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					                                                                          Revised 2006
                                 Freshman English 101

Class schedule: Monday through Friday, 1:00 pm to 1:43 pm
Conference/Make-up period: Monday through Friday, 1:43 pm to 2: 26 pm
Texts: Writing the College Essay 4th edition by James D. Zamagias
       Warriner’s English Grammar and Composition 6th edition
Instructor: Mrs. Jessica S. Deakins
Home phone number: 814-634-8478
Email address: jdeakins@masd.net

Course Objectives:

-   To recognize and meet the demands of college writing
-   To compose a variety of paper types including description, narration,
    characterization, process, comparison/contrast, cause and effect, definition, and
    research
-   To apply the writing process (brainstorming, organizing, outlining, drafting,
    evaluating, revising, editing, publishing)
-   To comprehend and apply correct grammatical/mechanical, structural, and usage
    rules
-   To comprehend and master correct MLA documentation format
-   To improve knowledge of available library resources
-   To research available library resources competently

Student Registration:

       Students enrolled in this course must register through Allegany College of
Maryland in order to receive three credits for Freshman English 101. These credits may
then be transferred to the college/university attended after high school graduation.

Grading Criteria for Writing and Class Requirements:

        In all compositions, a clearly and specifically phrased thesis statement, sensible
organization, ample examples or textual support (if research based), thorough
explanation, solid mechanics, advanced style, and correct documentation (if research
based) must be evident. All guidelines established (date due, length, number of works
cited/consulted, format, etc.) must be met. A severe deficiency in any area results in
assignment failure and/or subsequent revision of said composition. Students must earn an
A or B (84 %) and complete every assignment by the established deadline in order to
maintain Honors status and to receive the weighted grade point. Papers will be scored
out of 100 points unless otherwise specified: 100-94% = A; 93-90% = A-; 89-87% = B+;
86-84% = B; 83-80% = B-; 79-77% = C+; 76-74% = C; 73-70% = C-; 69-67% = D+;
66-64% = D; 63-60% = D-.
Recommended Student Profile:

The following characteristics should be considered in the enrollment of students in
Allegany College of Maryland Freshman English 101:

-   Students in this course should have the desire to learn more than the obvious or
    superficial.
-   Students should be competent writers who know Standard English structures.
-   Students should be able to work on their own and complete major projects without
    close teacher supervision.
-   Students should not enroll for status reasons or because they expect to ensure a high
    grade. Students must place the greatest emphasis on learning.
-   Students in this course should have the support of their parents that includes an
    understanding of its rigorous academic demands and the need for uninterrupted study.
-   Students should be recommended by their junior English instructors.
-
Freshman English 101 Composition Units to be Explored during the Academic
Semester:
           Writing the College Essay by James D. Zamagias

-   Chapter 1 – Writing as a Skill
-   Chapter 2 – Writing the Physical Description Paper
-   Chapter 3 – Writing the Narrative Paper
-   Chapter 5 – Writing the Process Paper
-   Chapter 7 – Classification
-   Chapter 8 – Writing the Definition Paper (includes library research)
-   Chapter 9 – Searching for Causes and Effects
-   Chapter 11 – Writing the Outline
-   Chapter 12 – Writing the Research Paper (includes library research)

Freshman English 101 Grammar/Mechanics, Structure, and Usage Units to be
Explored during the Academic Semester:

               Warriner’s English Grammar and Composition, Sixth Edition

-   Chapter 3 – The Phrase (Verbals)
-   Chapter 4 – The Clause (Structures of Subordination)
-   Chapter 5 – The Varieties of English (Standard versus Nonstandard)
-   Chapter 6 – Correct Agreement and Usage (Subject/Verb; Pronoun/Antecedent)
-   Chapter 12 – Coordination and Subordination
-   Chapter 14 – Placement and Use of Modifiers
-   Chapter 15 – Parallel Structure
-   Chapter 16 – Combining and Revising
                                                                          Revised 2007
                            Introduction to Literature 103

Class schedule: Monday through Friday, 1:00 pm to 1:43 pm
Conference/Make-up period: Monday through Friday, 1:43 pm to 2:26 pm
Instructor: Mrs. Jessica S. Deakins
Home phone number: 814-634-8478
Email address: jdeakins@masd.net

Course Objectives:

-   To recognize and meet the demands of analytical writing
-   To recognize and analyze common literary genres and devices
-   To sharpen analytical reading strategies
-   To evaluate significance and artistic merit of literary works
-   To compare/contrast literature to other similar works of recognized merit
-   To apply the writing process (brainstorming, organizing, outlining, drafting,
    evaluating, revising, editing, publishing)
-   To comprehend and apply correct grammatical/mechanical, structural, and usage
    rules
-   To comprehend and master correct MLA documentation format
-   To improve knowledge of available library resources
-   To research available library resources competently
-   To sharpen style and fluency

Student Registration:

       Students enrolled in this course must register through Allegany College of
Maryland in order to receive three credits for Freshman English 101. These credits may
then be transferred to the college/university attended after high school graduation.

Grading Criteria for Writing and Class Requirements:

        In all compositions, a clearly and specifically phrased thesis statement, sensible
organization, ample examples or textual support (if research based), thorough
explanation, solid mechanics, advanced style, and correct documentation (if research
based) must be evident. All guidelines established (date due, length, number of works
cited/consulted, format, etc.) must be met. A severe deficiency in any area results in
assignment failure and/or subsequent revision of said composition. Students must earn an
A or B (84 %) and complete every assignment by the established deadline in order to
maintain Honors status and to receive the weighted grade point. Papers will be scored
out of 100 points unless otherwise specified: 100-94% = A; 93-90% = A-; 89-87% = B+;
86-84% = B; 83-80% = B-; 79-77% = C+; 76-74% = C; 73-70% = C-; 69-67% = D+;
66-64% = D; 63-60% = D-.
Recommended Student Profile:

The following characteristics should be considered in the enrollment of students in
Allegany College of Maryland Introduction to Literature 103:

-   Students in this course should have the desire to learn more than the obvious or
    superficial.
-   Students should be competent writers who know Standard English structures.
-   Students should be able to work on their own and complete major projects without
    close teacher supervision.
-   Students should not enroll for status reasons or because they expect to ensure a high
    grade. Students must place the greatest emphasis on learning.
-   Students in this course should have the support of their parents that includes an
    understanding of its rigorous academic demands and the need for uninterrupted study.
-   Students should be recommended by their junior English instructors.

Major Works to be Read during the Academic Semester (Approximately 11 from
the following list of possibilities):

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

A Separate Peace by Jonathon Knowles

Sula by Toni Morrison

Hamlet by William Shakespeare

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

A Passage to India by E. M. Forster

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

Night by Elie Wiesel

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Cannery Row by John Steinbeck

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

Short Stories to be Read during the Academic Semester (10-15 from the following
list):

“The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

“Paul’s Case” by Willa Cather

“Roman Fever” by Edith Wharton

“Death in the Woods” by Sherwood Anderson

“A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner

“An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” by Ambrose Bierce

“The Cask of Amontillado” by Edgar Allan Poe

“The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson

“The Horse Dealer’s Daughter” by D. H. Lawrence

“He Thinks He’s Wonderful” by F. Scott Fitzgerald

“The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

“A & P” by John Updike

“Mr. Toussan” by Ralph Ellison

“Gorilla, My Love” by Toni Cade Bambara

“A Good Man is Hard to Find” by Flannery O’Connor

“Hills Like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway

Poetry Selections to be Read during the Academic Year:

“Hard Rock Returns to Prison from the Hospital for the Criminal Insane” by Etheridge
Knight

“To an Athlete Dying Young” by A. E. Housman
“That Time of Year” by William Shakespeare

“Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night” by Dylan Thomas

“The Negro Speaks of Rivers” by Langston Hughes

“Theme for English B” by Langston Hughes

“Harlem (A Dream Deferred)” by Langston Hughes

“She Walks in Beauty” by George Gordon, Lord Byron

“How Do I Love Thee?” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

“Variation on the Word Sleep” by Margaret Atwood

“To Have Without Holding” by Marge Piercy

“The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” by Christopher Marlowe

“My Lady’s Presence Makes the Roses Red” by Henry Constable

“She Dwelt Among the Untrodden Ways” by William Wordsworth

“A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” by John Donne

“Death Be Not Proud” by John Donne

“The Canonization” by John Donne

“Leaving the Motel” by W. D. Snodgrass

“The Little Old Lady in Lavender Silk” by Dorothy Parker

“What’s That Smell in the Kitchen?” by Marge Piercy

“Because I Could Not Stop for Death” by Emily Dickinson

“I Dwell in Possibility” by Emily Dickinson

“Wild Nights! Wild Nights! by Emily Dickinson

“The Sick Rose” by William Blake

“A Red, Red Rose” by Robert Burns

“The Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister” by Robert Browning
“Nuns Fret Not” by William Wordsworth

“Easter Wings” by George Herbert

“The Collar” by George Herbert

“The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner” by Randall Jarrell

“Dulce et Decorum Est” by Wilfred Owen

“Leningrad Cemetery, Winter of 1941” by Sharon Olds

“High Flight” by John Gillespie Magee, Jr.

“My Arkansas” by Maya Angelou

“Bonny Barbara Allan” anonymous

“Sir Patrick Spens” anonymous

“Get Up and Bar the Door” anonymous

“Richard Cory” by Edwin Arlington Robinson

“When I Consider How My Light is Spent” by John Milton

“Let Me Not to the Marriage of True Minds” by William Shakespeare

“Western Wind” anonymous

“Kubla Khan: Or, a Vision in a Dream” by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

“chanson innocente” by e. e. cummings

“portrait” by e. e. cummings

“I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by William Wordsworth

“Dover Beach” by Matthew Arnold

“Ode on a Grecian Urn” by John Keats

Vocabulary to be Learned and Applied during the Academic Semester:

SAT/Advanced Placement vocabulary exercises and quizzes

110 literary terms and quizzes
Vocabulary gleaned from literary works read

Reader Response Journal to be Kept during the Academic Semester:

Approximately five entries per novel

Approximately two entries per short story

Approximately ten entries for Hamlet

Approximately two entries for each day/grouping of poetry

Graded Assignments/Tests during the Academic Semester (Subject to Change):

3-5 page typed literary analysis comparing/contrasting two assigned novels

Lord of the Flies essay – thematic implications through plot/character development

A Separate Peace essay – effect of first person retrospective narration on revelation of
plot and on development of theme

Lord of the Flies/A Separate Peace 2-day exam – fill in the blanks and short answer

Things Fall Apart essay I – evaluation of style and use of stylistic devices and their effect

Things Fall Apart essay II – analysis of diction and imagery and their relation to theme
and aesthetic effect

Things Fall Apart essay III – identification/evaluation of central theme and writer’s
motivation

2-4 page typed social injustice informative essay and presentation that includes some
medium (video, music, photographs, handouts, illustration, etc.): bibliography and correct
documentation format required

To Kill a Mockingbird essay I – bildungsroman as it applies to Jem and Scout and the
influence of townspeople on their progression toward maturity

To Kill a Mockingbird – short answer quiz

3-5 page typed literary analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird on any of the following topics:
setting, point of view, theme, characterizaiton, symbolism, imagery, mood/tone, diction,
style

Fahrenheit 451 essay I – interpretation of societal norms as presented in the novel versus
in real life

Fahrenheit 451 quiz II – short answer/ brief essay
Fahrenheit 451 III – evaluation of social, religious, and political change advocated by
author; techniques used by author to influence audience’s views

Fahrenheit 451 literary allusion research report and group presentation

Fahrenheit 451/Bradbury style exploration: 2-page typed comparison/contrast of a short
story from Golden Apples of the Sun to the novel

“Gorilla, My Love” short answer quiz

2-page “Roman Fever” narrative tale – “The Ultimate Revenge”

“Death in the Woods” essay – reliability of narrator or feminist analysis

“A Rose for Emily” short answer quiz

“Mr. Toussan” essay – layers of racism

“An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” partner analysis – summary of plot, theme, stream
of consciousness narration, symbolism, imagery, manipulation of time

“The Lottery” short answer quiz

1-page “The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World” magic realism analysis

2-page short story analysis according to historical, feminist, or psychological literary
tradition of a work read in the unit

2-day unit exam on all short stories read – objective and essay

Hamlet Act I quiz – short answer/brief essay

Hamlet Act II quiz – short answer/brief essay

Hamlet Act III quiz – short answer/brief essay

Hamlet Act IV quiz – essay

Hamlet Act V quiz – essay

3-5 page typed Hamlet analysis paper

The Sun Also Rises essay I – effect of setting on plot, characterization, theme
development

The Sun Also Rises essay II – Hemingway style analysis
3-5 typed The Sun Also Rises analysis paper – theme of pleasure versus disquietude

Their Eyes Were Watching God quiz- short answer/essay

2-page typed creative writing Their Eyes Were Watching God project and presentation

poetry – numerous quizzes and essays throughout

2-3 page typed “Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister” analysis of speaker

2-day poetry exam – objective and essay

A Passage to India essay I – function of the “Bridge Party” and devices to make that
function successful

A Passage to India quiz II – short answer/essay

2-3 page typed A Passage to India informative report – summary of Christianity, Islam,
or Hinduism

Cannery Row quiz I – short answer/essay

Cannery Row essay II – gift symbolism

7-10 page typed independent literary analysis of a novel selected from the AP
Recommended Reading list; project includes library research, bibliography cards, outline,
planning sheet, note cards, rough draft, revisions and editing, second rough draft,
revisions and editing, final copy that includes bibliography

final – literary analysis essay

***MLA parenthetical documentation required for all literary analyses

				
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