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									                                 Microbiology
                                   MCB 2010
                                 Fall Term 2007
                    Office 1365          Office Hours: TBA
             Dr. Maria A. Guerrero      E-mail: mguerrer@mdc.edu
                 Miami Dade College – InterAmerican Campus
                       http://faculty.mdc.edu/mguerrer/

MCB 2010 is an introductory microbiology class that emphasizes microbial
characteristics, their physiology and genetics, primary niches, modes of disease
transmission, infectious process, disinfection procedures, drug treatments, and
both non-specific and specific immunity. It includes a survey of representative
types of microorganisms and their role in health and disease.

Textbook:
Foundations in Microbiology, Sixth Edition (by Kathleen Park Talaro)

Grading:
The final grade is based on quizzes/assignments/participation, tests, group
projects, and final exam (optional). The distribution and format of grading are
given below.
Tests: Tests will contribute about 50% of your total grade. There are 4 tests for
this course. The questions may include multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, short
essays, true or false, matching, etc. Questions are composed from lecture notes,
textbook and reading assignments. Test dates will be announced at least a week
in advance and make plans to be there on test dates. If given permission to
make up a test (see below, under exam make up conditions), this could be of a
different format from the regular test and it must be completed within one
week of the original test date or otherwise the test score will be a zero.
Students failing an exam are encouraged to come during my office hours to
discuss their study strategies.
Final Exam (Optional): There will be a cumulative final exam on the college
assigned date at the end of the semester. Students can use the final exam to
replace their lowest test grade. Students with an A average need not take this
test.
Quizzes/Assignments/Participation: There will be short quizzes throughout the
semester. The quizzes will be done as random quizzes (could be announced or
unannounced). There won’t be any make up for missed quizzes. Assignments
will vary (review questions, internet searches, concept maps, postings to
discussion board, etc). Assignments must be turned in by the due date as there
will be no deadline extensions. You are responsible for any work, or information
missed due to absence, tardy or early exit. In other words, you can not use “But,
I was absent/late that day” as an excuse. Quizzes/Assignments/Class
participation will account for 10% of your final grade.

Group or Individual Projects: For group work, groups will be assigned and
given guidelines/rubric well ahead of the project deadline. Tentatively, there will
be at least 2 projects for the semester. Details of the assignments will be discussed
in class. Projects will be worth 40% of the final grade.

Please note that all projects must be turned in ON TIME to be eligible for full
credit. For each day that a project is overdue (including weekends), 10% of the
point value will be deducted. You may e-mail your late assignment, but you
must provide me with a hard copy ASAP.

              There are no extra credit assignments for this course.

Grading Scale:
A= 90-100     B=80-89       C=70-79        D=60-69       F=59 and below
For example, if there have been 80 total points possible for the quizzes/
participation and the student has accumulated 65 points, 65 x 10 / 80 = 8.125%,
this figure is rounded up to 8%. The same operation applies to the test and
project sections. For instance, if there have been a total of 300 points possible for
the tests and the student has accumulated 250 points, 250 x 50 / 300 = 41.6%, this
figure is rounded up to 42%. Finally, if there have been a total of 100 points
possible for the projects and the student accumulated 90 points, 90 x 40 / 100 =
36%. As a result, from the abovementioned scenarios, the student would add 8
(from quizzes and participation) + 42 (from tests) + 36 (from projects) = 86 to
receive a course grade of B.

Attendance:
Class attendance is required for your success in this course. Considering that
class participation is part of the grade, students that are tardy/absent will be at a
disadvantage for this fraction of the grade.
Please, be prompt. Late arrivals are very disturbing for the instructor and
disruptive to fellow students. You should plan to leave enough time to allow for
traffic, parking, inclement weather, etc.
You must IMMEDIATELY notify the instructor regarding an absence on the day
of an exam (that day or the next day, by e-mail or by phone). DO NOT WAIT,
until we meet again to provide me with an acceptable excuse.
Note: When communicating through Email, use the WebCT Email feature.
Avoid using your personal Email accounts and if you have to use your personal
accounts, you need to identify yourselves in the subject line. For ex: RE:
question – John Smith, BSC 2010 Monday.

Exam Make-Up, Incomplete and Withdrawals:
Make up exams or incomplete grades will be given only when extenuating
circumstances occur (WAR, family emergencies, automotive accidents,
hospitalizations, etc) and as agreed upon between student and teacher. Students
seeking an incomplete (I) grade should have a “C” average at the time of request
and valid proof of extenuating circumstances. Each case will be considered
individually after meeting with the student and reviewing the proper excuse.
Students should fill an Incomplete Agreement form (contract), and should
complete the required work within one term of the date of the incomplete. A
grade of “I” will automatically turn into an “F” if the required work is not
completed within one term of the “I” grade.

WITHDRAWALS and class DROP are the responsibility of the student and
should be done within the given time as specified in the MDC academic
calendar.
Some important dates for the Fall Semester 2007
Last day to withdraw with 100% refund           Wednesday, September 5
Last day to withdraw and receive a “W” grade    Tuesday, November 6
Grade Input Deadline                            Saturday, December 22

Student Conduct:
The InterAmerican Campus of Miami Dade College is an Academic Community
committed to the values of Intellectual Integrity, Respect for Diversity,
Environmental Stewardship, Social Responsibility, and Informed Participation in
Civic Life. Students are expected to behave in a mature and professional manner.
Academic dishonesty will be dealt with as set forth in the Students Rights and
Responsibilities handbook. Anyone caught cheating on an exam will be assigned
a grade of “F” for the exam and will be referred to the Dean of Students for
disciplinary action. Classroom distractions are an annoyance to everyone and
they interfere with the learning environment in the classroom. Chronic lateness,
side conversations, eating meals, unnecessary exits, cell phones or pagers, text
messaging, etc. are all considered unwanted distractions. Please remember to
turn your pagers and cell phones OFF before coming to class. Students causing
a distraction will be asked to leave. For instance, if a telephone rings during
lecture or lab sections, the student will answer the call outside of the classroom
and remain outside of the classroom!!! Personal computers are not permitted
during the lecture unless specified. Students may not wear caps/hats during
quizzes or tests. Your final grade can be affected by your attendance record and
by your behavior in class especially when your grade is borderline.
Course competencies: (incomplete!! - currently being revised by the college)

Competency 1: Microscopic Examinations and Bacterial Classification
Upon successful completion of this laboratory, the student will be able to
describe the history of microbiology, describe techniques for examining and
classifying microorganisms into their appropriate taxonomic categories by:
1.1 List and explain the important discoveries made by Leeuwenhoek, Koch,
Pasteur, and others to the development of microbiology. Differentiate between
eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.
1.2 Discuss the cell theory, germ theory, and concept of spontaneous generation.
List and explain the functions all cells must perform.
1.3 Discuss the use of the principles of taxonomy in classifying various types of
microorganisms.
1.6 Categorize various life forms into the appropriate kingdoms.
1.7 List the similarities and differences of each of the following microbes:
bacteria, protozoa, fungi, algae, and viruses.
1.8 List several ways in which microorganisms can contribute to solving some
important human problems in the future.
1.9 Explain the function of each part of the microscope.
1.10 Explain magnification, resolution, and the path of light through a
microscope.
1.11 Compare and contrast the various light microscopes with the various
electron microscopes.
1.12 Explain how simple staining procedures differ from differential staining
methods.
1.13 List the steps in the Gram and acid-fast stains, the functions and principles
involved in each step, and diagnostic values of each procedure.
1.14 Define the concept "species." Compare the concept of species as applied to
bacteria with its application to higher organisms.
1.15 Describe recent developments in the methods of classification such as the
comparison of DNA bases and amino acid composition.
*1.16 Explain the differences between ionic, covalent and hydrogen bonding with
examples of each.
*1.17 Explain the importance of pH and buffer systems as they relate to
microorganisms.
*1.18 Describe the four classes of organic compounds: carbohydrates, lipids,
proteins and nucleic acids.
Expectations:
Obviously your book has more information than could be covered in one
semester. As your instructor, I will select topics to emphasize and use readings
and projects that correspond to the topics laid out in your syllabus (see below) to
try to cover the essentials. You on the other hand, will need to find the best way
to master vocabulary and content (much of it new to you) and this will require
time, motivation and preparation. An important consideration involves your
own learning style and what works best for you. To be successful, you must
commit essential concepts and terminology to memory. A list of how we retain
information called the “pyramid of learning” has been proposed by Edgar Dale:
“we remember about 10% of what we read; 20% of what we hear; 30% of what
we see, 50% of what we see and hear; 70% of what we discuss with others; 80% of
what we experience personally; and 95% of what we teach to someone else”.
Reminder: a 3-credit class like this one will require 2.5 h of direct instruction and
an expected additional 5-6 of preparation. A valid question is: “How can I learn
this information so as to be successful in the course as well as retain it for the
future?

Suggestions for success in this class:
Come to class on time and be prepared – If you miss classes you could miss
valuable information that can only be found in the classroom. Not attending
classes can also be interpreted as an indication that you are not serious about
your education. Bring the necessary materials (book, notebook, handouts, pen,
pencils).

Be prepared by reading ahead – you have a schedule of classes and are aware of
the topics/chapters to be covered. By reading ahead, you can prepare questions
during lecture.

Study regularly – the idea is to develop study habits, not to study just before the
exams or quizzes. Dedicate quality time to study. Review and rewrite your notes
immediately after class, while the material is still fresh in your mind!!!

Seek help before it’s too late in other words, DON’T FALL BEHIND – take
advantage of instructor office hours (which will be announced in class and
posted on my door) and review sessions. I really want to help you understand
the material and will be more than pleased to talk with you. A willingness to ask
questions is the hallmark of a mature, serious student. I’m here to help you, but
you have to do your part, by making an effort to come talk to me. And please
don’t wait until mid-quarter when you’ve fallen way behind. Start early!!

Form a study group – study groups can be a powerful learning experience and
can make studying more efficient, effective and fun. Focused studies with others
allow you to pool your ideas and see the material from a different perspective. It
also gives you a chance to organize, verbalize and explore your own ideas or
questions and get feedback from the group (as in above “pyramid of learning”). I
strongly encourage you to form study groups that meet regularly to discuss the
subject matter of the course.

Be respectful – do not interrupt class by chatting with others.
                           MCB 2010 Microbiology
                     MCB 2010– Lecture Schedule (MWF)
                        Instructor: Dr. M. A. Guerrero
Textbook: Foundations in Microbiology, 6th Edition (by Kathleen Park Talaro)
                     TENTATIVE LECTURE SCHEDULE
Week          Date                        Topic                  Chapter in
                                                                   book
  1        8/29, 8/31     Introduction, The Main Themes of            1
                                      Microbiology
  2     9/3*, 9/5, 9/ 7       Tools of the Laboratory: the            3
                                  Methods for Studying
                                     Microorganisms
  3           9/10,           An Introduction to Cells and            4
            9/12,9/14        Procaryotic Cell Structure and
                                         Function
  4        9/17, 9/19,            Eucaryotic Cells and                5
               9/21                  Microorganisms
  5        9/24, 9/26,    Test 1, An Introduction to Viruses          6
               9/28
  6        10/1, 10/3,      Elements of Microbial Nutrition,          7
               10/5               Ecology and Growth
  7       10/8, 10/10,     Physical and Chemical Agents for          11
              10/12                 Microbial Control.
                           Projects due: Adopt-a-Bacterium
  8      10/15, 10/17,         Drugs, Microbes, Host: The            12
              10/19            Elements of Chemotherapy
  9      10/22, 10/24,        Test 2, Microbial Metabolism            8
              10/26
 10      10/29, 10/31,      Microbial Genetics and Genetic          9, 10
               11/2                    Engineering
 11        11/5, 11/7,     Microbe-Human Interactions and            13
               11/9                   Epidemiology
 12      11/12, 11/14,     Test 3; Immunology: Non-specific        14, 15
              11/16              and specific immunity
 13      11/19, 11/21,            Diagnosing Infections              17
             11/23*
 14           11/30       Bug Parade Projects due: The Cocci
                          of Medical Importance; The Gram
                                positive bacilli of medical
                                      importance
   15          12/7      Bug Parade Projects due : The Gram
                             Negative Bacilli of Medical
                          Importance; The Fungi of Medical
                                      Importance;
   16         12/14         Bug Parade Projects due: The
                           Parasites of Medical Importance;
                           The Viruses that Infect Humans
                               (RNA and DNA viruses)
   17         12/17                    Final Exam

*Holiday (No Classes)
  This syllabus is subject to change. The instructor has planned a rigorous
  schedule that may be revised due to time constraints. Any changes in the
      lecture syllabus and/or examination schedule will be announced.
                         MCB 2010 Microbiology
                    MCB 2010– Lecture Schedule (F)
                      Instructor: Dr. M. A. Guerrero
Textbook: Foundations in Microbiology, 6th Edition (by Kathleen Park Talaro)
                  TENTATIVE LECTURE SCHEDULE
Week        Date                       Topic                     Chapter in
                                                                   book
  1         8/31        Introduction, The Main Themes of              1
                                   Microbiology
  2         9/ 7      Tools of the Laboratory: the Methods            3
                          for Studying Microorganisms
  3         9/14           An Introduction to Cells and               4
                          Procaryotic Cell Structure and
                                     Function
  4         9/21      Eucaryotic Cells and Microorganisms             5
  5         9/28        Test 1, An Introduction to Viruses            6
  6         10/5         Elements of Microbial Nutrition,             7
                               Ecology and Growth
  7        10/12        Physical and Chemical Agents for             11
                                 Microbial Control.
                         Projects due: Adopt-a-Bacterium
  8        10/19      Drugs, Microbes, Host: The Elements            12
                                 of Chemotherapy
  9        10/26           Test 2, Microbial Metabolism               8
 10         11/2          Microbial Genetics and Genetic            9, 10
                                    Engineering
 11         11/9         Microbe-Human Interactions and              13
                                   Epidemiology
 12        11/16     Test 3; Immunology: Non-specific and          14, 15
                                 specific immunity
 13        11/23*                    No classes
 14        11/30              Diagnosing Infections                  17
 15         12/7        Projects due: The Cocci of Medical
                     Importance; The Gram positive bacilli
                        of medical importance; The Gram
                            Negative Bacilli of Medical
                                    Importance
 16        12/14       Projects due: The Fungi of Medical
                      Importance; The Parasites of Medical
                         Importance; The Viruses that Infect
                          Humans (RNA and DNA viruses)
   17        12/21                  Final Exam

*Holiday (No Classes)
  This syllabus is subject to change. The instructor has planned a rigorous
  schedule that may be revised due to time constraints. Any changes in the
      lecture syllabus and/or examination schedule will be announced.

								
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