not be considered “retainable”.

See Figures 14 – 17.

These features may be extracted in accordance with provincial, regional and
local policy to access the underlying aggregate resource provided the application
results in a net environmental gain. See policy analysis in Section 7.0. The
following is a summary of the natural heritage features proposed for extraction:

a)      Environmentally Sensitive Area

The proposed Phase 4 extraction area contains a small portion of the Acton
Swamp Environmentally Sensitive Area (1.7 ha). This portion of the ESA includes
a hedgerow and a narrow band of upland forest that surrounds a small wetland.
The woodland is dominated by sugar maple with scattered white ash, black
cherry, white elm and ironwood. This feature meets the designation criteria for
Greenlands B in the Regional and Local Official Plan.
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                           43
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


b)     Wetlands

The proposed Phase 4 and 5 / 6 extraction areas contain a series of small,
disturbed and isolated wetlands. All of the wetlands have been assessed by
Stantec and Goodban Ecological Consulting relative to the Ontario Wetland
Evaluation System and they do not warrant inclusion within the Acton Swamp
Provincially Significant Wetland Complex. The Ontario Wetland Evaluation
System states not all wetlands within 750 m of a provincially significant wetland
are complexed and typically smaller wetlands are not included unless they have
important ecological functions.

The two wetlands (W2-a and W2-b) that are currently mapped as part of the
Acton Swamp Provincially Significant Wetland Complex (1268 ha) were
complexed through a desktop re-evaluation by the MNR in 1991. Based on the
detailed site inspections and conclusions of the natural environment technical
report these wetlands do not merit inclusion within the provincially significant
wetland complex.

Wetland W2-a is a 1.4 ha hybrid swamp, remnant of
what was formerly a much larger, contiguous
swamp that was removed during the realignment of
3rd Line and extraction of Phase 1 of the approved
Acton quarry. This wetland pocket is relatively
isolated in the landscape, surrounded by agricultural
fields, re-aligned 3rd Line and the Acton Quarry.
W2-a does not have any amphibian breeding
function; it does not perform any wetland functions W2-a is isolated, surrounded by
                                                                               rd
(physical or ecological) that contribute significantly agricultural field and 3 Line, has low
                                                       wildlife value, and loss of wetland
to the integrity or function of the complex and there hydrology.
is no surface water connection between this wetland
and the wetlands to the south and west. W2-a is a swamp community that is
common in the area and does not add to the diversity of the larger wetland
complex, which includes extensive swamps of similar community types
performing a full range of ecological functions.

Wetland W2-b is a 2.9 ha swamp remnant of a
much larger swamp that was removed during
extraction of Phase 3 of the approved Acton Quarry.
The wetland is immediately adjacent to the
extraction face in Phase 3. There is an absence of
standing water in W2-b, except in relation to quarry
discharge water in and around a dug pond. W2-b
does not perform any wetland functions (physical or
ecological) that contribute significantly to the             The pond in W2-b rises when water is
integrity or function of the wetlands within the             being pumped from Phase 3 of the
                                                             Acton Quarry.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                44
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


complex and it has no amphibian breeding functions,
except in association with the dug pond. The
characteristics of the wetland do not significantly add
to the biodiversity of the larger complex; and is does
not perform any corridor function.

The other wetlands U6 (0.3 ha), U7 (0.7 ha), U8 (1.1
ha), and U30 (0.3 ha) are located along the Phase 2
discharge, have disturbed vegetation and low wildlife …and drops quickly when pumping
                                                         is discontinued.
use. U9 (0.1 ha) and U10 (0.1 ha) are very small,
within ditches of former agricultural fields with limited hydroperiods and low
wildlife use. U28 (0.3 ha) is colonized by reed canary grass, surrounded by
agricultural fields, and does not support breeding habitat for amphibians. Based
on the complexing criteria in the OWES all of these wetlands do not merit
inclusion in the adjacent wetland complexes.

All of the identified wetlands within the proposed extraction meet the designation
criteria for Greenlands B in the Regional Plan and Greenlands B and Greenbelt
Greenlands in the Local Official Plan.

c)     Significant Woodlands

A 3,500 ha significant woodland exists on and adjacent to Phases 5 / 6 and 7 of
the proposed Acton Quarry Extension. Approximately 18.1 ha or less than 1 %
of this woodland is located within the proposed extraction area. The portion of
the woodland within the proposed extraction is predominately sugar maple and
white cedar upland forest, with pockets of swamp maple and white cedar swamp
forest.

The removal of a small area of the significant woodland will not have a negative
impact on the woodland as a whole based on the high percentage of forest cover
in the area and well connected linkages.

The significant woodland meets the designation criteria for Greenlands B in the
Regional Plan and Greenbelt Greenlands and Greenlands B in the Local Official
Plan.

d)     Low Sensitivity Aquatic/Drainage Features

The proposed Phase 5 extraction area contains two low sensitivity seasonal
drainage features and dug ponds that are used for release of dewatering
discharge from Phase 2 and 3 of the existing quarry. These features are not
considered to constitute a fishery or fish habitat.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            45
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


These features would not qualify as part of the Greenlands System in either the
Regional or Local Official Plan.

4.7.1 Mitigation Measures to Protect and Enhance the Greenlands System

To mitigate for the direct impact on the above noted natural heritage features
the Acton Quarry Extension has been designed to enhance the features and
functions of the Regional Greenlands System. The enhancement plan is based
on the principles and science of landscape and restoration ecology. The
enhancement plan is based on a combination of:

   immediate off-site enhancements that provide a broader, landscape level
   restoration plan; and

   progressive and final rehabilitation measures proposed for the Acton Quarry
   Extension.

4.7.1.1 Off-Site: Immediate Environmental Enhancement Plan

The off-site enhancement plan will be implemented prior to and during extraction
to provide enhancements in the short term to the surrounding landscape. The
purpose of the enhancement plan is to improve the quality, amount and
configuration of habitat in the study area. The core principles applied in the
enhancement plan are:

   Restore and enhance landscape connectivity ;

   Enlarge significant woodlands;

   Improve and provide habitat for target species including amphibians,
   Jefferson Salamander and Hooded Warbler; and

   Use of locally sourced native plant stock.

The offsite enhancement plan includes woodland creation, forest management
plan, wetland creation, wetland enhancement, and old field / thicket
management.

The following is a summary of the proposed enhancement plan. See Figure 18.

a) Woodland Creation

A significant component of the enhancement plan is the creation of 31.2 ha of
new woodlands that enlarge existing significant woodlands, and improve
linkages.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               46
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


On lands surrounding the proposed Extension and owned by Dufferin
Aggregates, there are numerous areas of open and secondary habitats.
Historically, these areas were used for agriculture either as crop fields, pastures,
hay fields or homesteads. Most of them, especially the ones recently abandoned,
remain open being dominated by herbaceous vegetation, while others, left fallow,
have become invaded by shrubs and young trees. From a landscape ecology
perspective, these areas present excellent opportunities for returning them to a
forest condition. Such in-fills would increase the amount of forest cover and
forest interior habitat, while providing new habitat opportunities for plants and
animals.

b) Forest Management Plan

Dufferin Aggregates is proposing a 56.7 ha forest management plan on its
additional lands with the goal of improving vegetation characteristics and
securing habitat for specific bird and amphibian species.

This strategy will employ a range of forest practices to manage portions of the
surrounding woodlands that are young to immature, early-successional stands
that would benefit from thinning, planting and removal of diseased trees and
invasive species such as buckthorn, etc. Standard forest practices, such as
selective cut, salvage cut, cleaning the understory, insect control and spot
plantings will be carried out as required.

Part of the forest management plan includes enhancing existing or creating new
habitat for the Hooded Warbler, by promoting a dense understory and improving
nesting habitat that can be improved through selective logging, which increases
the density of the shrub layer.

c) Wetlands

An important component of the enhancement plan is to create new wetland areas
that provide amphibian breeding habitat, including potential breeding habitat for
Jefferson Salamanders and to improve existing wetland areas. The enhancement
plan includes 0.3 ha of wetland creation and enhancement of 4.0 ha of existing
wetlands.

Three new wetlands are proposed to potentially enhance the off-site habitat for
Jefferson Salamander which is a threatened species in Ontario. These wetlands
will provide habitat for a variety of amphibians and potential breeding habitat for
Jefferson Salamander. The strategic location and design of these wetlands have
the potential to increase the carrying capacity of this species in the area. The
results from the Acton Quarry enhancement plan will be transferable, and these
techniques may be applied throughout its range to increase habitat and
population of this threatened species.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              47
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


d) Old Field and Thicket Management

A total area of 11.8 ha is proposed to be managed for old field or thicket by
maintaining the sites in an open or semi-open condition by controlling the spread
and growth of trees and shrubs. Thickets are typically in a mid-successional
stage between meadow and forest.

Thickets provide habitat for bird species which require open grassland for
hunting, but abundant vertical structures for perching and dense shrub cover for
nesting. Small patches of thicket are abundant throughout the study area and
Niagara Escarpment region; however few new thickets are becoming established
due to changing agricultural practices, natural succession, and suburban
development.

Old fields are culturally, early successional ecological features that provide
habitat for wildlife such as raptors and certain snake species which are attracted
by the abundance of small mammals. Within the Niagara Escarpment region and
the study area old fields are abundant, and contribute to the diversity of the
natural landscape mosaic.

4.7.1.2 Acton Quarry Extension Rehabilitation Plan

An important component of the proposed Acton Quarry Extension is the
progressive and final rehabilitation plan. The rehabilitation plan focuses on site-
specific ecological restoration within the licensed boundary and includes the
following key goals:

   providing a net gain in biological diversity of habitat types;
   linking habitats within the proposed license area to regional habitats;
   using native species in rehabilitation efforts;
   creating a naturalized and ecologically productive landscape;
   providing for a diversity of wildlife habitat types;
   providing for aquatic habitat; and
   expanding significant woodlands.

See Figures 19 and 20.

The rehabilitation plan has been designed to address provincial, regional and
local policies and ensure the application results in net ecological gain in
combination with the off-site enhancements initiated prior to and during
extraction.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               48
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


Taking into account policy requirements, the rehabilitation plan for the Extension
has been designed to include:

   90 ha of lakes, designed to maintain passive movement of groundwater to
   support natural features surrounding the proposed extension. The lakes also
   incorporate aquatic features which include varied shorelines with shallow near
   shore habitats and shoals to provide spawning and foraging habitat for variety
   of fish species;

   2.7 km of cliffs which are the most prominent feature of the Niagara
   Escarpment;

   18.2 ha of new woodlands that enlarge existing significant woodlands,
   improve linkages between the edge of the extraction areas and existing
   forest, swamp and other wetland communities. As part of the rehabilitation
   plan over 80% of the non-aquatic lands will be forested;

   680 m of talus slopes which incorporates a variety of subterranean features
   and the potential for diverse microclimate conditions. Talus slopes are
   important for snakes, invertebrates and small mammals; and

   6.5 ha of shoreline wetlands which provide important feeding and breeding
   habitat for both terrestrial and aquatic species and will link the site to the
   adjacent natural areas.

Rehabilitation in the proposed quarry extension will be progressive and will follow
the phasing of extraction to minimize disturbed area during the life of the
operation.

The proposed landform is suitable for conservation and recreational uses and
contributes to the goals of the Niagara Escarpment Plan, Greenbelt Plan and the
rural system in the Region of Halton and Town of Halton Hills.

Dufferin Aggregates has also submitted a Site Plan Amendment application to
amend the existing Acton Quarry rehabilitation plan. The existing approved
Acton Quarry rehabilitation plan requires 3 dry areas (dewatered) with a
vegetated quarry floor, forested slopes and areas of exposed cliff faces.

In contrast, the proposed rehabilitated landform creates of diversity of landforms
and features, including lakes, wetlands, vertical cliff faces, forests, talus slopes
and open fields. See Figure 21. Compared to the existing approved rehabilitated
landform, the proposal provides flexibility to store and release water as desired.
Under the current approval, the majority of the pumping to maintain dry
conditions would occur during peak flow, providing minimal to no benefit to the
natural environment.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             49
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The proposed revisions to the rehabilitation plan in Phase 1 of the Acton Quarry
are currently being processed by the Ministry of Natural Resources. The
proposed revisions to Phases 2 and 3 will addressed as part of the Acton Quarry
Extension.

4.7.2 Summary of Natural Heritage Features

Overall, the application results in a net environmental gain to the Greenlands
System while making available as much mineral aggregate resources as close to
market as possible.

The application results in the removal of 21.6 ha of low function, degraded, and /
or isolated natural heritage features. To mitigate for the loss of these natural
heritage features the rehabilitation plan for the Acton Quarry Extension in
combination with the off-site enhancement plan will result in:

   49.4 ha of new woodlands that enlarge existing significant woodlands, and
   improve linkages;

   56.7 ha of active forest management with the goal of improving vegetation
   characteristics and securing habitat for specific bird and amphibian species.

   0.3 ha of new wetland that provide amphibian breeding habitat, including
   potential breeding habitat for Jefferson Salamander;

   6.5 ha of new wetland located between the proposed lakes and surrounding
   natural areas to create linkages and provide habitat for amphibians;

   4.0 ha of wetland enhancement that will improve the extent, quality, hydrology
   and connectivity of existing wetland areas.

   2.7 km of limestone cliff, which are the most prominent features of the
   Niagara Escarpment, however they are also among the rarest;

   680 m of talus slopes which provide a variety of subterranean features and
   important habitat for snakes, invertebrates and small mammals;

   90 ha of lakes that will include aquatic habitat and provide a future fisheries
   resource;

   11.8 ha of grassland / thicket management which will provide habitat for bird
   species, small mammals and snakes.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               50
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


4.8    On-site Cultural Heritage Resources

The proposed extraction area consists of three residences and nine agricultural
barns / outbuildings.

A built heritage assessment, cultural heritage landscape                study   and
archaeological assessment was completed by Archaeologix Inc.

The cultural heritage landscape study did not identify any significant cultural
heritage landscapes. The built heritage assessment concluded the residences,
barns and outbuildings are not significant based on either the age of the
structures or the extensive alterations that have occurred to the structures.

The archaeological assessment indentified one location in Phase 4 requiring a
Stage 3 archaeological investigation and a location in Phase 5 / 6 West and
Phase 7 which required a Stage 4 archaeological investigation.

In Phase 4, the Stage 3 investigation concluded the significance and information
potential of the site was low due to the limited amount of cultural material and the
absence of any subsurface features or structural remains.

In Phase 5 / 6 and Phase 7 the Stage 4 archaeological investigation produced a
range of 19th century artifacts and cultural features consistent with a mid to late
19th century domestic settlements. The site has been completely excavated, and
the artifacts removed and documented in accordance with provincial guidelines.

Based on these assessments the proposed extraction area does not contain any
significant cultural heritage landscapes or built heritage features requiring
conservation and the archaeological resources have been conserved based on
provincial, regional and local policies.

4.9   Other On-site Considerations

The Georgetown municipal water supply system comprises three well fields
located downgradient at distances of more than 3.5 km from the quarry. Halton
Region has undertaken a study to refine the capture zones of their municipal
wells; however, the results have not been released. Based on the current
mapping of the wellhead protection zones (based on travel time) a small portion
of the east side of Phase 4 encroaches into Zone 3, a 2 to 10 year time of travel
zone for the Georgetown well. No activities are proposed for this area that are
restricted within Zone 3 and no impacts are predicted.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                   51
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


4.10   After Use of Dufferin’s Land Holdings

Dufferin has assembled over 28 properties, totaling 615 ha. These lands are
currently used for the existing Acton Quarry, rural residential, agricultural and
conservation uses.

The rehabilitated landform and protected natural heritage areas can provide an
important year-round recreational, educational, water management and
conservation asset in the Town of Halton Hills. Subject to approval of the
extension as proposed, Dufferin Aggregates will convey +/- 600 ha of land
(quarry and buffer lands) for public use after extraction, and implement a vision
for the area by creating and building the following facilities subject to the required
approvals:


   Recreational Activities / Facilities Hiking Trails       Tennis Courts
   Trail Staging Areas                                      Fishing
   Horseback Riding Trails                                  Ice Skating
   Mountain Bike Trails                                     Cross-Country Skiing
   Swimming, including a beach area                         Snowshoeing
   Boating                                                  Tobogganing
   Baseball Diamonds                                        Picnic Area / Pavilion
   Soccer Fields                                            Concession Stand
                                                            Boat Rental Facility


Public Education / Natural Environment:

   Public Education Centre
   Interpretative Displays (natural environment, geology, water, cultural heritage,
   ecological restoration)
   Historic Lime Kilns
   Wildlife Observation Area / Outlooks

Water Management:

   Creation of lakes and a reservoir
   Low flow augmentation for downstream aquatic habitat in Black Creek.
   Low flow augmentation for Acton (Halton) Waste Water Treatment Plant
   assimilative capacity in Black Creek.
   Optimal allocation of available water downstream to Scotch Block Tributary
   and 16 Mile Creek.
   Mitigating potential climate change effects by assuring availability of water for
   long-term protection of adjacent water resources (wetlands, creeks, and
   springs).
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              52
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The site would provide a year-round day use park that could be used by day
camps, school educational programs, local organizations and the general public.
It would be comparable in size and use to the Kelso Conservation Area and
Bronte Creek Provincial Park.

The lands north of 22nd Sideroad would be focused on active uses and lands
south of 22nd Sideroad would be focused on passive uses and conservation
efforts.

The vision for Dufferin’s Acton land holdings has been designed taking into
account the Town of Halton Hills “Recreation & Parks Strategic Action Plan”
(September, 2007). The Strategic Plan identified a number of existing and
emerging trends in the area such as:

   The aging population will expect higher quality recreation and park services
   that involve wellness and active living;

   There will be a departure from traditional stand-alone facilities towards those
   that are larger and can provide multiple -uses;

   The need for more outdoor fields as pressure mounts to accommodate
   growing sports such as soccer at both the youth and adult levels;

   The need for more trails since walking is ranked as the most popular physical
   activity among Ontarians, and the demand for trail networks is at all time high;

   The demand for passive outdoor spaces is becoming more prevalent;

   The need to integrate environmental features into park settings (e.g.
   woodlots, native grasslands, gardens, etc..) as a result of peoples increased
   awareness of the environment and their desire to be further connected to
   nature; and

   The need for partnerships with agencies, community organizations and the
   private sector to deliver the recreational and park needs of a community.

The size and diversity of Dufferin’s land holdings as a contiguous block become
increasingly valuable since:

   The landscape of southern Ontario has changed over the years with the
   conversion of land to residential and other urban types of uses, division of
   larger tracks of land into smaller parcels and the fragmentation of forest and
   agricultural lands. These land use changes have made it more difficult to
   acquire large contiguous tracks of land to provide for recreational and
   conservation opportunities.
          Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                     53
          Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
          February, 2009


     The majority of Ontario’s population can benefit from this park due to its
     location. The site is located in the GTA, a highly populated area that is
     experiencing significant amounts of growth. The 2001 population of the GTA
     was 5.3 million people and it is expected to grow to approximately 8 million
     people by 2031. This projected increase in population is expected to
     significantly increase the demand for local public recreation opportunities in
     the near future. Parks of this size with multiple uses have a service range of
     a two hour driving distance.20 By 2031 there will be over 11 million people
     within a two-hour travel area bounded by and including the Regions of
     Niagara, Waterloo, Dufferin, Simcoe, York and Durham.21

     The lands are located in an area where the Niagara Escarpment Parks and
     Open Space System could be enhanced. Dufferin’s land holdings provide a
     strategic location for a new public park and conservation area as the nearest
     facilities are located approximately 5 km north (Silver Creek Conservation
     Area) and 8 km south (Halton Falls Conservation Area). A smaller
     Conservation Area, the Limehouse Conservation Area, is located
     approximately 1.5 km east of Dufferin’s lands however due to the relative
     small size of this conservation area, the type of recreational activities it offers
     is limited. These sites could be connected by the Bruce Trail helping to
     establish the area as a recreational node that has the potential to become a
     destination for a multitude of recreational enthusiasts. See Figure 22; and

     The lands are within close proximity to major transportation routes, such as
     Regional Road 25, Trafalgar Road, Hwy 7 and Hwy 401.

The demand for new recreational opportunities, public parkland and natural
landscapes is well documented:

     The Niagara Escarpment Commission’s Strategic Plan recognizes that
     increases in population and growth in the GTA are increasing demands for
     recreational opportunities, public parkland and natural landscapes, while at
     the same time increasing demand for aggregates22. One of the goals in the
     Strategic Plan is to strengthen the NEC partnerships and collaborations to
     support geo-tourism, public access and protection of parkland and natural
     areas.23

     Conservation Halton’s Watershed Report Card (2005) recognizes the need
     for quality recreational opportunities in a natural setting.24 In this report,

20
     Ontario Provincial Parks – Planning and Management Policies, MNR 1992
21
     Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, Schedule 3 excluding the County of
     Northumberland, County and City of Peterborough and City of Kawartha Lakes, MPIR 2006
22
     Niagara Escarpment Commission, Strategic Plan (Updated), pp5
23
     Niagara Escarpment Commission, Strategic Plan (Updated), pp8
24
     Halton Conservation Watershed Report Card, 2005
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                      54
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


      Conservation Halton documents the declining trend in being able to provide
      recreational opportunities due to the increasing demand as the population
      increases in the watershed. Conservation Halton recognizes that “effective
      quarry rehabilitation projects can create critical greenspace for rapidly
      expanding communities.25

      The Region of Halton’s Strategic Plan (2007 – 2010) includes a goal to
      “Protect greenspace and enhance public accessibility, where appropriate”.
      Two of the actions include: “Complete development and commence
      implementation of the Greenlands Securement Strategy.” and “Develop the
      Limestone Legacy Project, in cooperation with Conservation Halton, to
      provide for a regional-scale park and open space system based on the
      Regional Waterfront parks model.” The Plan’s goal is to create a sustainable
      network of work class conservation parks for ecological health and to provide
      public green space for education and recreation.”26

      The Town of Halton Hills currently provides over 145 ha hectares of parkland
      and open space for both local and Town-wide parks. The Town of Halton
      Hills “Recreation & Parks Strategic Action Plan” identifies the need to
      proactively add to its supply of parkland including multi-use design parks,
      outdoor fields (soccer fields, baseball diamonds, and tennis courts), trails, and
      the integration of environmental features into park settings.

Dufferin’s vision would allow the site to assist in meeting the anticipated demand
for parkland and recreational opportunities. The site could also be managed
complementary to the objectives of the Niagara Escarpment Parks and Open
Space System and the goals and objectives of the Ontario provincial park
system.

The objectives of the Niagara Escarpment Parks and Open Space System are:

      “To protect unique ecological and historical areas;

      To provide adequate opportunities for outdoor education and recreation;

      To provide for adequate public access to the Niagara Escarpment;

      To complete a public system of major parks and open space through
      additional land acquisition and park and open space planning;

      To secure a route for the Bruce Trail;


25
     Conservation Halton, ViewPoint – Quarry Expansion and Rehabilitation, October 2004.
26
     Region of Halton, Report No. CS-104-07
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             55
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


      To maintain and enhance the natural environment of the Niagara
      Escarpment;

      To support tourism by providing opportunities on public land for discovery and
      enjoyment by Ontario’s residents and visitors; and

      To provide a common understanding and appreciation of the Niagara
      Escarpment”

The goal and objectives of the Ontario provincial park system is:

“To ensure that Ontario’s provincial parks protect significant natural, cultural, and
recreational environments, while providing ample opportunities for visitors to
participate in recreational activities.

The four key objectives are:

      Protection: To protect provincially significant elements of the natural and
      cultural landscape of Ontario.

      Recreation: To provide outdoor recreation opportunities ranging from high-
      intensity day-use to low-intensity wilderness experiences.

      Heritage Appreciation: To provide opportunities for exploration            and
      appreciation of the outdoor natural and cultural heritage of Ontario.

      Tourism: To provide Ontario’s residents and out-of-province visitors with
      opportunities to discover and experience the distinctive regions of the
      province.”27

Dufferin has experience in building public/private partnerships and creating a
public asset for the community. As part of Dufferin Aggregates’ Milton Quarry
Extension approval, Dufferin entered into an agreement to provide 405 ha (1,000
ac) of both natural and rehabilitated wetland, lakes, reservoir and forest to the
Conservation Authority. See Figure 23.




27
     Ontario Provincial Parks Policy Statement, MNR 1992
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                           56
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


The 405 ha is strategically located adjacent to 1,200 ha (2,965 ac) of
conservation land owned by Conservation Halton and the Regional Municipality
of Halton. This area forms a significant concentration of public lands in the GTA
that will provide a mix of passive and active recreational and conservation uses
for future generations.




                                                Public Trail and outlook at the Milton Quarry
Rehabilitated wetland located in the southern
                                                overlooking rehabilitated areas
portion of the Milton Quarry




In Acton, Dufferin is currently working to establish a new public trail system on
their lands north of the rail line and has entered into an agreement with the Bruce
Trail Association to realign the existing trail route to a more optimal location south
of 22nd Sideroad on their additional lands.

4.11     Local Economy

The Acton Quarry Extension will be an important part of the local economy.
Licensing 71 million tonnes will extend the life of the Acton Quarry by
approximately 18 – 24 years. On average the Acton Quarry employs 60 people
and indirectly 150 people through various contractors and suppliers working on-
site. On average the quarry spends over $12 million annually on services,
municipal taxes and levies.

The Region of Halton and the Town of Halton Hills will also benefit from having
an adequate supply of close to market aggregates to help build and maintain the
required infrastructure.     Ensuring an adequate supply of close to market
aggregate will reduce the cost of aggregate to the public and private sector and
assist the public sector in maximizing its investments dollars.

The quarry also provides the critical resource to support other industries in
Halton such as the construction industry, cement and concrete manufacturing
industry and other associated industries.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            57
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


5.0   SURROUNDING LAND USES
The proposed Acton Quarry Extension is located in a rural area. Within 1
kilometre of the proposed extension the predominant land uses include the
existing Acton Quarry, agricultural operations, natural heritage features, rural-
residential uses, commercial uses, the Town of Acton and another aggregate
extraction operation. See Figure 24.

The lands surrounding the proposed Acton Quarry Extension are typical of the
rural landscape above the Escarpment in the Region of Halton. The surrounding
area is comprised of rolling, marginal agricultural land. The area consists of
limited pasture and produces a mix of cash crops and hay. The agricultural
landscape is fragmented by non-agricultural uses and various natural heritage
features. No significant livestock operations exist adjacent to the proposed
Extension and livestock is limited to that associated with hobby farms and small
scale farms.

The following is a summary of surrounding land uses surrounding the proposed
extension. Surrounding natural heritage features are summarized in Section6.0.

Phase 4 is located to the north and west of Phase 1 of the Acton Quarry. Within
500 m there are no residences and there is one commercial use (Oyster King
Mushroom Farm) located to the west.

Phase 5 / 6 is located to the south of Phase 2 and 3 of the Acton Quarry. Within
500 m there are 5 rural residences and one commercial use (Ashgrove Welding)
located to the west along Regional Road 25.

Phase 7 is located to the south of Phases 5 and 6. Within 500 m there is a
cluster of 4 rural residences located to east of the proposed extraction area.

Within 1 km of the proposed extraction area there are several rural residences,
the Town of Acton (residential subdivision, waste water treatment plant and
former industrial lands) and rural commercial uses (Eurodesign Collision, Styling
& Design, Fruitman’s Garden Centre, Heritage Kitchen and Reno’s, Ash’s Auto
Sales and Service, Sgro Auto Wreckers, Bill’s Repair, Custom Barn Board
Furniture, Cedar Hill Trout Pond and Seasoned Firewood) and three licensed
sand and gravel pits operated by CBM.

The licensed sand and gravel pits are located in Part of Lots 23, 24 & 25 in
Concession V and Part of Lot 25 in Concession IV of the Town of Halton Hills.
The Limehouse Pit began operation in 1965. Over the years the operation has
expanded twice, once in the seventies and once in the eighties. In total the
license area is 165 ha, of which 100 ha is permitted for extraction. A large
portion of the existing pit has already been extracted and rehabilitated back to
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               58
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


agriculture.   The technical studies have considered the combined impact of the
operations.

Located within 1 km of the proposed extraction operations there are several
agricultural operations producing primarily cash crops / grains. There are also
some areas that are currently fallow or used for pasture and hay production and
there is a small-scale livestock operation (hobby farm with horses). Overall, the
surrounding area is not predominated by prime agricultural lands and would not
be considered a prime agricultural area.

Surrounding agricultural operations will not be adversely impacted by the
proposed extension. Mineral aggregate extraction and agricultural production
are compatible land uses. Mineral aggregate operations are typically found
located adjacent to or in close proximity to agricultural operations. These land
uses have historically co-existed together without unacceptable impacts. For
example, the existing Acton Quarry has co-existed with farming operations in the
area for almost 50 years.

Section 5.1 outlines the proposed mitigation measures to ensure the Acton
Quarry Extension is appropriately designed and buffered from surrounding land
uses. With the implementation of these mitigation measures the Acton Quarry
Extension is compatible with and does not adversely affect surrounding land
uses.

5.1    Compatibility with Surrounding Land Uses

Provincial, regional and local policy requires that new or expanded mineral
extraction operations be operated in a manner that minimizes impacts on
surrounding land uses. The operation shall be appropriately designed, buffered
and/or separated from sensitive land uses to prevent adverse effects from odour,
noise and other contaminants, and minimize risk to public health and safety.

The Halton Hills Official Plan requires impacts to be based on predictable,
measurable, objective effects on people and the environment. Assessing
compatibility shall be based on Provincial standards, regulations and guidelines,
where they exist and will consider and identify methods of addressing the
anticipated impacts in the area affected by the extractive operation.

The proposed Extension has been designed to minimize impacts on surrounding
land uses. Technical reports have been completed addressing residential wells,
blasting, noise, air quality, visual and traffic. The technical recommendations
have been incorporated into the Aggregate Resources Act Site Plans to ensure
provincial guidelines for water, noise, and blasting and air quality will be met. The
Aggregate Resources Act Site Plans list all of the operational controls and will
govern the operation of the proposed extension.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               59
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


Below is a summary of how the operation has been designed to protect
residential wells and minimize impacts from blasting, noise, air quality, visual and
traffic. With the implementation of these mitigation measures the Acton Quarry
Extension is compatible with and does not adversely affect surrounding land
uses.

5.1.1 Domestic Water Supplies

Conestoga-Rovers & Associates conducted extensive hydrogeologic assessment
and concluded that surrounding wells will not be adversely affected by the
proposed quarry extension due to the separation distance, hydrogeologic
conditions and the mitigation measures proposed to protect surrounding
ecological features will also serve to protect surrounding wells (see Section 6.1).

During extraction, Dufferin will implement a comprehensive monitoring program
of groundwater quality and quantity on-site and at selected residential properties.
The protection of individual wells will be accomplished by setting performance
based targets at strategically located monitoring wells. These wells will be
monitored and any potential influences on groundwater levels from the quarry
operations can be identified early and mitigated if required.

5.1.2   Noise

Aercoustics Engineering Limited conducted a noise assessment of the proposed
extension. The proposed operation has been designed to satisfy Ministry of
Environment Noise Guidelines (NPC 205 and 232) for surrounding receptors.
The following noise controls have been implemented in the Aggregate Resources
Act Site Plans for the proposed extension:

   Equipment used for overburden stripping and rehabilitation, as well as other
   construction projects should satisfy the noise emission levels of MOE NPC-
   115 “Noise due to Construction Equipment”;

   Quarry equipment is required to satisfy specified noise levels;

   Drilling and portable processing will be limited to the daytime period;

   Concurrent operations of phases can occur provided no simultaneous drilling
   or portable plant operations;

   During the night-time and early morning there should be no concurrent
   aggregate processing and shipping;

   In specified locations acoustic berms and portable drill barriers will be
   implemented to reduce noise levels;
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              60
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


   Minimum first bench heights are specified to ensure that some of the quarry
   equipment is operated below grade;

   Direction of extraction is specified to utilize the quarry face to reduce noise
   levels;

   No portable processing in Phase 4, 5E (when extraction is occurring in this
   phase), Phase 5 W; and

   In Phase 7 the number of shipment trucks is restricted during the early
   morning period and the portable plant must be housed in enclosures to
   reduce noise levels.

With the implementation of the above noted noise controls, the quarry operation
is predicted to satisfy the MOE sound level limits for all receptors and will not
result in unacceptable impacts on surrounding receptors.

5.1.3 Blasting

Golder Associates conducted a blasting impact assessment for the proposed
extension. The proposed operation has been designed to satisfy the Ministry of
Environment Blasting Guidelines (NPC 119). The following blasting controls have
been included in the Aggregate Resources Act Site Plans for the proposed
extension:

   The licensee will monitor all blasts for ground vibrations and blast
   overpressure and will operate to ensure compliance with current provincial
   guidelines;

   Blasting will not occur on a holiday or between the hours of 6:00 p.m. on any
   day and 8:00 a.m. on the following day; and

   All blast monitoring reports must be retained by the licensee and make
   available upon request by the Ministry of Natural Resources for audit
   purposes.

With the implementation of the above noted controls, the quarry operation is
predicted to satisfy the MOE ground and air vibrations limits for all receptors and
will not result in unacceptable impacts on surrounding receptors and will protect
wells and structures.

5.1.4 Air Quality

Rowan Williams Davies & Irwin Inc. (RWDI) conducted an air quality assessment
for the proposed extension. The air quality assessment included an emission and
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            61
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


dispersion modeling report and a best management practices plan for dust
control.

The best management plan includes details regarding the sources of fugitive dust
at the facility, control measures, an implementation plan and a schedule of the
inspection and maintenance practices. Based on the recommendations of the air
quality assessment the following controls have been included in the Aggregate
Resources Act Site Plans to ensure the operation satisfies the Ministry of
Environment Air Quality limits contained in Regulation 419 / 05:

   Dust will be mitigated on-site;

   Water or another provincially approved dust suppressant will be applied to
   internal haul roads and processing areas as often as required to mitigate
   dust;

   Processing equipment will be equipped with dust suppressing or collection
   devices, where the equipment creates dust and is being operated within 300
   metres of a sensitive receptor; and

   The Licensee will implement the requirements of the best management plan
   that has been prepared for the site.

Operating in accordance with these requirements will ensure air quality limits as
outlined in Ministry of Environment Regulation 419/05 are adhered to and
adjacent receptors are protected from unacceptable impacts.

5.1.5 Visual

MHBC Planning conducted a site visit of the subject site and surrounding area
and provided recommendations that have been included on the Aggregate
Resources Act Site Plans to screen the operation and maintain the open
landscape character of the area. The proposed Extension will be screened
based on a combination of the following:

   maintaining trees within Dufferin’s additional lands and setback areas;

   additional tree planting on Dufferin’s additional lands;

   acoustic berms, where required; and

   in areas where there is not sufficient vegetation to screen the proposed
   operation a minimum 3 m berm will be constructed adjacent to public roads.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                62
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The acoustic and visual berms will be vegetated and trees and shrubs will be
planted at the base of the berms. The primary plantings will include White Spruce
and White Pine. Other tree and shrub species include: Sugar Maple, Paper Birch,
Trembling Aspen, Bur Oak, Red Oak, Dogwoods, Viburnums, Sumac Species,
American Elder, Nannyberry, and Highbush Cranberry.

All on-site berms will be built in stages to mitigate noise and visual impacts from
the active extraction areas.

With the implementation of the above noted controls, the quarry operation will
maintain the open landscape character of the area and minimize visual impacts
to ensure there are no unacceptable impacts on the surrounding area.

5.1.6 Transportation

The Acton Quarry Extension proposes to extend the life of the Acton Quarry,
rather than increase the volume of aggregate that is permitted to be extracted
and hauled from the site annually. The Acton Quarry has approvals in place to
ship 4.0 million tonnes annually. This is not proposed to change with the
proposed Extension.

MMM Group completed a traffic impact assessment to determine whether the
existing Acton Quarry haul routes could continue to accommodate the truck
traffic related to the Extension. Included in the study was an assessment of the
proposed haul route on 3rd Line (south of 22nd Sideroad) and a new quarry truck
crossing on 3rd Line between Phases 1 and 4.

The Acton Quarry has two existing entrances / exits for highway trucks from 4th
Line and 22nd Sideroad and these will continued to be used for the proposed
extension. The majority of highway trucks use the 4th Line entrance / exit and
travel south on 4th Line, east on 17th Sideroad. From 17th Sideroad highway
trucks either go south on Trafalgar Road to Highway 401 or east on Maple Ave.
The remainder of trucks use the 22nd Sideroad entrance / exit and travel west to
Regional Road 25 and south on Regional Road 25 to access Highway 401.

Each of these routes is an established haul route designed to accommodate
truck traffic. During the spring season (March to April), all the highway trucks use
the 22nd Sideroad entrance / exit to Regional Road 25 because of the half load
restrictions along 4th Line. The only change from the established haul routes
occurs in Phase 7, where highway trucks are proposed to use 3rd Line south of
22nd Sideroad. 3rd Line South will need to be upgraded at Dufferin’s expense to
accommodate truck traffic from Phase 7. In this location, 3rd Line is a dead end
road and the proposed haul route will not pass any sensitive receptors. Trucks
will travel north on 3rd Line to 22nd Sideroad and will either travel west to Highway
25, or east through the existing quarry to 4th Line.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               63
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The Town of Halton Hills Official Plan encourages the establishment of new
aggregate operations on established haul routes (E.6.4.3.4.c) and requires the
effect of additional truck traffic to be evaluated to ensure the existing haul route
can function as a safe and efficient haul route (E.6.4.3.4.c). The application will
utilize existing haul routes, except for 3rd Line South and will not increase the
amount of aggregate that is permitted to be shipped annually from the Acton
Quarry.

The traffic impact assessment has been conservative and under normal
conditions truck traffic will be substantially less then evaluated in the traffic
impact assessment. Even considering an overly conservative scenario it is
concluded that the existing haul routes are built to an appropriate standard and
can continue to accommodate truck traffic from the Acton Quarry Extension.
The traffic impact assessment recommends the following measures be
implemented to accommodate the proposed Extension:

      3rd Line south of 22nd Sideroad should be upgraded to a sufficient
      standard to accommodate truck traffic; and

      Traffic lights should be installed at the proposed 3rd Line crossing
      between Phases 1 and 4, similar to those at the 22nd Sideroad crossing.
          Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             64
          Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
          February, 2009


6.0     SURROUNDING NATURAL HERITAGE FEATURES

The area surrounding the proposed Extension consists of generally poor and
shallow soils and agriculture uses were historically less intensive. As a result,
large woodland and wetlands were left relatively undisturbed and there are large
well-connected systems of woodland and wetlands providing north to south and
east to west connections outside of the proposed extraction area.

The subject site and surrounding area has been subject to extensive multi-year
environmental and water resources investigations. Based on the findings and
recommendations of these studies, important natural heritage and hydrologic
features have been excluded from the extraction area and will be protected. See
Section 6.1 of this report.

The following is a summary of surrounding natural heritage features that have
been identified within the study area. These features will be protected and in
some cases enhanced:

To the north of Phase 4 is the ESA # 47, Black Creek at Acton. This ESA
includes portions of the Black Creek at Acton wetland complex as well as valley
slopes and adjacent tablelands. The tablelands are comprised of a mixture of
deciduous forests, old fields and shrub thickets. Some of the valley slopes
contain seepage slopes with marsh and swamp communities.28 Based on the
field work and analyses completed the following natural heritage features were
identified within the ESA: significant woodlands; habitat for area sensitive birds,
rare birds, rare plants, rare mammals (in large forest blocks); high and low
sensitivity drainage/aquatic features; provincially significant wetlands; and
significant habitat for the Hooded Warbler.

To the southwest of Phase 4 and to the west of Phase 5 / 6 West is ESA # 28,
Acton Swamp. This ESA is part of the provincially significant Halton-Escarpment
Wetland Complex. The Halton Escarpment Wetland Complex is a 1269 ha
provincially significant wetland complex, composed of two wetland types (marsh
and swamp).29 Based on the field work and analyses completed the following
features were identified within the ESA: significant woodlands; habitat for area
sensitive birds, rare birds, rare plants, rare mammals (in large forest blocks); low
sensitivity drainage/aquatic features and provincially significant wetlands.

To the east of Phase 5/6 and south and east of Phase 7 is the Speyside Forest
Regional ANSI. This Regional ANSI contains the headwaters for several Sixteen
Mile Creek tributaries.  The ANSI is also part of a 14 km naturally vegetated,
wooded corridor. The site is representative of bedrock plain and swamp habitats
28
     Halton Natural Areas Inventory, 2006
29
     Ibid
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                65
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


and encompasses a large area of gently sloping rich escarpment plain forests on
a bedrock drift complex. This ANSI contains ESA # 29, Speyside Escarpment
Woods. This ESA is part of the provincially significant Halton-Escarpment
wetland complex. Habitats in the ESA alternate from dry upland communities
dominated by sugar maple and wet lowlands comprised of red and silver maple
swamp.

Based on the field work and analyses completed within the Speyside Forest
Regional ANSI and ESA # 29 the following features were identified: significant
woodlands; habitat for the West Virginia White Butterfly; habitat for area sensitive
birds, rare birds, rare plants, rare mammals (in large forest blocks); significant
amphibian woodland breeding ponds; low sensitivity drainage/aquatic features;
provincially significant wetland; other wetlands (high and low function); confirmed
breeding habitat, and suitable summer and winter habitat for the Jefferson
Salamander; and significant habitat for the Hooded Warbler.

Outside of these core environmental features, the field work and analyses
identified the following natural heritage features on lands surrounding the
proposed Extension: other wetlands (high, low or undetermined functions); low
sensitivity drainage/aquatic features; provincially significant wetlands; significant
woodland; Butternut, American Ginseng; habitat for area sensitive birds, rare
birds, rare plants, rare mammals (in large forest blocks); habitat for the West
Virginia White Butterfly; confirmed breeding habitat, and suitable summer and
winter habitat for the Jefferson Salamander; and significant amphibian woodland
breeding ponds. See Figures 25 to 29.

6.1 Mitigation Measures to Protect and Enhance Surrounding Natural
    Heritage Features

Provincial, regional and local policies require that mineral resource extraction be
undertaken in a manner that minimizes environmental impacts. A detailed, multi-
year environmental and water resources investigation was undertaken and
approximately two thirds of the land Dufferin assembled both north and south of
the existing quarry will be protected for conservation uses. No extraction will
take place on these lands. Activities in these areas will be limited to monitoring,
environmental mitigation, and ecological enhancement.

Important natural heritage and hydrologic features have been excluded from the
extraction area and will be protected. These features will be enhanced prior to
and during extraction to provide enhancements in the short term to the
surrounding landscape. The purpose of the enhancement plan is to improve the
quality, amount and configuration of habitat in the study area. The core
principles applied in the enhancement plan are:

   Restore and enhance landscape connectivity;
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             66
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009



   Enlarge significant woodlands;

   Improve and provide habitat for target species including amphibians,
   Jefferson Salamander and Hooded Warbler; and

   Use of locally sourced native plant stock.

The offsite enhancement plan includes woodland creation (31.2 ha), forest
management plan (56.7), wetland creation (0.3 ha), wetland enhancement (4.0
ha), and old field / thicket management (11.8 ha).

The following mitigation measures will be implemented to ensure no negative
impact on adjacent natural heritage features:

   Maintain a minimum 15 m setback from significant woodlands;

   Maintain a minimum 30 m setback from significant wetlands;

   Installation of silt fencing during site preparation and stripping;

   Implementation of edge management techniques when creating new forest
   edges;

   Protection of groundwater and surface water regimes as outlined in the
   Adaptive Management Plan; and

   Operate in accordance with the Adaptive Management Plan which is a
   detailed mitigation, monitoring and response plan developed by Stantec,
   Ecoplans, Goodban Ecological Consulting and Conestoga Rovers &
   Associates to protect adjacent natural features.

The purpose of the Adaptive Management Plan approach is to recognize the
inherent variability in the natural environment and the gradual development of the
quarry. Rather than implement a “static” design which may not be the optimal
system for the actual conditions encountered, a flexible system is developed
which can be expanded or optimized based on observed performance ensuring
protection of the natural environment. This approach is widely accepted for
environmental mitigation and was approved and made a condition of license for
Dufferin’s Milton Quarry Extension.

The Adaptive Management Plan addresses the variability of the natural
environment and the mitigation requirements through an organized process of
design, implementation, monitoring, evaluation, and optimization. The mining
and mitigation plans for the proposed Extension are ideally suited to the Adaptive
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                 67
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


Environmental Management approach because of the gradual development of
the quarry over time, and the natural variability of both the water resources and
biological conditions.

The principal purpose of the mitigation system is to support the water regimes
around the perimeter of the proposed Extension. The mitigation system is
designed to ensure the protection of water-related ecological features and other
water resources including water supply wells so there are no unacceptable
impacts.      Interim mitigation during extraction and lake filling is comprised
primarily of direct surface water discharge to protect surrounding features at
specified times, locations and flow rates. The direct protection of adjacent
surface water resources will support groundwater levels underlying and beyond
these features. Additionally groundwater recharge wells along the northern
extraction limit of Phase 4 will be implemented to ensure groundwater levels are
appropriately maintained in this area under interim conditions. See Figure 30.

The AMP encompasses a comprehensive and integrated groundwater, surface
water and ecological monitoring program to proactively identify any potential
influences of extraction and adjust or initiate the appropriate mitigation activities.
As part of the pre-extraction monitoring component, the feature-specific
groundwater and surface water performance-based targets will be reviewed and
refined if appropriate based on additional baseline data collection.
After rehabilitation (creation of lakes), the interim mitigation system will no longer
be required as the lake system will support the necessary passive movement of
groundwater toward the surrounding natural features . Continued lake-to-lake
transfers (gravity flow or pumping) and surface discharge by gravity will be
required to maintain the lake levels and to protect adjacent features.

The long term management of the Acton Quarry with the proposed Extension is
based on a more beneficial system that will require less management than that
required to implement the existing approved quarry. The existing approved
Acton Quarry requires active pumping from all 3 phases in the long term.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            68
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


7.0   POLICY ANALYSIS

The following is a detailed policy analysis of the Growth Plan for the Greater
Golden Horseshoe, Provincial Policy Statement, Niagara Escarpment Plan,
Greenbelt Plan, Region of Halton Official Plan and the Town of Halton Hills
Official Plan as they relate to the Acton Quarry Extension.

This policy analysis relies upon information contained in the following technical
reports prepared for this application. In many cases the policy requirements and
a detailed discussion have been addressed in the foregoing sections of this
report and are cross referenced to avoid repetition.

   “Geology and Water Resources Assessment Report (3 Volumes) Acton
   Quarry Extension Town of Halton Hills, Ontario”, Conestoga-Rovers &
   Associates, November 2008.

   “Level I and II Natural Environment Technical Report Acton Quarry Extension
   Town of Halton Hills, Ontario”, Stantec Consulting Ltd., Goodban Ecological
   Consulting and Ecoplans Limited, December 2008.

   “Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Expansion Project Noise Impact Study”,
   Aercoustics Engineering Limited, November 2008.

   “Blasting Impact Assessment Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Proposed
   Extension”, Golder Associated Ltd., November 2008.

   “Air Quality Assessment Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension Halton
   Hills, Ontario”, RWDI Consulting Engineers and Scientists, December 2008.

   “Traffic Impact Assessment Proposed Acton Quarry Extension Town of
   Halton Hills”, MMM Group, January 2009.

   “Archaeological Assessment (Stages 1, 2 & 3) Dufferin Aggregates, a
   Business Unit of St. Lawrence Cement Inc. Acton Quarry Extension Part of
   Lots 19, 20, 21 and 22, Concession 3 and Part of Lots 20, 21 & 22,
   Concession 4 Town of Halton Hills Region of Halton, Ontario”, Archaeologix
   Inc., November 2008.

   “Archaeological Assessment (Stage 4) Dufferin Aggregates, a Business Unit
   of St. Lawrence Cement Inc. Acton Quarry Extension Part of Lots 19, 20, 21
   and 22, Concession 3 and Part of Lots 20, 21 & 22, Concession 4 Town of
   Halton Hills Region of Halton, Ontario”, Archaeologix Inc., November 2008.
          Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            69
          Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
          February, 2009


      “Archaeological Assessment (Stages 1, 2 & 3) Dufferin Aggregates, a
      Business Unit of St. Lawrence Cement Inc. Acton Quarry Extension Part of
      Lot 24, Concession 3 Town of Halton Hills Region of Halton, Ontario”,
      Archaeologix Inc., October 2008.

      “Cultural Landscape Study and Built Heritage Assessment Dufferin
      Aggregates, a Business Unit of St. Lawrence Cement Inc. Acton Quarry
      Extension Part of Lots 19, 20, 21, 22 and 24, Concession 3 and Part of Lots
      20, 21 and 22, Concession 4 Town of Halton Hills Region of Halton, Ontario”,
      Archaeologix Inc., November 2008.

      “Agricultural Impact Assessment, Acton Quarry Extension”, MHBC Planning,
      January 2009.

      “Performance-Based Adaptive Management Plan Acton Quarry Extension –
      Town of Halton Hills, Ontario”, Conestoga-Rovers & Associates, Stantec
      Consulting Ltd., Goodban Ecological Consulting and Ecoplans Limited
      November 2008.

7.1      Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, 2006

The Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, 2006 was prepared and
approved under the Places to Grow Act. The Growth Plan provides the following
context:

         “The Greater Golden Horseshoe (GGH) is one of the fastest growing
         regions in North America. It is also the destination of choice for many
         people and businesses relocating from other parts of Canada and around
         the world. They settle here because of the high quality of life and the
         economic opportunities. This is a place of prosperity where, through their
         skills and talents, people are building a great future for themselves.”
         (Section 1.1)

         “Over the next quarter century, communities within the GGH will continue
         to experience the benefits that come with growth, including: vibrant,
         diversified communities and economies; new and expanded community
         services; and arts, culture and recreation facilities. However, without
         properly managing growth, communities will continue to experience the
         negative aspects associated with rapid growth, such as increased traffic
         congestion, deteriorating air and water quality, and the disappearance of
         agricultural lands and natural resources.” (Section 1.1)

         “Decade of neglect and lack of sufficient investment have resulted in the
         current infrastructure deficit. Tens of billions of dollars beyond current
         levels of investment will be required before the situation is back in
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              70
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


      balance. All levels of government under pressure to meet public
      infrastructure needs. Additional support from federal partners; innovative,
      alternative partnership arrangements that protect the public interest; and
      the strategic staging of infrastructure investments are all required to
      respond to these challenges. Ultimately, better investment in our cities will
      help to mitigate sprawl.      Enhancing infrastructure, integrating and
      improving transit systems, protecting valuable natural resources and
      strengthening local government will all go far towards the implementation
      of this Plan.” (Section 1.1)

      “The GGH is one of the fastest growing regions in North America. By
      2031, the population of this area is forecasted to grow by an additional 3.7
      million (from 2001) to 11.5 million people, accounting for over 80 percent
      of Ontario’s population growth. The magnitude and pace of this growth
      necessitates a plan for building healthy and balanced communities and
      maintaining and improving our quality of life.” (Section 2.1). See Figure 3.

      “The GGH is blessed with a broad array of unique natural heritage
      features and areas, irreplaceable cultural heritage sites, and valuable
      renewable and non-renewable resources that are essential for the long-
      term economic prosperity, quality of life, and environmental health of the
      region. These valuable assets must be wisely protected and managed as
      part of planning for future growth. […..] A balanced approach to the wise
      use and management of all resources, including heritage, agriculture, and
      mineral aggregates, will be implemented.” (Section 4.1)

The mineral aggregate policies of the Growth Plan state:

      “Through sub-area assessment, the Ministers of Public Infrastructure
      Renewal and Natural Resources will work with municipalities, producers of
      mineral aggregate resources, and other stakeholders to identify significant
      mineral aggregate resources for the GGH, and to develop a long-term
      strategy for ensuring the wise use, conservation, availability and
      management of mineral aggregate resources in the GGH, as well as
      identifying opportunities for resource recovery and for co-ordinated
      approaches to rehabilitation where feasible.” (Section 4.2.3.1)

The Acton Quarry Extension is located within the GGH which is experiencing
extensive growth and infrastructure requirements which will require a substantial
amount of aggregate (see Sections 4.2, 4.3 and 4.4). The sub-area assessment
has not been completed by the Province; however, the proposed Extension is
identified as a “High Potential Mineral Resource Areas” in the 2006 Region of
Halton Official Plan. Making available this essential non-renewable resource is
important to assist the GGH in providing the raw material needed to build and
maintain its required infrastructure.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             71
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The proposed Extension represents a balanced approach to the wise use and
management of all resources. Approximately two-thirds of Dufferin’s lands will
be protected for conservation uses. Activities in these areas will be limited to
monitoring, environmental mitigation and ecological enhancement.             The
proposed Extension is not located within a prime agricultural area. See Sections
4.0 to 6.0.

In conclusion, the application conforms to the Growth Plan for the Greater
Golden Horseshoe.

7.2   Provincial Policy Statement (2005)

The 2005 Provincial Policy Statement (PPS) was issued under Section 3 of the
Planning Act and came into effect March 1, 2005. The PPS provides policy
direction on matters of Provincial interest related to land use planning and
development (Part 1 Preamble).

The PPS provides for appropriate development while protecting resources of
Provincial interest, public health and safety, and the quality of the natural
environment (Part 1 Preamble).

The PPS is a policy-led planning system recognizing and addressing the
complex interrelationships among environmental, economic and social factors in
land use planning. It supports a comprehensive, integrated and long-term
approach to planning, and recognizes linkages among policy areas (Part III -
How to read the Provincial Policy Statement).

The Provincial Policy Statement is more than a set of individual policies. The
PPS should be read in its entirety and the relevant policies should be applied to
each situation (Part III - How to read the Provincial Policy Statement). No single
resource should automatically take priority or another due to the complex
interrelationships among environmental, economic and social factors in land use
planning.

The PPS recognizes that the Province’s natural heritage resources, water,
agricultural lands, mineral resources, cultural heritage and archaeological
resources provide important environmental, economic and social benefits. The
wise use and management of these resources over the long term is a key
provincial interest (Part IV: Vision for Ontario’s Land Use Planning System).

Section 3 of the Planning Act requires that decisions affecting planning matters
“shall be consistent with” policy statements issued under the Act (Part II:
Legislative Authority).
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              72
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


The proposed Acton Quarry Extension is consistent with the Provincial Policy
Statement (2005) for the following reasons:

1.1.1 HEALTHY, LIVEABLE AND SAFE COMMUNITIES ARE SUSTAINED BY:

   a) promoting efficient development and land use patterns which sustain the
      financial well-being of the Province and municipalities over the long term;

The Acton Quarry Extension is an extension of an existing use, which utilizes
existing infrastructure to promote efficient development and a land use pattern
that will sustain the financial well-being of the Province and municipality over the
long term. See Section 4.5.

   b) accommodating an appropriate range and mix of residential, employment
      (including industrial, commercial and institutional uses), recreational and
      open space uses to meet long-term needs;

The Acton Quarry Extension is an interim industrial use that will provide
employment opportunities and will be rehabilitated to provide recreational and
open space uses to meet long-term needs. See Sections 4.10 and 4.11.

   c) avoiding development and land use patterns which may cause
      environmental or public health and safety concerns;

The quarry has been designed to mitigate environmental, public health and
safety concerns. See Sections 4.7.1 and 5.1.

   g) ensuring that necessary infrastructure and public service facilities are or
      will be available to meet current and projected needs.

Providing 71 million tonnes of the highest quality aggregate in a close to market
location will assist the Province, Region and Local municipality in building the
necessary infrastructure and public service facilities to meet current and
projected needs. See Sections 4.2, 4.3 and 4.4.

1.1.4 RURAL AREAS IN MUNICIPALITIES

1.1.4.1 In rural areas located in municipalities:

  a)   permitted uses and activities shall relate to the management or use of
       resources, resource-based recreational activities, limited residential
       development and other rural land uses;

The site is within a rural area as defined by the PPS and the management and
use of mineral aggregate is a permitted use.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                 73
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


  b)   development shall be appropriate to the infrastructure which is planned or
       available, and avoid the need for the unjustified and/or uneconomical
       expansion of this infrastructure;

The application is an extension of an existing use and the infrastructure is in
place to support the continuation of the quarry. See Section 4.5.

  d)   development that is compatible with the rural landscape and can be
       sustained by rural service levels should be promoted;

The development has been appropriately designed to be compatible with the
rural landscape. See Section 5.1.

  e)   locally-important agricultural and resource areas should be designated
       and protected by directing non-related development to areas where it will
       not constrain these uses;

The subject site is identified as a High Potential Mineral Resource Area in the
Regional Plan. See Section 4.2.

  f)   opportunities should be retained to locate new or expanding land uses that
       require separation from other uses; and

This site is a known deposit of mineral aggregate resources and has been
protected for resource use. The quarry has been appropriately designed and
separated from adjacent uses to prevent adverse impacts. See Sections 4.2,
5.1 and 6.1.

  g)   recreational, tourism and other economic opportunities should be
       promoted.

The operation of the quarry will provide both direct and indirect economic
opportunities and the rehabilitated quarry will provide recreational and tourism
opportunities. See Sections 4.10 and 4.11.

1.6.5 TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS

  1.6.5.1    Transportation systems should be provided which are safe, energy
             efficient, facilitate the movement of people and goods, and are
             appropriate to address projected needs.

  1.6.5.2    Efficient use shall be made of existing and planned infrastructure.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                 74
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The Acton Quarry Extension is located close to market and will utilize existing
haul routes that provide for safe, energy efficient movement of goods and is an
efficient use of existing infrastructure. See Section 5.1.6.

1.7 LONG-TERM ECONOMIC PROSPERITY

1.7.1 Long-term economic prosperity should be supported by:

 a)   optimizing the long-term availability and use of land, resources,
      infrastructure and public service facilities;

 The quarry extension optimizes the long-term availability and use of resources
 and utilizes existing infrastructure.

 e)   planning so that major facilities (such as airports, transportation/transit/rail
      infrastructure and corridors, intermodal facilities, sewage treatment
      facilities, waste management systems, oil and gas pipelines, industries
      and resource extraction activities) and sensitive land uses are
      appropriately designed, buffered and/or separated from each other to
      prevent adverse effects from odour, noise and other contaminants, and
      minimize risk to public health and safety;

 The quarry has been designed, buffered and / or separated to prevent adverse
 effects on adjacent land uses. See Section 5.1.

2.0 WISE USE AND MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES

Ontario's long-term prosperity, environmental health, and social well-being
depend on protecting natural heritage, water, agricultural, mineral and cultural
heritage and archaeological resources for their economic, environmental and
social benefits.

The application supports Ontario’s long-term prosperity, environmental health
and social well-being and makes available a close to market aggregate
resources that has economic, environmental and social benefits. See Sections
.4.0 to 6.0.

2.1   NATURAL HERITAGE

2.1.1 Natural features and areas shall be protected for the long term.

Natural features and areas will be protected for the long term, and where
appropriate enhanced. See Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             75
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


2.1.2 The diversity and connectivity of natural features in an area, and the long-
      term ecological function and biodiversity of natural heritage systems,
      should be maintained, restored or, where possible, improved, recognizing
      linkages between and among natural heritage features and areas, surface
      water features and ground water features.

The diversity and connectivity of natural features in the area and their long-term
ecological function and biodiversity will be maintained, and in some cases
restored and enhanced. See Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

2.1.3 Development and site alteration shall not be permitted in:

       a) significant habitat of endangered species and threatened species;
                                                              1
       b) significant wetlands in Ecoregions 5E, 6E and 7E ; and

       c) significant coastal wetlands.

Based on the detailed field work and analysis the extraction area does not
contain any of the above noted features. Two remnant areas that were
historically mapped as part of the larger provincially significant wetlands are
located within the proposed extraction area, but based on detailed field work and
analysis, these remnant wetland areas are of low function and do not warrant
inclusion within the provincially significant wetland . See Section 4.7.

2.1.4 Development and site alteration shall not be permitted in:

  a) significant wetlands in the Canadian Shield north of Ecoregions 5E, 6E
     and 7E;
  b) significant woodlands south and east of the Canadian Shield;

  c)   significant valleylands south and east of the Canadian Shield;

 d)    significant wildlife habitat; and

  e)   significant areas of natural and scientific interest

 unless it has been demonstrated that there will be no negative impacts on the
 natural features or their ecological functions.

Extraction is proposed within a small portion of a much larger significant
woodland. The removal of this woodland will not have a negative impact to the
natural features or the ecological functions of the woodland as a whole, and
mitigation is proposed to enhance the feature. See Section 4.7.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               76
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


2.1.5 Development and site alteration shall not be permitted in fish habitat
      except in accordance with provincial and federal requirements.

Based on the Natural Environment report, the proposed extraction area does not
contain fish habitat. See Section 4.7.

2.1.6 Development and site alteration shall not be permitted on adjacent lands
      to the natural heritage features and areas identified in policies 2.1.3, 2.1.4
      and 2.1.5 unless the ecological function of the adjacent lands has been
      evaluated and it has been demonstrated that there will be no negative
      impacts on the natural features or on their ecological functions.

The Adaptive Management Plan has been designed to mitigate and monitor
adjacent features to ensure that there is no negative impact on the natural
features or their ecological functions. See Section 6.1.

2.2 WATER

2.2.1 Planning authorities shall protect, improve or restore the quality and
      quantity of water by:

a)     using the watershed as the ecologically meaningful scale for planning;

The application has been designed taking into account potential impacts on a
watershed basis. The end use of the quarry and water management system will
assist in the management of water resources within the respective watersheds.
See Section 4.10.

b)    minimizing potential negative impacts, including cross-jurisdictional and
      cross-watershed impacts;

The proposed extraction area is located within both the 16 Mile Creek and Black
Creek watershed boundaries. The application has been designed to minimize
potential negative impacts within both watersheds. See Section 6.1.

c)    identifying surface water features, ground water features, hydrologic
      functions and natural heritage features and areas which are necessary for
      the ecological and hydrological integrity of the watershed;

Surface water features, ground water features, hydrological functions and natural
heritage heritages that are necessary for the ecological and hydrological integrity
of the watershed have been identified and excluded from the proposed extraction
area. These features will be monitored and mitigated in accordance with the
Adaptive Management Plan to protect the ecological and hydrological integrity of
the watershed. See Sections 6.0 and 6.1.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            77
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


d)     implementing necessary restrictions on development and site alteration
      to:

      1.     protect all municipal drinking water supplies and designated
             vulnerable areas; and

There are no designated vulnerable areas and the application will not impact
municipal drinking water supplies. The closest municipal well is 3.5 km from the
subject site. See Section 4.9.

      2.     protect, improve or restore vulnerable surface and ground water,
             sensitive surface water features and sensitive ground water
             features, and their hydrologic functions;

There are no vulnerable surface and groundwater, sensitive surface water and
sensitive groundwater features within the proposed extraction area. The
application will protect, and in some cases improve or restore surrounding
vulnerable surface and ground water, sensitive surface water features and
sensitive ground water features and their hydrologic functions. See Sections 4.7,
6.0 and 6.1.

e)    maintaining linkages and related functions among surface water features,
      ground water features, hydrologic functions and natural heritage features
      and areas;

The application has been designed to maintain linkages and related functions
among surface water features, ground water features, hydrologic functions and
natural heritage features and areas. See Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

f)    promoting efficient and sustainable use of water resources, including
      practices for water conservation and sustaining water quality; and

The quarry has been designed to promote efficient and sustainable use of water
resources. The quarry includes practices for water conservation through re-
circulation of water for washing and processing and includes water quality
monitoring to sustain water quality.

2.2.2 Development and site alteration shall be restricted in or near sensitive
      surface water features and sensitive ground water features such that
      these features and their related hydrologic functions will be protected,
      improved or restored.

      Mitigative measures and/or alternative development approaches may be
      required in order to protect, improve or restore sensitive surface water
      features, sensitive ground water features, and their hydrologic functions.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             78
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


There are no sensitive surface water or sensitive groundwater features within the
proposed extraction area and the Adaptive Management Plan will protect
sensitive groundwater and sensitive surface water features around the
Extension. The Adaptive Management Plan, off-site enhancement plan and
rehabilitation plan include mitigative and monitoring requirements to protect, and
in some cases improve or restore sensitive surface water features, sensitive
ground water features, and their hydrologic functions. See Sections 4.7, 6.0 and
6.1.

2.5 MINERAL AGGREGATE RESOURCES

2.5.1 Mineral aggregate resources shall be protected for long-term use.

The proposed extraction area has a long standing history of being identified as
an important mineral aggregate resource area in the GTA and is being protected
for long term use. See Section 4.2.

2.5.2   Protection of Long-Term Resource Supply

2.5.2.1 As much of the mineral aggregate resources as is realistically possible
        shall be made available as close to markets as possible.

        Demonstration of need for mineral aggregate resources, including any
        type of supply/demand analysis, shall not be required, notwithstanding
        the availability, designation or licensing for extraction of mineral
        aggregate resources locally or elsewhere.

The application makes available as much of the mineral aggregate resource as is
realistically possible from a strategic close to market location. See Sections 4.0
to 6.1.

2.5.2.2 Extraction shall be undertaken in a manner which minimizes social and
        environmental impacts.

The Acton Quarry Extension has been designed to minimize social impacts and
enhance the natural environment. See Sections 4.7, 5.1 and 6.1.

2.5.2.3 The conservation of mineral aggregate resources should be promoted by
        making provision for the recovery of these resources, wherever feasible.

The Acton Quarry recycles mineral aggregate resources, wherever feasible to
maximize the resource on-site.
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               79
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


2.5.3    Rehabilitation

2.5.3.1 Progressive and final rehabilitation shall be required to accommodate
        subsequent land uses, to promote land use compatibility, and to
        recognize the interim nature of extraction. Final rehabilitation shall take
        surrounding land use and approved land use designations into
        consideration.

Progressive and final rehabilitation will occur and will create a landform that will
accommodate subsequent recreational, educational, water management and
conservation uses.      The final rehabilitated landform is compatible with
surrounding and approved land use designations. See Sections 4.7.1 and 4.10.

2.5.4 Extraction in Prime Agricultural Areas

2.5.4.1 In prime agricultural areas, on prime agricultural land, extraction of
mineral aggregate resources is permitted as an interim use provided that
rehabilitation of the site will be carried out so that substantially the same areas
and same average soil quality for agriculture are restored.

On these prime agricultural lands, complete agricultural rehabilitation is not
required if:

a)      there is a substantial quantity of mineral aggregate resources below the
        water table warranting extraction, or the depth of planned extraction in a
        quarry makes restoration of pre-extraction agricultural capability
        unfeasible;

b)      other alternatives have been considered by the applicant and found
        unsuitable. The consideration of other alternatives shall include resources
        in areas of Canada Land Inventory Class 4 to 7 soils, resources on lands
        identified as designated growth areas, and resources on prime agricultural
        lands where rehabilitation is feasible. Where no other alternatives are
        found, prime agricultural lands shall be protected in this order of priority:
        specialty crop areas, Canada Land Inventory Classes 1, 2 and 3; and

c) agricultural rehabilitation in remaining areas is maximized.

The Acton Quarry Extension and surrounding area is not a prime agricultural
area. See Sections 4.6 and 5.0.

2.6     CULTURAL HERITAGE AND ARCHAEOLOGY

2.6.1 Significant built heritage resources and significant cultural heritage
      landscapes shall be conserved.
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                           80
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


The proposed extraction area does not contain any significant built heritage
resources or significant cultural heritage landscapes. See Section 4.8.

2.6.2 Development and site alteration shall only be permitted on lands containing
     archaeological resources or areas of archaeological potential if the
     significant archaeological resources have been conserved by removal and
     documentation, or by preservation on site. Where significant archaeological
     resources must be preserved on site, only development and site alteration
     which maintain the heritage integrity of the site may be permitted.

Significant archaeological resources within the proposed extraction area have
been conserved by removal and documentation. See Section 4.8.

2.6.3 Development and site alteration may be permitted on adjacent lands to
     protected heritage property where the proposed development and site
     alteration has been evaluated and it has been demonstrated that the
     heritage attributes of the protected heritage property will be conserved.

      Mitigative measures and/or alternative development approaches may be
      required in order to conserve the heritage attributes of the protected
      heritage property affected by the adjacent development or site alteration.

There are no protected heritage properties adjacent to the proposed extraction
area. See Section 4.8.

3.0 PROTECTING PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY

Ontario's long-term prosperity, environmental health and social well-being
depend on reducing the potential for public cost or risk to Ontario’s residents
from natural or human-made hazards. Development shall be directed away from
areas of natural or human-made hazards where there is an unacceptable risk to
public health or safety or of property damage.

The proposed Acton Quarry Extension does not contain any natural hazards or
human-made hazards as defined by the Provincial Policy Statement.

7.3    Niagara Escarpment Plan, 2005

The Niagara Escarpment Plan is a provincial plan which governs land use within
the Niagara Escarpment Plan Area. The legislative authority for the Plan is the
Niagara Escarpment Planning and Development Act. The Niagara Escarpment
Plan serves as a framework of objectives and policies to strike a balance
between development, preservation and the enjoyment of this important
resource.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            81
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The purpose of the Niagara Escarpment Plan is to provide for the maintenance of
the Niagara Escarpment and lands in its vicinity substantially as a continuous
natural environment and to ensure only such development occurs as is
compatible with the natural environment.

Proposed plan amendments must be consistent with the purpose and objectives
of the Niagara Escarpment Planning and Development Act and the Niagara
Escarpment Plan shall be consistent with other relevant Provincial policies
(1.2.1).

The principle as to whether new aggregate operations should be permitted in the
Niagara Escarpment Plan Area has been thoroughly reviewed. As a result of this
review, policies were included in the Niagara Escarpment Plan that:

   prohibit new mineral aggregate operations in the Escarpment Natural Area
   and Escarpment Protection Area: and

   permit new mineral aggregate operations in the Escarpment Rural Area
   subject to an amendment.

Objective 5 of the Escarpment Rural Area is:

“5. To provide for the designation of New Mineral Resource Extraction Areas
which can be accommodated by amendment to the Niagara Escarpment Plan.”

Permitted uses in the Escarpment Rural Area include new licensed pits and
quarries producing more than 20,000 tonnes annually subject to Part 1.9
(requiring an amendment to the Niagara Escarpment Plan) and Part 2.11 of the
Plan.

A portion of the subject site is within the Niagara Escarpment Plan and the lands
that are being considered for the extension of the Acton Quarry are designated
Escarpment Rural Area. See Figure 4.

In total +/- 77 ha are proposed to be re-designated from Escarpment Rural Area
to Mineral Resource Extraction Area. The amendment also includes             re-
designating +/- 56 ha of Dufferin’s additional lands from Escarpment Rural Area
to Escarpment Natural Area.
          Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                          82
          Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
          February, 2009


The application conforms to the Niagara Escarpment Plan for the following
reasons:

Purpose

The purpose of this Plan is to provide for the maintenance of the Niagara
Escarpment and land in its vicinity substantially as a continuous natural
environment, and to ensure only such development occurs as is compatible with
that natural environment.

The proposed Acton Quarry Extension satisfies the purpose of the Niagara
Escarpment Plan.         Located to the east of the quarry are lands designated
Escarpment Natural Area, Escarpment Protection Area and Escarpment Rural
Area which provides for the maintenance of the Niagara Escarpment and land in
its vicinity substantially as a continuous natural environment.

The application is also compatible with the natural environment. The application
proposes to designate +/- 56 ha of Dufferin’s additional lands from Escarpment
Rural Area to Escarpment Natural Area. The application also includes an off-site
ecological enhancement plan, rehabilitation plan and a mitigation and monitoring
plan to ensure that the natural environment is protected and enhanced.

Objectives

The objectives of the Plan are:

1.    To protect unique ecologic and historic areas;

The Acton Quarry Extension does not include any unique ecologic and historic
areas and adjacent areas will be protected. See Sections 4.7, 4.8 and 6.1.

2.    To maintain and enhance the quality and character of natural streams and
      water supplies;

The water resources and ecological evaluations have demonstrated that the
quality and character of natural streams and water supplies will be protected and
the water management system provides opportunities to enhance surrounding
natural features. See Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

3.    To provide adequate opportunities for outdoor recreation;

Aggregate extraction is an interim land use. Subject to approval of the Acton
Quarry Extension as proposed, Dufferin Aggregates will convey +/- 600 ha of its
land (quarry and buffer lands) after extraction into public ownership for
          Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            83
          Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
          February, 2009


recreational, educational, water management and conservation opportunities.
See Section 4.10.


4.      To maintain and enhance the open landscape character of the Niagara
        Escarpment in so far as possible, by such means as compatible farming or
        forestry and by preserving the natural scenery;

During operations, the quarry will be screened and wherever possible vegetation
will retained within the setback to maintain the open landscape. Following
rehabilitation, the open landscape character of the area will be enhanced by
creating lakes with exposed cliff faces, wetlands and vegetated shorelines. See
Sections 5.1.5 and 4.7.1.

5.      To ensure that all new development is compatible with the purpose of the
        Plan;

The development is compatible with the purpose of the Plan. See above.

6.      To provide for adequate public access to the Niagara Escarpment; and

Dufferin is currently working to establish a new public trail system on their lands
north of the rail line. The company has also entered into an agreement with the
Bruce Trail Association to realign the existing trail route to a more optimal
location south of 22nd Sideroad on their additional lands. Subject to approval of
the Acton Quarry Extension as proposed, Dufferin Aggregates will convey +/- 600
ha of its land (quarry and buffer lands) into public ownership after extraction for
recreational, educational, water management and conservation opportunities.
See Section 4.10.

1.2.1 PLAN AMENDMENTS

The following provisions apply to applications to amend the Niagara Escarpment
Plan:

     Planning policies and land use designations may be changed as long as the
     purpose and objectives of the Niagara Escarpment Planning and
     Development Act and the Niagara Escarpment Plan are met. The purpose
     statement and objectives in the Introduction of the Plan shall not be changed
     outside of the context of a full review of the Plan.

The purpose and objectives of the Niagara Escarpment Planning and
Development Act and the Niagara Escarpment have been met. See above.
          Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             84
          Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
          February, 2009


      Sections 6.1(2.1) and 10(6) of the Niagara Escarpment Planning and
      Development Act require that amendments to the Niagara Escarpment Plan
      be justified. The justification for a proposed amendment to the Niagara
      Escarpment Plan means the rationale for the amendment, and includes
      reasons, arguments or evidence in support of the change to the Plan
      proposed through the amendment.

The Niagara Escarpment Plan has an objective to provide for and permits new
mineral resource extraction areas in the Escarpment Rural subject to an
amendment. See Sections 2.0 to 6.0 for rationale.

      It must be demonstrated that the proposed amendment and the expected
      impacts resulting from the proposed amendment do not adversely affect the
      purpose and objectives of the Niagara Escarpment Planning and
      Development Act. The proposed amendment must be consistent with the
      purpose and objectives of the Niagara Escarpment Planning and
      Development Act and the Niagara Escarpment Plan and shall be consistent
      with other relevant Provincial policies.

The proposed amendment does not adversely affect the purpose and objectives
of the Niagara Escarpment Planning and Development Act. See above. The
application is also consistent with other relevant Provincial policies. See Sections
7.1, 7.2 and 7.4.

1.5      ESCARPMENT RURAL AREA

Escarpment Rural Areas are an essential component of the Escarpment corridor,
including portions of the Escarpment and lands in its vicinity. They provide a
buffer to the more ecologically sensitive areas of the Escarpment.

Objectives

5.       To provide for the designation of new Mineral Resource Extraction Areas
         which can be accommodated by an amendment to the Niagara
         Escarpment Plan.

The Acton Quarry Extension is designated Escarpment Rural Area.                The
proposed application serves to implement Objective 5.

Development Policies for Mineral Extraction

1.       In evaluating applications for amendment to the Niagara Escarpment Plan
         to redesignate Escarpment Rural Area to Mineral Resource Extraction
         Area, the following matters will be considered:
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            85
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


a) Protection of the natural and cultural environment, namely:

i) Groundwater and surface water systems on a watershed basis;

Groundwater and surface water quantity and quality will be managed and
monitored to ensure water resources and related ecological functions are
appropriately protected. The Adaptive Management Plan includes triggers,
mitigation and contingency methods to recognize and prevent unacceptable
impacts. See Section 6.1.

       ii)    Habitat of endangered (regulated), endangered (not regulated),
              rare, special concern and threatened species;

The proposed extraction area does not contain any habitat of endangered or
threatened species. . Habitat for rare and special concern species were
considered in the natural environment technical report under significant wildlife
habitat. The natural environment technical report concludes that the removal of
existing features within the proposed extraction area will not have any negative
impact on rare or special concern species. See Section 4.7.

iii)Adjacent Escarpment Protection and Escarpment Natural Areas;

Adjacent Escarpment Protection and Escarpment Natural Areas and their
associated features and functions will be protected in accordance with the
Adaptive Management Plan and off-site ecological enhancement plan. See
Sections 4.7.1, 6.0 and 6.1.

iv) Adjacent Rural Area natural features;

Adjacent Escarpment Rural Area natural features will be protected in accordance
with the Adaptive Management Plan and off-site ecological enhancement plan.
See Sections 4.7.1 and 6.1. The application also proposes to designate +/- 56
ha of Dufferin’s additional lands from Escarpment Rural Area to Escarpment
Natural Area.

v) Existing and optimum routes of the Bruce Trail;

Dufferin has entered into an agreement with the Bruce Trail Association to
realign the existing trail route to a more optimal location south of 22nd Sideroad
on their additional lands.

vi) Provincially significant wetlands;

Based on the detailed field work and analyses the proposed extraction area does
not contain any provincially significant wetlands. Two remnant areas that were
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            86
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


historically mapped as part of the larger provincially significant wetlands are
located within the proposed extraction area, but based on the detailed field work
and analyses, these remnant wetland areas are of low function and do not
warrant inclusion within the provincially significant wetland complex. See
Sections 4.7.

vii) Provincially significant ANSIs; and

There are no provincially significant ANSIs within the proposed extraction area or
on the surrounding lands. See Sections 4.7 and 6.0.

viii) Significant cultural heritage features.

The proposed extraction area does not contain any significant built heritage
resources or significant cultural heritage landscapes. Significant archeological
resources within the proposed Extension have been conserved by removal and
documentation. See Section 4.8.

b)     Opportunities for achieving the objectives of Section 8 of the Niagara
       Escarpment Planning and Development Act through the final rehabilitation
       of the site;

The objectives of the Niagara Escarpment Planning and Development Act are
addressed above. Final rehabilitation of the site will provide additional
opportunities to achieve these objectives. Subject to approval of the Acton
Quarry Extension as proposed, Dufferin Aggregates will convey +/- 600 ha of its
land (quarry and buffer lands) into public ownership after extraction for
recreational, educational, water management and conservation opportunities.
The rehabilitated landform in combination with the off-site ecological
enhancement will enhance the diversity of the area. See Sections 4.7.2 and
4.10.

c)     Maintenance and enhancement of the quality and character of natural
       systems, water supplies, including fish habitat; and

There are no sensitive surface water or sensitive groundwater features within the
proposed extraction area and the Adaptive Management Plan will protect
sensitive groundwater and sensitive surface water features around the
Extension. See Sections 4.7.2 and 6.1.

The proposed extraction area does not contain any fish habitat. See Section 4.7.

d)     Capability of the land for agricultural uses and its potential for
       rehabilitation for agricultural uses.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               87
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The proposed extraction area and surrounding area is not considered a prime
agricultural area and rehabilitation back to agricultural is not required. See
Sections 4.6 and 5.0.
2. Amendment applications must be accompanied by:

a)     Information on the location of the site in relation to the actual Escarpment
       and to the Escarpment Rural, Protection and Natural Area designations;

The actual Escarpment is more than 300 m to the east of the proposed extraction
area. The site and surrounding area is designated Escarpment Rural Area. The
application proposes to designate +/- 56 ha of Dufferin additional lands from
Escarpment Rural Area to Escarpment Natural Area. See Figure 4 for the
location of the site in relation to the Escarpment Rural Area, Escarpment
Protection Area and Escarpment Natural Area designations.

b)     Information to support the requirements of Policy 1, along with information
       submitted to meet the requirements of the Aggregate Resources Act,
       including site plans submitted under Section 8 and reports submitted
       under Section 9; and

See Section 1.2 for a full list of the studies submitted to support the requirements
of Policy 1 and requirements of the Aggregate Resources Act.

c)    Information on the ultimate use of the site in conformity with the
      Escarpment Rural, Protection or Natural Area designations.

Subject to approval of the Acton Quarry Extension as proposed, Dufferin
Aggregates will convey +/- 600 ha of its land (quarry and buffer lands) into public
ownership after extraction for recreational, educational, water management and
conservation opportunities. These potential after-uses conform to the
designations of the Niagara Escarpment Plan. See Section 4.10.

3.    A Processing Guide is available from the Niagara Escarpment
      Commission for assistance in preparing applications to amend the Niagara
      Escarpment Plan designation from Escarpment Rural Area to Mineral
      Resource Extraction Area, and for the consideration of new Provincial
      wayside pits and quarries. The Processing Guide was developed following
      completion of the Mineral Resource Planning Study: “Niagara Escarpment
      Plan Area and Surrounding Areas” in November, 1995. The Guide
      provides information on the Plan Amendment and Development Permit
      processes. It does not change the legal requirements for evaluating those
      applications under the Niagara Escarpment Planning and Development
      Act or the Niagara Escarpment Plan.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            88
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The Processing Guide has been considered and the Comprehensive Application
Checklist and Reviewer’s Checklist of Critical Issues has been submitted as part
of the application.

The “Niagara Escarpment Mineral Resource Study” confirmed the
appropriateness of the policies which provide for the designation of new
extraction areas in the Escarpment Rural Area by amendment. The study assists
in defining how the purpose of the Niagara Escarpment Plan is satisfied for new
mineral resource extraction applications. The proposed Extension area meets
this test and satisfies the purpose of the Niagara Escarpment Plan.

1.9 MINERAL RESOURCE EXTRACTION AREA

The Mineral Resource Extraction Area designation includes pits and quarries
licensed pursuant to the Aggregate Resources Act and areas where mineral
resource extraction may be permitted subject to the policies of this Plan.

Objectives

1.    To designate licensed Mineral Resource Extraction Areas.

The site is proposed to be licensed under the Aggregate Resources Act.

2.    To minimize the impact of mineral extraction operations on the
      Escarpment environment.

The proposed mineral extraction operation has been designed to protect and
enhance the Escarpment environment. See Sections 4.7.2 and 6.1.

3.    To provide for areas where new pits and quarries may be established.

The proposed extraction area has a long standing history of being recognized as
an important mineral aggregate resource area. See Section 4.2. The site is also
designated Escarpment Rural Area which has an objective to provide for new
mineral resource extraction subject to an amendment.

4.    To ensure that after uses and rehabilitation are compatible with the
      applicable Plan designation, the surrounding environment and existing
      uses.

The proposed Extension area will be rehabilitated to lakes, wetlands, exposed
cliff faces and vegetated shorelines and will be integrated with adjacent natural
features. The rehabilitated landform in combination with the off-site ecological
enhancement plan will enhance the diversity of the area. Subject to approval of
the Acton Quarry Extension as proposed, Dufferin Aggregates will convey +/- 600
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              89
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


ha of its land (quarry and buffer lands) into public ownership after extraction for
recreational, educational, water management and conservation opportunities.
These potential after-uses conform to the designations of the Niagara
Escarpment Plan. See Sections 4.7.2 and 4.10.

5.    To encourage, where possible, the rehabilitated after uses of pits and
      quarries to be integrated into the Niagara Escarpment Parks and Open
      Space System.

Subject to approval of the Acton Quarry Extension as proposed, Dufferin
Aggregates will convey +/- 600 ha of its land (quarry and buffer lands) into public
ownership after extraction for recreational, educational, water management and
conservation opportunities. This property is strategically located to enhance the
Niagara Parks and Space System. See Section 4.10.

After Uses, Permitted Uses and New Lots

4.    Where the rehabilitation is being undertaken by reforestation, the after use
      shall aim to re-establish a functioning ecosystem similar in condition to the
      natural ecosystems in the region.

Over 80% of the rehabilitated landform above the lakes will be forested to
connect the site to adjacent environmental areas. The off-site ecological
enhancement plan also proposes to plant additional forests and implement a
forest management plan with the goal of improving the ecological health of
adjacent woodlands. See Section 4.7.1.

5.    The site shall be rehabilitated in accordance with the objectives of the
      applicable redesignation of the Niagara Escarpment Plan and be
      compatible with and have minimal impact upon the surrounding natural
      and visual environment and existing uses.

The proposed Extension area will be rehabilitated to lakes, wetlands, exposed
cliff faces and vegetated shorelines and will be integrated with adjacent natural
features. The rehabilitated landform, in combination with the off-site ecological
enhancement plan, will enhance the natural and visual environment. The subject
site would qualify for redesignation to Escarpment Natural Area and Escarpment
Protection Area. See Section 4.71.

6.    Where the rehabilitation is being undertaken to agriculture, substantially
      the same acreage and average soil capability for agriculture shall be
      restored.

The area is not a prime agricultural area and rehabilitation back to agriculture is
not required. See Section 4.6.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              90
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


PART 2 DEVELOPMENT CRITERIA

Part 2 of the Niagara Escarpment Plan includes development criteria that apply
to development located within the Niagara Escarpment Development Control
Area. Part 2, Section 2.1 of the Niagara Escarpment Plan states that the criteria
in Part 2 deal with development in a variety of situations, and, therefore, all the
criteria will not apply to every development. The Niagara Escarpment Plan has
developed specific criteria in Section 2.11 that apply to mineral aggregate
operations. Part 1.5 of the Niagara Escarpment Plan permits new mineral
aggregate operations in the Escarpment Rural Area, subject to an amendment
and Part 1.9 and 2.11 of the Niagara Escarpment Plan.

2.11 MINERAL RESOURCES

The objective is to minimize the impact of new mineral extraction operations and
accessory uses on the Escarpment environment.

1.    Extractive operations including wayside pits and quarries and haul routes
      shall not conflict with the following criteria:

      a)     The protection of sensitive ecological, geological, historic and
             archaeological sites or areas.

Sensitive ecological, geological, historic and archaeological sites are protected.
See Sections 4.7, 4.8, 6.0 and 6.1.

      b)     The protection of surface and groundwater resources.

Groundwater and surface water quantity and quality will be managed and
monitored to ensure water resources and related ecological functions are
appropriately protected. The Adaptive Management Plan includes triggers,
mitigation and contingency methods to recognize and prevent unacceptable
impacts. See Section 6.1.

      c)     The maintenance of agricultural areas, in accordance with the
             Agricultural Policies of the Provincial Policy Statement (PPS).

The area is not a prime agricultural area and rehabilitation back to agriculture is
not required. See Section 4.6.

      d)     The minimization of the adverse impact of extractive and accessory
             operations on existing agricultural or residential development.

The site has been designed to minimize adverse impact on existing agricultural
or residential development. See Sections 5.0 and 5.1.
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                           91
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009



      e)        The preservation of the natural and cultural landscapes as much as
                possible during extraction and after rehabilitation.68

The proposed extraction area does not contain any significant built heritage
resources or significant cultural heritage landscapes. Significant archeological
resources within the proposed Extension have been conserved by removal and
documentation. See Section 4.8.

During extraction natural features will be protected and enhanced where
appropriate in accordance with the Adaptive Management Plan and the off-site
ecological enhancement plan. See Sections 4.7.2 and 6.1.

After rehabilitation the proposed Extension area will be rehabilitated to lakes,
wetlands, exposed cliff faces and vegetated shorelines and will be integrated with
adjacent natural features. The rehabilitated landform in combination with the off-
site ecological enhancement plan will enhance the diversity of the area. See
Section 4.7.2.

      f)        The minimization of the adverse impact of extractive and accessory
                operations on parks, open space and the existing and optimum
                routes of the Bruce Trail.

Dufferin has entered into an agreement with the Bruce Trail Association to
realign the existing trail route to a more optimal location south of 22nd Sideroad
on their additional lands. The company is also working to establish a new public
trail system on their lands north of the rail line.

Subject to approval of the Acton Quarry Extension as proposed, Dufferin
Aggregates will convey +/- 600 ha of its land (quarry and buffer lands) into public
ownership after extraction for recreational, educational, water management and
conservation opportunities. This property is strategically located to enhance the
Niagara Parks and Open Space System. See Section 4.10.

2.    For quarries licensed prior to June 12, 1985, no extraction shall take place
      at any point nearer to the brow of the Escarpment than 90 metres (300
      feet) measured horizontally. For new quarry operations approved after the
      date of approval of the revised Plan, no extraction shall take place at any
      point nearer to the brow of the Escarpment than 200 metres (600 feet)
      measured horizontally or any greater setback required by the
      implementing authority.

Conestoga Rovers & Associates completed a geological investigation to define
the location of the Escarpment Brow. The Ministry of Northern Development and
Mines has also interpreted the location of the Escarpment Brow in relation to the
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             92
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


Acton Quarry Extension. The closest approach of the proposed extraction area to
the Niagara Escarpment brow is more than 300 metres.

3.    As a condition of the licence the extractive operation shall be screened
      while it is in progress and, where possible, prior to extraction in a manner
      compatible with the surrounding visual environment.

The proposed extraction operation will be screened prior to extraction in a
manner compatible with the surrounding visual environment. See Section 5.1.5.

4.    Screening shall incorporate the following:

      a)     Overburden material supplemented with native tree and shrub
             plantings should be utilized for screening purposes.

      b)     Tree screen plantings are to be of compatible species and sizes to
             permit only very limited visual contact from the surrounding
             landscape.

      c)     All plantings should be properly maintained to ensure continued
             survival and good growth rates.

      d)     Where the existing forest is adequate to be considered as an
             effective screen along the perimeter of the site, no additional
             artificial berming or stock piling of overburden materials will be
             permitted within the forested area being used as a natural screen.

The Aggregate Resources Act Site Plans implements the above noted
requirements.

5.    Wherever possible, rehabilitation shall be progressive as the extraction
      proceeds. Progressive rehabilitation may include the use of off-site
      material, and where on-site material is not available, minimal amounts of
      off-site material required to stabilize and revegetate disturbed areas, but
      shall not include any major regrading toward a planned after use with the
      deposition of off-site material.

The operation will be extracted and progressively rehabilitated. The phasing
and rehabilitation requirements are outlined on the Aggregate Resources Act Site
Plans. Off-site material may be imported subject to meeting the requirements of
the Ministry of the Environment and Ministry of Natural Resources.

6.    The use of off-site material for progressive rehabilitation must also be
      acceptable to the Ministry of Environment and the Ministry of Natural
      Resources.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                  93
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


Overburden calculations demonstrate there will be a minor deficit of overburden
on-site to complete the proposed rehabilitation. The use of off-site material is
proposed subject to meeting the requirements of the Ministry of the Environment
and Ministry of Natural Resources.

7.     Off-site material required for the processing of aggregate products being
       produced, may be transported to the site, i.e., sands to be mixed with
       existing aggregate to create a specified aggregate product.

The Aggregate Resources Act Site Plan includes this permission.

8.     All accessory uses to the Mineral Resource Extraction Area operation
       shall be discontinued and be required to vacate the property as soon as
       the site is depleted, and on-site processed material has been transported
       from the property.

Once extraction operations are finished at the site, all accessory uses will be
discontinued.

9. Rehabilitation shall incorporate the following:

       a)     Excess topsoil and overburden are to be retained and stabilized for
              future rehabilitation.

All topsoil and overburden is to be retained on site and used for rehabilitation.

       b)     All excavated pit walls are to be regraded to a slope of 3 to 1 or
              less except in regions where topsoil and fill materials are scarce. In
              such areas finished slopes may be no steeper than 2 to 1. Exposed
              sections of pit or quarry faces may be left unrehabilitated for
              aesthetic or educational purposes as incorporated into an approved
              after use plan.

The backfilled slopes of the rehabilitated quarry will be no steeper than 2:1 and
exposed sections of the quarry face will be left for aesthetic, educational and
environmental purposes. See Section 4.7.1.

       c)     Vegetation, including seeding, crops or trees and shrubs, shall be
              planted as soon as possible following finished grading.

The Aggregate Resources Act Site Plans include the requirement to vegetate the
rehabilitated slopes as soon as possible following final grading.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              94
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


7.4   Greenbelt Plan, 2005

The Greenbelt Plan is a provincial plan which governs land use within the
Greenbelt Plan Area, which includes the Niagara Escarpment Plan and Oak
Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan Area. The Greenbelt Plan was established
under Section 3 of the Greenbelt Act. The Greenbelt is a broad band of
permanently protected land which provides for a diverse range of economic and
social activities associated with rural communities, agriculture, tourism,
recreation and resource uses (1.2.1).

The lands that are being considered for the extension of the Acton Quarry are
located within the Greenbelt Plan area. For the lands located within the Niagara
Escarpment Plan Area the policies of the Niagara Escarpment Plan apply.

The portion of the site outside of the Niagara Escarpment Plan is designated
Protected Countryside Area, within the Natural Heritage System. See Figure 5.
The Greenbelt Plan permits new or expanded quarries in this designation and
supports the availability of aggregates close to market for economic and
environmental reasons (4.2.3). An amendment to the Greenbelt Plan is not
required.

Within the Natural Heritage System, the Greenbelt Plan makes a distinction
between new aggregate operations and expansions to existing operations. For
expansions the policies are more permissive and extraction may be permitted in
key natural heritage features and key hydrologic features if the decision is
consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement (4.3.2.d). In contrast, new
aggregate operations are prohibited in significant wetlands; significant habitat of
endangered species and threatened species; and significant woodlands unless
the woodland is occupied by young plantation or early successional habitat
(4.3.2.a).

The application conforms to the Greenbelt Plan for the following reasons:

1.1 CONTEXT

The Golden Horseshoe is one of the fastest growing regions in North America.

The Greenbelt is a cornerstone of Ontario’s proposed Greater Golden Horseshoe
Growth Plan which is an overarching strategy that will provide clarity and
certainty about urban structure, where and how future growth should be
accommodated, and what must be protected for current and future generations.

The Greenbelt Plan identifies where urbanization should not occur in order to
provide permanent protection to the agricultural land base and the ecological
features and functions occurring on this landscape.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             95
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The Greenbelt Plan includes lands within, and builds upon the ecological
protections provided by, the Niagara Escarpment Plan (NEP) and the Oak
Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan (ORMCP). It also complements and supports
other provincial level initiatives such as the Parkway Belt West Plan and the
Rouge North Management Plan.

The Protected Countryside lands identified in this Greenbelt Plan are intended to
enhance the spatial extent of agriculturally and environmentally protected lands
currently covered by the NEP and the ORMCP while at the same time improving
linkages between these areas and the surrounding major lake systems and
watersheds. Collectively, the lands in these three plans form the Greenbelt. The
Protected Countryside (as shown on Schedule 1 of this Greenbelt Plan) is made
up of an Agricultural System and a Natural System, together with a series of
settlement areas.

The Agricultural System is made up of specialty crop, prime agricultural and rural
areas. The Natural System identifies lands that support both natural heritage and
hydrologic features and functions. Both systems maintain connections to the
broader agricultural and natural systems of southern Ontario.

The settlement areas, identified as Towns/Villages and Hamlets, vary in size,
diversity and intensity of uses and are found throughout the Protected
Countryside.

While providing permanent agricultural and environmental protection, the
Greenbelt also contains important natural resources and supports a wide range
of recreational and tourism uses, areas and opportunities together with a vibrant
and evolving agricultural and rural economy.

The schedules to this Greenbelt Plan show lands, settlements, roads and natural
systems outside of the Greenbelt Area. This Plan does not apply to lands beyond
the Greenbelt Area as shown on Schedule 1.

Within the vast majority of south-central Ontario and substantial portions of the
Greater Golden Horseshoe beyond the Greenbelt Area, there are extensive
agricultural areas, natural and hydrologic features and functions, and other
significant resources. The lack of inclusion within the Greenbelt Area does not
imply any lesser importance or recognition of the full array of natural
environmental and resource attributes found in these areas. Rather, all lands
outside of the Greenbelt Area will continue to be governed by current, and
potentially future, planning frameworks and regimes which manage land use in
Ontario. In addition, no preference for urban structure or the allocation of
residential and employment growth beyond the Greenbelt should be inferred from
the Greenbelt Plan, as it is intended that these matters be addressed by the
planning system and the proposed Growth Plan.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             96
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The Greenbelt Plan identifies where urbanization should not occur and creates a
permanently protected Countryside to protect agricultural and environmental
resources. The protected countryside also contains important natural resources
and supports a wide range of recreational and tourism uses, areas and
opportunities together with a vibrant and evolving agricultural and rural economy.
Mineral aggregate operations are an appropriate rural resource use and the
establishment of new or expanded aggregate operations are permitted in the
Greenbelt Plan Area.

1.2 VISION AND GOALS

1.2.1 Vision

The Greenbelt is a broad band of permanently protected land which:

       Protects against the loss and fragmentation of the agricultural land base
       and supports agriculture as the predominant land use;

       Gives permanent protection to the natural heritage and water resource
       systems that sustain ecological and human health and that form the
       environmental framework around which major urbanization in south-
       central Ontario will be organized; and

       Provides for a diverse range of economic and social activities associated
       with rural communities, agriculture, tourism, recreation and resource
       uses.

One of the goals of the Greenbelt Plan is to provide for a diverse range of
economic activities associated with resource uses which includes providing for
new or expanded mineral aggregate operations.

1.2.2 Goals

To enhance our urban and rural areas and overall quality of life by promoting the
following matters within the Protected Countryside:

1. Agricultural Protection

a)     Protection of the specialty crop area land base while allowing supportive
       infrastructure and value added uses necessary for sustainable agricultural
       uses and activities;

b)     Support for the Niagara Peninsula specialty crop area as a destination and
       centre of agriculture focused on the agri-food sector and agri-tourism
       related to grape and tender fruit production;
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                97
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


c)    Protection of prime agricultural areas by preventing further fragmentation
      and loss of the agricultural land base caused by lot creation and the
      redesignation of prime agricultural areas;

d)    Provision of the appropriate flexibility to allow for agriculture, agriculture-
      related and secondary uses, normal farm practices and an evolving
      agricultural/rural economy; and

e)    Increasing certainty for the agricultural sector to foster long-term
      investment in, improvement to, and management of the land.

The subject site is not a prime agricultural area and surrounding agricultural uses
will not be adversely affected. See Sections 4.6 and 5.0.

2. Environmental Protection

a)    Protection, maintenance and enhancement of natural heritage, hydrologic
      and landform features and functions, including protection of habitat for
      flora and fauna and particularly species at risk;

b)    Protection and restoration of natural and open space connections between
      the Oak Ridges Moraine, the Niagara Escarpment, Lake Ontario, Lake
      Simcoe and the major river valley lands, while also maintaining
      connections to the broader natural systems of southern Ontario beyond
      the Golden Horseshoe such as the Great Lakes Coast, the Carolinian
      Zone, the Lake Erie Basin, the Kawartha Highlands and the Algonquin to
      Adirondacks Corridor;

c)     Protection, improvement or restoration of the quality and quantity of
      ground and surface water and the hydrological integrity of watersheds;
      and

d)    Provision of long-term guidance for the management of natural heritage
      and water resources when contemplating such matters as development,
      infrastructure, open space planning and management, aggregate
      rehabilitation and private or public stewardship programs.

The proposed extraction area, Adaptive Management Plan, off-site enhancement
plan and rehabilitation plan have been designed to protect and enhance
important natural heritage features; protect surface water and groundwater
quality and quantity from unacceptable impacts; maintain linkages and related
functions among surface water features, ground water features, hydrologic
functions and natural heritage features and areas and protect the hydrological
integrity of the Black Creek and 16 Mile Creek watersheds. See Sections 4.7,
6.0 and 6.1.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               98
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


Section 4.3.2 of the Greenbelt Plan provides specific policies to provide guidance
for the management of natural heritage and water resources when contemplating
new or expanded mineral aggregate operations and rehabilitation.

3. Culture, Recreation and Tourism

a)    Support for the conservation and promotion of cultural heritage resources;

b)    Provision of a wide range of publicly accessible built and natural settings
      for recreation including facilities, parklands, open space areas, trails and
      water based/shoreline uses that support hiking, angling and other
      recreational activities; and

c)    Enabling continued opportunities for sustainable tourism development.

The proposed extraction area does not contain any significant built heritage
resources or significant cultural heritage landscapes. Significant archeological
resources within the proposed extraction area have been conserved by removal
and documentation. See Section 4.8.

Subject to approval of the Acton Quarry Extension as proposed, Dufferin
Aggregates will convey +/- 600 ha of its land (quarry and buffer lands) into public
ownership after extraction for recreational, educational, water management and
conservation opportunities. The rehabilitated landform, in combination with the
off-site ecological enhancement, would provide a publicly accessible built and
natural setting for recreation including facilities, parklands, open space areas,
trails and water based/shoreline uses that support hiking, angling and other
recreational activities. See Section 4.10.

5. Infrastructure and Natural Resources

a)    Support for infrastructure which achieves the social and economic aims of
      the Greenbelt and the proposed Growth Plan while seeking to minimize
      environmental impacts;

b)    Recognition of the benefits of protecting renewable and non-renewable
      natural resources within the Greenbelt; and

c)    Provision for the availability and sustainable use of those resources critical
      to the region’s social, environmental, economic and growth needs.

The infrastructure requirements of the Growth Plan are significant and require a
substantial amount of aggregate to meet the region’s social, environmental,
economic and growth needs. The Greenbelt Plan recognizes the environmental
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             99
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


and social benefits of accessing close to market aggregates. See Sections 4.2,
4.3 and 4.4.

The Acton Quarry Extension will protect and enhance the surrounding natural
environment and in the long term, the proposed Extension area will be
rehabilitated to lakes, wetlands, exposed cliff faces and vegetated shorelines.
The rehabilitated landform, in combination with the off-site ecological
enhancement plan, will enhance the diversity of the area. See Sections 4.7.2,
6.0 and 6.1.

3.2.4 Key Natural Heritage Features and Key Hydrologic Features Policies

Key natural heritage features include:

     Significant habitat of endangered species, threatened species and special
     concern species;
     Fish habitat;
     Wetlands;
     Life Science Areas of Natural and Scientific Interest (ANSIs);
     Significant valleylands;
     Significant woodlands;
     Significant wildlife habitat;
     Sand barrens, savannahs and tallgrass prairies; and
     Alvars

Key hydrologic features include:

     Permanent and intermittent streams;
     Lakes (and their littoral zones);
     Seepage areas and springs; and
     Wetlands

For lands within a key natural heritage feature or a key hydrologic feature in the
Protected Countryside, the following policies shall apply:

1.      Development or site alteration is not permitted in key hydrologic features
        and key natural heritage features within the Natural Heritage System,
        including any associated vegetation protection zone, with the exception of:

        a) Forest, fish and wildlife management;

        b)    Conservation and flood or erosion control projects, but only if they
              have been demonstrated to be necessary in the public interest and
              after all alternatives have been considered; or
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                100
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


       c)      Infrastructure, aggregate, recreational, shoreline and existing uses,
              as described by and subject to the general policies of section 4 of
              this Plan.

Within the area designated Protected Countryside the proposed extraction area
contains some low function wetlands and a small portion of a much larger
significant woodland. The Greenbelt Plan permits expansions to existing mineral
operations within these features subject to section 4 of the Greenbelt Plan.

4.3.2 Non-Renewable Resource Policies

For lands within the Protected Countryside, the following policies shall apply:

1.    Activities related to the use of non-renewable resources are permitted in
      the Protected Countryside, subject to all other applicable legislation,
      regulations and municipal official plan policies and by-laws. The
      availability of mineral aggregate resources for long-term use will be
      determined in accordance with the PPS, except as provided below.

2.     Non-renewable resources are those non-agriculture based natural
       resources that have a finite supply, including mineral aggregate resources.
       Aggregates, in particular, provide significant building materials for our
       communities and infrastructure, and the availability of aggregates close to
       market is important both for economic and environmental reasons.

3.     Notwithstanding the Natural System policies of section 3.2 of this Plan,
       within the Natural Heritage System, mineral aggregate operations and
       wayside pits and quarries are subject to the following:

       c)    Any application for a new mineral aggregate operation, or the
             expansion of an existing mineral aggregate operation shall be
             required to demonstrate:

              i.     How the connectivity between key natural heritage features
                     and key hydrologic features will be maintained before, during
                     and after the extraction of mineral aggregates;

              ii.    How the operator could immediately replace any habitat that
                     would be lost from the site with equivalent habitat on another
                     part of the site or on adjacent lands; and

              iii.   How the Water Resource System will be protected or
                     enhanced; and
      Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             101
      Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
      February, 2009


     d)    An application for the expansion of an existing mineral aggregate
           operation may be permitted in the Natural Heritage System,
           including key natural heritage features and key hydrologic features,
           and in any associated vegetation protection zone only if the related
           decision is consistent with the PPS.

4.   The Ministry of Natural Resources will pursue the following under the
     Aggregate Resources Act, for all mineral aggregate operations, including
     wayside pits and quarries, within the Protected Countryside:

     a)    Rehabilitated area will be maximized and disturbed area minimized
           on an ongoing basis during the life-cycle of an operation;

     b)    Progressive and final rehabilitation efforts will contribute to the
           goals of the Greenbelt Plan;

     c)    The Ministry of Natural Resources will determine the maximum
           allowable disturbed area of each mineral aggregate operation. Any
           excess disturbed area above the maximum will be required to be
           rehabilitated. For existing operations this shall be completed within
           10 years of the date of approval of the Greenbelt Plan, and 50%
           completed within six years. For new operations, including
           expansions, the total disturbed area shall not exceed an
           established maximum allowable disturbed area; and

     d)    An application for a mineral aggregate operation or wayside pits
           and quarries may be permitted only where the applicant
           demonstrates that the quantity and quality of groundwater and
           surface water will be maintained as per Provincial Standards under
           the Aggregate Resources Act.

5.   When operators are undertaking rehabilitation of mineral aggregate
     operation sites in the Protected Countryside, the following provisions
     apply:

     b)    The disturbed area of a site will be rehabilitated to a state of equal
           or greater ecological value, and for the entire site, long-term
           ecological integrity will be maintained or restored, and to the extent
           possible, improved;

     c)    If there are key natural heritage features or key hydrologic features
           on the site, or if such features existed on the site at the time of
           application:
          Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               102
          Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
          February, 2009


               i.     The health, diversity and size of these key natural heritage
                      features and key hydrologic features will be maintained or
                      restored and, to the extent possible, improved to promote a
                      net gain of ecological health; and

               ii.    Any permitted extraction of mineral aggregates that occurs in
                      a feature will be completed, and the area will be
                      rehabilitated, as early as possible in the life of the operation.

        d)     Aquatic areas remaining after extraction are to be rehabilitated to
               aquatic enhancement, which shall be representative of the natural
               ecosystem in that particular setting or ecodistrict, and the combined
               terrestrial and aquatic rehabilitation shall meet the intent of 4.3.2.5
               (c).

6.      Final rehabilitation in the Natural Heritage System will meet these
        additional provisions:

        b)     Where there is underwater extraction, no less than 35% of the non-
               aquatic lands of each license is to be rehabilitated to forest cover,
               which shall be representative of the natural ecosystem in that
               particular setting or ecodistrict; and

        c)     Rehabilitation will be implemented so that the connectivity of the
               key natural heritage features and the key hydrologic features on the
               site and on adjacent lands will be maintained or restored, and to the
               extent possible, improved.

7.      Operators are encouraged to consider and provide for public access to
        former aggregate sites upon final rehabilitation.

The application conforms to the requirements of Section 4.3.2 of the Greenbelt
Plan for the following reasons:

     The application will make available 71 million tonnes of aggregate from a
     close to market location which is important both for economic and
     environmental reasons. Making available this resource is consistent with the
     PPS which requires “As much of the mineral aggregate resources as is
     realistically possible shall be made available as close to markets as possible”.
     See Sections 4.2, 4.3, 4.4 and 4.11.

     The subject site and surrounding area has been subject to extensive multi-
     year environmental and water resources investigations by Conestoga-Rovers
     & Associates, Stantec Consulting Ltd., Goodban Ecological Consulting,
     Ecoplans Limited and other consulting experts. Based on the findings and
     Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            103
     Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
     February, 2009


recommendations of these investigations, important natural heritage and
hydrologic features have been excluded from the extraction area and will be
protected. Based on the areas recommended for protection connectivity
between key natural heritage features and key hydrologic features will be
maintained before, during and after the extraction of the site. See Sections
4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

The Greenbelt Plan permits an expansion of an existing mineral aggregate
operation in the Natural Heritage System including key natural heritage
features and key hydrologic features, and in any associated vegetation
protection if the related decision is consistent with the PPS. Within the area
designated Protected Countryside the proposed extraction area includes a
small portion of a much larger significant woodland and three low function
wetlands. One of these wetlands was historically mapped as part of the
provincially significant wetland complex. Based on detailed field work and
analyses, this wetland is of low function and does not warrant inclusion within
the provincially significant wetland complex. The PPS does not require
protection of other wetlands and the removal of a small portion of a much
larger significant woodland will not have a negative impact on the overall
feature or ecological functions. See Section 4.7.

To mitigate for the loss of the above noted natural heritage features the
Acton Quarry Extension has been designed to enhance the features and
functions of the Regional Greenlands System. The enhancement plan is
based on the principles and science of landscape and restoration ecology.
The enhancement plan is based on a combination of immediate off-site
enhancements that provide a broader, landscape level restoration plan; and
progressive and final rehabilitation measures proposed for the Acton Quarry
Extension. See Section 4.7.1 and 4.7.2.

Groundwater and surface water quantity and quality will be managed and
monitored to ensure water resources and related ecological functions are
appropriately protected. The Adaptive Management Plan includes triggers,
mitigation and contingency methods to recognize and prevent unacceptable
impacts. See Section 6.1.

The operation has been designed taking into account the mining sequence
and stripping opportunities to ensure that rehabilitated areas are maximized
and disturbed area minimized on an ongoing basis during the life-cycle of the
operation. During the life of the operation the quarry will be dewatered and
progressive rehabilitation will be limited to the perimeter of the quarry and
rock pillar as final extraction limits are reached. Disturbed areas are defined
by MNR to include active extraction areas, internal haul routes, berms,
buildings, sumps, wash ponds, processing areas, stockpile areas and areas
under site preparation or progressive rehabilitation. Approximately 35 ha of
           Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                104
           Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
           February, 2009


      the Acton Quarry is within the area designated Protected Countryside. Based
      on the definition of disturbed area and the nature of quarry operations 32 ha
      is the proposed maximum disturbed area for the lands within the Protected
      Countryside.

      The proposed Extension area will be rehabilitated to lakes, wetlands, exposed
      cliff faces and vegetated shorelines and will be integrated with adjacent
      natural features.   As part of the rehabilitation and off-site ecological
      enhancement plan, the health, diversity and size of key natural heritage
      features and key hydrologic features will be restored and improved to
      promote a net gain of ecological health. See Section 4.7.

      An important functional component of the quarry rehabilitation plan is the
      lakes, which is recognized as a key hydrologic feature in the Greenbelt Plan.
      The lakes are designed to maintain passive movement of groundwater to
      support natural features surrounding the proposed extension. The lakes also
      provide fish habitat and a future recreational fishery. The lakes have been
      designed to include several reef shoals and treatment of backfilled slopes and
      quarry faces to provide spawning and foraging habitat for a variety of fish
      species. These littoral habitats located at the interface between terrestrial
      and aquatic environments are important feeding and breeding habitat for a
      variety of aquatic species, as well as terrestrial species.      The interface
      between the shallow and deep water lake habitats also support important
      functions for deep water fish species.

      Over 80 % of the rehabilitated landform above the lakes will be forested to
      connect the site to adjacent environmental areas. The off-site ecological
      enhancement plan also proposes to plant additional forests and implement a
      forest management plan with the goal of improving the ecological health of
      adjacent woodlands. See Section 4.7.1.

      Following final rehabilitation, Dufferin will convey +/- 600 ha of its land (quarry
      and buffer lands) into public ownership after extraction to provide public
      access for recreational, educational, water management and conservation
      opportunities. See Section 4.10.

7.5      Region of Halton Official Plan

The Region of Halton Official Plan was approved under Section 3 of the Planning
Act. The Regional Plan governs land use within the Region of Halton. The
Regional Plan requires planning decisions to be based on a proper balance of
protecting the environment, enhancing the Region’s economic competitiveness,
and fostering a healthy, equitable society.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             105
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


“Halton Region acknowledges the need to consider its own planning area as part
of a larger physical, social and economic entity such as the GTA and the Golden
Horseshoe……. Particular attention must be paid by Regional Council to inter-
regional issues and forces affecting the GTA and the surrounding area in an
effort to apply Regional resources strategically to those matters over which it
does have some control” ( 40).

The Region of Halton contains some of the highest quality and closest to market
aggregate resources in the GTA and Golden Horseshoe. The Regional Plan
requires the Region to ensure that as much of the mineral aggregate resources
as is realistically possible are made available to supply mineral resource needs
while having regard to other Regional goals and objectives (107.1).

All of the lands being considered for the Acton Quarry Extension are within the
boundaries of the Regional Municipality of Halton. The lands being considered
for the extension of the quarry are predominately designated Escarpment Rural
Area and Agricultural Rural Area and a small portion is designated Greenlands A
and Greenlands B. See Figure 6.

The Regional Plan prohibits new or expanded quarries from locating in the
Escarpment Natural or Escarpment Protection Areas. The Plan directs new or
expanded quarries to locate in the Escarpment Rural Area and / or Agricultural
Area. If the proposal includes or negatively affects areas designated Greenlands
A or B, the Regional Plan requires the application to be consistent with Provincial
Policy resulting in a net gain to the natural environment (110.7.2). In evaluating
consistency with the Provincial Policy Statement, the Region of Halton has
confirmed that a proposal that meets the net gain or enhancement provisions of
the Regional Plan also meets the ‘no negative impact’ test of the 2005 Provincial
Policy Statement.

An amendment to the Regional Plan (2006) is required to permit the proposed
Expansion. In total +/- 124 ha are proposed to be re-designated Mineral
Resource Extraction Area (75 ha from Escarpment Rural Area, 42 ha from
Agricultural Rural Area and 7 ha from Greenlands A & B).

The amendment also includes re-designating +/- 60 ha of land to a more
restrictive environmental designation. Approximately 27 ha are proposed to be
re-designated from Agricultural Rural Area to Greenlands B, +/- 30 ha from
Greenlands B to Escarpment Natural Area and 3 ha from Escarpment Rural Area
to Escarpment Natural Area.

The application conforms to the Regional Plan based on the following:

25. Regional Council supports the notion of sustainable development, which
    "meets the need of the present without compromising the ability of future
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               106
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


     generations to meet their own need." (Our Common Future, The World
     Commission on Environment and Development, 1987) Planning decisions in
     Halton will be made based on a proper balance among the following factors:
     protecting    the   natural      environment,       enhancing its  economic
     competitiveness, and fostering a healthy, equitable society. The overall goal
     is to enhance the quality of life for all people of Halton.

The application carefully balances environmental, economic and social
considerations. There is an established need for close to market sources of high
quality aggregate to help build and maintain infrastructure in Halton and the
surrounding area. The quarry will assist in meeting present needs, while
protecting the natural environment and in the future the rehabilitated quarry and
surrounding land would provide an important recreation and conservation area
within the GTA. See Sections 4.0 to 6.0.

90. The Rural System consists of the designations of Escarpment Protection
    Area, Escarpment Rural Area, Agricultural Rural Area, Hamlets, Mineral
    Resource Extraction Areas and the Halton Waste Management Site, all of
    which are shown on Map 1, and Rural Clusters, which are shown in Local
    Official Plans. In addition, Prime Agricultural Areas are generally defined as
    lands below the Escarpment Brow, for the purpose of prohibiting non-farm
    uses in the Escarpment Protection Area, Escarpment Rural Area,
    Agricultural Rural Area, Mineral Resource Extraction Areas, and Greenlands
    B.

Mineral resource extraction operations are part of the rural system of Halton.

91. The goal of the Rural System is to maintain a permanently secure,
    economically viable agricultural industry, as well as other resource
    industries, and to preserve the open-space character and landscape
    heritage of Halton's non-urbanized areas.

This site has a long standing history of being identified as an important mineral
aggregate resource area in the GTA and is being protected for long term use. An
objective of the Regional plan is “To promote and protect Halton's mineral
resource industry as an important component of its economic base.” See
Sections 4.2, 4.3 and 4.4.

The open landscape character of the area will be preserved during operations
and enhanced in the long term. See Sections 4.7.1, 5.1.5 and 4.10.

96. The objectives of the Escarpment Rural Area are:

     96(5)   To provide for the designation of new Mineral Resource Extraction
             Areas which can be accommodated in accordance with the policies
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                107
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


              of this Plan and by amendment to The Niagara Escarpment Plan
              and this Plan.

A portion of the proposed extraction area is designated Escarpment Rural Area.
The proposed application serves to implement Objective 5 of the Escarpment
Rural Area.

99. The objectives of the Agricultural Rural Area are:

     99(17) To provide for the designation of new Mineral Resource Extraction
            Areas which can be accommodated in accordance with policies of
            this Plan and by amendment to this Plan.

A portion of the proposed extraction area is designated Agricultural Rural Area.
The proposed application serves to implement Objective 17 of the Agricultural
Rural Area.

107. The objectives of the Mineral Resource Extraction Areas are:

     107(1) To ensure as much of the mineral aggregate resources as is
            realistically possible be made available to supply mineral resource
            needs as close to markets as possible while having regard to other
            Regional goals and objectives.

Providing 71 million tonnes of the highest quality aggregate in Southern Ontario
from a close to market location will assist the Province, Region and Local
municipality in building the necessary infrastructure and public service facilities to
meet current and projected needs. See Sections 4.2, 4.3 and 4.4.

     107(3) To minimize the impact of mineral resource extraction operations
            on the Greenlands System.

The Acton Quarry Extension has been designed to protect and in some cases
enhance the natural environment. See Sections 4.7 and 6.1.

     107(5) To ensure the progressive rehabilitation of pits and quarries to
            appropriate after-use within the time frame of the licence.

The operation has been designed taking into account the mining sequence and
stripping to ensure that rehabilitated area will be maximized and disturbed area
minimized on an ongoing basis during the life-cycle of the operation.       See
Aggregate Resources Act Site Plans.
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             108
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


110. It is the policy of the Region to:

     110(2) Require that all extraction and accessory operations be conducted
            in a manner which minimizes environmental pollution in accordance
            with Provincial, Regional and Local standards and requirements.

 The quarry has been designed, buffered and / or separated to prevent adverse
 effects on adjacent land uses. See Section 5.1.

     110(3) Require that surface and ground water resources be protected from
            the adverse impacts of extraction, through appropriate
            Hydrogeological studies and in accordance with Provincial
            requirements and policies of the Region in consultation with the
            Conservation Authorities.

Groundwater and surface water quantity and quality will be managed and
monitored to ensure water resources and related ecological functions are
appropriately protected. The Adaptive Management Plan includes triggers,
mitigation and contingency methods to recognize and prevent unacceptable
impacts. See Section 6.1.

     110(4) Encourage the licensee to carry out an Environmental Impact
            Assessment for any extractive operations within or near any
            Greenlands. The purpose of such an Assessment is to consider
            mitigative measures to protect the function of the Greenlands or its
            remaining portions and to provide base information to assist in the
            rehabilitation of the extracted area.

An Environmental Impact Assessment has been completed and recommends
mitigative measures to protect the function of the natural heritage features that
comprise the Greenlands System. See Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

     110(5)Encourage the progressive rehabilitation of extractive operations.

It is a requirement of the Aggregate Resources Act to complete progressive
rehabilitation and the application implements this. See Aggregate Resources
Act Site Plans.

     110(6) Consider Extraction Areas as an interim use and encourage the
            rehabilitation of all such Areas to Greenlands A or B or for
            agricultural use.

The proposed Extension area will be rehabilitated to lakes, wetlands, exposed
cliff faces and vegetated shorelines and will be integrated with adjacent natural
features. The rehabilitated landform, in combination with the off-site ecological
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                           109
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


enhancement plan, will enhance diversity. See Section 4.7.2. The majority of
these features would merit designation as part of the Greenlands System
following rehabilitation.

     110(7) Require an amendment to this Plan for any new Mineral Resource
            Extraction Areas, except for an 11.3ha expansion of an existing
            sandstone quarry located on the east half of Lot 21, Concession V,
            former Township of Esquesing, in the Town of Halton Hills.

An amendment to the Region of Halton Official Plan (2006) has been applied for.
In total +/- 124 ha are proposed to be re-designated Mineral Resource Extraction
Area (75 ha from Escarpment Rural Area, 42 ha from Agricultural Rural Area and
7 ha from Greenlands A & B).

The amendment also includes re-designating +/- 60 ha of land to a more
restrictive environmental designation. Approximately 27 ha are proposed to be
re-designated from Agricultural Rural Area to Greenlands B, +/- 30 ha from
Greenlands B to Escarpment Natural Area and 3 ha from Escarpment Rural Area
to Escarpment Natural Area.

     110(7.1)Prohibit new or expanded Mineral Resource Extraction Areas from
             locating in Escarpment Natural or Escarpment Protection Areas;

The proposed extraction area is not designated Escarpment Natural Area or
Escarpment Protection Area.

     110(7.2) Direct new or expanded Mineral Resource Extraction Areas to
             locate in the Escarpment Rural and Agricultural Rural Areas. Where
             the proposal includes or negatively affects areas of Greenlands A
             or B, the proponent is required to demonstrate that the proposal is
             consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement and the Provincial
             Greenbelt Plan where applicable and will result in a net gain or
             enhancement to functions or features of the Greenlands System. In
             this regard, the Region views the protection of Greenlands A as a
             priority. The net gain or enhancement shall be based on a
             combination of progressive and final rehabilitations of the proposal
             and/or other measures initiated by the proponent prior to and/or
             during the extraction operation.

The majority of the proposed extraction area was historically cleared and
cultivated for agricultural purposes dating back to the 1860’s. Approximately 80
% of the site qualifies for designation as Escarpment Rural Area or Agricultural
Rural Area. The Regional Plan directs new or expanded quarries to locate within
these areas.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             110
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


In Halton, there is a high degree of overlap between natural heritage features
and the underlying Amabel resource. Both of these resources are protected in
provincial, regional and local plans therefore, a balanced approach must be
implemented to ensure the wise use and management of all rural resources.

To implement a balanced approach, the Regional Plan permits mineral
aggregate operations within the Greenlands System subject to consistency with
the Provincial Policy Statement and the Provincial Greenbelt Plan where
applicable and the requirement for the application to result in a net gain or
enhancement to functions or features of the Greenlands System. The net gain or
enhancement shall be based on a combination of progressive and final
rehabilitation and/or other measures initiated by the proponent prior to and/or
during the extraction operation.

The Regional Plan designates the following natural heritage features as
Greenlands A and B:

      Greenlands A includes: regulatory flood plains, Lake Ontario and
      Burlington Bay shoreline; provincially significant wetlands; and significant
      portions of the habitat of endangered and threatened species, and

      Greenlands B includes: environmentally sensitive areas; public open
      space; regionally significant wetlands,        provincially and regionally
      significant areas of natural and scientific interest (both life science and
      earth science); significant woodlands, Carolinian Canada sites; and Halton
      Regional forests;

Approximately 20% of the site contains low function, degraded, and/or isolated
natural heritage features which qualify for designation as Greenlands B
(significant woodland, environmentally sensitive area, other wetlands).

Provincial Policy permits development within significant woodlands provided
there is no negative impact to the overall feature or functions of the significant
woodland. The Region of Halton has confirmed that when assessing negative
impact, consideration of the net environmental gain principle, including
enhancements initiated by the applicant prior to and/or during extraction, and the
proposed progressive and final rehabilitation of the site shall be taken into
account. Provincial Policy does not require the protection of other wetlands.

To mitigate for the loss of the these features an off-site enhancement and
rehabilitation plan for the Acton Quarry Extension is proposed that will result in:
49.4 ha of new woodlands; 56.7 ha of active forest management, 0.3 ha of new
wetland that provide amphibian breeding habitat; 6.5 ha of new wetland located
between the proposed lakes and surrounding natural areas; 4.0 ha of wetland
enhancement; 2.7 km of limestone cliff, 680 m of talus slopes; and 90 ha of
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            111
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


lakes which provide aquatic habitat and a future fisheries resource; and 11.8 ha
of grassland / thicket management.

Overall, the application results in a net environmental gain to the Greenlands
System while making available as much mineral aggregate resources as close to
market as possible. See Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

     110(8) Evaluate each proposal for new Mineral Resource Extraction Areas
            based on its individual merits and consideration of all the following
            factors:

             a)     availability of mineral aggregates to meet local, Regional and
                    provincial demands at reasonable costs in accordance with
                    Provincial policies,

The subject site is identified as a High Potential Mineral Resource Area in the
Regional Plan. Providing 71 million tonnes of the highest quality aggregate in
Southern Ontario from a close to market location will assist the Province, Region
and Local municipality in building the necessary infrastructure and public service
facilities to meet current and projected needs at reasonable costs. See Sections
4.2, 4.3 and 4.4.

             b) economic benefits to Halton,

The Region of Halton recognizes that a significant amount of infrastructure is
required to accommodate the projected population. Upgrading and building new
infrastructure and buildings is essential for maintaining the quality of life in
Halton. Ensuring an adequate supply of close to market aggregate will reduce
the cost and assist the public sector is maximizing its investment dollars.

The Regional Plan also has an objective “To promote and protect Halton's
mineral resource industry as an important component of its economic base.”

Licensing 71 million tonnes of aggregate will extend the life of the Acton Quarry
by approximately 18 – 24 years. On average, the quarry employs 60 people and
indirectly employs 150 people through various contractors and suppliers working
on-site. On average, the quarry spends over $12 million annually on services,
municipal taxes and levies.

The quarry will also provide the critical resource to support other industries in
Halton such as the construction industry, cement and concrete manufacturing
industry and other associated industries. See Section 4.11.

             c) impact on, and proposed measures to minimize such impact:
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            112
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


      [i] the Greenlands System through an Environmental Impact
                    Assessment, where applicable, and in accordance with
                    Section 100(7.2),

The Acton Quarry Extension has been designed to protect and enhance the
natural environment. See Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

      [ii] quality and quantity of surface and ground waters,

Groundwater and surface water quantity and quality will be managed and
monitored to ensure water resources and related ecological functions are
appropriately protected. The Adaptive Management Plan includes triggers,
mitigation and contingency methods to recognize and prevent unacceptable
impacts. See Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

      [iii] adjacent land uses,

The quarry has been designed, buffered and / or separated to prevent adverse
effects on adjacent land uses. See Section 5.1.

      [iv] any heritage resources or significant geologic formations,

The extraction area does not contain any significant built heritage resources or
significant cultural heritage landscapes. Significant archaeological resources
within the extraction area have conserved by removal and documentation. See
Section 4.8.

The site does not contain any significant geologic formations. The Escarpment
brow is located more than 300 m from the site and the site does not contain any
significant karst features.

      [v] transportation, and

The Acton Quarry Extension is located close to market and will utilize existing
haul routes that provide for safe, energy efficient movement of goods. See
Section 5.1.6.

      [vi] the surrounding farming and rural communities, and

 The quarry has been designed, buffered and / or separated to prevent adverse
 effects on adjacent land uses. See Sections 5.0 and 5.1.

             d)     proposed rehabilitation plan and compatibility of the
                    proposed after-use with the goals and objectives of this Plan.
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              113
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


The Acton Quarry Extension will be rehabilitated to lakes, wetlands, exposed cliff
faces and vegetated shorelines and will be integrated with adjacent natural
features. The rehabilitated landform, in combination with the off-site ecological
enhancement plan, will enhance the diversity of the area. Following final
rehabilitation, Dufferin will convey +/- 600 ha of its land (quarry and buffer lands)
into public ownership after extraction to provide public access for recreational,
educational, water management and conservation opportunities. These potential
after-uses conform to the goals and objectives of the Regional Plan. See Section
4.10.

111. The objectives of the Region are:

     111(1) To protect from incompatible land uses and conserve mineral
            resources as a non-renewable natural resource for future use.

     111(2) To promote and protect Halton's mineral resource industry as an
            important component of its economic base.

     111(3) To protect mineral aggregate resources from land uses
            incompatible with possible future extraction, as is realistically
            possible in the context of other land use planning objectives of this
            Plan and in recognition of the continuing local, Regional and
            provincial demand forecast for mineral aggregate.

Licensing the Acton Quarry Extension will ensure the protection and availability
of this non-renewable resource.

112. It is the policy of the Region to:

     112(1) Protect high potential mineral resource areas outside Urban Areas,
            Hamlets and Rural Clusters within Halton, consistent with Sections
            110(7.1) and 110(7.2) of this Plan and consisting of primary and
            secondary sand and gravel resource areas and selected
            bedrock/shale resource areas as mapped and updated from time to
            time by the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines or the
            Ministry of Natural Resources.

The proposed extraction area is considered a high potential mineral resource
area and is protected in the Regional Plan. See Section 4.2.

     112(4) Seek to ensure the availability of mineral aggregate resources in
             accordance with forecast local, Regional and provincial demands.

Providing 71 million tonnes of the highest quality aggregate in Southern Ontario
from a close to market location will assist the Province, Region and Local
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                114
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


municipality in building the necessary infrastructure and public service facilities to
meet current and projected needs. See Sections 4.3 and 4.4.

7.6    Town of Halton Hills Official Plan, 2008

The Town of Halton Hills Official Plan was approved under Section 3 of the
Planning Act. The Official Plan establishes a vision for the future land use
structure of the Town and is intended to serve as the basis for managing change
until 2021. The Official Plan establishes an ‘environment-first’ philosophy which
is a land use planning approach that is considered in making all planning
decisions in the Town. The ‘environment-first’ philosophy recognizes the
importance of maintaining, restoring and where possible, enhancing or improving
natural heritage features and ecological functions in conjunction with other
interests in accordance with Provincial policy and legislation (Section A1).

The Community Vision section of the Official Plan recognizes that mineral
aggregate extraction is a rural based activity and an important component of the
local economy. The Plan requires mineral aggregate extraction to be undertaken
in a manner that minimizes social and environmental impacts. In keeping with the
‘environment-first’ philosophy, the Official Plan permits mineral extraction
operations within the Greenlands system provided the application results in a net
environmental gain to the features or functions of the Greenlands system through
a combination of compensation and enhancements that are initiated prior to
and/or during extraction, and the proposed progressive and final rehabilitation of
the site to uses that benefit the community (Section A1).

All of the Acton Quarry Extension lands are within the boundaries of the Town of
Halton Hills. The lands being considered for the extension of the quarry are
currently designated Escarpment Rural Area and Protected Countryside and a
small portion is designated Greenlands A, Greenlands B and Greenbelt
Greenlands. See Figure 7.

An amendment to the Town of Halton Hills Official Plan (2008) has been
submitted. In total +/- 124 ha are proposed to be designated Mineral Resource
Extraction Area (75 ha from Escarpment Rural Area, 42 ha from Protected
Countryside and 2 ha from Greenlands A & B and 5 ha from Greenbelt
Greenlands). The amendment also includes re-designating +/-60 ha of land to a
more restrictive environmental designation. Approximately 3 ha are proposed to
be re-designated from Escarpment Rural Area to Escarpment Natural Area, +/-
27 ha from Protected Countryside Area to Greenbelt Greenlands and +/- 30 ha
from Greenlands B to Escarpment Natural Area.
          Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                          115
          Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
          February, 2009


The application conforms to the Town of Halton Hills Official Plan based on the
following:

A2       GOALS AND STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

A2.1.1         To protect, enhance and where possible restore, significant natural
               heritage features and related ecological functions in the Town for
               present and future generations.

The Acton Quarry Extension has been designed to protect, and in some cases
enhance and restore significant natural heritage features and related ecological
functions in the Town for present and future generations. See Sections 4.7, 4.10,
6.0 and 6.1.

A2.4.1         To protect, maintain and enhance the open space character of
               lands outside of the Urban Areas and the Hamlet Areas for
               enjoyment by present and future generations.

During operations the quarry will be screened and wherever possible vegetation
will be retained within the setback to maintain the open landscape character. See
Section 5.1.5.

Following rehabilitation the open landscape character of the area will be
enhanced by creating lakes with exposed cliff faces, wetlands and vegetated
shorelines. See Section 4.7.1.

A2.5.1         To preserve areas demonstrating high capability for agricultural
               production for that purpose.

The Acton Quarry Extension and surrounding area is not a prime agricultural
area. See Section 4.6.

A2.6.1         To identify, conserve and enhance the Town’s cultural heritage
               resources and promote their value and benefit to the community.

The extraction area does not contain any significant built heritage resources or
significant cultural heritage landscapes. Significant archaeological resources
within the extraction area have conserved by removal and documentation. See
Section 4.8.

A2.7.2 o)      To protect and recognize the Town’s mineral aggregate resource
               industry as an important component of its economic base.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                           116
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The extraction area has a long standing history of being identified as an
important mineral aggregate resource area in the GTA and is being protected for
long term use. See Section 4.2.

The Acton Quarry is an important component of the Town’s economic base.
Licensing 71 million tonnes of aggregate will extend the life of the Acton Quarry
by approximately 18 – 24 years. On average, the quarry employs 60 people and
indirectly employs 150 people through various contractors and suppliers working
on-site. On average, the quarry spends over $12 million annually on services,
municipal taxes and levies.

The quarry will also provide the critical resource to support other industries in
Halton such as the construction industry, cement and concrete manufacturing
industry and other associated industries. See Section 4.11.

A2.10 MINERAL AGGREGATE RESOURCES

A2.10.1 GOAL

To protect mineral aggregate resource areas for long term use while ensuring
that extraction occurs in a manner that minimizes environmental and social
impacts.

A2.10.2 STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

   i) To ensure that as much of the mineral aggregate resources in the Town
      as is realistically possible shall be made available to supply mineral
      aggregate needs as close to markets as possible provided the extraction
      can occur in a manner that minimizes environmental and social impacts.

The application ensures that as much of the mineral aggregate resource as is
realistically possible will be made available in a manner that minimizes
environmental and social impacts. See Sections 4.0 to 6.0.

   j) To ensure the proper management of mineral aggregate operations to
      minimize potential negative environmental and social impacts.

The Acton Quarry Extension has been designed to minimize social impacts and
enhance the natural environment. See Sections 4.7, 4.10, 5.0, 5.1, 6.0 and 6.1.

   k) To protect areas having high potential aggregate resource deposits from
      incompatible development that would preclude or hinder access to the
      resource.
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            117
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


The proposed extraction area is identified as a high potential mineral resource
area in the Local Plan. See Section 4.2.

   l) To ensure that all operations are progressively rehabilitated in an
      environmentally responsible fashion.

Progressive rehabilitation is a requirement of the Aggregate Resources Act. The
operation has been designed taking into account the mining sequence and
stripping opportunities to ensure that rehabilitated areas will be maximized and
disturbed area minimized on an ongoing basis during the life-cycle of the
operation. The proposed Extension will be rehabilitated to lakes, wetlands,
exposed cliff faces and vegetated shorelines. See Section 4.7.1.

   m) To ensure that roads are appropriate and built to a standard that can
      accommodate truck traffic associated with mineral aggregate extraction
      operations.

The existing haul route will continue to be used and it is built to a standard that
can accommodate truck traffic. One new section of haul route is proposed on 3rd
Line from Phase 7 to 22nd Sideroad. This section of road is proposed to be
upgraded to an appropriate standard to accommodate truck traffic. See Section
5.1.6.

   n) To promote the conservation of mineral aggregate resources through the
      recovery of these resources wherever feasible.

The Acton Quarry recycles mineral aggregate resources, wherever feasible to
maximize the resource on-site.

B4.2.3.1 ESCARPMENT RURAL AREA OBJECTIVES

It is the objective of this designation to:

       d) to provide for the designation of new Mineral Resource Extraction
          Areas which can be accommodated in accordance with the policies of
          this Plan and by amendment to the Niagara Escarpment Plan, the
          Region of Halton Official Plan and this Plan.

The portion of the Acton Quarry Extension is designated Escarpment Rural Area.
The proposed application serves to implement Objective d) of the Escarpment
Rural Area.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             118
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


C2.2 WHAT AN EIS SHOULD DEMONSTRATE

Before development is approved in the area subject to the EIS, the EIS shall
demonstrate that the relevant policies of this Plan are met, including, for mineral
aggregate extraction operations, the principle of net environmental gain as set
out in Section E6.4.3.5 of this Plan. The EIS should demonstrate that the use will:

   a) not have a negative impact on significant natural heritage features and
      related ecological functions;

   b) not discharge any substance that could have an adverse effect on air
      quality, groundwater, surface water and associated plant and animal life;

   c) be serviced by an adequate supply of water and that the groundwater
      taking associated with the use will not have an adverse effect on existing
      water supplies, surface water features and associated plant and animal
      life;

   d) not cause erosion or siltation of watercourses or unacceptable changes to
      watercourse morphology;

   e) not interfere with groundwater recharge to the extent that it would
      adversely affect groundwater supply for any use;

   f) not cause an increase in flood potential on or off the site;

   g) maintain/enhance/restore/rehabilitate the natural condition of affected
      watercourses, and protect/enhance/restore/rehabilitate aquatic habitat;

   h) not encourage the demand for further development that would negatively
      affect wetland function or contiguous wetland areas;

   i) enhance and restore endangered terrestrial and aquatic habitat where
      appropriate and feasible;

   j) not unduly interfere with the function of existing or potential natural
      corridors that are determined to be of significance;

   k) not lead to a reduction to the extent of significant woodlands within the
      Greenlands system; and,

   l) not lead to species loss or negative impacts on endangered, threatened or
      rare species and/or their habitat.
          Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                           119
          Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
          February, 2009


In determining whether the above criteria have been satisfied, reference may be
made to applicable federal and provincial standards and regulations as well as
referring to the relevant policies of this Plan.

A natural environment technical report was completed that addresses the
requirements of an EIS and the policies of the Official Plan that permit new or
expanded mineral aggregate operations within the Greenlands system.
Specifically, it demonstrates that there will be no negative impact on significant
natural heritage features and related ecological functions in keeping with the
principle of net environmental gain. In assessing negative impact and the
principle of net environmental gain, the Town considers compensation and
enhancements initiated by the proponent prior to and/or during extraction and the
proposed progressive and final rehabilitation of the site.

The natural environment technical report concluded that with the implementation
of the proposed mitigation, rehabilitation and off-site environmental enhancement
plan the application protects the natural environment and results in a net gain
and overall increase to the size, diversity and function of the Greenlands system.
See Section 4.7.

C5      WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

At the present time, many of the Town’s residents obtain drinking water from
private wells. It is a policy of this Plan to protect existing sources of drinking
water for future use.

On this basis, all major applications for development in close proximity to
development serviced by private wells shall be supported by a Hydrogeological
Report. Major applications shall include any development requiring an
Amendment to this Plan. In addition, a Hydrogeological Report may be required
for other applications in accordance with the policies of this Plan.

The Report shall be prepared to the satisfaction of the Town and the Region of
Halton. The purpose of the Hydrogeological Report is to investigate the impacts
of the proposed development on water quality and quantity and provide
recommendations on:

     a) how to protect or enhance the hydrological function of the water resource;

     b) how to minimize or eliminate the effect of the proposed use on the
        groundwater recharge and discharge function;

     c) how to minimize or eliminate the effect of the proposed use on the quality
        and quantity of drinking water in adjacent private and municipal wells;
          Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              120
          Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
          February, 2009


     d) how to protect, enhance or restore sensitive                      groundwater
        recharge/discharge areas, aquifers and headwater areas;

     e) whether it is necessary to monitor water budgets for groundwater aquifers
        and surface water features; and,

     f) how to ensure that the quality of the sensitive surface water features
        affected by the development are protected, improved or restored.

There are no sensitive surface water or sensitive groundwater features within the
proposed extraction area. A water resources assessment was completed and
with the implementation of the Adaptive Management Plan, off-site enhancement
plan and rehabilitation plan sensitive surface water features, sensitive ground
water features, groundwater recharge / discharge, aquifers and headwaters will
be protected, and in some cases enhanced or restored. See Sections 4.7, 4.9,
5.1.1, 6.0 and 6.1.

C6      GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT

All residents of the Town of Halton Hills obtain their drinking water from
groundwater sources. The majority of the water used is extracted from municipal
wells in the Georgetown and Acton urban areas. Given this reliance on
groundwater primarily for human use and its ecological importance, it is the
objective of this Plan to:

     a) manage water resources in a manner that ensures an adequate
        sustainable supply of clean water for both human use and the natural
        environment;

     b) support the preparation of watershed and subwatershed plans to assist in
        the proper management of water as a key resource;

     c) protect existing surface and ground water quality from degradation and to
        improve and restore water quality where degraded;

     d) to incorporate source protection objectives into the land use planning
        process to ensure that the sources of water are not compromised in the
        future as a result of land use decisions;

     e) avoid competition for water supplies through appropriate regional planning
        initiatives and decision-making processes;

     f) encourage the establishment of water conservation measures as a way to
        meet water supply needs in the same manner that alternatives to create
        new supplies are investigated; and,
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             121
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009



   g) educate the public on the value of protecting the resource and how they
      can contribute to its protection.

A water resources assessment was completed and concluded that surrounding
private residential wells will not be adversely affected by the proposed quarry
extension due to the separation distance, hydrogeologic conditions, and the
mitigation measures proposed to protect surrounding ecological features that will
also serve to protect surrounding wells.

During extraction, Dufferin will implement a comprehensive monitoring program
of groundwater quality and quantity on-site and at selected residential properties.
The protection of individual wells will be accomplished by setting performance
based targets at strategically located monitoring wells. These wells will be
monitored and any potential influences on groundwater levels from the quarry
operations can be identified early and mitigated if required. See Section 5.1.1.

C6.1POLICIES

The Region of Halton has long recognized the value of groundwater resources
and has prepared an Aquifer Management Plan to provide for an overall
understanding of the resource and to provide the basis for policies in the Region
of Halton Official Plan.

Policies based on the Aquifer Management Plan have been incorporated into the
Region of Halton Official Plan. These include identifying Municipal Wellhead
Protection Zones based on the groundwater flow patterns within the vicinity of
each of the active wells supplying water to the Region. Municipal Wellhead
Protection Zones that are located within Halton Hills are identified on Appendix
1B to this Plan. It is the policy of this Plan:

   a) to encourage the Region to update the AMP as new information becomes
      available;

   b) to show the boundaries of the Municipal Wellhead Protection Zones in the
      Comprehensive Zoning By-law, once incorporated into the Regional
      Official Plan and this Plan by amendments, and prohibit or restrict within
      these areas land uses that have the potential to release or discharge
      contaminants to significantly affect groundwater quality;

   c) to require those land uses that have the potential to release or discharge
      contaminants to significantly affect the quality of groundwater be subject to
      a review by the Region to assess the risks of such uses to potentially
      contaminate groundwater and, based on this assessment, to determine
      whether: the landowner is required to undertake a hydrogeological study
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                          122
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


        to the satisfaction of the Region and implement its recommendations.
        Such recommendations may result:

        i) in the prohibition of the use; or

        ii) in the restriction of the use; or

        iii) an agreement to adopt Best Management Practices as prescribed by
             the Region.

     d) to cooperate with the Region in the extension of Municipal Wellhead
        Protection Zones for municipal wells serving neighbouring municipalities,
        and request similar protection from neighbouring municipalities for
        municipal wells serving the residents of Halton Hills.

The Georgetown municipal water supply system comprises three well fields
located downgradient at distances of more than 3.5 km from the quarry. Halton
Region has undertaken a study to refine the capture zones of their municipal
wells, however, the results have not been released. Based on the current
mapping of the wellhead protection zones (based on travel time) a small portion
of the east side of Phase 4 encroaches into Zone 3, a 2 to 10 year time of travel
zone for the Georgetown well. No activities are proposed for this area that are
restricted within Zone 3 and no impacts are predicted.

E1      AGRICULTURAL AREA

E1.1OBJECTIVES

It is the objective of this designation to:

     f)to provide for the designation of new Mineral Resource Extraction Areas
     which can be accommodated in accordance with the policies of this Plan and
     by an amendment to the Region of Halton Official Plan and this Plan.

A portion of the Acton Quarry Extension is designated Agricultural Rural Area.
The proposed application serves to implement Objective f) of the Agricultural
Rural Area designation.

E6      MINERAL RESOURCE EXTRACTION AREA

E6.1OBJECTIVES

It is the objective of this designation to:
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             123
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


   a) recognize existing pits and quarries and protect them from activities that
      would preclude or hinder their continued use or expansion;

The application is to expand the existing Acton Quarry. See Section 4.5.

   b) protect known aggregate deposits and areas of high potential mineral
      aggregate resources for potential future extraction;

The majority of the proposed extraction is identified as a high potential mineral
aggregate resource area in the Town’s Official Plan. See Section 4.2.

   c) ensure that new pits and quarries will not have a negative impact on
      significant natural heritage features and related ecological functions in
      keeping with the principle of net environmental gain;

The natural environment technical report, specifically, demonstrates that there
will be no negative impact on significant natural heritage features and related
ecological functions in keeping with the principle of net environmental gain. The
application protects the natural environment and results in a net gain and overall
increase to the size, diversity and function of the Greenlands system. See
Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

   d) ensure that the haul routes used are appropriate;

The existing haul route will continue to be used and it is built to a standard that
can accommodate truck traffic. One new section of haul route is proposed on 3rd
Line from Phase 7 to 22nd Sideroad. This section of road is proposed to be
upgraded to an appropriate standard to accommodate truck traffic. See Section
5.1.6.

   e) ensure that extractive activities are carried out in a manner that minimizes
      environmental and social impacts;

The Acton Quarry Extension has been designed to minimize social impacts and
enhance the natural environment. See Sections 4.7, 4.10, 5.0, 5.1, 6.0 and 6.1.

   f) ensure that aggregate extraction operations are designed to minimize
      visual impacts on the open space character of the rural landscape; and,

During operations the quarry will be screened and wherever possible vegetation
will retained within the setback to maintain the open landscape character of the
rural landscape. See Section 5. 1.5.
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                           124
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


Following rehabilitation the open landscape character of the area will be
enhanced by creating lakes with exposed cliff faces, wetlands and vegetated
shorelines. See Section 4.7.1.

   g) ensure the progressive rehabilitation of pits and quarries to an appropriate
      after use.

The proposed Extension area will be rehabilitated to lakes, wetlands, exposed
cliff faces and vegetated shorelines. Subject to approval of the Acton Quarry
Extension as proposed, Dufferin Aggregates will convey +/- 600 ha of its land
(quarry and buffer lands) into public ownership after extraction for recreational,
educational, water management and conservation opportunities. These potential
after-uses are appropriate and consistent with the goals of the rural area. See
Section 4.10.

E6.4.3   NEW MINERAL AGGREGATE OPERATIONS OR EXPANSIONS TO
         EXISTING OPERATIONS

E6.4.3.1 INTRODUCTION

All new mineral aggregate operations and/or expansions to existing mineral
aggregate operations onto lands that are not designated Mineral Resource
Extraction Area shall require an Amendment to the Official Plan and, where
applicable, the Niagara Escarpment Plan. Notwithstanding the foregoing, an
Official Plan Amendment will not be required for the proposed expansion of an
existing sandstone quarry located on Part of Lot 21, Concession 5.

An amendment to the Town of Halton Hills Official Plan (2008) has been
submitted. In total +/- 124 ha are proposed to be designated Mineral Resource
Extraction Area (75 ha from Escarpment Rural Area, 42 ha from Protected
Countryside and 2 ha from Greenlands A & B and 5 ha from Greenbelt
Greenlands). The amendment also includes re-designating +/-60 ha of land to a
more restrictive environmental designation. Approximately 3 ha are proposed to
be re-designated from Escarpment Rural Area to Escarpment Natural Area, +/-
27 ha from Protected Countryside Area to Greenbelt Greenlands and +/- 30 ha
from Greenlands B to Escarpment Natural Area.

E6.4.3.2 LOCATIONAL CRITERIA

It is the policy of this Plan:

    a) to direct new or expanded mineral aggregate operations to locate in the
       Agricultural Area, the Escarpment Rural Area and the Protected
       Countryside Area;
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            125
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The majority of the proposed extraction area was historically cleared and
cultivated for agricultural purposes dating back to the 1860’s. Approximately 80
% of the site qualifies for designation as Escarpment Rural Area or Protected
Countryside Area. The Local Plan directs new or expanded quarries to locate
within these areas.

   b) to prohibit new or expanded mineral aggregate operations from locating in
      the Escarpment Natural Area, Escarpment Protection Area, Urban Area,
      Hamlet Area and Rural Cluster Area; and,

The proposed extraction area is not designated Escarpment Natural Area or
Escarpment Protection Area.

   c) to only permit new or expanded mineral aggregate operations within the
      Greenlands system where it can be demonstrated that there will be no
      negative impact on significant natural heritage features and related
      ecological functions in keeping with the principle of net environmental
      gain in accordance with Section E6.4.3.5 of this Plan.

In the Town of Halton Hills, there is a high degree of overlap between natural
heritage features and the underlying Amabel resource. Both of these resources
are protected in provincial, regional and local plans therefore, a balanced
approach must be implemented to ensure the wise use and management of all
rural resources.

To implement a balanced approach, the Local Plan permits mineral aggregate
operations within the Greenlands System where it can be demonstrated that
there will be no negative impact on significant natural heritage features and
related ecological functions in keeping with the principle of net environmental
gain.

The Local Plan designates the following natural heritage features as part of the
Greenlands system:

      Greenlands A, includes: regulatory flood plains, Lake Ontario and
      Burlington Bay shoreline; provincially significant wetlands; and significant
      portions of the habitat of endangered and threatened species, and

      Greenlands B, includes: environmentally sensitive areas; public open
      space; regionally significant wetlands,        provincially and regionally
      significant areas of natural and scientific interest (both life science and
      earth science); significant woodlands, Carolinian Canada sites; and Halton
      Regional forests;
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              126
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


       Greenbelt Greenlands apply only to the lands within the Protected
       Countryside Designation of the Greenbelt Plan.              The Greenbelt
       Greenlands designation includes: significant habitat of endangered
       species, threatened species and special concern species; fish habitat;
       Wetlands; life science areas of natural and scientific interest (ANSIs);
       significant valleylands; significant woodlands; significant wildlife habitat;
       sand barrens, savannahs and tallgrass prairies; alvars; permanent and
       intermittent streams; lakes (and their littoral zones) and seepage areas
       and springs.

Approximately 20% of the site contains low function, degraded, and/or isolated
natural heritage features which qualify for designation as Greenlands B or
Greenbelt Greenlands (significant woodland, environmentally sensitive area, and
other wetlands).

When assessing negative impact on significant natural heritage features the
Town of Halton Hills Official Plan requires consideration of the net environmental
gain principle, including enhancements initiated by the applicant prior to and/or
during extraction, and the proposed progressive and final rehabilitation of the site
shall be taken into account.

To mitigate for the loss of the these features an off-site enhancement and
rehabilitation plan for the Acton Quarry Extension is proposed that will result in:
49.4 ha of new woodlands; 56.7 ha of active forest management, 0.3 ha of new
wetland that provide amphibian breeding habitat, including potential breeding
habitat for Jefferson Salamander; 6.5 ha of new wetland located between the
proposed lakes and surrounding natural areas; 4.0 ha of wetland enhancement;
2.7 km of limestone cliff, 680 m of talus slopes; and 90 ha of lakes which will
include aquatic habitat and provide a future fisheries resource; and 11.8 ha of
grassland / thicket management.

Overall, the application results in a net environmental gain to the Greenlands
System while making available as much mineral aggregate resources as close to
market as possible. See Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

E6.4.3.3 MINERAL AGGREGATE OPERATIONS IN PRIME AGRICULTURAL
AREAS

In prime agricultural areas, on prime agricultural land, extraction of mineral
aggregates is permitted as an interim use, subject to Section E6.4.3.1 of this
Plan, provided that rehabilitation of the site will be carried out whereby
substantially the same areas and same average soil quality for agriculture are
restored. On these prime agricultural lands, complete agricultural rehabilitation is
not required if:
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            127
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


    a) there is a substantial quantity of mineral aggregates below the water table
       warranting extraction; or

    b) the depth of planned extraction in a quarry makes restoration of
       preextraction agricultural capability unfeasible; and,

    c) other alternatives, including resources in areas of Canada Land Inventory
       Class 4 to 7 soils and resources on prime agricultural lands where
       rehabilitation is feasible, have been considered by the applicant and
       found unsuitable; and,

    d) agricultural rehabilitation in remaining areas will be maximized.

The Acton Quarry Extension and surrounding area is not a prime agricultural
area. See Sections 4.6, 5.0 and 4.10.

E6.4.3.4 APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

Any application for Amendment to the Official Plan and/or the zoning by-law shall
be supported by studies that are based on predictable, measurable, objective
effects on people and the environment. Such studies will be based on Provincial
standards, regulations and guidelines, where they exist and will consider and
identify methods of addressing the anticipated impacts in the area affected by the
extractive operation. All applications shall be supported by information that
address:

    a)    the impact of the operation of the mineral aggregate resource use on:

          i) the natural heritage features and ecological functions on the site
             and in the area;

The diversity and connectivity of natural features, in the area and the long-term
ecological function and diversity will be maintained, and in some cases restored
and enhanced. See Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

          ii)nearby communities;

 The quarry has been designed, buffered and / or separated to prevent adverse
 effects on adjacent land uses. See Section 5.1.

          iii)agricultural resources and activities;

The Acton Quarry Extension and surrounding area is not a prime agricultural
area. Adjacent agricultural resources and activities will not be impacted. See
Sections 4.6 and 5.0.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                              128
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


          iv)the quality and quantity of groundwater and surface water;

Groundwater and surface water quantity and quality will be managed and
monitored to ensure water resources and related ecological functions are
appropriately protected. The Adaptive Management Plan includes triggers,
mitigation and contingency methods to recognize and prevent unacceptable
impacts. See Section 6.1.

          v)the built or cultural heritage resources in the area;

The extraction area does not contain any significant built heritage resources or
significant cultural heritage landscapes. Significant archaeological resources
within the extraction area have conserved by removal and documentation. See
Section 4.8.

          vi)significant geologic formations on the site and in the area;

The site does not contain any significant geologic formations. The Escarpment
brow is located more than 300 m from the site and the site does not contain any
significant karst features.

          vii)the groundwater recharge and discharge functions on the site and in
          the immediate area;

Groundwater quantity and quality will be managed and monitored to ensure
water resources and related ecological functions are appropriately protected.
The Adaptive Management Plan includes triggers, mitigation and contingency
methods to recognize and prevent unacceptable impacts. See Section 6.1.

          viii) surface water features in the area; and,

Surface water quantity and quality will be managed and monitored to ensure
water resources and related ecological functions are appropriately protected.
The Adaptive Management Plan includes triggers, mitigation and contingency
methods to recognize and prevent unacceptable impacts. See Section 6.1.

          ix) nearby wells used for drinking water purposes.

The proposed Extension will not adversely affect nearby wells used for drinking
water. See Section 5.1.1.

   b)the effect of the additional truck traffic on the ability of an existing haul
   route to function as a safe and efficient haul route considering among other
   matters the following:
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                               129
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


          i)the types of operations proposed;

          ii)current road standards and an assessment of the proposed haul
          route relative to those standards;

          iii)anticipated type of truck traffic; and

          iv)increases in background traffic levels together with current levels of
          truck traffic and other traffic;

There will be no additional permitted truck traffic on existing haul routes. The
application proposes to extend the life of the Acton Quarry and will not increase
permitted annual tonnage rates. See Section5.1.6.

   c)the suitability of any new haul route. It is a policy of this Plan to encourage
   the establishment of new aggregate operations on established haul routes. If
   a new haul route is proposed, it shall only be approved if it has been
   demonstrated that:

          i)The new haul route is, or can be made, safe and capable of handling
          the volume of traffic proposed;

          ii)The selection and design of the proposed haul route has taken into
          consideration and addressed impacts on existing and permitted
          sensitive land uses along the proposed haul route;

          iii) The design of the new haul route has taken into consideration the
          existing road right-of-way characteristics including existing trees and
          vegetation within the road right-of-way, wood, wire, stump and stone
          fence lines within or adjacent to the right-of-way or other historical
          landscape remnants and where practical has identified means by
          which such features will be retained in order to minimize the impacts
          on the character of the area;

          iv)The design of the new haul route has taken into consideration the
          physical characteristics of the potential route including road
          classification, load limits, road surfacing and the identification of any
          physical constraints to heavy truck traffic, such as vertical or horizontal
          curves, sight lines or shoulders and the means to address any
          deficiencies;

          v) The design of the haul route has taken into consideration the traffic
          impacts (both operational and physical) resulting from the truck traffic
          generated by the proposed operation, including impacts on road
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             130
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


          structure, traffic flow and safety and the mitigation measures that will
          be employed to address these impacts;

The existing haul route will continue to be used and it is built to a standard that
can accommodate truck traffic. One new section of haul route is proposed on 3rd
Line from Phase 7 to 22nd Sideroad. This section of road is proposed to be
upgraded to an appropriate standard to accommodate truck traffic. The road is a
dead end road and the new haul route will not pass any sensitive receptors.
Trucks will travel north on 3rd Line and either travel west to Highway 25, or east
through the existing quarry to 4th Line. See Section 5.1.6.

    d)the impact of the noise, odour, dust and vibration generated by the
    proposed use on adjacent land uses;

The quarry has been designed to ensure provincial guidelines for noise, blasting
and air quality are met. See Section 5.1.

    e) how the policy of no negative impact on significant natural heritage
    features and related ecological functions on the site and in the area can be
    satisfied taking into account the net environmental gain provisions of this
    Plan. This may be achieved, for example, through the progressive
    rehabilitation or design of a pit or quarry.

The natural environment technical report, specifically, demonstrates that there
will be no negative impact on significant natural heritage features and related
ecological functions in keeping with the principle of net environmental gain. The
application protects the natural environment and results in a net gain and overall
increase to the size, diversity and function of the Greenlands system. See
Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

    f) how the impacts from the proposed pit or quarry on adjacent uses will be
    mitigated in order to lessen those impacts; and,

The Acton Quarry Extension has been designed to minimize social impacts. See
Section 5.1.

    g) how the site will be progressively rehabilitated to accommodate
    subsequent land uses after the extraction is completed; and,

The proposed Extension area will be rehabilitated to lakes, wetlands, exposed
cliff faces and vegetated shorelines. Subject to approval of the Acton Quarry
Extension as proposed, Dufferin Aggregates will convey +/- 600 ha of its land
(quarry and buffer lands) into public ownership after extraction for recreational,
educational, water management and conservation opportunities. These potential
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            131
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


after-uses are appropriate and consistent with the goals of the rural area.   See
Sections 4.7.1 and 4.10.

   h)how the visual impacts of the proposed aggregate extraction operation will
   be minimized through the preparation of appropriate studies that considers
   potential visual impacts from adjacent roads and from those properties that
   may be potentially impacted.

During operations the quarry will be screened and wherever possible vegetation
will retained within the setback to maintain the open landscape. See Section
5.1.5.

Following rehabilitation the open landscape character of the area will be
enhanced by creating lakes with exposed cliff faces, wetlands and vegetated
shorelines. See Section 4.7.1.

E.6.4.3.5 ASSESSMENT OF IMPACTS

Where a policy in this Plan requires that mineral aggregate extraction not have a
negative impact on a significant natural heritage feature or related ecological
function in accordance with the principle of net environmental gain, the Town
shall consider compensation and enhancements to be initiated by the proponent
prior to and/or during extraction and the proposed progressive and final
rehabilitation of the site.

In assessing negative impact on significant natural heritage features the Acton
Quarry Extension was designed to result in a net environmental gain taking into
account compensation and enhancements initiated by the proponent prior to
and/or during extraction and the proposed progressive and final rehabilitation of
the site. See Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

In addition to the above, the required studies for a proposed pit or quarry, that
address the matters identified in Section E6.4.3.4 of this Plan shall take into
account the impacts from pits or quarries that are operating or undergoing
rehabilitation in the area.

In considering the added impact of a new pit or quarry licence to existing
impacts, Council shall ensure that mitigation measures intended to lessen the
added impact are reviewed and applied as required.

Currently there are two mineral aggregate operations within 1 km of the site, the
existing Acton Quarry and CBM’s Limehouse sand and gravel pit operation. The
Extension is a continuation of the existing Acton Quarry and will not result in an
increase in permitted extraction levels. The technical reports took into account
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                           132
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


the combined impacts of the mineral aggregate operations and concluded there
would not be adverse impact.

E6.4.4 CRITERIA FOR APPROVAL

Prior to the approval of an Official Plan Amendment and/or Zoning By-law for a
new or expanded mineral aggregate operation the applicant shall demonstrate
that:

   f) the quality of sensitive groundwater and sensitive surface water features
      in the area will be protected, improved or restored taking into account any
      mitigative measures initiated by the proponent prior to and/or during
      extraction and the proposed rehabilitation plan, in accordance with the
      recommendations of appropriate studies;

There are no sensitive surface water or sensitive groundwater features within the
proposed extraction area and the Adaptive Management Plan will protect
sensitive groundwater and sensitive surface water features around the
Extension. The Adaptive Management Plan includes triggers, mitigation and
contingency methods to recognize and prevent unacceptable impacts. See
Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

   g) the quantity of water available for other uses in the area and as base flow
      for sensitive surface water features will be protected, improved or
      restored taking into account any mitigative measures that are initiated by
      the proponent prior to and/or during extraction and the proposed
      rehabilitation plan, in accordance with the recommendations of
      appropriate studies;

Groundwater and surface water quantity and quality will be managed and
monitored to ensure water resources and related ecological functions are
appropriately protected. The Adaptive Management Plan includes triggers,
mitigation and contingency methods to recognize and prevent unacceptable
impacts. See Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

   h) there is no negative impact on significant natural heritage features or
      related ecological functions in accordance with the principle of net
      environmental gain taking into account any compensation and
      enhancements that are recommended in an EIS and initiated by the
      proponent prior to and/or during extraction and the proposed progressive
      and final rehabilitation of the site;

The natural environment technical report, specifically, demonstrates that there
will be no negative impact on significant natural heritage features and related
ecological functions in keeping with the principle of net environmental gain. The
         Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                                133
         Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
         February, 2009


application protects the natural environment and results in a net gain and overall
increase to the size, diversity and function of the Greenlands system. See
Sections 4.7, 6.0 and 6.1.

    i) as much of the site as possible will be rehabilitated by establishing or
       restoring natural self-sustaining vegetation; and,

Over 80 % of the rehabilitated landform above the lakes will be forested to
connect the site to the adjacent environmental areas. The off-site ecological
enhancement plan also proposes to plant additional forest and implement a
forest management plan with the goal of improving the ecological health of
adjacent woodlands. See Section 4.7.1.

    j) other environmental and social impacts such as noise, dust, odour and
       visual impacts are minimized.

The quarry has been designed to ensure provincial guidelines for noise, blasting
and air quality are met. See Section 5.1.

During operations the quarry will be screened and wherever possible vegetation
will retained within the setback to maintain the open landscape. See Section
5.1.5.

Following rehabilitation the open landscape character of the area will be
enhanced by creating lakes with exposed cliff faces, wetlands and vegetated
shorelines. See Section 4.7.1.

E6.4.7 REHABILITATION

It is the policy of this Plan to encourage the progressive rehabilitation of all pits
and quarries within the Town. Council will work with pit and quarry operators and
the Ministry of Natural Resources to ensure that all new licenses have
appropriate progressive rehabilitation plans. If the site to be rehabilitated is in the
area of the Niagara Escarpment Plan Area, rehabilitation shall take place in
accordance with the objectives of the applicable redesignation of the Niagara
Escarpment Plan. The rehabilitation measures taken will be compatible with, and
have minimal impact upon, the surrounding natural and visual environment and
existing uses.

If a site is to be rehabilitated to a natural state, it is the policy of this Plan that
natural self-sustaining vegetation and, where possible, hydrologic features be
established and restored. The rehabilitation of prime agricultural lands shall be in
accordance with Section E6.4.3 of this Plan.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                             134
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


The proposed Extension area will be rehabilitated to lakes, wetlands, exposed
cliff faces and vegetated shorelines and will be integrated with adjacent natural
features. The rehabilitated landform in combination with the off-site ecological
enhancement plan will enhance the diversity of the area and the visual
environment.

An important functional component of the quarry rehabilitation plan is the lakes.
The lakes are designed to maintain passive movement of groundwater to support
natural features surrounding the proposed extension.

The lakes also incorporate aquatic features which include varied shorelines with
shallow near shore habitats and shoals which provide spawning and foraging
habitat for a variety of fish species.     These littoral habitats located at the
interface between terrestrial and aquatic environments are important feeding and
breeding habitat for a variety of aquatic species, as well as terrestrial species.
The interface between the shallow and deep water lake habitats also supports
important functions for deep water fish species.

Subject to approval of the Acton Quarry Extension as proposed, Dufferin
Aggregates will convey +/- 600 ha of its land (quarry and buffer lands) into public
ownership after extraction for recreational, educational, water management and
conservation opportunities. These potential after-uses are appropriate and
consistent with the goals of the rural area. See 4.7.1 and 4.10.

E.6.5Extraction within Protected Countryside

Section E.6.5 of the Town of Halton Hills Official Plan includes policies for
extraction within the Protected Countryside designation of the Greenbelt Plan.
The Town’s policies are consistent with the policies of the Greenbelt Plan and
they are addressed in Section 7.4 of this report.

7.7   Town of Halton Hills, Esquesing Zoning By-law 74-51

Phase 4, 5 and 6 East and the southern portion of Phase 7 are located within the
Niagara Escarpment Development Control Area and are therefore not subject to
local zoning. The Town of Halton Hills, Esquesing Zoning By-law 74-51 zones
the balance of the subject lands (Phase 5 and 6 West, and the northern portion
of Phase 7) Rural (RU) and a small portion of General Residential Special Zone
(RG-1).

A Zoning By-law amendment application is required to rezone Phase 5 and 6
West and the northern portion of Phase 7 from Rural (RU) and General
Residential Special Zone (RG-1) to Extractive Industrial (M2) to permit the
proposed mineral aggregate extraction land use. See Figure 31.
        Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                            135
        Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
        February, 2009


8.0   CONCLUSIONS

The Acton Quarry Extension represents good planning and the wise use and
management of an essential resource. For the reasons outlined in this report the
application is consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement and conforms to the
Greenbelt Plan, Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, Niagara
Escarpment Plan, Region of Halton Official Plan and the Town of Halton Hills
Official Plan. The application carefully balances economic, environmental and
social considerations and is in the public interest for the following reasons:

   The Acton Quarry Extension is appropriately designated in Provincial,
   Regional and Local Plans to consider an expansion to the Acton Quarry;

   The proposed Extension will make available 71 million tonnes of an identified
   provincially significant aggregate resource that is urgently needed in the GTA;

   Ensuring an adequate supply of close to market aggregate is essential for
   economic, social and environmental reasons;

   The application is an extension of an established use with infrastructure in
   place to support the continuation of the operation.

   The quarry has been appropriately designed and buffered from surrounding
   land uses to ensure it is compatible with and does not adversely affect
   surrounding land uses;

   The Acton Quarry Extension has been designed to protect and enhance the
   natural environment.       The application includes an immediate off-site
   enhancement plan and a final rehabilitation plan that results in a net gain and
   overall increase to the size, diversity and function of the Greenlands system.

   A comprehensive mitigation and monitoring plan has been prepared to ensure
   that off-site natural heritage features and water resources are protected.

   The applications includes re-designating +/- 60 ha of adjacent lands to a more
   restrictive environmental designation;

   The site is not within a prime agricultural area;

   The Acton Quarry is an important part of the local economy. The application
   will extend the life of the quarry by 18 – 24 years and the quarry employs 60
   people and indirectly 150 people through various contractors and supplier
   working on-site. The quarry also spends over $12 million annually on
   services, municipal taxes and levies; and
       Dufferin Aggregates Acton Quarry Extension                          136
       Aggregate Resources Act Summary Statement and Planning Report
       February, 2009


   Dufferin Aggregates will convey +/- 600 ha of its land (quarry and buffer
   lands) into public ownership after extraction for recreational, educational,
   water management and conservation uses. Due to the location and diversity
   of the landform this site provides a unique opportunity to meet the growing
   demand for passive and active recreational uses. These lands will also
   enhance the Niagara Escarpment Parks and Open System.


MHBC PLANNING




____________________________             ____________________________
Brian A. Zeman, BES, MCIP, RPP           Adrian K. Cammaert, HBA



____________________________
Nick Miele, BLA, OALA, CSLA

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:22
posted:11/27/2011
language:English
pages:140