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					                       European Military Programs
                                 University of Phoenix
                                   Course Syllabus


Course Prefix and Number:            QRB 501


Course Title:                        Quantitative Reasoning for Business

Course Group Number:                 MILMB0939

Course Schedule:                     Workshop 1 – 6 January 2010

                                     Workshop 2 – 13 January 2010

                                     Workshop 3 – 20 January 2010

                                     Workshop 4 – 27 January 2010

                                     Workshop 5 –3 February 2010

                                     Workshop 6 – 10 February 2010


Course Location, Day and Time:       RAF Mildenhall Education Center
                                     5:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. Wednesday


Required Course Materials:           All materials required for this course are provided
                                     electronically and can be located at the              page
                                     of the student Website: https://ecampus.phoenix.edu


                                     Required Writing Manuals‟, which can be found on the
                                     left hand column of your             course web
                                     page(s). These writing manuals have distinct features
                                     and will be valuable reference tools throughout your
                                     academic programs. Links to course materials and
                                     electronic resources for each week of class are located
                                     on there. Content is divided by weeks



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                                           Jake Hornsby
 Instructor’s Name:

 Contact Telephone Number:                 07917 535 877

                                           Primary: hjacob@email.phoenix.edu
 Contact E-mail Address:
                                           Alt: jdh51@cam.ac.uk


 Assignment Submission:                    Assignments are due on by midnight on the night of
                                           class at the end of the week the assignment is due.



Welcome:

I look forward to helping each person in this class work through the material in this primer
course which introduces quantitative tools to make rational business decisions. This course will
require a lot of interaction as, in this teaching format, I believe sharing and hearing others share
increases learning exponentially. I will always be available via email and mobile if you need help
with anything. Email is the preferred contact method and I will respond to any question within 24
hours.

Faculty Biography:

My career thus far has been relatively varied and has ranged from a junior enlisted member to a
Director level position in my current role. In my military career I was first a maintainer then,
after OTS, became a Communications Officer. I have held several positions to include Executive
Officer, researcher, project manager, and Flight Commander to name a few. I am now a reservist
for the Air Force Academy where I interview military and high school students as part of the
application process. I currently work for the University of Cambridge where I am the Head of
Networks. Here, I control the budget, resources, and personnel which take care of the entirety of
the networking estate, to include the fiber infrastructure, telephone systems (VoIP), core routers,
software services, and sundry other elements of the ever-expanding University. My educational
background includes a BS in Computer Science/Mathematics, MBA, and Ph.D. in Information
Systems. I, like many enrolled in the University of Phoenix, am also a working student
completing a Master of Laws at the University of London part time.

Availability:

I will respond to all voice/emails within 24 to 48 hours.




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Course Description:

Quantitative Business Reasoning is about preparing you with the tools to analyze business
situation with a new lens. That is, there are many ways to look at problems of which many are
qualitative. This course however looks to prepare the student to look at problems
quantitatively…which you will find is the norm in almost any business segment.


Course Changes
Please note that there might be changes between this syllabus and the course module /syllabus. In
all cases, please be sure to follow the information and assignments in this course syllabus.
Further, the syllabus may change at some point during the next six weeks if the need arises and
as I review the pre-defined assignments within the syllabus. Further, the Journal assignment for
each week will be presented at the class prior to the week the journal must be worked.




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Attendance Policy:

This policy is an addendum to the existing University of Phoenix Excused Absence Policy noted
in the Faculty and Student Handbooks. The intent is to define the additional considerations
afforded to military students and operations tempo and events that are beyond the student‟s
control and to ensure that we are equitable with stateside counterparts in the application of EA.

Any student not physically present for class at the specified class time is considered absent,
regardless of the reason for the absence and must be entered as “Did Not Attend” electronically.
The following chart defines the total number of absences that a student can sustained without
being automatically dropped from the class. There are no exceptions to this rule.

         Course Length                                      Absences
         One to Four Weeks (2 Credits)                      0
         Five to Nine Weeks (3 Credits)                     1
         10 or More Weeks    (3 - 5 Credits)                2



    1. The first absence if allowed two is considered a free absent day and does not require any
       authorization or paperwork submission. Please retain paperwork in case the student is
       forced to miss another class date.
    2. All excused absence requests must be accompanied by military orders specifying the
       exact dates the student will be TDY and related directly to execution of the mission
       and/or work. Exceptions to military orders:
            Letter from the student‟s commander stating that working after hours was
               mandatory requirement and duty related.
            A base emergency arose requiring the student to miss class, such as evacuation of
               buildings due to bomb threats, fires, natural disasters.
       The following my have orders but are not considered valid excused absences:
            Travel orders for personal leave or vacation
            Quarters for personal illness (exceptions may be granted in extreme/unusual
               circumstances)


Learning Teams:

Learning Teams are an essential part of the academic experience for students and Learning Team
members need to make the necessary commitment to working together to meet the criteria for
Learning Team Assignments. In addition to providing supplemental learning environment for
mastery of course content, learning teams provide students with an opportunity to develop and
refine teamwork skills. Learning Teams are comprised of three to five students and will meet
weekly outside of class times in person, via teleconference, real-time electronic conferencing, or
asynchronous conferencing.



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Each week starting in Workshop Two, each Learning Team must complete a Learning Team Log
to be turned in to the faculty member. Teams are expected to spend between 4.5 – 5.5 hours per
week outside of class.

Students are required to complete a Learning Team Log for each week to document the Learning
Team meetings, whether held face-to-face or electronically. Learning Teams must submit the
logs to the faculty member.

Learning Team Charter:

All Learning Teams will be required submit a completed Learning Team Charter to the instructor
in Workshop 2 of each course.

Participation:

Participation in all workshops is required. An absence for whatever reason will result in the loss
of the participation points for participation that night. If a student is absent, he or she does not
gain the benefit of class involvement and is not contributing to the learning of other students in
the class.

Participation Grading Criteria:

Participation is graded on individual and group contributions to class discussions. The vast
majority of managers‟ interactions with others are oral. Absent students generally spend very
little time reading and even less time writing reports. For this reason, the development of oral
skills is given a high priority in this course. The classroom should be considered a laboratory in
which students can test their ability to convince peers of the correctness of their approach.

Some of the characteristics of effective class participation are:

    1. Are the student‟s points made relevant to the discussion in terms of increasing everyone‟s
       understanding, or are they merely regurgitation of case facts?

    2. Do student comments take into consideration the ideas offered by others earlier in the
       class, or are the points isolated and disjointed? The best contributions following the lead
       off tend to be those, which reflect, not only excellent preparation, but good listening, and
       interpretative and integrative skills as well.

    3. Do student comments show evidence of a thorough reading and analysis of the case?

    4. Does the student distinguish among different kinds of data; that is, facts, opinions,
       assumptions, and inferences?

    5. Is there a willingness to test new ideas or all comments cautious or “safe”?




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    6. Is the student willing to interact with other class members by asking questions or
       challenging conclusions?

Outstanding Contributor: Contributions in class reflect thorough preparation. Ideas offered
are usually substantive, provide one or more major insights, as well as direction for the class.
Arguments, when offered, are well substantiated and persuasively presented. If this person were
not a member of the class, the quality of discussions would be diminished significantly.

Good Contributor: Contributions in class reflect thorough preparation. Ideas offered are
usually substantive, provide good insights and sometimes direction for the class discussion.
Arguments when presented, are, generally, well substantiated and are often persuasive. If this
person were not a member of the class, the quality of the discussion would be diminished
considerably.

Adequate Contributor: Contributions in class reflect satisfactory preparation. Ideas offered are
sometimes substantive, provide generally useful insights, but seldom offer a major new direction
for the discussion. Arguments are sometimes presented and are fairly well substantiated and
sometimes persuasive. If this person were not a member of the class, the quality of the
discussions would be diminished somewhat.

Non-participant: This person has said little or nothing in this workshop or class. Hence, there
is no adequate basis for evaluation. If this person were not a member of the class, the quality of
the discussions would not be changed.

Unsatisfactory Contributor: Contribution in class reflects inadequate or nonexistent
preparation. Ideas offered are seldom substantive; provide few, if any, insights; and rarely
provide a constructive direction for the class discussion. Integrative comments and effective
arguments are completely absent. Class contributions are, at best, “time fillers” efforts to make
isolated, obvious, or confusing points. If this person were not a member of the class, valuable
class time would be saved.

          Examples of things that cause a student not to earn the full amount of participation
points:

                                         Doing homework in class
                                         Not adding to classroom discussions
                                         Not reading assigned material
                                         Being disruptive
                                         Arriving late, leaving early
                                         Cell phone/pagers going off during class
                                         Surfing Internet, reading emails or using laptops or other
                                          electronic media for anything other than taking notes on
                                          class discussions or activities




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Cell Phones and Pagers:

Out of consideration for others, please turn your cell phone and pagers to the silent mode. If they
do not have a silent or vibratory mode, please turn them off. No texting is allowed while class is
in session. These items tend to distract the other students when they ring during class discussions
or learning team activities.

Use of Laptop Computers in the Classroom:

University of Phoenix encourages students to use their laptop computers in our Learning Centers
for classroom research support. However, laptop computers should only be used in the
classroom with the permission of the instructor. Laptop computers may not be used to complete
individual or team assignments while class is in session.


Late Arrival/Early Departure:

Late arrival or early departure will result in a loss of participation points at the rate of one
participation point for each 30 minute increment of class.


Course Standards:

The Teaching/Learning Model used at the University of Phoenix is based on the assumption that
in preparation for every course, students will satisfy all prerequisites. During the course itself,
students will achieve certain learning outcomes. All performance assessment will depend upon
the accomplishment of these outcomes. Students are graded on achievement rather than effort.
It is the responsibility of the student to be prepared for each workshop.

The University trusts each student to maintain high standards of honesty, ethical behavior, and
academic integrity. It is assumed that students will perform professionally in preparing work
required for this class. All assignments submitted in fulfillment of course requirements must be
the student‟s own work. All assignments, except those designated as “team”, are meant to
represent the effort of each individual student. Team projects and assignments should represent
equal efforts by all team members.

One of the highlights of the University of Phoenix academic experience is that students can draw
on the wealth of examples from their organizations in class discussions and in their written work.
While the University‟s Teaching/Learning Model emphasizes the sharing of professional
experiences in the context of analyzing relevant course materials, it is against the policy of the
University of Phoenix for students for faculty members to share information in class about
present or past employers that would be considered confidential, privileged, proprietary, or a
trade secret.




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Student Code of Academic Integrity:

By virtue of membership in the University‟s academic community, students accept a
responsibility to abide by the Student Code of Academic Integrity, which is a part of the Student
Code of Conduct. A link to the Code can be found on the Center for Writing Excellence Web site
or by logging into the University of Phoenix Student and Faculty website and going to the
following URL within the Center for Writing Excellence:. Then go to Tutorials and Guides and
on the right side is the Student Code of Academic Integrity with plagiarism information:

https://ecampus.phoenix.edu/secure/aapd/studentdocuments/uophx/academic_integrity.htm


Academic Honesty:

Plagiarism or academic dishonesty, whether accidental or deliberate, is a serious violation of the
Student Code of Conduct. The faculty member has the option of using classroom sanctions or
elevating the case to campus level. Students are advised that written assignments may be
submitted by the faculty member to an online plagiarism detection service.

It is plagiarism to go to the Internet, find an article, copy it to the clipboard and then drop it into
your word processor. Listing the article as a reference on the last page will not cover you. This
is plagiarism.

There are a few things that you can do that will help you to avoid being charged with academic
dishonesty. Please note the following:
    1. Anytime that you use the words or ideas of another person without giving credit, it is
       considered plagiarism, intentional or unintentional
    2. Differences between direct and indirect quotes:
        Direct Quotes: Includes the exact wording from the source.
        Indirect Quotes: Summarizes or paraphrases the content from the source.
    3. APA in-text requirements:
        Direct Quote: Author‟s last name, publication date, and page number.
        Indirect Quote: Author‟s last name, publication date.
    4. Punctuation requirements: All word-for-word quotations must be placed in quotation
       marks.
    5. Exception to the rule: Common Knowledge – if the same information can be found in
       three or more sources and those sources do not cite an earlier source, the information is
       considered common knowledge. Also, commonly known facts (e.g., Washington, D.C.
       is the capital of the U.S.) do not need a citation, even if you had to look them up. When in
       doubt, CITE.

Avoiding Plagiarism

It is highly recommended that each student complete the Avoiding Plagiarism tutorial located at
the University of Phoenix Student and Faculty website (http://mycampus.phoenix.edu). Look in
the Center for Writing Excellence.


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If plagiarism exists in any written work, that paper or activity will receive ZERO points, and
further academic penalties will be pursued which include the possibility of an F in the course and
suspension from school.

Consequences of Plagiarism , European Military Program:

Minor Plagiarism
Minor plagiarism is considered a few words to one sentence that is not properly cited.

Consequences of Minor Plagiarism
The faculty member will provide counseling to the student of the infraction and award zero
points for the assignment. The faculty member must follow up and submit the notification of
academic dishonesty to the DAA.

Major Plagiarism
Major plagiarism is considered any information of more than one sentence that is not properly
cited.

Consequences of Major Plagiarism
The faculty member will verify the student plagiarized the assignment (team or individual). The
faculty member will inform the student that major plagiarism has been found and the student
must contact his/her academic counselor immediately. The faculty member will also forward the
documentation of the plagiarized assignment and the Notification of Academic Dishonesty form
to the Academic DAA. The faculty member will issue an F or WF grade to the student for that
course. The student may also receive a 30 day suspension for this infraction. A reoccurrence of
this infraction will result in a recommendation of expulsion for the student.




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APA Format

American Psychological Association (APA) format is required for all individual and team papers.
The University of Phoenix will provide support services to assist students with APA formatting
(e.g. PERRLA software, Center for Writing Excellence, tutoring, etc.). However, it is the
student‟s responsibility to make sure all papers are properly formatted.

Students’ Rights and Responsibilities

University of Phoenix students are expected to conduct themselves as responsible members of
the University's academic community as defined in its Code of Student Responsibility. This
requires the demonstration of mutual respect and civility in academic and professional discourse.
Conduct that is determined to impair the opportunities of others to learn or that disrupts the
orderly functions of the University will be deemed misconduct, and will be subject to appropriate
disciplinary action. The Standards of Students Behavior are further detailed in the University of
Phoenix Catalog.

Student End of Course Surveys (SEOCS)

During the last week of your class, please take the opportunity to share with us your opinions of
the course, curriculum, and university services by filling out a Student End-of-Course Survey.
This will be available to you via a link on the student Web page, http://ecampus.phoenix.edu/,
starting on the first day of the final week of class. Please note that the survey will not be available
after the last day of class.

Academic Resources:

Coursework in this class must uphold the high standards of academic integrity established by the
University of Phoenix. Consequently, when you are conducting research for an assignment, the
majority of your sources should be from peer-reviewed academic journals, such as those you find
in the University Library or in the additional readings on the       page for this course.

PLEASE NOTE: Wikipedia is not an acceptable independent academic source for written
assignments for any courses. Wikipedia is not validated by expert academic peer review
authorities, and is, by Wikipedia's own admission, not frequently reviewed for factual validity
and currency. Wikipedia can be used as a portal to gain deeper access to specific topics from
valid sources but cannot be listed as a source (i.e. citations or references) on papers.
Encyclopedias in general are not recommended reference sources. Students are urged to use the
University of Phoenix Library as their primary references source.

Written Work:

All papers must be submitted on their due date by the end of class. Work submitted for
evaluation should be the student‟s best effort, show familiarity with the course objectives and



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demonstrate mastery of the concepts and theory presented by use of examples and expression of
practical applications of the theory and concepts written into each assignment.

Students are encouraged to use the Plagiarism Checker at the Center for Writing Excellence to
check each written paper before submitting it to the instructor. All papers are to be typed, spell-
checked and grammar checked, well written with a logical flow of thought. Papers must be
submitted double-spaced with 1” margins and prepared in the APA format which is found in the
Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Papers should be in 12-font,
using Times New Roman. Indent paragraphs five spaces to indicate a new paragraph. Please
include a title page on all papers. Although numbered, the title page does not count toward the
required number of content pages.

Students should submit all written work to WritePoint program in the Center for Writing
Excellence and make any corrections before submitting the assignment for a grade.


Assignment Feedback / Return of Assignments:

All students will receive assignment feedback on written assignments and presentations by the
following week.

Late Work:

Late work will not earn the full points possible. Students will lose two points for each day the
assignment is late. Assignments must be submitted by the end of the course. No assignments will
be accepted past the last day of the class.

Incomplete grades:

A grade of “Incomplete” will be considered only if the request for an Incomplete is submitted
before the end date of the course and all assignments from a minimum of three workshops are
completed with a passing grade prior to the course end date. Incompletes are given at the
discretion of the faculty member. University of Phoenix policy on Incompletes states, “If a
student is granted an Incomplete grade, the student‟s final grade will be reduced one full letter
grade by the faculty member, regardless of the circumstances under which the Incomplete was
granted.”




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Topics and Objectives:


COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course applies quantitative reasoning skills to business problems. Students learn to analyze data using
a variety of analytical tools and techniques. Other topics include formulas, visual representation of
quantities, time value of money, and measures of uncertainty.

TOPICS AND OBJECTIVES

Working with Numbers and Formulas

   Write mathematical expressions and equations for word problems.
   Apply the rules for order of operations (including exponents) in solving problems.
   Identify dependent and independent variables and their relationships.

Business Applications I

   Differentiate the levels of measurement.
   Solve simultaneous equations algebraically.
   Use time series data to forecast.

Visual Representation of Quantities

   Construct histograms and bivariate plots using Excel.
   Determine value of a slope by using the slope-intercept formula.
   Conduct a linear regression analysis.

Time Value of Money

   Compute exponential and reciprocal functions.

Decision Making with Uncertainty

   Construct a frequency distribution.
   Compare and contrast measures of central tendency (mean, median, and mode) and measures of
    dispersion (range and standard deviation).
   Construct a normal distribution.

Business Applications II

   Apply basic probability concepts.
   Explain the importance of the central limit theorem in sampling.
   Convert data to indexes.




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Point Values for Course Assignments:



      Week One: Working with Numbers and Formulas
      Participation                                               2
      Individual Assignment: Order of Operations and
      Dependent and Independent Variables                        13
      Week Two: Business Applications I
      Participation                                               2
      Journal Assignment: Variable type observations over the
      week                                                        3
      Individual Assignment: Levels of Measurement,
      Simultaneous Equations, and Time Series                    12
      Week Three: Visual Representation of Quantities
      Participation                                               2
      Learning Team Assignment: Histogram and Bivariate
      Plots, Value of a Slope, and Linear Regression Analysis    15
      Week Four: Time Value of Money
      Participation                                               2
      Individual Assignment: Exponential and Reciprocal
      Functions                                                  15
      Week Five: Decision Making with Uncertainty
      Participation                                               2
      Individual Assignment: Frequency Distribution, Measures
      of Central Tendency and Dispersion, Quality Control, and
      Normal Distribution                                        15
      Week Six: Business Applications II
      Participation                                               2
      Learning Team Assignment: Basic Probability, Central
      Limit Theorem and Sampling, and Indexes                     15
      Point Total                                                100




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Grading Scale - Criteria and Guidelines

 Letter Grade                                    Criteria                               Numeric Range
       A          Far exceeds the standard for all required work                           96-100
       A-         Far exceeds the standard for all required work                            91-95
       B+         Exceeds the standard for all required work                                88-90
       B          Exceeds the standard for all required work                                85-87
       B-         Exceeds the standard for all required work                                81-84
       C+         Met the standard for all required work                                    78-80
       C          Met the standard for all required work                                    75-77
       C-         Met the standard for all required work                                    71-74
       D+         Did not meet the standard for all required work                           67-70
       D          Did not meet the standard for all required work                           64-66
       D-         Did not meet the standard for all required work                           61-63
       F          Did not meet the standard all required work; must retake the course        < 60



Grading Points:

 WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS
 Item                               Description                                     Percents
   1   Content and Conceptualization                                                  60%
   2   Logical organization of thoughts, ideas and structure                          20%
   3   Spelling, Grammar, APA format, etc.                                            20%
                                                                            Total    100%
 INDIVIDUAL ORAL PRESENTATIONS
  Item                                  Description                                 Percents
    1   Relevancy to class objectives                                                 30%
    2   Clarity and conciseness of principles stated                                  30%
    3   Evidence of preparation, including the ability to field questions             20%
    4   Presentation skills, including compliance with time limits                    20%
                                                                            Total    100%




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LEARNING TEAM ORAL PRESENTATIONS
 Item                               Description                           Percents
   1  Relevancy to stated objectives                                        20%
   2  Appropriateness of examples as an illustrative vehicle                10%
   3  Evidence of contribution of each team member                          10%
   4  Creativity                                                            10%
   5  Presentation skills including compliance with time limits             10%
   6  Evidence of substantive research                                      10%
   7  Identification of principles                                          10%
   8  Practical applications                                                10%
   9  Mechanics of presentation                                             10%
                                                                  Total    100%




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Course Assignments and Deliverables


      Week One

      Working with Numbers and Formulas

         Write mathematical expressions and equations for word problems.
         Apply the rules for order of operations (including exponents) in solving problems.
         Identify dependent and independent variables and their relationships.

      ASSIGNMENTS

      1. Read objectives and welcome.

      2. Read Topics 2, 4, & 10 of Quantitative Reasoning: Tools for Today’s Informed Citizen.

      3. Read materials posted in course materials.

      4. Individual Assignment: Order of Operations and Dependent and Independent Variables

             Complete the following order of operations questions:

              o   McConnell & Brue text

                      Ch. 7, study question 12
                      Ch. 8, study questions 2 and 11
                      Ch. 20, study question 2
                      Ch. 22, study question 7

              o   Marshall, McManus, & Viele text

                      Ch. 3, exercise E3.6

             Complete the following dependent and independent variables question from the Horngren text:

                  o    Ch. 2, question 2B2




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Week Two

Business Applications I

   Differentiate the levels of measurement.
   Solve simultaneous equations algebraically.
   Use time series data to forecast.

ASSIGNMENTS

1. Read Ch. 1 (pp. 9-14) & Ch. 19 of Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics and Topic 6 in
   Quantitative Reasoning: Tools for Today’s Informed Citizen.

2. Read materials posted in course materials.

3. Complete Journal of observed variable types and „studies‟ encountered during the week to be
   discussed in week three.

4. Individual Assignment: Levels of Measurement, Simultaneous Equations, and Time Series

       Complete the following levels of measurement question from the Lind, Marchal, & Wathen text:

            o    Ch. 1, exercise 18

        Complete the following simultaneous equations question from the Horngren text:

            o    Ch. 3, problem 3-41

        Complete the following question using simultaneous equations
    :
        Consider the following demand and supply functions for a good:


                        , where P is price and Q is quantity

            a. Plot these two functions on the same graph
            b. Determine the equilibrium point (intersection of the two lines) algebraically.
               Please show the steps taken to reach your conclusion.


         Complete the following time series question from the Lind, Marchal, and Wathen text. Use Excel
    or other statistical software to complete the questions and show the output from whichever software
    you utilize.

            a.   Ch. 19 exercise 17
            b.   Ch. 19 exercise 21




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Week Three

Visual Representation of Quantities / Time Value of Money

    Construct histograms and bivariate plots using Excel.
    Determine value of a slope by using the slope-intercept formula.
    Conduct a linear regression analysis.

ASSIGNMENTS

1.   Read Ch. 4 & 13 of Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics and Topics 2 & 5 and pp. 452-
     458 of Quantitative Reasoning: Tools for Today’s Informed Citizen.

2.   Read materials posted in course materials.

3.   Learning Team Assignment: Histogram and Bivariate Plots, Value of a Slope, and Linear Regression
     Analysis

        Complete the following questions the Lind, Marchal, & Wathen. The following questions contain
         elements of each of learning objectives.

                 Chapter 13, Exercises 6, 16, 17, 25 and 31
                 Chapter 14, exercise 14

             Complete the following from the Marshall text:
                 o E6.9 and E.11 from Chapter 6

4.   Discussion question: write a short summary paragraph of a journal article that looked at the
     correlations between variables (should be easy to find!). What was it about and what causal factors
     were they investigating?




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Week Four

Time Value of Money/Decision Making with Uncertainty

    Compute exponential and reciprocal functions.

ASSIGNMENTS

1.   Read Topic Chapters 2 ,3, 4, 7 from the Lind text and Chapter 11 from the Horngren text

2.   Read materials posted in course materials.

1.   Individual Assignment: Frequency Distribution, Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion,
     Quality Control, and Normal Distribution

        Complete the following frequency distribution questions:


         o   Lind, Marchal, & Wathen text

                 Ch. 2, exercise 11 (a through c only)
                 Ch. 3, exercises 8, 14, 21, 26, 48, 52, 53
                 Ch. 4, exercises 19

        Complete the following from the Horngren text
            o Ch 11, exercises 11-34, 11-37




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Week Five

Decision Making with Uncertainty

    Construct a frequency distribution.
    Compare and contrast measures of central tendency (mean, median, and mode) and measures of
     dispersion (range and standard deviation).
    Construct a normal distribution.

ASSIGNMENTS

2.   Read Ch. 2, 3, & pp. 213-231 of Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics and Topic 17 of
     Quantitative Reasoning: Tools for Today’s Informed Citizen.

3.   Read materials posted in course materials.

4.   Individual Assignment: Frequency Distribution, Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion,
     Quality Control, and Normal Distribution

        Complete the following frequency distribution questions:

         o   Sevilla & Somers text

                 Activity 18.1


        Complete the questions from the Lind, Marchal, & Wathen text:

             o    Ch. 17, exercise 20 (a and b only)
             o    Ch. 7, exercises 2, 7, 9, 14, 25


        Complete the following normal distribution questions from the Sevilla & Somers text:

             o    Topic 17, exploration 2




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                      European Military Programs
Week Six

Business Applications II

   Apply basic probability concepts.
   Explain the importance of the central limit theorem in sampling.
   Convert data to indexes.

ASSIGNMENTS

1. Read Ch. 5, 8, & 18 of Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics and Topics 8 & 18 of
   Quantitative Reasoning: Tools for Today’s Informed Citizen.

2. Read materials posted in course materials.

3. Learning Team Assignment: Basic Probability, Central Limit Theorem, Sampling, and Indexes

       Complete the following basic probability questions:


        o   Lind, Marchal, & Wathen text

                Ch. 5, exercise 8,12, 28, 22 (a and c), 25, 32, 33, 36, 58, 66, 69, 86

       Complete the following indexes questions:


        o   Lind, Marchal, & Wathen text

                Ch. 18, exercises 27, 28Ch




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