TEACHER EDUCATION

Document Sample
TEACHER EDUCATION Powered By Docstoc
					                     TEACHER
                    EDUCATION
                    HANDBOOK



                Elementary Education/K-8 Program
                Secondary Education/7-12 Program
(Biology, Chemistry, Communication, English, Government, History, Mathematics, Physics, Theater)
                All-Grades Education/K-12 Program
                   (Art, Modern World Languages, Music, Physical Education)
Education of the Deaf & Hard of Hearing/K-12 Program
          Special Education/K-12 Program
 Communication Disorders/PreProfesssional Program
         Sign Language Interpreter Program

                            Augustana College
                               2006-2007
http://www.augie.edu/dept/educ/andrews/teachereducationhandbook.doc




                                                                                             1
            HANDBOOK CONTENTS
Augustana College Mission Statement, page 3
Conceptual Framework, page 4
Program Competencies, page 6
Accreditation, page 15
Governance, page 15
Academic Advisors, page 15
Program Entrance and Exit Requirements, page 16
Academic Grievance Procedure, page 19
Student Staffings, page 20
PRAXIS, page 20
Assessment of Candidate Dispositions, page 20
Volunteer Program, page 22
Student Associations, page 22
Field Experiences, page 22
Teacher Education ePortfolio, page 25
Teacher Impact Upon Student Learning Project, page 33
Student Teaching Information, page 48

  Up-to-date advising checklists, forms, and other
  program resources are available online from the
        Education Department Homepage:

    http://www.augie.edu/dept/educ/ed/home.htm

       Education Department Phone 274-4629




                                                        2
               AUGUSTANA COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT
Augustana is a college of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, offering students of varying backgrounds and ages
     a high quality education combining the liberal arts with preparation for professional careers or advanced study.
   Augustana is a Christian community dedicated to the intellectual, moral, physical and spiritual growth of individual
                                                         students.

                           The Shared Fundamental Values of Augustana College

       CHRISTIAN
       By being a college of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
       Centering on worship
       Welcoming all faiths
       Nurturing the search for a mature religious faith
       Relating Christian faith and ethics to learning and service

       LIBERAL ARTS
       By providing an education of enduring worth
       Affirming teaching and learning as central and life-long
       Fostering a broad understanding of humans and their interactions
       Enriching lives by exposure to enduring forms of aesthetic and creative expressions
       Developing broad knowledge and skills crucial in a changing world
       Creating awareness of one's own religious and ethical beliefs and those of others
       Cultivating health and wellness

       COMMUNITY
       By caring for one another and our environments
       Responding to needs
       Respecting human differences
       Empowering one another
       Tending to the ecology of place

       EXCELLENCE
       By committing to high standards and integrity
       Practicing faithfulness in teaching, learning, supporting, administering
       Nurturing potential
       Challenging the intellect
       Acting ethically
       Recognizing achievement

       SERVICE
       By affirming that wholeness includes reaching out to others
       Accepting the call to servant hood
       Promoting justice
       Integrating career and service
       Serving church and society




                                                                                                              3
          CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK




The mission statement of Augustana College is “to provide an education of enduring
worth in times of change by blending the broad learning experiences of the liberal arts
with the student’s individual professional goals by relating Christian faith to learning.”
The College Mission serves as the driving force for the Education Department.

The Conceptual Framework describes how Augustana College’s Teacher Education
Program has been influenced and informed by current and historical research in
education, by current best practice and reform research and by the changes called for
by NCATE and other learned societies. Additionally, the conceptual framework
articulates the Teacher Education Program’s beliefs and provides justification and
rationale for its existence and purpose. It is meant to be a vehicle through which the
unit shares with the professional community its way of seeing, thinking, and being.

Our program’s conceptual framework, the Circle of Courage, is based on a model of
youth empowerment supported by contemporary research, the heritage of early youth
work pioneers and Native American philosophies of child care. The model is
encompassed in four core values: belonging, mastery, independence, and generosity.
The central theme of this model is that a set of shared values must exist in any
community of learners, including public education and teacher training institutions, to
create environments that ultimately benefit society. The term reclaiming is used in this
model because reclaiming environments meet the needs of both the individual and
society. Members of the Professional Education Unit determined that they want to
create a reclaiming environment for their teacher candidates and dispose program
graduates to create classrooms and schools that exemplify all four values of the Circle
of Courage.




               Belonging is an integral part of the Augustana environment. Students
need to attach to caring adults in order to begin the process of learning and incorporate
basic social values. The college encourages teacher candidates’ sense of belonging
through small interactive classes and numerous teacher candidate groups. Within the
Teacher Education Program, belonging is facilitated through consensus building,
                                                                                             4
inclusive learning climates, and cooperation. Teacher candidates examine their field
placements with regard to the ways in which the teacher creates a belonging
environment that nurtures positive peer attachments through learning. Faculty also
structure the teacher candidates' learning environment to create a community of
learners.




                Mastery, the second value in the Circle of Courage Model, promotes the
belief that teacher candidates need to develop social, intellectual, and academic
competence if they are to become capable and responsible citizens. Mastery is ensured
both through the Augustana core and the Teacher Education Program requirements.
College and program admission requirements, stringent course standards, early
practicum experiences and portfolios are examples of measures used to assess
learning and levels of preparedness. When teacher candidates are knowledgeable and
skilled in the professional discipline and the liberal arts core, they are disposed to
become "master" teachers.




                Independence is the third value promoted within the Circle of Courage
model. To develop positive autonomy and interdependence, teacher candidates must
be secure in the guidance of caring adults and believe they have some power over their
world. The Augustana liberal arts core provides teacher candidates with the tools for
independence from their first entry course, New Student Seminar, to the Capstone
course for seniors. These courses enable teacher candidates to learn about themselves
and their relationship to others. In the Teacher Education Program, qualities that
promote problem solving, leadership, respect for diversity, collaboration, assertiveness
and responsibility are built into the curriculum and modeled by unit faculty.




                Generosity is incorporated into Augustana's liberal arts core by expecting
teacher candidates to participate in volunteer work and the college’s annual Community
Service Day, thus encouraging them to display empathy and concern for others. The
curriculum within the Teacher Education Program is designed to assist teacher
candidates in making the connection between their chosen career and a commitment to
society. The Teacher Education Program’s Volunteer Program provides teacher
candidates with an opportunity beyond program-required practicums to work in varied
community settings. A positive learning environment must be characterized by a
climate of caring so that all involved support one another and cooperate in making their
social and academic experiences meaningful.

                                                                                         5
The mission of the Education Department is to empower students with the tools needed
to create learning environments that ensure belonging, mastery, independence and
generosity. This mission is grounded in a philosophy that integrates the best of
Western educational thought with the wisdom of the indigenous Native American culture
of the region and emerging research on positive youth development.

PROGRAM COMPETENCIES
The curriculum of the Teacher Education Program is structured to blend the Circle of
Courage values into a model for professional behavior. A set of professional
competencies, based upon INTASC (Interstate New Teachers Assessment and Support
Consortium) principles, has been identified to guide course content and practicum
experiences and both the initial and advanced level. Each of the program
competencies has been aligned with the four shared values of belonging, mastery,
independence, and generosity.

                 PROGRAM COMPETENCIES AT THE INITIAL LEVEL

#1 KNOWLEDGE OF SUBJECT MATTER: The teacher candidate understands the
central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches
and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter
meaningful for students.

Teachers in command of their subject understand its substance -- factual information as
well as its central organizing concepts -- and the ways in which new knowledge is
created, including the forms of creative investigation that characterize the work of
scholars and artists. Knowledge of subject matter is universally considered an essential
attribute for effective teaching and successful learning. The most meaningful and
lasting learning occur when individuals construct knowledge. The role of the teacher is
to help learners build their own knowledge through engaging them in meaningful
learning experiences. To create these experiences, pre-service teacher candidates
must possess an in-depth understanding of major concepts including concepts
addressed in local, state, and national content standards, assumptions, debates,
processes of inquiry, and ways of knowing that are central to the disciplines they teach.
Knowledge of subject matter also implies an understanding of inquiry used in various
disciplines. Inquiry training lets students experience the same process scientists go
through when attempting to explain a puzzling phenomenon. Employing methods such
as inquiry training in the classroom allows teachers to engage learners in generating
knowledge and testing hypotheses according to the methods of inquiry and standards of
evidence used in the discipline. In every classroom, it is critical that the teacher
evaluate resources and curriculum materials for their comprehensiveness, accuracy,
usefulness for representing particular ideas and concepts, and relevance to local, state,
and national content standards. It is also essential that teachers discern cultural
authenticity and presence of bias. Subject matter knowledge is essential for the
selection and evaluation of curriculum materials and resources. Effective teachers have
a rich understanding of the subject(s) they teach and appreciate how knowledge in their
subject is created, organized, linked to other disciplines and applied to real-world
settings.
                                                                                            6
Belonging: The teacher candidate’s sense of community is built through a shared
understanding of the major concepts including concepts addressed in local, state, and
national content standards, assumptions, debates, processes of inquiry, and ways of
knowing that are central to the discipline being taught.

Mastery: The teacher candidate’s competence in his/her subject matter promotes a
disposition toward lifelong learning, has curricular implications, and promotes a spirit of
inquiry.

Independence: The teacher candidate’s strong knowledge base enables him/her to be
empowered in the classroom, to focus on pedagogical skills and to assist students in
the construction of their understanding.

Generosity: The teacher candidate’s sense of generosity is evident through the sharing
of his/her expertise with P-12 students, colleagues, and the professional community.

#2 KNOWLEDGE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING: The teacher
candidate understands how children learn and develop, and can provide learning
opportunities that support their intellectual, social and personal development.

Effective teachers understand how students develop and learn. They incorporate the
prevailing theories of cognition and intelligence in their practice. They are aware of the
influence of context and culture on behavior. They develop students' cognitive capacity
and their respect for learning. A teacher working with a particular group of children or
adolescents quickly realizes how each individual is unique. Differing personalities,
learning abilities, interests, and skills make clear the wide variation in students of
approximately the same age. And yet, in spite of wide differences, common
characteristics unite students within an age group. Although children and adolescents
grow and develop at different rates with varied abilities, there are predictable patterns
and sequences to their development. Understanding these patterns, sequences, and
states of development is essential groundwork for a pre-service teacher making
decisions about the content and methods of educating a group of students. Educational
practice, to be effective, must be rooted in the rapidly advancing research and theory of
human development and learning.

Belonging: The teacher candidate’s knowledge of all human needs in personality, self-
worth, and social/emotional development will inform decisions and practices as s/he
builds classroom community; this understanding of developmental differences will
encourage acceptance of differences in the learning community.

Mastery: Teacher candidates’ awareness of and ability to use knowledge of human
development will inform his/her ability to plan and execute developmentally appropriate
lessons and learning experiences.

Independence: Knowledge of human development and learning will enhance the
teacher candidate’s ability to structure a classroom that emphasizes autonomy, self-
responsibility, identity, self-worth and self-concept.

Generosity: Knowledge of human development and learning will inform the teacher
candidate’s practices regarding diversity, equity, and curricular modifications.
                                                                                              7
#3 ADAPTING INSTRUCTION FOR INDIVIDUAL NEEDS: The teacher candidate
understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates
instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.

Effective teachers are dedicated to making knowledge accessible to all students. They
act on the belief that all students can learn. They treat students equitably, recognizing
the individual differences that distinguish one student from another and taking account
of these differences in their practice. They adjust their practice based on observation
and knowledge of their students' interests, abilities, skills, knowledge, family
circumstances and peer relationships. Effective teachers do not treat all students alike,
for similar treatment is not necessarily equivalent to equitable education. There are
broad differences in students and the skills they bring to the learning environment.
These differences include varied learning styles, diverse cultural backgrounds, and
exceptionalities in learning. The effective teacher understands how children differ in
their development and approaches to learning and is able to adapt strategies and
environments to meet specific needs of children. Therefore, a major role of the teacher
is to assess each student’s developmental levels and abilities in all areas and match
learning environments and experiences appropriately. To fulfill this role, a teacher
candidate must be an astute observer of students and a professional who can use
observational data to diagnose, guide, and instruct. Further, the teacher candidate
must design instruction that helps use students’ strengths as the basis for their growth.
In this classroom students are valued for their uniqueness, and they learn to appreciate
uniqueness in one another. The classroom environment then becomes a learning
community in which individual differences are respected. As students’ differences
become clear, the teacher might adjust assignments by modifying time allocation, work
setting, and communication/response modes. In some instances, teachers will
participate in and assist other professionals and parents in the development and
implementation of individualized plans for children with special developmental and
learning needs.

Belonging: Teacher candidates create an inclusive learning community in which the
specific needs of all children are met.

Mastery: Teacher candidates design instruction that uses students’ strengths as a
basis for their academic growth.

Independence: Teacher candidates recognize student differences (e.g. learning styles,
cultural differences, and disabilities) and adapt instruction accordingly.

Generosity: Teacher candidates create a learning community in which differences are
respected and all contributions are honored.

#4 MULTIPLE INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES: The teacher candidate understands
and employs a variety of evidence-based learning strategies to encourage students'
development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.

Effective teachers command specialized knowledge of how to convey and reveal
subject matter to students. They are aware of the preconceptions and background
knowledge that students typically bring to each subject and of strategies and
instructional materials that can be of assistance. They understand where difficulties are
likely to arise and modify their practice accordingly. Their instructional repertoire allows
                                                                                            8
them to create multiple paths to the subjects they teach, and they are adept at teaching
students how to pose and solve their own problems. Effective teachers draw from a
wide repertoire of instructional strategies and models, adjusting their choices to meet
their instruction to meet intended standards, objectives and the needs of all students.
Instructional strategies include, but are not limited to the following: differentiation,
scaffolding, inquiry, discovery, Socratic questioning, guided learning, cooperative
learning, direct instruction, best practice strategies, simulations, and problem-based
learning.

Belonging: By using multiple instructional strategies, all children are more likely to feel
they are part of the classroom learning environment. The teacher candidate’s selection
of instructional strategies (cooperative learning, class discussions, peer mediated
instruction, etc.) impacts students’ sense of belonging.

Mastery: The teacher candidate’s use of multiple instructional strategies will help
develop critical thinking, problem-solving, and performance skills in the P-12 student.
Teacher candidates must be aware there are multiple goals that will be addressed
among diverse learners.

Independence: The use of multiple instructional strategies by teacher candidates offers
the learner choices in how and what to learn, and encourages active and inquiry-based
learning.

Generosity: A spirit of generosity is evident through the teacher candidate’s selection of
specific learning strategies that will promote students’ giving, helpfulness, and caring
that encourages giving knowledge to others (cooperative learning, peer mediated
learning, etc.).

#5 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT AND MOTIVATION SKILLS: The teacher candidate
uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a
learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in
learning, and self-motivation.

Effective teachers create, enrich, maintain and alter instructional settings to capture and
sustain the interest of their students and to make the most effective use of time. In
addition, they know how to engage individual students as well as groups of students to
ensure a positive learning environment. Effective teachers work in many ways to build
positive classroom interactions. They realize that a proactive approach will be most
effective in establishing and maintaining a positive classroom environment. These
teachers recognize that involving students in this endeavor not only promotes growth in
personal and social responsibility, but also enhances the development of democratic
and social values. Group rapport is enhanced as students and teachers work
cooperatively to establish classroom norms and rules. Teaching and modeling effective
problem-solving techniques such as conflict resolution provide motivation for learning,
positive social interaction among children, and positive self-worth for all. Thus, the
effective teacher strives to create a learning community that fosters group decision-
making, collaboration, individual responsibility, and self-directed learning. Teachers
understand the need to be able to define problems, identify alternatives, choose a
course of action and a plan for implementation, and consider the possible
consequences of a given action. Effective teachers have developed systems for
overseeing their classrooms so that the focus is on learning, not on controlling
                                                                                              9
disruptive behavior. Discipline and management techniques vary, and no one system
has been proven most effective. Thus, effective teachers consider the desired learning
results, their knowledge of their students and the social context, and their own prior
experience in selecting management strategies.

Belonging: The teacher candidate’s knowledge and understanding of group motivation
serves to enhance the development of democratic and social values within the learning
community. Teacher candidates and students work cooperatively to establish
classroom norms and rules through collaborative decision-making.

Mastery: The teacher candidate’s knowledge and understanding of individual and group
motivation informs the ongoing development of a classroom management plan which
serves to guide classroom interactions and reactions and is flexible enough to
accommodate individual student needs.

Independence: As teacher candidates move forward in becoming effective classroom
managers, they are able to define problems, identify alternatives, and choose and
implement appropriate courses of actions.

Generosity: The teacher candidate’s understanding of group motivation and behavior
creates a learning environment that encourages and supports positive social interaction
for each child.

#6 COMMUNICATION SKILLS: The teacher candidate uses knowledge of effective
verbal, nonverbal, media, and technological communication techniques to foster active
inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

Much of teaching is about sending and receiving messages. Carefully planned and
skillfully delivered messages can issue invitations to students that school is a place to
share ideas, investigate, create, and collaborate with others. School can be a place to
be understood as well as a place to gain understanding. But without intentional
considerations and planning, the messages actually received by the students can be
conflicting, confusing, or discouraging. For this reason, teacher candidates need to
monitor their personal verbal and nonverbal communication so it is characterized by
clarity, organization, enthusiasm, and sensitivity. Teacher candidates’ oral and written
communications need to be models of appropriate grammar, content, and syntax.
Effective teacher candidates consistently use active listening skills as well. These
include the use of paraphrasing, perception checking, and clarifying questions.
Environments and resources, as well as people, send messages. The physical
environment of a classroom can communicate to students many things. Bright,
cheerful, colorful environments are likely to set expectations that this is a happy,
interesting place to be. Classrooms where all of the students have work displayed are
likely to communicate that all the children share this room and all are valued. When
materials that are frequently used are stored so they are easily accessible, students
learn that they can be independent in this classroom. The condition and organization of
materials also communicates the importance the teacher attaches to the work done with
those materials. Part of the effective teacher’s role, therefore, is to select, adapt, and
create a physical environment and a broad range of instructional resources that engage
the students in exciting learning and that send the messages intended. Effective
teacher candidates also recognize the increasing importance of technology as a tool for
student learning and as a major communication resource to be developed.
                                                                                         10
Technological media, classroom environment, and the teacher’s verbal and nonverbal
communications should all work together to send the students clear and consistent
messages about classroom expectations, goals, and challenges.

Belonging: Teacher candidates will create a classroom environment that models verbal
and nonverbal collaboration.

Mastery: Teacher candidates will carefully and clearly articulate expectations and
instructions that facilitate student learning.

Independence: Teacher candidates will monitor their personal verbal and nonverbal
communication so it is characterized by clarity, organization, enthusiasm, and
sensitivity.

Generosity: Teacher candidates will create classrooms where all students’ work, ideas,
and contributions are shared and valued in the classroom.

#7 INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING SKILLS: The teacher candidate plans instruction
based upon knowledge of subject matter, local, state, and national content standards,
students, and the community.

An effective teacher plans learning experiences based on a set of diverse factors, each
of which influences the outcome of student learning. First, the subject matter is
considered. It is important that the teacher have a thorough knowledge of the
composition of the subject being taught as well as an understanding of teaching
methods that are unique to that subject. Second, curriculum goals are important.
These goals give the teacher direction in making plans. Curriculum goals have a variety
of sources: school districts and the local community provide many; the teacher
candidate creates others. As teachers engage in both long-term and short-term
planning, they must be flexible when considering local, state, and national content
standards within these contexts: subject matter, local school district goals, current
educational issues, legal issues, family and community considerations, public policies,
and community resources. Third, the individual needs of learners are of utmost
importance. Teachers need to be able to create short-range and long-term plans that
are linked to student needs yet be ready to respond to unanticipated classroom events
and adapt those plans to ensure student progress and motivation. Fourth, community
needs and resources are a factor in planning lessons. Each community is unique in its
citizens’ consensus about what is important for its children to know. As public
educators, teachers need to be sensitive to these beliefs and reflect on them when
making plans. Tying all these elements together is essential in mastering the interests,
needs, and aptitudes of each of the students being taught. While in the classroom,
teachers need to be reflective of their current practice and to be open to adjustments
and revisions that become necessary for working with a diverse group of students.
Effective teachers' instructional repertoires also include knowledge of available
curricular resources such as primary sources, models, reproductions, textbook series,
teachers' guides, videotapes, computer software and musical recordings.

Belonging: Teacher candidates will plan instruction that is inclusive, cooperative and
differentiated to meet the needs of all students.

Mastery: Teacher candidates document mastery of instructional planning skills through
                                                                                         11
class projects, portfolio artifacts, experiences in the schools, and through assessment
administered by supervising teachers in the schools.

Independence: Teacher candidates exhibit increased responsibility for instructional
planning as they progress through the program.

Generosity: Teacher candidates share their planning skills as they contribute special
projects in the community and area schools.

#8 ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING: The teacher candidate understands and
uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous
intellectual, social and physical development of the learner.

Assessment in teaching is not a simple task; teachers must monitor the successes and
failures of individual students and evaluate their classes as collectives of learners.
Additionally, they make judgments about themselves as teachers in relation to those
students and classes. Effective teachers can assess the progress of individual students
as well as that of the class as a whole. They employ multiple methods for measuring
student growth and understanding and can clearly explain student performance to
parents. The purpose of assessment is to assist students, teacher candidates, schools,
and parents in recognizing what students have learned and to identify areas in which
students need improvement. Teacher candidates gather, synthesize, and evaluate
many different types of information about their students to make effective decisions
about instruction. Observations, tests on content, and standardized tests are examples
of traditional evaluative measures that provide indicators that suggest learning has
taken place. These traditional measures, however, may tell little about the depth of
knowledge in relation to solving real-life problems. New approaches to assessment
have tried to address this need by focusing on performance samples in which students
demonstrate that they can perform a task such as giving a speech, playing an
instrument, or writing a story. Some of these tasks are called alternative assessments
because they take place in a contrived context. They are an improvised or created
“alternative” to a real-life problem-solving situation. In contrast, other performance tasks
are authentic assessment because students demonstrate learning in a real-life setting.
Whatever type of assessment is used, each should reflect the following three qualities:
The assessment should be as reliable as possible. This means that the assessment
should provide dependable, consistent results. In addition, the assessment strategies
used by the teacher candidate should be valid. In other words, the teacher candidate
should make sure that the assessment strategy measures what it claims to measure.
Teacher candidates must be knowledgeable in adapting assessment methods to
address the individual and special needs of all P-12 students, particularly those with
special needs. Finally the strategies should be fair, impartial, and unbiased.

Belonging: Through careful assessment and analysis of student performance the
teacher candidate can better understand student needs and foster a climate of
belonging.

Mastery: A strong understanding of appropriate and varied formal and informal
assessments will inform the Teacher candidate’s decision-making process.

Independence: Effective assessment results serve to identify strengths and
weaknesses, facilitate goal setting, and enable the P-12 students to be autonomous;
                                                                                          12
use of student self-assessment can help develop independence.

Generosity: The teacher candidate’s use of assessment techniques will provide
opportunities for peer interaction, feedback, and peer support.

#9 PROFESSIONAL COMMITMENT AND RESPONSIBILITY: The teacher candidate is
a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and
actions on others (students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community)
and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.

Effective teachers are models of educated persons, exemplifying the virtues they seek
to inspire in students. They engage in lifelong learning which they seek to encourage in
their students. Striving to strengthen their teaching, effective teachers critically examine
their practice, seek to expand their repertoire, deepen their knowledge, sharpen their
judgment and adapt their teaching to new findings, ideas and theories. A true
professional is one who has the ability to learn as much from the students as they learn
from him or her. In an effort to match instruction to the needs of students, this teacher
spends much time evaluating the implications of his or her teaching decisions in the
classroom. This is the mark of a reflective practitioner. Such self-reflection leads to
greater knowledge about the students, about the subject being taught, and about the
craft of teaching. Self-reflection also takes place when considering relationships with
parents and educational professionals. Indeed, a teaching professional needs
continuing education. Certification is only the first step in a long process of continual
development as a professional. Growing professionally means learning new ways to
make lesson plans, understanding subject matter more thoroughly, and managing a
classroom. But true professionals need more than technical teaching skills. They must
also have the ability to constantly self-evaluate and act critically. New ideas together
with classroom experience form a strong theoretical base from which the teacher works,
allowing for more effective decision-making in the classroom. Thus, it is crucial that
teachers seek opportunities for professional growth and place new ideas within the
theoretical framework that already exists in their classroom. Teachers must keep
current with the growing body of curricular materials -- including literature available
through their professional organizations -- and constantly evaluate the usefulness of
those materials based on their understanding of curriculum theory, of students, of
subject matter, and of the school's and their own educational aims.

Belonging: The teacher candidate’s foundational knowledge of the profession allows
him/her to be an active participant in the professional community of educators.

Mastery: The teacher candidate’s practice of reflection allows him/her to continue to
grow in his/her knowledge of subject matter, pedagogical skills and personal
competence as an effective teacher.

Independence: As a professional, the teacher candidate seeks out new strategies,
developments, and theories through participation in professional development
opportunities.

Generosity: When the teacher candidate takes on leadership roles within the
profession, mentors his/her peers, and provides service to the community, s/he
demonstrates a spirit of generosity. A teacher candidate who masters these skills
becomes a good mentor; the teacher candidate within this context is the learner.
                                                                                          13
#10 PARTNERSHIPS: The teacher candidate fosters relationships with families
(parents, guardians, and support people), school colleagues, and community agencies
to support students' learning and well-being.

Teaching most commonly is regarded as the daily conduct of lessons and the provision
of learning experiences. But the work of teaching reaches beyond the boundaries of
individual classrooms to wider communities of learning. In order to take advantage of
the broad range of professional knowledge and expertise that resides within the school,
effective teachers have a range of duties and tasks outside the direct instruction of
students that contribute importantly to the quality of the school and to student learning.
There are two broad areas of responsibility. One involves participation in collaborative
efforts to improve the effectiveness of the school. The second entails engaging parents
and others in the community in the education of young people. Teachers must have a
thorough understanding of the need to have positive working relationships with their
students and their students’ families (parents, guardians, and support people) as well as
school colleagues, and community agencies. Effective teachers engage in a variety of
experiences within and beyond the school that promote a spirit of collaboration,
collegiality, and personal growth. They work in cooperative teams, endorse collegial
efforts, and seek opportunities to work with families (parents, guardians, and support
people), school colleagues, and community agencies. Effective teachers recognize the
importance of sharing experiences and ideas. Community members and events can be
powerful learning experiences for teachers. Effective teachers learn how to
successfully collaborate with churches and other civic and community-based
organizations. Exposure to these influences can assist teachers in understanding the
frame of reference within which the community’s children operate. Teachers must be
receptive to moving beyond the walls of the school to discover the students’ other
learning environments. Effective teachers contribute to the effectiveness of the school
by working collaboratively with other professionals on instructional policy, curriculum
development and staff development. They can evaluate school progress and the
allocation of school resources in light of their understanding of state and local
educational objectives. They are knowledgeable about specialized school and
community resources that can be engaged for their students' benefit, and are skilled at
employing such resources as needed. Effective teachers find ways to work
collaboratively and creatively with parents, engaging them productively in the work of
the school. The responsibilities of educators in a democratic society include working
with a community of concerned individuals who rally around one central goal: educating
children.

Belonging: Teacher candidates begin their partnerships with area schools and the
community as freshman and expand these partnerships over four years, which
increases their sense of belonging to the profession of teaching by giving them varied
experiences in P-12 schools.

Mastery: The unit exposes teacher candidates to a plethora of teaching professionals
and related experts through conferences, presentations, symposium days, and
modeling from accomplished teachers.

Independence: Teacher candidates bring their individual strengths, experiences, and
talents to build partnerships in the profession.

Generosity: By conducting projects in the community and area schools, teacher
                                                                                         14
candidates initiate partnerships and collaborative endeavors. It is expected that teacher
candidates contribute to their placements in meaningful ways.

ACCREDITATION
The Education Department is regularly reviewed by various accrediting agencies to
ensure quality programs. Currently, the Teacher Education Program at Augustana
College is accredited as follows:

      --National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
      --South Dakota Department of Education (SD DOE)
      --Council on Education of the Deaf (CED)
      --Higher Learning Commission (college level)

Periodic changes in the Teacher Education Program occur as state and national
accreditation bodies and learned societies revise their knowledge bases and program
standards. Faculty evaluate the programs and see more effective ways to prepare you
for your professional career. Changes also occur as college programs strive to be
current so that you have updated skills and are ready for the real world.

GOVERNANCE
The Education Department Chairperson provides the leadership for all programs. In
addition the Education Department Chairperson is responsible to chair and convene the
department’s various governance committees. The Education Department is comprised
of Base Programs and each Base Program is comprised of those faculty members who
have the majority of their teaching assignments in a major program and are as follows:
Elementary Education, Secondary Education, Special Education, Education of the Deaf
and Hard of Hearing, Communication Disorders, and Sign Language Interpreter
Training. The Teacher Education Committee/TEC serves as the governing body for the
Education Department and is a standing committee in the college's governance
structure. It is comprised of faculty from each Base Program, a faculty member from
each department with a SD DOE Approved Program, the Certification Officer, the Field
Placement Coordinator, a representative from each of the college’s three divisions
(Social Science, Natural Science, Humanities), the Academic Dean, and student
representatives. The Education Department is comprised of full-time faculty teaching in
each of the Base Programs as well as the Field Placement Coordinator and the
Certification Officer. Education Department Meetings provide a forum for conducting
departmental business as well as a forum for Base Programs to receive input from
faculty regarding proposals for new programs and courses as well as changes in
existing ones. The Education Department Advisory Board, comprised of P-12
representatives and Base Program representatives, provides the Education Department
and its Base Programs with input and expertise and informs the actions of the unit.

ACADEMIC ADVISORS
When you enter Augustana as a first year student or a transfer student, you are
assigned an advisor. During orientation week students and advisors have a time to

                                                                                       15
meet each other. If for some reason you are not assigned an advisor or you wish to
change your advisor, follow these steps:

       1.    Get a change of advisor form at the Registrar’s Office.
       2.    Check with the Department Secretary for the names of possible advisors.
       3.    Visit with the professor about becoming your advisor and secure the
             professor’s signature on the form.
       4.    Return the completed form to the Registrar's Office.

The following guidelines will assist you with planning your program of study:

--Make an appointment with your advisor. Call, e-mail, or stop by the office to see if
there is a sign-up sheet. It is your responsibility to contact your advisor.
--Come prepared with your registration materials and a draft of your schedule or idea
and any questions you might have.
--Remember it is your schedule, your education and your responsibility to inform your
advisor of changes in your plans. Many students change their minds about courses and
majors. These changes may mean a new plan. Keep your advisor informed of any
changes.
--Keep a record of the classes you are taking and how you are progressing toward your
goals.
--Please note that Advising Checklists are available online from the Education
Department homepage: http://www.augie.edu/dept/educ/ed/home.htm
--Make sure you read and understand pertinent information found in the college catalog.

PROGRAM ENTRANCE AND EXIT
REQUIREMENTS
Teacher education candidates are responsible for a variety of external fees associated
with the Teacher Education Program, including, but not limited to the following:

      Criminal Background Check(s),
      Chalk and Wire ePortfolio access code,
      Tuberculin Test/TB,
      Health check,
      Fingerprinting,
      PRAXIS exam(s) registration and testing fees, and
      Other fees as required by accrediting agencies, SD DOE, and/or cooperating
       schools and agencies.

In some cases the fee(s) is attached to a particular course and in other cases the fee is
separate from a particular course.


PROGRAM ENTRY

The Application to the Teacher Education Program form is completed during the
candidate’s enrollment in EDUC 275. The form helps to identify those who intend to
pursue entrance to the program and formally communicate program entrance
                                                                                         16
requirements to prospective candidates. Admission to the Teacher Education Program
occurs upon completion of the following:

      Completion of at least 45 semester credit hours
      Cumulative GPA of 2.60
      Freedom from disciplinary status
      Academic Advisor’s recommendation
      Approval from the Education Department and/or the Department of Major and the
       Teacher Education Committee
      Satisfactory Ratings on Assessment of Candidate Dispositions
      Completion of EDUC/SPED 110, EDUC 245, & EDUC 275 with grades of at least
       C- or above
      Successful Initial Level Portfolio Review

The Teacher Education Committee/TEC considers applications to the program once
each semester and with their approval, teacher candidates are granted admission to the
program. Teacher candidates will be notified of their admission status by the Field
Placement Coordinator. Admission to the Teacher Education Program is necessary
before teacher candidates will be allowed to register for some upper level courses.

PRIOR TO ENTERING STUDENT TEACHING

The Intent to Student Teach Form is due to the Field Placement Coordinator ONE
YEAR prior to the semester of student teaching. It is the candidate’s responsibility to
submit the Intent to Student Teach form by December 1 or May 1 of the appropriate
semester. Acceptance to student teaching occurs after candidates have been admitted
to the teacher education program and upon completion of the following:

      Cumulative GPA of 2.60
      Completion of all coursework required for major and certification with grades of
       C- or better for the teacher candidate’s chosen program of study (exceptions to
       this MUST be cleared in writing through Field Placement Coordinator)
      Approval from the Education Department and/or the Department of Major and the
       Teacher Education Committee
      Satisfactory Ratings on Assessment of Candidate Dispositions
      Teacher candidates in the Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing program
       must completed the Sign Communication Proficiency Interview/SCPI at an
       Intermediate Level

The Teacher Education Committee/TEC considers applications to student teaching
once each semester and with their approval, teacher candidates are granted
acceptance to student teaching. Teacher candidates will be notified of their acceptance
status by the Field Placement Coordinator.

Completion of the following is necessary before teacher candidates will be allowed to
begin their student teaching experience:

      Candidates must submit copies of scores for completed PRAXIS Content and
       PLT exams for ALL program areas being completed or provide a copy of the
       computer generated registration form evidencing that the student has registered
                                                                                        17
        to complete PRAXIS Content and PLT exams for ALL program areas being
        completed
       Successful Intermediate Level Portfolio Review

 In addition, teacher candidates must complete the following, as required by cooperating
 schools, at their expense, PRIOR to being allowed to begin their student teaching
 experience:

       Tuberculin Test/TB
       Health Check
       Criminal Background Check
       Fingerprinting
       Other as required by cooperating schools.

 Teacher candidates must also create a Student Teaching Showcase Portfolio the
 semester PRIOR to the semester of student teaching. Student Teaching Showcase
 Portfolios should be completed by October 1 or February 1 of the appropriate semester.
 Information regarding the Student Teaching Showcase Portfolio is available from the
 Education Department Homepage:

                      http://www.augie.edu/dept/educ/ed/home.htm

 PRIOR TO EXITING STUDENT TEACHING

 Teacher candidates are eligible to exit the Teacher Education Program upon completion
 of the following:

       Cumulative GPA of 2.60
       Completion of all coursework required for major and certification with grades of
        C- or better for the teacher candidate’s chosen program of study
       A successful student teaching experience, full attendance at Education
        Symposium Day, a Successful Final Level Portfolio Review, successful
        completion of the Teacher Impact Upon Student Learning Project and required
        student teaching artifacts
       Prior to recommendation for program completion and receiving a grade for
        Student Teaching, PRAXIS Content and PLT exam scores for ALL program
        areas being completed must be submitted to the Education Department--
        Specifically, each teacher candidate must produce original ETS generated
        composite score results and a photo copy of all sub-category scores for Praxis
        Content and PLT exams taken. Candidates whose scores are not received by
        the completion of student teaching will receive a grade of INCOMPLETE for
        student teaching.

NOTE: Formal consequences for candidates who have unexcused absences from
Education Symposium Day shall include the following:

    Meet with Prof Julie Simko, Certification Officer and Sandi Vietor, Career Center—
     write a summary of information (candidate must initiate the meeting)
    Impact Project—meet with faculty member who reviewed project for one-on-one
     discussion (candidate must initiate the meeting)
                                                                                           18
  Writing Assignment—Synthesis Paper related to Keynote Speaker’s Topic based
   upon at least 3 scholarly articles, APA (candidate must initiate meeting with
   Education Department Chairperson to discuss details of the writing assignment)

UPON PROGRAM COMPLETION

Upon program completion and graduation from the college, teacher candidates may
apply for teacher certification. Candidates cannot be recommended for licensure until
PRAXIS scores have been received and the official transcripts reflect program
completion and graduation from the college. Teacher candidates should consult with
the Teacher Education Program’s Certification Officer who will facilitate the application
process. The steps for acquiring a teaching certificate or license include:

1.     Get an application form from the state from which certification is desired. The
       Education Department at Augustana has forms for South Dakota, Iowa,
       Minnesota, and Nebraska.
2.     Complete the form. Some will need to be notarized.
3.     Attach a check/money order if required.
4.     An official transcript with the registrar’s seal must accompany the completed
       application form.
5.     Returning the form(s), check, and transcript to the Certification Officer, Education
       Department, Augustana College

Teacher candidates are advised that South Dakota Codified Law provides for the
revocation or refusal of teacher certification upon felony conviction of a crime involving
moral turpitude, including traffic in narcotics. See the Certification Officer for additional,
detailed information.

*Teacher candidates are also required to meet requirements for the Teacher Education
Portfolio throughout their program of study as detailed in this handbook.

Academic Grievance Procedure
The academic grievance procedure shall be used in all cases involving grievances by
students against faculty or other students concerning alleged academic injustices
relating to grades, cheating, or unprofessional conduct.

Step 1. The student shall take a complaint to the instructor within two weeks of the
occurrence. If the grievance concerns a final semester grade the complaint must be
made within three weeks of the distribution of term grades. If the student feels unable
to approach the instructor, the grievance may be taken to the chair of the department in
which the instructor is a member (if the instructor is the department chair, the grievance
should be taken to the division chair). If the grievance is redressed or the student is
satisfied in this meeting with the instructor or the department/division chair, the matter is
settled.

Step 2. If the student feels dissatisfied with the instructor's response to the grievance
the student may take the grievance to the chair of the department in which the instructor
involved is a member or to the division chair if the instructor is the chair of the
department. This appeal must be brought within one week of the unsatisfactory
                                                                                             19
response to the initial statement of grievance. The department (or the division) chair
shall require the student to submit the grievance in written form and shall ask for a
written response from the instructor involved. On the basis of this information and any
other that the department (or division) chair shall judge pertinent, the chair shall render
a decision. This decision shall be given to the student in writing and a written record of
the decision and its basis must be kept by the chair and shared with the instructor. If
the student and the instructor are satisfied, the matter is settled.

Step 3. If the student or the instructor feels dissatisfied with the decision regarding the
grievance rendered by the department (or division) chair, either may appeal the decision
to the Academic Dean within one week of the unsatisfactory decision. This appeal
must be in writing and must indicate why an appeal should be heard. The Academic
Dean shall ask the department (or division) chair for the written record of the grievance
procedure to that point. Through consultation with the Vice President for Student
Services, the grievance shall be reviewed and the appeal considered. The decision of
this appeal body shall be final.

Student Staffings
Candidates who are experiencing difficulty in courses or field experiences, display a
lack of professionalism in courses or field experiences, and/or who have demonstrated
a pattern of dispositional areas of concern in courses or field experiences may be
referred for a staffing by their academic advisor, supervising or cooperating teacher,
college supervisor, course instructor, or college faculty. The staffing is designed to
define the problem, develop an action plan for improvement, discuss ramifications, and
arrange for follow up. The completed form is to be filed in the student’s academic
folder.

PRAXIS
The Educational Testing Service/ETS offers a set of rigorous and carefully validated
assessments that provide accurate and reliable information. Augustana’s Teacher
Education Program and the state of SD require candidates to take PRAXIS II exams
(Subject Assessments and PLT/Principles of Learning and Teaching) as part of its
program requirements and state teacher licensure requirements. Detailed information
regarding state-by-state PRAXIS requirements can be found at: http://www.ets.org.
Teacher candidates are required to take PRAXIS II Content Exams for all programs
being completed and are required to take the PRAXIS II Principles of Learning and
Teaching/PLT Exam that best matches their preparation area.

ASSESSMENT OF CANDIDATE DISPOSITIONS
The Teacher Education Program at Augustana College formally assesses candidate
dispositions in the candidate’s program of study prior to program admittance (initial),
prior to the time the candidate begins student teaching (intermediate), and during the
semester of student teaching (final). Assessment of candidate dispositions is done by
Education Department faculty (internal) and by mentor teachers, practicum supervisors
and cooperating teachers (external). Dispositional data are used to inform each
candidate’s matriculation through the program of study and are aggregated to inform
                                                                                          20
  programmatic decision making. The formal assessment of candidate dispositions is
  supplemented by the informal kinds of observations made by faculty in the college
  classroom and by academic advisors through the advising process and when
  recommending candidates for program entry and acceptance to student teaching. In
  addition, the unit’s staffing process serves as a formal mechanism for addressing areas
  of concern.

Initial Assessment            EDUC 275 Mentor Teacher
Intermediate Assessment       -EDUC 335 Literacy in the Content Area (SEED & ALL-
                              GRADES) OR EDUC 320/325/350 (ELED) OR SPED 301
                              (SPED) OR EDHH 323 (EDHH)

                                                           AND

                              -SPED 240 (ELED/SEED/ALL-GRADES) OR EDHH 287
                              (EDHH) OR SPED 280 Practicum Supervisor (SPED)
Final Assessment              Cooperating Teacher

  The following 10 dispositional statements based upon INTASC Standards and with a
  focus on student learning are used as the basis for the assessment of candidate
  dispositions at the initial level. Through coursework, class participation, and field
  experiences, the initial level program candidate demonstrates the following dispositions:

        Knowledge of Subject Matter
             o The teacher candidate has enthusiasm for the discipline(s) s/he teaches
                and sees connections to everyday life.
        Knowledge of Human Development and Learning
             o The teacher candidate is disposed to use students' strengths as a basis
                for growth and their errors as an opportunity for learning.
        Adapting Instruction for Individual Needs
             o The teacher candidate believes that all children can learn at high levels,
                persists in helping all children achieve success, and is sensitive to
                community and cultural norms.
        Multiple Instructional Strategies
             o The teacher candidate values flexibility and reciprocity in the teaching
                process as necessary for adapting instruction to student responses, ideas,
                and needs.
        Classroom Management and Motivation Skills
             o The teacher candidate supports a positive learning environment and
                considers how different motivational strategies are likely to encourage the
                development for each student.
        Communication Skills
             o The teacher candidate values many ways in which people seek to
                communicate and encourages many modes of communication in the
                classroom.
        Instructional Planning Skills
             o The teacher candidate believes that plans must always be open to
                adjustment and revision based on student needs and changing
                circumstances.
        Assessment

                                                                                         21
          o The teacher candidate values ongoing assessment as essential to the
             instructional process and recognizes that many different assessment
             strategies, accurately and systematically used, are necessary for
             monitoring and promoting student learning.
      Professionalism
          o The teacher candidate is a reflective practitioner who recognizes his/her
             professional responsibility for engaging in and supporting appropriate
             professional practices for self and colleagues.
      Partnerships
          o The teacher candidate is willing to work with other professionals to
             improve the overall learning environment for students.

VOLUNTEER PROGRAM
In the spirit of generosity, Augustana students in the Education Program are
encouraged to give 25 hours a year to volunteer activities such as tutoring, teaching
church school classes, providing respite care, assisting at hospitals or agencies, or
participating in activities sponsored by community groups related to their profession.
The activity should be : people-oriented, independent of course requirements, and
volunteer work, not part of a paid job. Students are required to document their
generosity by initiating and updating the Volunteer Program Log and including this as an
artifact in their Teacher Education Portfolio.

STUDENT ASSOCIATIONS
There are several ways that you can become involved in Education Department
activities. For example, there are student groups that are always welcoming new
members:

Augustana College Education Association (ACEA)
Deaf Awareness
Student Council for Exceptional Children (SCEC)
National Student Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA)

FIELD EXPERIENCES
Field experiences facilitate candidates’ development as professional educators by
providing opportunities for candidates to observe in schools and other agencies, tutor
and mentor P-12 students, assist teachers or other school personnel, and participate in
education-related events. Throughout each program of study, candidates will engage in
a variety of field experiences which are carefully designed and planned to be
developmental and sequential. Candidates begin their field experiences while enrolled
in EDUC/SPED 110 where they complete the Early Field Experience, a
tutoring/mentoring field experience designed to introduce candidates to the school
environment and interact with a P-12 student in a one-on-one setting. This initial field
experience is designed to help candidates solidify their resolve to pursue entrance to
the program and a teaching career. Subsequent field experiences become more
intensive moving the candidate from observation to participation to eventually providing
opportunities for candidates to interact with small groups of students or teach a lesson
                                                                                        22
 under the supervision of the cooperating teacher. The table that follows outlines the
 various field experiences:

                                          ALL PROGRAMS
    FIELD             BRIEF                ASSESSMENT            # OF HOURS              WHO
 EXPERIENCE        EXPLANATION                                                         SECURES
                                                                                      PLACEMENT
EDUC/SPED 110      Tutoring/Mentoring     Reflection Log        10                   Course Instructor
                   a P-12 student
EDUC 275           Observation &          Reflection Log,       40                   Field Placement
                   Participation,         Cooperating                                Coordinator
                   Planning and           Teacher
                   Delivery of at least   Evaluation, 5 Field
                   one lesson             Based Assignments
EDUC 355           Field experience at    Log & Discussion      10                   Field Placement
                   Family Immersion                                                  Coordinator
                   Center, Cultural
                   Field Trips, ELL
NAST               Native Reads           Log &                 2-3 Hours per week   Native Reads
                   Program—serve as       Contemporary                               Coordinator or
                   reading tutor OR       Issues Paper                               Education Faculty
                   One-on-one
                   tutoring in SFPS
                          ELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAM
SPED 240           Observation &          Observation           30                   Field Placement
                   Participation in       Reports, Journal,                          Coordinator
                   SPED and Inclusive     Case Study,
                   classroom              Cooperating
                                          Teacher Evaluation
PE 265             Observation &          Log                   10                   Field Placement
                   Participation                                                     Coordinator
EDUC 290           Observation &          Paper, Peer           5-10                 Course Instructor
                   Participation;         observation
                   Delivery of a Circle
                   of Courage lesson
EDUC 301           Unit observation       Log, Observation      10                   Field Placement
                                                                                     Coordinator
EDUC 320/325/350   Observation,           Log, Teacher & Self   45-50                Field Placement
                   planning, and          Assessment,                                Coordinator
                   delivery of lessons    Debriefing
                   for literacy and       Sessions
                   social studies
             SECONDARY AND/OR ALL-GRADES EDUCATION PROGRAM
SPED 240           Observation &          Observation           30                   Field Placement
                   Participation in       Reports, Journal,                          Coordinator
                   SPED and Inclusive     Case Study,
                   classroom              Cooperating
                                          Teacher Evaluation
EDUC 310’s         Varies—see             Varies—see            Varies—see           Course Instructor
                   individual course      individual course     individual course
                   syllabi                syllabi               syllabi
EDUC 345           Mentoring in middle    Reflection Log        8                    Course Instructor
                   school after school
                   program
                              SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM
SPED 230           Assisting students     Active Involvement    15                   Course Instructor
                   with cognitive &       Paper, Teacher
                   developmental          evaluation

                                                                                                    23
                 disabilities
SPED 260         E-mail                  Reflective              5-10 via e-mail; 2-3    Course Instructor
                 correspondence,         Synthesis               in classroom
                 Classroom visit
SPED 280         Teacher aiding in a     Journal, Child          75                      Field Placement
                 SPED setting            Report, IEP Artifact,                           Coordinator
                                         other artifacts,
                                         teacher evaluation
SPED 301         Highly focused          Written reflections     5                       Course Instructor
                 practicum on            on classroom
                 classroom               organization,
                 organization, IEP       scheduling, lesson
                 preparation,            planning, and IEP
                 instructional           preparation
                 planning, student
                 management and
                 observations of
                 case study student
SPED 310         Assessment labs         Observation             10-12                   Course Instructor
                 (observations of        papers, Child
                 FAS clinics and         Assessment Report
                 preschool
                 screenings;
                 administering of
                 individual test to
                 child volunteer)
SPED 360         Hands-on                Written reflective      15                      Course Instructor
                 practicum with          journal and
                 resource room           evaluation of
                 students                cooperating teacher
                                        DEAF EDUCATION
EDHH 220         Observe and assist      Reflection Paper        4                       Course Instructor
                 in Literacy Fun at
                 Augie
EDHH 221         Hearing                 Observation, log,       10-12                   Course Instructor
                 Assessment in           instructor debriefing
                 Roberts Learning
                 Center
EDHH 224         Observation &           Observation, log,       10-12                   Course Instructor
                 Participation           instructor debriefing
EDHH 226, 227,   Participation in        Reflection paper;       2-4                     Course Instructor
331, 332         events in deaf          Videotape of
                 community               experience
EDHH 287         Observation &           E-mail                  120-140                 Field Placement
                 Participation           correspondence                                  Coordinator &
                                         with course                                     Course Instructor
                                         instructor and
                                         practicum partner,
                                         Reflection Log
EDHH 306, 318    Teaching event at       Lesson Plans,           6-10                    Course Instructor
                 Augustana—              Observation
                 Literacy Fun
EDHH 323         Teaching event at       Lesson Plans,           6-10, 2 days            Course Instructor
                 Augustana—              Observation             additional for travel
                 Literacy Fun,                                   to Twin Cities
                 Candidates also
                 travel to the Twin
                 Cities to observe
                 various programs
                 for deaf and hard of

                                                                                                        24
                  hearing students
                             MIDDLE SCHOOL ENDORSEMENT
EDUC 330          Participation with     Log                  25            Field Placement
                  MS Interdisciplinary                                      Coordinator
                  Team
EDUC 345          Mentoring in middle    Reflection Log       8             Course Instructor
                  school after school
                  program
                             KINDERGARTEN ENDORSEMENT
EDUC 231          Observation and        Reflection Log and   30            Field Placement
                  participation in a     Debriefing                         Coordinator
                  kindergarten           Sessions
                  classroom

 Liability

 The College requires all full-time students to have health insurance coverage. A health
 insurance plan is available for purchase to all students who prefer either their own policy
 or complementary coverage to their family's or parents' coverage. All students are
 required to "subscribe" to the college- sponsored insurance plan, or provide
 documentation of other insurance coverage, or indicate by written disclaimer that all
 medically related charges are the responsibility of the student. Students will be enrolled
 in the college insurance plan if proof of other insurance or signed waiver is not provided.
 Complete details concerning benefits, coverage, and claim procedures may be obtained
 from the Wellness Center.

 Auto liability covers only Augustana owned, rented, or leased vehicles. Staff or
 students using their own vehicles on college business are NOT covered and must rely
 on their own insurance policies. However, when staff or students wish to use their own
 vehicle they will be covered under the college’s policy for that specific event provided
 they have made the arrangement with our insurance company prior to the event, but
 even then their own insurance is primary.

 Students engaged in practicum or student teaching experiences may be covered
 through liability insurance available through SDEA/NEA if they are a member. Any
 excess charges incurred will be paid by the college insurance policy.




 TEACHER EDUCATION PORTFOLIO
 Teacher education in South Dakota and at Augustana College is based upon three main
 areas of integrated knowledge bases: General Education Studies, Professional
 Education Requirements, and Requirements for Teaching Programs. In addition, the
 Teacher Education Program at Augustana College is competency based and requires
 candidates to engage in the on-going development of a portfolio where candidates are
 asked to record, integrate, and reflect on their preservice program experiences.

 The portfolio is a collection of materials, or artifacts that evidences an individual's
 growth and development toward becoming a professional educator. This collection of
 authentic, learner specific documents is also acknowledgment that the development of a
                                                                                           25
professional educator is an individualized process. These artifacts reflect the
candidates’ progress over a period of time and provide useful information in assessing
the success of the program in meeting its goals and maintaining the required
competencies.

This performance-based assessment tool will provide authentic evidence of candidate
performance and should be considered a working portfolio. Through a combination and
variety of required and self-selected artifacts, candidates will document their acquisition
of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for teaching. In addition, this
portfolio will provide candidates with a personal tool for reflecting upon their teaching
skills, knowledge, and dispositions.

The portfolio is an assessment instrument to determine if candidates are meeting state
and program requirements and competencies. Unit faculty review and evaluate each
portfolio through the use of rubrics. Candidates may be asked to further develop and/or
revise their portfolio at any of the review points before progressing through the program.

The portfolio process is continually reviewed by the Education Department; therefore,
revisions should be expected as an ongoing aspect the unit’s assessment system.

Beginning in the fall of 2006, the Teacher Education Portfolio will be initiated,
maintained, and assessed via the Chalk and Wire ePortfolio platform. Students will be
assessed a non-refundable ePortfolio fee as part of their enrollment in EDUC 275
Generic Methods in Education.




Students who enrolled in EDUC 275 Generic Methods in Education prior to fall of 2006,
will continue to maintain their portfolio via a web-based electronic format. The
electronic portfolio template is available for downloading at:
http://www.augie.edu/dept/educ/andrews/portfolio.htm

NOTE: Artifacts included in your web-based electronic portfolio should make use of
pseudonyms to protect the identify of P-12 students, teachers, and schools. In addition,
while you may include digital photos/videos in your electronic portfolio, photographs can
not show faces of P-12 students. You may, however, include photos of you working
with groups of students where you are facing the camera and the students’ backs are to
the camera. You may include digital photos of bulletin boards and learning centers, for
example.

PORTFOLIO PURPOSES

To demonstrate and document personal development and to identify both strengths and
areas for improvement

To document active and performance-based learning by candidates in their individual
professional growth and development

                                                                                         26
        To provide students with a resource of relevant materials for use in the profession and
        as a tool in seeking employment

        To provide a data source for assessing the Teacher Education Program at Augustana
        College and for use in the unit’s ongoing, systematic program evaluation

        PROGRAM COMPETENCIES

        A set of professional competencies, based upon the Interstate New Teachers
        Assessment and Support Consortium/INTASC principles, have been identified to guide
        course content and field experiences as well as articulate what students will know and
        be able to do upon program completion. The competencies assist candidates in
        developing a commitment to and proficiency in their chosen profession. The curriculum
        of the Teacher Education Program is structured to blend the Circle of Courage values
        into a model for professional behavior. Throughout their program of study, candidates
        will complete course requirements designed to facilitate mastery and understanding of
        the following program competencies:

        #1    KNOWLEDGE OF SUBJECT MATTER
        #2    KNOWLEDGE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING
        #3    ADAPTING INSTRUCTION FOR INDIVIDUAL NEEDS
        #4    MULTIPLE INSRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
        #5    CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT AND MOTIVATION SKILLS
        #6    COMMUNICATION SKILLS
        #7    INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING SKILLS
        #8    ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING
        #9    PROFESSIONAL COMMITMENT AND RESPONSIBILITY
        #10   PARTNERSHIPS

        REVIEWING THE TEACHER EDUCATION PORTFOLIO
        The portfolio will be formally reviewed three times throughout your program to provide
        feedback and support throughout the development of your portfolio. A rubric will be
        used at each formal review to provide feedback and identify areas that may need
        revision. If a candidate does not meet review expectations, s/he will be asked to revise
        and resubmit his/her working portfolio for a second review. The formal review times are
        outlined in the table that follows:

REVIEW CYCLE               WHEN                 RELATED               TOOLS              REVIEWERS
                                               COURSE or
                                              EXPERIENCE
INITIAL              During enrollment in   EDUC 275            -Initial Level        -Education
                     EDUC 275, each                             Portfolio Review      Department Faculty
                     Fall or Spring                             Rubric
INTERMEDIATE         During semester        Varies by program   -Self Evaluation      -Education
                     candidate has been                         -Intermediate Level   Department Faculty
                     accepted to student                        Portfolio Review
                     teaching, each Fall                        Rubric
                     or Spring
FINAL                During the semester    Student             --Final Level         -Education
                     of Student Teaching    Teaching            Portfolio Review      Department Faculty
                                            Semester            Rubric

                                                                                                  27
The development and completion of the Teacher Education Portfolio is a requirement
for all candidates in the Teacher Education Program at Augustana College. Portfolios
will be reviewed at various times throughout your program to provide feedback and
support. Candidates must have a minimum of 2 artifacts with Artifact Cover Sheets for
each competency—see portfolio template or table of contents for details regarding the
nature of required artifacts and suggestions for self-selected artifacts. Candidates will
begin the development of their portfolio when enrolled in EDUC 275 where a series of
orientation sessions will be held.

The Initial Level Portfolio Review will occur late in the semester of enrollment in EDUC
275. Candidates should have a MINIMUM of 6 artifacts with cover sheets uploaded at
this time, in addition to other required documentation—see table of contents or template
for details. Candidates who do not meet expectations for the Initial Level Portfolio
Review will have their portfolio returned for revision(s) and will need to resubmit their
portfolio for a second review-- students who do not pass the Initial Level Portfolio
Review will receive a grade of INCOMPLETE for EDUC 275. Students will NOT be able
to enroll in upper level courses or be admitted to the Teacher Education Program until
their portfolio has been resubmitted and found to meet expectations for the Initial Level
Portfolio Review.

Candidates should continue to upload artifacts and Artifact Cover Sheets in preparation
for the Intermediate Level Portfolio Review which occurs after a candidate has been
accepted to student teaching, late in the semester prior to student teaching. Candidates
must have a successful Intermediate Level Portfolio Review in order to begin their
student teaching as scheduled. Candidates must have all a minimum of at least 2
artifacts per competency, with Artifact Cover Sheets uploaded at this time. In addition,
candidates should complete the Portfolio Self-Evaluation.

Students who do not meet expectations for the Intermediate Level Portfolio Review will
have their portfolio returned for revision(s) and will need to resubmit their portfolio for a
second review—students who do not pass the Intermediate Level Portfolio Review will
NOT be allowed to begin their student teaching experience until their portfolio has been
resubmitted and found to meet expectations for the Intermediate Level Portfolio Review.

The final artifact, the Teacher Impact Upon Student Learning Project, will be completed
during student teaching. This project in addition to several other student teaching
artifacts will serve as the basis for the Final Level Portfolio Review. This project,
considered a culminating effort, will incorporate aspects of all the program
competencies. Faculty will be randomly assigned to evaluate the Teacher Impact Upon
Student Learning Projects and candidates will share their projects with peers in small
groups during the Education Symposium Day. Detailed information regarding this
project will be provided to candidates during the Student Teaching Orientation and is
included in this publication as well.

Students who do not meet expectations for the Final Level Portfolio Review will have
their project returned for revision(s) and will need to resubmit their portfolio for a second
review—candidates who do not pass the Final Level Portfolio Review will receive a
grade of INCOMPLETE for Student Teaching. Candidates will NOT receive a
satisfactory grade for student teaching until their portfolio has been resubmitted and
found to meet expectations for the Final Level Portfolio Review.

                                                                                           28
                     Initial Level Portfolio Review Rubric
Artifact Reflection: Artifact reflections should be 5-8 sentences in length and adhere to the
following format: one-sentence description of the artifact followed by a rationale for competency
alignment and how completion of the artifact informs the candidates understanding of the Circle
of Courage.
1 Unacceptable Performance: Documents are not aligned with appropriate program
  competencies; Artifact descriptions inadequately describe the document; Rationales for
  program competency alignment do not explain why and how the artifact meets the standards;
  Relationship to the Circle of Courage is not conveyed
2 Emerging Performance
3 Expected Performance: Documents are aligned with appropriate program competencies;
  Artifact descriptions describe the document; Rationales for program competency alignment
  indicate why the artifact meets the standards; Relationship to the Circle of Courage is
  conveyed
4 Excellent Performance
5 Exemplary Performance: Documents are clearly aligned with appropriate program
  competencies inclusive of strong rationale for alignment; Artifact descriptions describe the
  document clearly and concisely and provide a complete context; Rationales for program
  competency alignment convincingly explain why and how the artifact meets the standards;
  Relationship to the Circle of Courage is clearly and succinctly conveyed in a meaningful and
  personalized way
Required Artifacts: See performance descriptors
1 Unacceptable Performance: Portfolio is NOT inclusive of at least 6 artifacts with cover
  sheets; Volunteer Program Log Sheet & Professional Development Summary Sheet have not
  been initiated or are incomplete
2 Emerging Performance
3 Expected Performance: Portfolio is inclusive of at least 6 artifacts with cover sheets;
  Volunteer Program Log & Professional Development Summary have been initiated
4 Excellent Performance
5 Exemplary Performance: Portfolio is inclusive of more than 6 artifacts with cover sheets;
  Volunteer Program Log & Professional Development Summary have been initiated




                                                                                              29
               Intermediate Level Portfolio Review Rubric
Artifact Reflection: Artifact reflections should be 5-8 sentences in length and adhere to the
following format: one-sentence description of the artifact followed by a rationale for competency
alignment and how completion of the artifact informs the candidates understanding of the Circle
of Courage.
1 Unacceptable Performance: Documents are not aligned with appropriate program
  competencies; Artifact descriptions inadequately describe the document; Rationales for
  program competency alignment do not explain why and how the artifact meets the standards;
  Relationship to the Circle of Courage is not conveyed
2 Emerging Performance
3 Expected Performance: Documents are aligned with appropriate program competencies;
  Artifact descriptions describe the document; Rationales for program competency alignment
  indicate why the artifact meets the standards; Relationship to the Circle of Courage is
  conveyed
4 Excellent Performance
5 Exemplary Performance: Documents are clearly aligned with appropriate program
  competencies inclusive of strong rationale for alignment; Artifact descriptions describe the
  document clearly and concisely and provide a complete context; Rationales for program
  competency alignment convincingly explain why and how the artifact meets the standards;
  Relationship to the Circle of Courage is clearly and succinctly conveyed in a meaningful and
  personalized way
Required Artifacts: See performance descriptors
1 Unacceptable Performance: Portfolio is NOT inclusive of at least 20 artifacts with cover
  sheets; Volunteer Program Log Sheet & Professional Development Summary Sheet have not
  been initiated or are incomplete; Self-Evaluation has not been completed.
2 Emerging Performance
3 Expected Performance: Portfolio is inclusive of at least 20 artifacts with cover sheets;
  there are at least 2 artifacts per competency; Volunteer Program Log & Professional
  Development Summary have been updated; Self-Evaluation is completed
4 Excellent Performance
5 Exemplary Performance: Portfolio is inclusive of more than 20 artifacts with cover sheets;
  there are at least 2 artifacts per competency; Volunteer Program Log & Professional
  Development Summary have been updated; Self-Evaluation is completed




                                                                                              30
PORTFOLIO SELF EVALUATION FOR:_____________________________
 MY PORTFOLIO:                                               Y/N   EVIDENCE
 Contains varied samples that represent my program of study.




Provides evidence that I think critically.




Provides evidence that I apply theory to practice.




Demonstrates my understanding of program competencies.




Reflects my enthusiasm for learning and teaching.




Incorporates the Circle of Courage philosophy.




                                                                              31
                                                  Final Level Portfolio Review Rubric
ARTIFACT REFLECTIONS: Artifact reflections should be 5-8 sentences in length and adhere to the following format: one-sentence
description of the artifact followed by a rationale for competency alignment and how completion of the artifact informs the candidates
understanding of the Circle of Courage.
1   Below Expected Performance: Documents are not aligned with appropriate program competencies; Artifact descriptions
    inadequately describe the document; Rationales for program competency alignment do not explain why and how the artifact meets
    the standard; Relationship to the Circle of Courage is not conveyed
2   Emerging Performance
3   Expected Performance: Documents are aligned with appropriate program competencies; Artifact descriptions describe the
    document; Rationales for program competency alignment indicate why the artifact meets the standard; Relationship to the Circle of
    Courage is conveyed
4   Excellent Performance
5 Exemplary Performance: Documents are clearly aligned with appropriate program competencies inclusive of strong rationale for
  alignment; Artifact descriptions describe the document clearly and concisely and provide a complete context; Rationales for
  program competency alignment convincingly explain why and how the artifact meets the standard; Relationship to the Circle of
  Courage is clearly and succinctly conveyed in a meaningful and personalized way
REQUIRED ARTIFACTS: Required student teaching artifacts are: Video Reflection, Teacher Impact Upon Student Learning Project,
PRAXIS Score Report, Updated Volunteer Program Log, Updated Professional Development Summary
1   Below Expected Performance: Portfolio is NOT inclusive of required student teaching artifacts; Volunteer Program Log &
    Professional Development Summary have NOT been updated
2   Emerging Performance
3   Expected Performance: Portfolio is inclusive of required student teaching artifacts; Volunteer Program Log & Professional
    Development Summary have been updated
4   Excellent Performance
5 Exemplary Performance: Portfolio is inclusive of required student teaching artifacts and additional artifacts; Volunteer Program
  Log & Professional Development Summary have been updated




                                                                                                                                         32
                       Teacher Impact Upon Student Learning Project
The Teacher Impact Upon Student Learning Project is specifically designed to dispose teacher candidates to:
    be reflective practitioners,
       thoughtfully and systematically consider the impact their instruction has upon P-12 student(s), and
       use assessment, both formative and summative, to inform instruction.
Prior to the semester of student teaching, typically on reading day, student teacher candidates will receive information
regarding this project. This project is a required artifact for the Teacher Education Portfolio. Projects will be shared during
small group gatherings during Education Symposium Day. Successful completion of it is a required component of the
student teaching experience and for the Teacher Education Program. If a candidate is asked to revise and resubmit the
project, it is THE CANDIDATE’S responsibility to follow through on the revision and resubmission process in a timely
manner. Failure to do so may jeopardize exit from the program, graduation from the college, and subsequent
eligibility for teacher certification. Education Department faculty will be randomly assigned to review the projects using a
common rubric; candidates will be informed of their faculty evaluator at the appropriate time. Candidates should e-mail their
completed project to their faculty evaluator, provide them with a paper copy, or upload it in their Teacher Education Portfolio
and then e-mail their faculty evaluator when the project is ready for review. Projects should be made available AT LEAST
ONE WEEK PRIOR TO the Education Symposium Day at the latest to allow faculty ample time to review and evaluate
them. Those completing their student teaching in international or long-distance sites should contact the Field Placement
Coordinator, Becky Fiala, to discuss the details of submitting the project.

On Education Symposium Day, candidates, in small groups of no more than 5 and at least one faculty member, will share
their projects. Although not required, you may find it useful to have a visual aid to use when sharing your project. The
following guidelines will assist you in this project:

       Early in the placement, discuss this project with your cooperating teacher and your college supervisor to determine
        the focus of your unit and when you will teach the unit
       PLAN AHEAD…schedule the unit so that your project will be completed in time for the Education Symposium
        Day—if it is impossible to complete your project by the time you need to turn it in, consider completing a mid-term
        assessment rather than a final, post-assessment of your students’ learning
       Select a single class as the context for the project
       Plan your unit
       Do your pre-assessment
       Make any adjustments to your unit based upon what you learned from the pre-assessment results
       Teach your unit as planned with any adjustments made from pre-assessment results
       Do your post-assessment
       Review your project and write your reflection

                                    A REVIEW on WRITING BEHAVIORAL OBJECTIVES

A learning objective is the focal point of a lesson plan. It is a description of an intended learning outcome and is the basis for
the rest of the lesson. It provides criteria for constructing an assessment for the lesson, as well as for the instructional
procedures the teacher designs to implement the lesson. A learning objective determines the criteria for any assessment
rubric. As you will see, without an objective that clearly communicates specific student behavior or performance, it is
difficult, if not impossible to determine exactly what a particular lesson is supposed to accomplish. Objectives used in
education are terms that refer to descriptions of observable student behavior or performance that are used to make
judgments about learning - the ultimate aim of all teaching. Learning objectives are about curriculum, not instruction. This is
a key point. Many tend to confuse learning objectives with objectives a teacher may have that relate to student conduct or
behavior in a classroom. Properly constructed learning objectives are about the evidence of learning; they specify what
                                                                                                                       33
behavior a student must demonstrate or perform in order for a teacher to infer that learning took place. Since learning
cannot be seen directly, teachers must make inferences about learning from evidence they can see and measure. Learning
objectives, if constructed properly, provide an ideal vehicle for making those inferences. A well constructed learning
objective describes an intended learning outcome and contains three parts:

1. Conditions (a statement that describes the conditions under which the behavior is to be performed)
2. Behavioral Verb (an action word that connotes an observable student behavior)
3. Criteria (a statement that specifies how well the student must perform the behavior).

Well-written learning objectives are the heart of any lesson plan. If the objectives you compose are "fuzzy" and difficult, if
not impossible to assess, the rest of the lesson plan you create that is based on the objective is likely to be flawed. Before
you begin to write an objective, spend a little time thinking about what you are describing, and remember to make the
student behavior observable. You will find this process helps you to clarify what you intend, and you will be better able to
communicate that intent to your students, regardless of their grade level, age, or subject. On the matter of being "fuzzy,"
remember this: fuzzy thinking might get you through the day, but it will never get you through a career.

The following verbs and their definitions can be helpful when composing learning objectives. These are general definitions
that describe only the observable behavior and do not include linkages to any specific content.

APPLY A RULE: To state a rule as it applies to a situation, object or event that is being analyzed. The statement must
convey analysis of a problem situation and/or its solution, together with the name or statement of the rule that was applied.

ASSESS: To stipulate the conditions by which the behavior specified in an objective may be ascertained. Such stipulations
are usually in the form of written descriptions. For obvious reasons, assess is rarely used as a verb in learning objectives at
the elementary school level.

CLASSIFY: To place objects, words, or situations into categories according to defined criteria for each category. The
criteria must be made known to the student.

COMPOSE: To formulate a composition in written, spoken, musical or artistic form.

CONSTRUCT: To make a drawing, structure, or model that identifies a designated object or set of conditions.

DEFINE: To stipulate the requirements for inclusion of an object, word, or situation in a category or class. Elements of one
or both of the following must be included: (1) The characteristics of the words, objects, or situations that are included in the
class or category. (2) The characteristics of the words, objects, or situations that are excluded in the class or category. To
define is to set up criteria for classification.

DEMONSTRATE: The student performs the operations necessary for the application of an instrument, model, device, or
implement. NOTE: There is a temptation to use demonstrate in objectives such as, "the student will demonstrate his
knowledge of vowel sounds." As the verb is defined, this is improper use of it.

DESCRIBE: To name all of the necessary categories of objects, object properties, or event properties that are relevant to
the description of a designated situation. The objective is of the form, "The student will describe this order, object, or event,"
and does not limit the categories that may be used in mentioning them. Specific or categorical limitations, if any, are to be
given in the performance standards of each objective. When using this verb in an objective, it is helpful to include a
statement to the effect of what the description, as a minimum, must reference.

DIAGRAM: To construct a drawing with labels and with a specified organization or structure to demonstrate knowledge of
that organization or structure. Graphic charting and mapping are types of diagramming, and these terms may be used
where more exact communication of the structure of the situation and response is desired.
                                                                                                                       34
DISTINGUISH: To identify under conditions when only two contrasting identifications are involved for each response.

ESTIMATE: To assess the dimension of an object, series of objects, event or condition without applying a standard scale or
measuring device. Logical techniques of estimation, such as are involved in mathematical interpolation, may be used. See
MEASURE.

EVALUATE: To classify objects, situations, people, conditions, etc., according to defined criteria of quality. Indication of
quality must be given in the defined criteria of each class category. Evaluation differs from general classification only in this
respect.

IDENTIFY: To indicate the selection of an object of a class in response to its class name, by pointing, picking up,
underlining, marking, or other responses.

INTERPRET: To translate information from observation, charts, tables, graphs, and written material in a verifiable manner.

LABEL: To stipulate a verbal (oral or written) response to a given object, drawing, or composition that contains information
relative to the known, but unspecified structure of these objects, drawings, or compositions. Labeling is a complex behavior
that contains elements of naming and identifying.

LOCATE: To stipulate the position of an object, place, or event in relation to other specified objects, places, or events.
Ideational guides to location such as grids, order arrangements and time may be used to describe location. Note: Locate is
not to be confused with IDENTIFY.

MEASURE: To apply a standard scale or measuring device to an object, series of objects, events, or conditions, according
to practices accepted by those who are skilled in the use of the device or scale.

NAME: To supply the correct name, in oral or written form for an object, class of objects, persons, places, conditions, or
events which are pointed out or described.

ORDER: To arrange two or more objects or events in accordance with stated criteria.

PREDICT: To use a rule or principle to predict an outcome or to infer some consequence. It is not necessary that the rule or
principle be stated.

REPRODUCE: To imitate or copy an action, construction, or object that is presented.

SOLVE: To effect a solution to a given problem, in writing or orally. The problem solution must contain all the elements
required for the requested solution, and may contain extraneous elements that are not required for solution. The problem
must be posed in such a way that the student that the student is able to determine the type of response that is acceptable.

STATE A RULE: To make a statement that conveys the meaning of the rule, theory or principle.

TRANSLATE: To transcribe one symbolic form to another of the same or similar meaning.




                                                                                                                       35
                                  PART I: DESCRIPTION OF CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT

Grade level(s) in class_____ # of students enrolled in class_____

Classroom Grouping (check all that apply)
___Whole class ___Small groups ___Individual ___Peer teaching ___Other:

Instructional Materials (check all that apply)
___Textbooks ___Manipulatives ___Technology ___Other:______________________________

Resources (select one and list)
___Well Equipped ___Adequately Equipped ___Poorly Equipped
List available resources:


Teaching interruptions (select one and describe)
___Few ___Some ___Many
Description:


Help available to you (check all that apply.)

___Educational Assistants(s) ___Peer Tutors ___Parent Volunteers ___Resource Teachers
___Other:__________________________________________________________________

Individual Differences
___# of students who are culturally diverse ___# of students with special needs
___# of students who are gifted/talented    ___# of students who are Title I
___# of students who are male               ___# of students who are female
___Other:__________________________________________________________________

Describe the technological resources available to you in this classroom:



Describe the attitudes toward individual differences in this classroom:



Describe the physical organization of the classroom:



Describe the typical kinds of instructional methods employed in this classroom:



Describe the typical approach to assessment in this classroom:



Indicate any other aspects of this classroom that have not been addressed by the above:




                                                                                          36
                                                                 PART II: OUTLINE FOR UNIT OF STUDY
                                                        Complete the table below—add rows to the table as necessary

                                                                                     Unit Title
                                                                                    Grade Level
                                                                                     Duration
Describe your Unit Introduction




          OVERALL UNIT GOAL
    Daily Student-Centered Behavioral         Standards Alignment                     Assessment of Objective   Materials or Resources   Instructional groupings and
               Objectives               (Indicate which standards are referenced)                                                                  strategies




Describe your Unit Closure




                                                                                                                                                                   37
                                           PART III: ASSESSMENT PLAN
            NOTE: your pre and post assessment methods need not be the same although they can be
Describe your pre-assessment method(s) and include a copy if possible; Why did you select this particular pre-
assessment method?
Describe your post-assessment method(s) and include a copy if possible; Why did you select this particular post-
assessment method?
Describe what else you would do informally and formally during the course of the unit to assess student
understanding and progress.
Describe how your unit plan goals, objectives, pre-assessment, instruction, and post-assessment are consistent with
each other.

                                 PART IV: ASSESSMENT RESULTS WORKSHEET
                Use a table format like the one below to record the assessment results for each student
              NOTE: Use pseudonyms or only first names to protect your students’ confidentiality!!
                        Column 1                                  Column 2                       Column 3
                        Students
                                                               Pre-Assessment                Post-Assessment

  1.

  2.

  3.ETC.

                                                   PART V: REFLECTION
          How did the pre-assessment results inform your instructional plan—what modifications or changes did you
           make based upon the pre-assessment results?
          How many students accomplished the unit’s goals/objectives? How do you know?
          How many students did not meet the unit’s goals/objectives? How do you know?
          What will be done to ensure that students not meeting the unit’s goals/objectives learn the material and/or
           what can be done to help students who did not master the unit’s goals/objectives to improve in these areas?
          Are there circumstances or conditions that should be considered regarding the students who did not meet
           the unit’s goals/objectives? Explain.
          Based on the results you obtained and your experience with this unit of instruction, what will you do
           differently in planning, teaching, and/or assessment the next time you teach this content?
          Describe how you felt about this process.




                                                                                                                   38
                       Teacher Impact upon Student Learning Rubric
             5                           4                         3                        2                             1
   Exemplary Performance      Excellent Performance      Expected Performance      Emerging Performance        Unacceptable Performance


                                                      Contextual Factors
Knowledge of school and            Candidate displays a comprehensive understanding of the                5      4       3       2        1
classroom factors                  characteristics of the school and classroom that may affect
                                   learning.
Knowledge of                       Candidate displays general and specific understanding of               5      4       3       2        1
characteristics of students        student differences that may affect learning.
                                                  Instructional Design
Significance, challenge,           Objectives reflect several types or levels of learning, are            5      4       3       2        1
variety and appropriateness        significant, challenging, developmentally appropriate, and meet
for students                       the needs of the students.
Clarity                            Objectives clearly stated and reflect student-centered outcomes.       5      4       3       2        1
Alignment with national,           Objectives explicitly aligned with state and/or local standards.       5      4       3       2        1
state or local goals
Alignment with learning            Unit activities, assignments, and resources linked to the learning     5      4       3       2        1
objectives                         objectives; all objectives are addressed.
Use of a variety of                Unit includes variety across instruction, activities, assignments,     5      4       3       2        1
instruction, activities,           and resources.
assignments, and resources
Use of available technology        Unit integrates available technology in an appropriate manner.         5      4       3       2        1
                                                      Assessment Plan
Alignment with learning            Assessments congruent with the learning objectives.                    5      4       3       2        1
objectives
Multiple modes and                 Assessment is ongoing and includes multiple assessment                 5      4       3       2        1
approaches                         modes.
Adaptations based on the           Assessments adapted to meet the needs of individual students.          5      4       3       2        1
individual needs of students
                                                           Reflection
Modifications based on             Candidate makes appropriate modifications to the instructional         5      4       3       2        1
analysis of student learning       plan based on the individual student needs; these modifications
                                   were based on analysis of student performance, best practice
                                   and/or contextual factors
Interpretation of Student          Candidate explores multiple hypotheses for why some students           5      4       3       2        1
Learning                           did not meet learning goals.
Insights on effective              Candidate identifies successful and unsuccessful activities and        5      4       3       2        1
instruction and assessment         assessments and provides plausible reasons.
Implication for future             Candidate provides ideas for redesigning learning goals,               5      4       3       2        1
teaching                           assessment, and instruction and explains why these
                                   modifications would improve student learning.
   Candidates who do not meet expectations for the Teacher Impact Upon Student Learning Project will have their project returned for
 revision(s) and will need to resubmit it for a second review. Candidates must receive a rating of at least 3 (Expected Performance) on all
areas of the rubric. Students will NOT receive a satisfactory grade for student teaching until their project has been resubmitted and found
                  to meet these expectations. FACULTY— indicate a rationale for ratings of 1 or 2 directly on the rubric!!




                                                                                                                               39
                         VOLUNTEER PROGRAM LOG SHEET

Augustana students in the Teacher Education Program are encouraged to give 25
hours or more a year to volunteer activities such as tutoring, teaching church school
classes, providing respite care, assisting at hospitals or agencies, and/or participating in
activities sponsored by community groups related to their profession. Volunteer
activities can take place on campus, in the Sioux Falls community, and/or in your home
community and can take place at any time throughout the calendar year. The activity
should be:

       1.people oriented

       2.independent of course requirements and

       3.volunteer work, not part of a paid job

Record your volunteer activities on this log sheet and file in your Teacher Education
Program Portfolio.
DATE      ACTIVITY                                                       HOURS




                                                                                          40
                    PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY

This summary should be a running record of your involvement in professional
development activities. Include your participation in professional organizations such as
Deaf Awareness, SCEC, and ACEA. You should also indicate your attendance at
workshops or conferences and Education Symposium Day. Your involvement in
student government is another area you could include in this summary.

DATE       ACTIVITY or INVOLVEMENT




                                                                                       41
      Documentation of Participation with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individuals

Students who are majoring in Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing are required to
complete 250 hours in which they participate in activities with deaf and hard of hearing
individuals. Most of these hours are completed during EDHH 287 (approximately 140
hours). Other classes such as ASL 1- 4, EDHH 220, EDHH 306, EDHH 318, and EDHH
323 include assignments that require students to participate in activities with deaf and
hard of hearing individuals. Some examples of participating with deaf and hard of
hearing individuals include:

             Events at SDSD (i.e., carnival)
             Deaf Awareness events (Burst of Sign, signing performances)
             Babysitting deaf children
             Attending events at the South Dakota Center for Deaf Adults
             Working in a summer camp or summer school program for deaf youth
             Tutoring deaf individuals
             Teaching Religious Education to deaf students
             Assisting in ASL classes
             Signing at chapel

Record your hours on this sheet and include it in your Teacher Education Portfolio.
Date     Activity                                                  Amount of time




                                                                                      42
                                                   Standardized Rubrics
             The following rubrics or versions thereof will be used by course instructors to evaluate
                                                portfolio artifacts.
                                           PRESENTATION RUBRIC CRITERIA
  Component                Exceptional                     Admirable                      Acceptable                 Unacceptable
Content--Depth     Extensive depth and           An abundance of material        Sufficient information that   There is a great deal of
of Research        complexity of ideas           clearly related to thesis;      related to thesis; many       information that is not
(35%)              matched to thesis and         points are clearly made and     good points made but          clearly connected to the
                   supported by rich,            all evidence.                   there is an uneven            thesis/objective, limited
                   engaging and/or pertinent                                     balance and little            information.
                   details; evidence of                                          variation.
                   analysis, reflection and
                   insight. Use of references
                   indicates substantial
                   research.
Coherence and      Establishes and maintains     Thesis is clearly stated and    Most information              Concept and ideas are
Organization       a clear focus/voice.          developed; specific             presented in logical          loosely connected; lacks
(20%)              Sections flow well and        examples are appropriate        sequence; generally very      clear transitions; flow
                   organization is thoughtful.   and clearly developed;          well organized but better     and organization are
                                                 conclusion is clear; shows      transitions from idea to      choppy.
                                                 control; flows together well;   idea and medium to
                                                 good transition; succinct but   medium.
                                                 not choppy; well organized.
Creativity         Very original, unique         Clever, at times unique, well   Some original touches,        Predictable, bland, did
(10%)              approach, engaging,           done, interesting, solid        generally interesting,        not keep audience
                   provocative.                  interpretation.                 interpretation is adequate.   interested, weak
                                                                                                               originality, weak
                                                                                                               interpretation.
Materials          Thoughtful and effective      Balanced use of materials,      Use of materials is varied    Choppy use of materials,
(5%)               use of varied materials all   properly used to develop        and connected to thesis.      lacks smooth transitions
                   tied to thesis and            thesis, use of media is                                       from on medium to
                   objective, elaborates on or   varied and appropriate.                                       another, not clearly
                   extends audience                                                                            connected to thesis.
                   understanding.
Speaking Skills    Voice is rich, precise,       Poised, clear articulation,     Clear articulation but not    Some mumbling, little
(10%)              confident, distinctive and    proper volume, steady rate,     as polished, very few         eye contact, uneven
                   used effectively. An error-   good posture and eye            grammatical errors.           rate, little or no
                   free presentation with        contact, enthusiasm,                                          expression,
                   respect to volume, rate,      confidence, and free of                                       unacceptable grammar.
                   eye contact, and energy.      grammatical errors.
Group              Worked extremely well         Worked very well with           Attempted to work well        Did not respect each
Collaboration.     with others, solicited,       others, worked to get           with others, “on task” the    other’s opinions, argued
(10%)              respected, and                everyone involved, solicited    majority of the time,         often, little or no
                   complemented each             ideas of others, productive     respected opinions of         teamwork, struggled with
                   other’s ideas, highly         team.                           others, accomplished the      the task, (not achieved).
                   productive.                                                   task.
Response           Audience is captured by       Involved the audience in the    Presented facts with some     Some related facts but
(10%)              the presentation, they        presentation, points made in    interesting “twists”, held    went off topic and lost
                   learn a great deal from the   creative way, held the          the audience’s attention      the audience, mostly
                   information presented and     audience’s attention            most of the time, audience    presented facts with little
                   appreciate the presenter’s    throughout, audience learns     learns some information.      or no imagination,
                   passion.                      more than expected.                                           audience has difficulty
                                                                                                               learning from the
                                                                                                               presentation.




                                                                                                                              43
                                                PROJECT RUBRIC CRITERIA
  Component               Exceptional                     Admirable                        Acceptable                   Unacceptable
Content          Project displays extensive     Project displays solid             Project displays basic         Project makes content
(20%)            content knowledge, with        content knowledge and              content knowledge but          errors or does not correct
                 evidence of continuing         makes connections between          cannot articulate              content errors student
                 pursuit of such                the content and other parts        connection with other          makes, representation of
                 knowledge, representation      of the discipline and other        parts of the discipline or     content is inappropriate
                 of content is appropriate      disciplines, links well with       with other disciplines,        and unclear or uses poor
                 and links well with            students’ knowledge and            representation of content      examples and analogies.
                 students’ knowledge and        experience.                        is inconsistent in quality.
                 experience, students
                 contribute to
                 representation of content.
Organization &   Not only are the goals         Goals are valuable in their        Goals are moderately           Goals are not valuable
Coherence        valuable, but the project      level of expectations,             valuable in either their       and represent low
(15%)            can also clearly articulate    conceptual understanding,          expectations or                expectations or no
                 how goals establish high       and importance of learning,        conceptual understanding       conceptual
                 expectations and relate to     pedagogical practices reflect      for student and in             understanding for
                 curriculum frameworks          current research on best           importance to learning,        students, goals do not
                 and standards, project         practice within the discipline     project displays basic         reflect important learning,
                 displays continuing search     but without anticipating           pedagogical knowledge          project displays little
                 for best practice and          student misconceptions, the        but does not anticipate        understanding of
                 anticipates students’          lesson’s or unit’s structure is    student misconceptions,        pedagogical issues
                 misconceptions, the            clear and allows for different     the lesson or unit has a       involved in student
                 lesson or unit has clearly     pathways according to              recognizable structure,        learning of the content,
                 defined structure that         student needs.                     although the structure is      the lesson or unit has no
                 activities are organized                                          not uniformly maintained       clearly defined structure
                 around, time allocations                                          throughout, most time          or the structure is
                 are reasonable.                                                   allocations are                chaotic, time allocations
                                                                                   reasonable.                    are unrealistic.
Material         Instructional materials and    Instructional materials and        Instructional materials and    Instructional materials
Resources        resources are suitable to      resources are suitable to the      resources are partially        and resources are
(10%)            the instructional goals and    instructional goals and            suitable to the                unsuitable to the
                 engage students mentally,      engage students mentally.          instructional goals,           instructional goals or do
                 students initiate the                                             students’ level of mental      not engage students
                 choice, adaptation, or                                            engagement is moderate.        mentally.
                 creation of materials to
                 change their own
                 purposes.
Instructional    All students are               Most activities and                Some activities and            Activities and
Plan             cognitively engaged in the     assignments are appropriate        assignments are                assignments are
(15%)            activities and assignments     to students, almost all            appropriate to students        inappropriate for
                 in their exploration of        students would be                  and would engage them          students in terms of their
                 content, students can          cognitively engaged in them,       mentally, but others do        age or background,
                 initiate or adapt activities   most of the learning               not, only some of the          students would not be
                 and projects to enhance        activities are suitable to         learning activities are        challenged mentally,
                 understanding, learning        students and instructional         suitable to students or        learning activities are not
                 activities are highly          goals, progression of              instructional growth,          suitable to students or
                 relevant to students and       activities in the unit is fairly   progression of activities in   instructional goals, and
                 instructional goals, they      even, and most activities          the unit is uneven, and        they do not follow an
                 progress coherently,           reflect recent professional        only some activities reflect   organized progression
                 producing a unified whole      research.                          recent professional            and do not reflect recent
                 and reflecting recent                                             research.                      professional research.
                 professional research.




                                                                                                                                 44
Presentation &   Projects’ questions are of     Most of the project’s            Project’s questions are a    Project’s questions are of
Delivery         uniformly high quality, with   questions are of high quality,   combination of low and       low quality, the lesson’s
(15%)            adequate time for              adequate time is available       high quality, only some      structure is not uniformly
                 students to respond,           for students to respond, the     invite a response, the       maintained and pacing is
                 students formulate many        lesson has a clearly defined     lesson has a clearly         inconsistent, project
                 questions, the lesson’s        structure around which the       defined structure around     directions and
                 structure is highly            activities are organized,        which the activities are     procedures are confusing
                 coherent, allowing for         pacing of the lesson is          organized, pacing of the     to students, project’s
                 reflection and closure as      consistent, project directions   lesson is inconsistent,      spoken language is
                 appropriate, pacing of the     and procedures are clear to      project directions and       inaudible, or written
                 lesson is appropriate for      students and contain an          procedures are clarified     language is illegible,
                 all students, project          appropriate level of detail,     after initial student        spoken or written
                 directions and procedures      project’s spoken and written     confusion or are             language may contain
                 are clear to students and      language is clear and            excessively detailed,        many grammar and
                 anticipate possible student    correct, vocabulary is           project’s spoken language    syntax errors, vocabulary
                 misunderstanding,              appropriate to students’ age     is audible, and written      may be inappropriate,
                 project’s spoken and           and interests.                   language is legible, both    vague, or used
                 written language is correct                                     are used correctly but       incorrectly leaving
                 and expressive, with well-                                      limited or is not            students confused.
                 chosen vocabulary that                                          appropriate to students’
                 enriches the lesson.                                            ages or backgrounds.

Assessment       The proposed approach to       All the instructional goals      Some of the instructional    Content and methods of
and Student      assessment is completely       nominally assessed through       goals are assessed           assessment lack
Response         congruent with the             the proposed plan, but the       through the proposed         congruence with
(5%)             instructional goals, both in   approach is more suitable to     approach, but many are       instructional goals, the
                 content and process,           some goals than others,          not, assessment criteria     proposed approach
                 assessment criteria and        assessment criteria and          and standards have been      contains no clear criteria
                 standards are clear and        standards are clear and          developed, but they are      or standards.
                 have been clearly              have been clearly                either not clear or have
                 communicated to                communicated to students.        not been clearly
                 students, there is                                              communicated to
                 evidence that students                                          students.
                 contributed to the
                 development of the criteria
                 and standards.
Student          Audience is captured by        Audience learns more than        Audience learns some         Audience has difficulty
Engagement       the presentation; they         expected.                        information.                 learning from the
(5%)             learn a great deal from the                                                                  presentation.
                 information presented and
                 appreciate the presenter’s
                 passion.
Group            Worked extremely well          Worked very well with            Attempted to work well       Was dysfunctional, did
Collaboration    with others, solicited,        others, worked to get            with others, “on task” the   not respect each other’s
(5%)             respected, and                 everyone involved, solicited     majority of the time,        opinions, argued often,
                 complemented each              ideas of others, productive      respected opinions of        little or no teamwork,
                 other’s ideas, highly          team.                            others, accomplished the     struggled with the task,
                 productive.                                                     task.                        not achieved.
Creativity       Very original, unique          Clear, at times unique, well     Some original touches,       Predictable, bland, did
(10%)            approach, engaging,            done, and interesting.           generally interesting,       not keep audience
                 provocative.                                                    interpretation adequate.     interested, weak
                                                                                                              originality, weak
                                                                                                              interpretation.




                                                                                                                             45
                                             WRITING RUBRIC CRITERIA
Component              Exceptional                      Admirable                         Acceptable                 Unacceptable
Ideas and     The paper is exceptionally      The paper is clear and           The writer is beginning to     As yet, the paper has no
Content       clear, focused, purposeful,     focused, it holds the reader’s   define the topic, even         clear sense of purpose
(50%)         and enhanced by                 attention, the topic is          though development is still    or central theme. To
              significant detail that         concise and manageable,          basic or general, the topic    extract meaning from the
              captures a reader’s             quality details give the         is fairly broad; however,      text, the reader must
              interest, the topic is          reader important                 you can see where the          make inferences based
              concise, relevant, telling,     information, reasonably          writer is headed, support      on sketchy or missing
              quality details give the        accurate details are present     is attempted, but does not     details. The writing
              reader important                to support the main ideas,       go far enough yet in           reflects more than one of
              information that goes           the reader’s questions are       fleshing out the key issues    these problems, the
              beyond the obvious or           anticipated and answered.        or story line, ideas are       writer is still in search of
              predictable. As                                                  reasonably clear, though       a topic, brainstorming, or
              appropriate, the writer                                          they may not be detailed,      has not yet decided what
              draws on relevant                                                personalized, accurate or      the main idea of the
              information from a variety                                       expanded enough to show        piece will be, information
              of resources, supporting                                         in-depth understanding or      is limited or unclear or
              detail’s are accurate,                                           a strong sense of              the length is not
              significant, and helpful in                                      purpose, the writer seems      adequate for
              clarifying or expanding the                                      to be drawing on               development, the idea is
              main ideas, the writer                                           knowledge or experience,       a simple restatement of
              write from knowledge or                                          but has difficulty going       the topic or an answer to
              experience; the ideas are                                        form general observations      the question with little or
              fresh and original, the                                          to specifics, the reader is    not attention to detail, the
              writer continuously                                              left with questions. More      writer has not begun to
              anticipates and responds                                         information is needed to       define the topic in a
              to the reader’s                                                  “fill in the blanks”, the      meaningful, personal
              informational needs and                                          writer generally stays on      way, everything seems
              questions.                                                       the topic but does not         as important as
                                                                               develop a clear theme.         everything else does; the
                                                                               The writer has not yet         reading has a hard time
                                                                               focused the topic past the     sifting out what is
                                                                               obvious.                       important, the text may
                                                                                                              be repetitious, or may
                                                                                                              read like a collection of
                                                                                                              disconnected, random
                                                                                                              thought with no
                                                                                                              discernable point.
Voice         The writer’s energy and         The writer crafts the writing    The writer seems sincere,      The writer seems
(5%)          passion for the subject         with an awareness and            but not fully engaged or       indifferent, uninvolved, or
              drive the writing, making       respect for the audience and     involved, the result is        distanced from the topic
              the text lively, expressive,    the purpose for writing, the     pleasant and even              and/or the audience, the
              and engaging, the writer’s      tone of the writing adds         personable, but not            writer is not concerned
              enthusiasm for this topic       interest to the message and      compelling, the writing        with the audience, the
              are evident throughout the      is appropriate for the           communicates in an             writer’s style is a
              piece, the writer seems to      purpose of the audience, the     earnest, pleasing, yet safe    complete mismatch for
              know his/her audience           reader feels an interaction      manner.                        the reader, the writing is
              well and to speak right to      with the writer.                                                so short that little is
              them.                                                                                           accomplished beyond
                                                                                                              introducing the topic, the
                                                                                                              writer speaks in a kind of
                                                                                                              monotone that flattens
                                                                                                              the message.
Word Choice   The writer shows                Words convey the intended        The language is                The writer struggles with
(5%)          exceptional skills in           message in a precise,            functional, even if it lacks   limited vocabulary,
              choosing words that             interesting, and natural way,    much energy, it is easy to     searching for words to
              create just the mood,           words are specific and           figure out the writer’s        convey meaning,
              impression, or word             accurate, it is easy to          meaning on a general           language is vague,
              picture the writer wants to     understand just what the         level, words are adequate      words are used
              instill in the heart and        writer means.                    and correct, they simply       incorrectly.
              mind of the reader, the                                          lack much flair and
              words are powerful,                                              originality.
              engaging, specific and
              accurate.



                                                                                                                            46
Organization   The order, presentation or     The order, structure, or         The organizational             The writing lacks a clear
(20%)          internal structure of the      presentation of information      structure is strong enough     sense of direction, ideas,
               piece is compelling and        moves the reader through         to move the reader             details, or events seem
               moves the reader               the text with no confusion,      through the text without       strung together in a loose
               purposefully through the       an inviting introduction         too much confusion, the        or random fashion, there
               text, the introduction         draws the reader in, the         paper has a recognizable       is no identifiable internal
               engages the reader, a          conclusion is satisfying and     introduction and               structure, the writing
               powerful conclusion            ties up lose ends, transitions   conclusion, the                reflects more than one of
               leaves the reader with a       clearly show how ideas           introduction may not           those problems, there is
               sense of closure and           connect, details seem to fit     create a strong sense of       no real lead to set up
               resolution, purposeful and     where they are placed,           anticipation, the              what follows, no real
               thoughtful transitions         sequencing is logical and        conclusion may not tie up      conclusion to wrap things
               clearly show how ideas         effective, pacing is             all loose ends, transitions    up, connections between
               connect, placement of          controlled, the writer knows     often work well, at other      ideas are confusing or
               details, anecdotes, facts,     when to slow down and            times, connections             not even present,
               and examples are well          elaborate and when to pick       between ideas are fuzzy,       sequencing needs lots
               thought out, deliberate,       up the pace and move on,         sequencing shows some          and lots of work, pacing
               and helpful to the reader’s    organization flows smoothly,     logic, but not under control   feels awkward, the writer
               understanding,                 the choice of structure          enough that it consistently    slows to a crawl when
               sequencing is logical and      usually matches the purpose      supports the ideas, in fact,   the read wants to get on
               effective, pacing is very      and audience.                    sometimes it is so             with it and vice versa,
               well controlled, the writer                                     predictable and rehearsed      problems with
               knows when to slow                                              that the structure takes       organization make it hard
               down and elaborate, and                                         attention away from the        for the reader to get a
               when to pick up the pace                                        content, pacing is fairly      grip on the main point or
               and move on, organization                                       well controlled, though the    story line.
               flows very smoothly, the                                        writer sometimes lunges
               choice of structure                                             ahead too quickly or
               matches the purpose and                                         spends too much time on
               audience.                                                       details that do not matter,
                                                                               the organization
                                                                               sometimes supports the
                                                                               main point or story line, at
                                                                               other time the reader feels
                                                                               an urge to slip in a
                                                                               transition or move things
                                                                               around.
Sentence       Sentence fluency is finely     Sentences are well built,        The text hums along with       The reader has to
Fluency        crafted, combining a           with strong and varied           a steady beat, but tends to    practice quite a bit in
(15%)          sense of rhythm and            structure that invites           be more pleasant or            order to give this paper a
               grace, flow and cadence,       expressive oral reading,         businesslike than musical,     fair interpretive reading,
               sentences are consistently     sentences are generally          more mechanical than           sentences are choppy,
               constructed in a way that      constructed in a way that        fluid, sentences are           rambling, or awkward,
               underscores and                underscores and enhances         usually constructed            phrasing does not sound
               enhances meaning,              the meaning, sentences           correctly, they hang           natural, many sentences
               sentences vary in length       often vary in length as well     together, they are sound,      begin the same way.
               as well as structure,          as structure, purposeful and     some sentence variety is
               purposeful and varied          varied sentence beginnings       attempted.
               sentence beginnings add        add variety and energy.
               variety and energy.
 Conventions   The writer demonstrates        The writer demonstrates a        The writer shows               The writer shows little to
(5%)           an excellent                   good grasp of standard           reasonable control over a      no control over a limited
               understanding and control      writing conventions (spelling,   limited range of standard      range of standard writing
               over a wide range of           punctuation, capitalization,     writing conventions            conventions (spelling,
               standard writing               grammar, usage,                  (spelling, punctuation,        punctuation,
               conventions (spelling,         mechanics, paragraphing,         capitalization, grammar,       capitalization, grammar,
               punctuation, capitalization,   etc.), the piece is very close   usage, mechanics,              usage, mechanics,
               grammar, usage,                to being ready to publish.       paragraphing, etc.),           paragraphing, etc.), the
               mechanics, paragraphing,                                        moderate editing would be      reader must read once to
               etc.), the piece is ready to                                    required to polish the text    decode and again for
               publish.                                                        for publication.               meaning, extensive
                                                                                                              editing would be required
                                                                                                              to polish the text for
                                                                                                              publication.



                                                                                                                            47
 STUDENT TEACHING INFORMATION
Student teaching is the final, culminating step in your preservice preparation toward
becoming a teaching professional. Your effort and commitment are vital to your
success in this experience. Student teaching is considered a full-time experience. The
minimum length of time any candidate will spend student teaching is 12 weeks; you
should register for 1 credit hour of student teaching for each week of student teaching.
In addition, the minimum number of credit hours any candidate will register for student
teaching is 12 credit hours. Candidates, however, may complete more than 12 weeks
of student teaching and register for more than 12 credit hours if they are pursuing
teaching endorsements or double majors. While most candidates will be able to
complete their student teaching within the parameters of the regular semester,
candidates pursuing double majors or those with multiple endorsements, will find that
their student teaching will carry over into or start in the interim term. The Field
Placement Coordinator will determine the number of credit hours each candidate should
register for and will confirm this upon receipt of the student teacher roster to ensure that
the credit hours registered for are in accordance with departmental and college policy.
Any deviations will be brought to the attention of the registrar’s office and will be
corrected.

The following information is required for petitioning to student teach in school districts
outside the 50-mile radius of Sioux Falls or for those students interested in an
International Student Teaching experience. It is the intent of the Education Department
at Augustana College to provide appropriate student teaching placements that ensure
quality experiences and support the program competencies and conceptual framework
of the Education Department.

Students interested in student teaching in international settings should contact the Field
Placement Coordinator early in their program. The Petition Form to Student Teach
Outside the Sioux Falls Area, inclusive of International Student Teaching Placements
must be filed with the Field Placement Coordinator at least one year prior to the
semester of student teaching. The student will be held responsible for any additional
expenses incurred for the International Student Teaching Placement. In some cases,
students may need to complete a student teaching experience in the United States.
Students should contact the Director of International Student Programs for more
information. During your student teaching, you will be supervised by faculty members
from the site with an Augustana supervisor as well. You are encouraged to consider
this opportunity to prepare yourself for teaching in multicultural and international settings
with students of varied backgrounds.

   Students must provide the following:

      A statement of educational rationale for seeking this outside placement.

      A recommendation form from a faculty member at Augustana College.

      Contact information for the school district in which the student is seeking a
       placement. This should include the school principal’s name, phone number,
       mailing address and/or email address.

                                                                                           48
      A statement indicating their understanding of the financial obligation to pay for
       supervision fees incurred in this placement.

The petition should accompany the student teaching application one year prior to the
semester that the student is student teaching. December 1st for Fall placements and
May 1st for Spring placements. Upon receiving the petition and application, the Field
Placement Coordinator will present the petition to the Teacher Education Committee for
action at the next regularly scheduled meeting and will inform the student in writing of
the committee’s decision.

Students granted distance student teaching experiences are still required to meet the
components of the student teaching experience required of all students at the discretion
of the Field Placement Coordinator.

WHEN A PETITION IS NOT REQUIRED

Students may be assigned to schools and agencies outside the 50-mile radius under
one or more of the following circumstances without petitioning:

   1. When an educationally appropriate placement cannot be made locally, they may
      be placed in an established school or agency outside the 50-mile radius.
   2. The student has a family member who is terminally ill.
   3. The student’s health is poor.
   4. The student marries and the spouse lives elsewhere.

Students are allowed to appeal the decision through the College’s Academic Grievance
Procedure as outlined in the Teacher Education Handbook.

                                  Recommendation Form
                    For Student Teaching Outside the Sioux Falls Area
                            Including International Placements

   The Education Department would appreciate your comments regarding the student’s
   desire to student teach outside the Sioux Falls Area. Please return to the Field
   Placement Coordinator’s office in the Education Department. Thank you.

   1. Describe the applicant’s strengths that you feel will help promote a successful
       student teaching experience (flexibility, problem solving, coping skills, sense of
       humor, self confidence).
   2. Discuss any areas of concern that may limit the success of the applicant in a
       distance experience.
   3. How would you describe the applicant’s work habits? (time management,
       promptness, communication skills, independence, initiative, professionalism).
   4. Additional comments.

Please read the student teaching information carefully to be sure you understand your
role and your responsibilities and those of your cooperating teacher and college
supervisor. Plan to work hard, take the initiative to learn new things, try new
techniques, and enjoy your time in the classroom.


                                                                                            49
  STUDENT TEACHING SHOWCASE PORTFOLIO
  Student teachers/clinicians are required to submit a showcase portfolio representing
  their background and preparation as part of the application for student teaching/clinical
  practicum inclusive of the SFPS Application for Student Teaching. Student Teaching
  Showcase Portfolios should be uploaded to the WWW by October 1 for those student
  teaching the following spring and by February 1 for those student teaching the following
  fall. Instructions for completing your web based portfolio are available online at:

                  http://www.augie.edu/dept/educ/andrews/usingword.htm

  The template for the Student Teaching Showcase Portfolio is available for downloading
  from:

                  http://www.augie.edu/dept/educ/andrews/showcase.htm



     Please see the Student Teaching Handbook for
   complete information regarding student teaching at:

http://www.augie.edu/dept/educ/andrews/st_handbook.doc




                                                                                          50

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:55
posted:11/26/2011
language:English
pages:50